Communication and Media Studies (COMM)

COMM MTNC. MAINTENANCE-PCOM. (0 Credits)

COMM 0010. OBSERVER ED BOARD. (0 Credits)

COMM 0912. REQUIREMENT PREPARATION. (0 Credits)

For Ph.D. and Master's students, registration necessary to maintain continuous enrollment while preparing for a milestone requirement, such as comprehensive exam, Master's thesis, or dissertation submission.

Attribute: Z410.

COMM 0914. REQUIREMENT PREPARATION IN SUMMER. (0 Credits)

For Ph.D. and Master's students, registration necessary to maintain continuous enrollment while preparing for a milestone requirement during the summer. (e.g., to be used by Ph.D. students after the oral examination/defense and prior to receiving the degree).

COMM 1000. FUNDAMENTALS OF COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES. (3 Credits)

This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamental approaches, theories and perspectives essential for an understanding of mediated communication, the industries that make it possible. Throughout the term we will explore many ways in which our symbolic environment both reflects and shapes life in the 21st century, from interpersonal to international relations, and everything in between.

Attributes: AMST, FRSS, SSCI.

Mutually Exclusive: COMM 1010.

COMM 1010. INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the major approaches, theories and perspectives in the study of Communication and the Media.

Attributes: FRSS, SSCI.

Mutually Exclusive: COMM 1000.

COMM 1098. INTERNSHIP. (1 Credit)

COMM 1999. TUTORIAL. (1 Credit)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

COMM 2098. INTERNSHIP. (2 Credits)

Supervised placement for students interested in work experience.

COMM 2999. TUTORIAL. (2 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

COMM 3098. INTERNSHIP. (3 Credits)

Supervised placement for students interested in work experience.

COMM 3999. TUTORIAL. (3 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

COMM 4000. COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES HONORS SEMINAR. (4 Credits)

An invitation-only course for the top students in the majors of the Department of Communication and Media Studies. The course topic will rotate every year, as will the instructor. Offered at both campuses. Counts as an elective towards any CMS major. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMM 4098. INTERNSHIP. (4 Credits)

Supervised placement for students interested in work experience. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMM 4701. INTERNSHIP SEMINAR. (4 Credits)

Juniors and Seniors only. Intern duty and seminar meetings during which students analyze their work experience in terms of the mass media as a whole. Written projects and selected readings geared to each student's internship will be assigned. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMM 4801. INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE I. (2 Credits)

Weekly intern duty and regular meetings with a faculty adviser during which students extend classroom experience into the real world. Written projects and readings relating to the internship are assigned. Seniors only.

COMM 4901. INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE II. (2 Credits)

Weekly intern duty and regular meetings with a faculty adviser during which students extend classroom experience into the real world. Written Projects and readings relating to the internship are assigned. Seniors only.

COMM 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

COMM 5000. MEDIA ANALYSIS AND CRITICISM. (3-4 Credits)

A global interdisciplinary examination of the historical, social and psychological roles of communication during the 20th century.

COMM 5005. THEORIES OF PUBLIC COMM. (3-4 Credits)

An examination of communication models that focus on the transmission of the heritage and ideals of civilization.

COMM 5010. ROLE OF PUBLIC COMMUNCTN. (3-4 Credits)

Analysis of how public communication has been defined and what function it is thought to play in society.

COMM 5020. THE COMM INDUSTRIES. (3-4 Credits)

The origins, structure and operations of the major media, presented from historical, economic, and social perspectives.

COMM 5030. UNDERSTANDING NEW MEDIA. (3,4 Credits)

This course is devoted to to the exploration and examination of new media and digital communications, including the computer, as a medium of communication, computer-mediated communications, videogaming, mobile communications, the internet, online communications, and concepts such as cyberspace, virtual reality, hypertext and hypermedia, digital arts, participatory media, social media, etc. The goal of this course is to gain a general understanding of how these modes of communication work and work us over. In other words, the main concern is with how we interact with and in our new media environments, and how that communication differs from the way we have interacted previously, how we think, feel, and behave in electronic words; how we form our sense of self and identity online (and off); how we form our sense of community online (and off). No special skill in computing is needed for this class but it is assumed that students have access to and are familiar with e-mail and the Web.

COMM 5035. LATINO JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMM 5125. MEDIA & SOCIAL AWARENESS. (3-4 Credits)

The relationship of the entertainment and marketing functions of media to the development of values and concepts of self and others.

COMM 5155. POLITICAL COMMUNICATIONS. (3-4 Credits)

Analytical case studies of public information and practices of the modern nation state.

