Legal and Policy Studies (LGPO)

LGPO 0100. FORDHAM PRE-LAW INSTITUTE. (3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of the U.S. legal system and U.S. law. Topics include Introduction to the U.S. Legal System, Constitutional Law and Legislation/Regulation, Foundations of Private Law, Criminal Justice, Civil Procedure and Litigation, Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility, and Legal Research and Writing. Classes are taught by Fordham Law School faculty, who will introduce the Socratic method of teaching common in legal education. Optional sessions will prepare students for the law school admissions process, the first year of law school studies, and legal professional development. One class will feature a conversation with law graduates working in various legal positions in the public and private sectors. This course is designed for those contemplating law school but all are welcome.

LGPO 1105. INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL AND POLICY STUDIES. (3 Credits)

LGPO 3000. POLICY AND FEDERAL AGENCIES? WHO MAKES THE RULES YOU LIVE BY?. (4 Credits)

Who makes the rules? An examination of the enormous impact of government agencies on the day-to-day lives of citizens and noncitizens; a comprehensive overview of the myriad government agencies created over the last century to formulate policy and promulgate rules and regulations that implement the laws enacted by Congress; an examination of how these agencies function as an ad hoc fourth branch of government; the intersection of agency rule making with the three branches of government: executive, legislative and judicial, and agency impact on policy development; how the agencies serve as an extension of executive power, generate test cases for judicial review that define the scope of laws and determine whether agency interpretations are within Congressional intent. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LGPO 3010. WRITING AND RATIFICATION CONSTITUTION. (4 Credits)

Written in secrecy and without authority, the US Constitution was nothing more than a mere proposal upon its release to the public in 1787. The Federal Convention (referred to today as the Constitutional Convention) specified that the decision whether or not to establish the new document as the supreme law of the young confederacy was to be in the hands of “We the People” through ratifying conventions – not a unanimous consent the 13 independent state legislatures. This course is an examination of the writing and ratification of the US Constitution, with particular attention to the role of American Revolution ideology, the failures of the Articles of Confederation that led to the Convention, and the monumental political debate that surrounded its ratification. The course includes a substantial online component and an overnight field trip to the National Constitution Center and Independence Mall in Philadelphia. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LGPO 3015. US CONSTITUTIONAL MOMENTS. (4 Credits)

This course is a study of the watershed moments in US Constitutional history. Several times in the history of the United States, the US Constitution has undergone dramatic change, calling into question the meaning and legal definitions of personal rights and liberties. Often, these moments changed the path of civil rights in the country, for example: the passage of the Bill of Rights, the Reconstruction Amendments, and the New Deal era. Students will explore these moments – and the moments change was considered but not accomplished – within the greater historical and legal policy context of the United States. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LGPO 3100. HEALTHCARE IN THE U.S.: A RIGHT OR A PRIVILEGE. (3 Credits)

There is a national debate on health care in the U.S. as the Affordable Care Act with mandated insurance coverage is creating a sea change in the health care industry away from fee-for-service toward performance-based delivery of health care services. This course examines the debate, government's role in providing health care coverage and services, how to formulate policy and who is entitled to coverage.

LGPO 3200. REGULATING BUSINESS: WHO NEEDS IT?. (3 Credits)

With the implementation of provisions of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in the wake of the recent economic downturn, this course will examine the regulatory climate for businesses and corporations in the United States as well as U.S.-based transnational corporations. An analysis of recent trading practices and efforts to regulate previously self-policing financial industry members through pursuit of insider trading investigations by the SEC and other government agencies will be included in the analysis of consumer protection in an assessment of what is the role of government in regulating business.

LGPO 3300. GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. (3 Credits)

An overview of the implementation of government policy with the view to prepare individuals for working in the public service. This course will analyze how the management of public programs and policies is accomplished so that government can function and politics is translated into reality. The course will include examination of government decision making and analysis of the policies themselves, the various interest groups and individuals that give rise to these policies and the creation of alternative policies when necessary.

LGPO 3400. BASIC ECONOMIC POLICYMAKING. (3 Credits)

This course surveys the major economic policies made by the government, political influences on economic policymaking, and the consequences of economic policy on politics. Some concepts covered will include macroeconomic policy and indicators (e.g., GDP, inflation and unemployment), fiscal and monetary policy, taxes, regulation and trade, deficits and debts, structural reform, fiscal stimulus vs. austerity and the influences on economic policymaking by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government as well as interest groups and the public.

LGPO 3500. EFFECTING CHANGE: ACTIVISM, ADVOCACY, LOBBYING, AND PACS. (3 Credits)

The process of effecting policy change may involve a complex interplay of forces at many levels operating both within and outside government, ranging from individual activists, community organizers advocating on behalf of a cause or group, lobbyists employed by private or corporate special interest groups or political action committees organized to aggregate financial resources to support or block a particular agenda. This course examines the variety of mechanisms utilized to implement policy change, the constraints (or lack thereof) under which they operate and the efficacy of their respective approaches.

LGPO 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)