COMM 5160. PROPAGANDA & PERSUASION. (3-4 Credits)

A socio-political analysis of the development, maintenance and modification of beliefs, attitudes, and opinions.

COMM 5165. SOCIAL/CULTURAL COMM. (3-4 Credits)

Analysis and critique of media influences upon social and cultural attitudes, opinion and behavior.

COMM 5180. PROBLEM OF NEWS. (3-4 Credits)

Examination of how the public perceives the world around it via the information media. How these media provide framework for the understanding of the local, national and international news.

COMM 5200. NARRATIVE THINKING. (3-4 Credits)

Interrogating social interation, media effects and cultural formation this course addresses 4 fundamentals questions: How do human beings acquire knowledge through story and storying? How do human beings store access knowledge through story and storying? How do human beings disseminate knowledge though story and storying? How do human beings validate or invalidate through story and storying?.

COMM 5300. MEDIA CREATIVITY&MORAL CHOICE. (3 Credits)

This course will examine our social values and mores as reflected through the media. In television and film fiction, what actions do we applaud, and how have our standards evolved through the years? In non-fiction news, what is considered newsworthy and what does that tell us about ourselves? From Public Enemy (gangsterism is terrible but we love watching it) to The Godfather and The Sopranos (they're gangsters but they're our gangsters); from High Noon (its worth risking death to fight fair) to Unforgiven forty years later (no problem shooting unarmed men); from JFK's private life (discreetly secret at the time) to our current political profiling (with all those specific details), we consider, evaluate and measure who we are as a culture, what our ethics were, and what they have become.

COMM 5520. PUBLIC, COMMUNITY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDIA. (3-4 Credits)

The course examines the long history, rich content, and diverse forms of expression that characterize alternative, community and public media in the United States, and across the globe. We will look at a variety of media created by independent producers, community organizations, not-for-profit profit, and public instittutuion, to understand the social, cultural and political significance of these formats. As public expression and representation that exist outside of the for-profit model of media production, we analyze the motivations, goals and effects of this increasingly diverse and prolific realm of media.

COMM 5750. FILM AESTHETICS & ECONOMIES. (3 Credits)

In order to understand images we see on movie screens, we must understand their economic backstory. Before any film reaches the viewing audience, is is shaped significantly by a multitude of people, business structures, and labor practices through the stages of production, distribution, and exhibition. With this in mind, this course explores formative economic and industrial moments, contexts and relationships from which particular films emerge. To do this, we will look at historical and contemporary developments in filmmaking both within and beyond the U.S. Hollywood Industry. In addition to the economic frameworks of filmmaking, we will also consider onscreen outcomes. By attending to genres, actors, aesthetics, and other key elements of film texts, the course traces economic and industry decisions to the final product of the film itself.

COMM 5969. TARGETED WRITING. (3-4 Credits)

A Workshop in writing for specific purposes and results: press releases for public, government and commercial venture, op-ed pieces and columns, think pieces and scholarly essays and fiction for genres. Professional writing is the underlying emphasis throughout.

COMM 6025. BROADCAST INNOVATORS. (3-4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the most important anchors, correspondents, and news executives in American broadcasting, including Edward R. Murrow, Walter Cronkite, and Ted Turner. We will read these pioneers' biographies and autobiographies and watch their work, to determine what effects these innovators had upon broadcasting while they worked, as well as, how the've affected the news business today. The course will cover the first days of television through the present. Students who have taken the undergraduate version of this course, COMM 3322 “TV News Innovators”, may not take COMM 6025.

COMM 6050. MEDIA RESEARCH METHODS. (3 Credits)

An overview of the various types of research conducted by and for the media.

COMM 6100. GENDER & MEDIA. (3 Credits)

An examination of gender images and representatives across a broad range of media genre, formats and programming. Assuming gender to be a sociocultural/biological set of categories, we will explore the ways in which both the masculine and the femine have been inscribed as cultural identifiers and social norms. Deconstructing cultural and media texts will be anchored to theoretical discussions that tie gender concepts to pop culture and social structures. A variety of expressions that transgress gender categories will be explored as possible paths to changes and challenges to market driven representation.

COMM 6145. History of Women's Magazines in America. (3 Credits)

Historically, women's magazines have been among the most popular forms of print media in the United States. Yet even before the 1830's, when Godey's Lady's Book put women's magazines on the popular and commercial map, controversy has surrounded their contents, purpose and implications. From the start, critique has emanated from a wide range of social and political interests, and not least from women themselves. From classrooms to chatrooms, books to blogs, the debate about nature and impact of women's magazines on gender identity and women's lives is still in play today. This course will explore the multidimensional history of the American women's magazine from the rise of the tradition to the present, examining fundamental continuities, eclectic contents, and key critical claims within their changing theoretical, social, political, commercial and media industry contects.

COMM 6150. MEDIA AND SYMBOLIC FORM. (3 Credits)

An examination of our codes and modes of communications, information, and perception. Perspectives on our use of signs and symbols, words and images, speech and writing systems, and new electronic and digital forms. Survey of approaches drawn from linguistic, semiotics, general semantics, cybernetics, orality-literacy studies, the study of media as languages, and remix cultures.

COMM 6155. MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY. (3 Credits)

An exploration of the many intersections between the process of human communication and the development of human technology. While communication technologies will be emphasized, this course will also consider other types of technology (e.g. production, transportation, health and medicine, warfare, etc.), and the general concept of technology itself, as analyze the nature and impact of technologies and technological change, their effects on the process of communications, on our forms of social organization and culture, and on our very modes of thought, feeling, and consciousness.

COMM 6160. TELEVISION & THE NEW MEDIA. (3 Credits)

This course looks at how the now venerable medium of television is both threatened by competition from the Internet, and benefits from its reach. Will seeing television shows on Hulu.com and TV.com undermine the advertising basis of network television? How did blogging help Lost, Twitter assist Mad Men, My Space figure in Bones, You Tube assist Saturday Night Live? These and other examples of television-web cooperation will be carefully examined.

COMM 6165. COMM & COMMUNITY. (3 Credits)

A historical and philosophical inquiry into the socializing and legitimating functions of various media, with a view to consequences for communications policy.

COMM 6190. COMM POLICIES&PRACTICES. (3 Credits)

Critical study of US communication policies and their application to electronic media. Conflicting interests of the media and public are studied in detail, and means for the public to gain access to media are examined and tested.

COMM 6200. SCREENWRITING. (3 Credits)

This course teaches the elements involved in writing a screenplay: structure, dialogue,introduction and development of characters, storytelling skills in general and how to create a flow of yuor specific story in particular. Students learn how to work with reversals, integrated relationships and interconnected events; and above all, how to tell a compelling story visually, by using the camera as the audiences eyes. There are films to watch and analyze, and screenplays to critique; but the major project of the term is to write a full-length screenplay from conception to fully realized script. In class, we spend a substantial amount of time watching and discussing of full-length screenplays from films watched outside of class and scene-by-scene analyses that compare a written screenplay to the finished film version. Students may also be required to see films outside the class, and to discuss their respective screenplays in terms of structure, intent and execution.

COMM 6210. COMMUNICATION & THE LAW. (3 Credits)

A study of the law's impact on the development and use of mass media technologies.

COMM 6250. INTERNATIONAL COMM. (3 Credits)

Cross-cultural analysis of the role of communications in selected European and Third World countries with emphasis on the impact of the mass media on information exchange, economics and national identity.

COMM 6300. PUBLIC COMM-DIGITAL ENVIRON. (3-4 Credits)

An exploration of computers, the Internet, and cyberspace as new media of communication and new environments for social interaction. Topics covered will include: the characteristics of digital medial and computer-mediated communications; the functions, forms and culture of cyberspace; mind and identity in a networked environment; the legal, political and social issues related to new media; and human relationships in an electronic environment. This is not a hands-on course, but a basic familiarity with computers, e-mail, and Web browsing (as a user, not a programmer) would be helpful.

COMM 6370. STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS AT THE UNITED NATIONS AND OTHER HUMANITARIAN ORGANIZATIONS. (3 Credits)

This course presents the pressing demand for effective communication strategies at humanitarian and cultural organizations and agencies, especially those involved with the United Nations. Constructive communication across boarders and between people of different religious and cultural backgrounds is a primary goal of the Alliance of Civilization, founded at the United Nations in 2005. Continuing efforts to create open dialogue, understanding and global stability involve the development of media coordination efforts internationally. Relief efforts and crisis management across the globe also require strategic message design, and best efforts to bring the experiences of those in distress to global publics. Ways in which the voices of beneficiaries, aide workers and crisis managers inform the public help determine public empathy and support for those in need. Speakers include: Jordi Torrent, Media Literacy Program Coordinator, UN Alliance of Civilizations; Robin Andersen, the “Disaster Narrative” in Global Media Coverage of Humanitarian Crisis; Kent Page, Senior Advisor for Strategic Communication for UNICEF: Alexander van Tulleken, MD, with the World Health Organization in Darfur; Chaim Litewski, Chief, United Nations Television; Caroline Petit, Chief, UN Promotion & Distribution Unit News and Media Division; Timothy La Rose, Communications Officer, Office of the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict.

COMM 6400. CRITIQUES OF ADVERTISING. (3 Credits)

Analysis of advertising campaigns, ideologies, themes and trends in conjunction with practical assignments for print and broadcast media.

COMM 6425. WORLD CINEMA. (3-4 Credits)

Covers the emergence of film as a global art form, economic force, and cultural phenomenon in a variety of national and international settings. Covers the potential for film, and the discourse and theory of cinema, to effectively encourage cultural awareness, political dialogue, and social commentary. Examines issues of film production; funding, collaboration, training, and problems of censorship, as well as issues of reception.

COMM 6440. GLOBAL MEDIA IN AN INTERACTIVE AGE. (3 Credits)

This course explores the concept of public opinion, audiences, and interactive participation with media on a global scale. The role media plays in shaping attitudes, identities, and nationalism is analyzed historically, and reconsidered in a world increasingly interconnected through digital technologies and the ways in which they are reshaping information, media content and civic participation around the world. Emphasizing examples and initatives developed in different countries, we will consider their potential for sustainable development, economic well-being, and global stability and citizenship.

COMM 6500. MEDIA METHODS & MESSAGES. (3 Credits)

Techniques, strategies and standards of targeted research and writing are examined and applied to major writing projects.

COMM 6555. INTERNSHIP SEMINAR. (3 Credits)

One of two possible tracks for fulfilling M.A. degree requirements. Seminar for students who are MA in Public Communications .

COMM 6570. NATURE TRAVEL AND CONSERVATION COMMUNICATION. (3,4 Credits)

Nature, Travel and Conservation Communication This course explores Dr. Andersen’s current research on communication design for ethical travel and conservation in the tourism industry, the fastest growing sector of the world’s largest industry. We analyze the ways in which marketing and strategic communication can be employed to encourage sustainable tourism practices at eco-lodges, game parks and other sites where visitors interact with natural environments, local communities and wildlife. Wildlife encounters that provide a unique context for conservation education will be identified, along with strategic communication models designed for sustainable and alternative development in environmentally sensitive regions. Travel, adventure, animal, and nature programming and magazines, as well as on-line material, websites and tourism guidebooks will also be analyzed for their narrative and visual rhetorical strategies that help shape views of the natural world, its people and communities, and the roles and behaviors’ of the global tourist.

COMM 6575. ORGANIZATIONAL COMM. (3 Credits)

COMM 6580. PUBLIC RELATIONS. (3 Credits)

An examination of the operations and practices of public relations with particular emphasis on publicity and public relations campaigns, issues development and crisis management.

COMM 6600. COMMUNICATION ON THE NET. (3 Credits)

A study of how communicators use networked communications to convey messages for cultural, social or public policies.

COMM 6630. POLITICS & NEW MEDIA. (3-4 Credits)

An examination of the impacts that new media are having on the political process in America and world-wide. Key characteristics of new media include the empowerment of reader and viewers as writers and producers and the viral marketing of political candidates and ideas. Students not only look at these media and their impact, but work on the web with blogs, videos, and audio files.

COMM 6700. VIDEO ENVIRONMENTS. (3 Credits)

An examination of the basic production principles, aesthetics and epistemology of video applications in corporate, public and creative communication environments.

COMM 6705. SPECIAL TOPICS. (3 Credits)

This course looks critically at the changing ways the death of a public figure is mourned in the mass media. Using case studies and critical texts on celebrity, the public sphere, and public memory, we will explore such questions as how the death is depicted, how the legacy of the deceased is presented and framed, and how the posthumous fame of the celebrity continues on after death. Case studies will range over the 20th and 21st century to include Rudolph Valentino, Judy Garland, Diana of Wales, Michael Jackson and Amy Winehouse.

COMM 6770. CAPSTONE RESEARCH I. (3 Credits)

A one-on-one mentor-student course in which the student finds a faculty mentor to develop a research paper or project. The project or paper can be completed during this course. If more time is needed, student may enroll in Capstone Research II to complete the paper or project. Requirements for this course are to identify the capstone topic or research question, outline the topic or research, and complete a literature review or foundational material.

COMM 6777. CAPSTONE RESEARCH II. (3 Credits)

A one-on-one mentor-student course in which the paper or project proposal and early research are developed into a final form.

COMM 6851. COMMUNICATIONS ETHICS. (3-4 Credits)

COMM 6880. THESIS RESEARCH I. (3 Credits)

COMM 6888. THESIS RESEARCH II. (3 Credits)

COMM 8999. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1-4 Credits)