Journalism (JOUR)

JOUR 1701. INTRODUCTION TO MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISM WITH LAB. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2083): A course designed to introduce the student to various fundamentals of journalism today, including writing leads; finding and interviewing sources; document, database and digital research; and story development and packaging. The course also discusses the intersection of journalism with broader social contexts and questions, exploring the changing nature of news, the shifting social role of the press and the evolving ethical and legal issues affecting the field. The course requires a once weekly tools lab, which introduces essential photo, audio, and video editing software for digital and multimedia work. Note: Credit will not be given for both this course and COMM 2082/JOUR 1702. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: EP1.

JOUR 1702. INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

A course designed to introduce the student to various elements of reporting- including writing leads and articles and finding and interviewing sources- as well as the nature of news, the social role of the press, and the ethical and legal issues that face it. Students are encouraged to submit work to the college newspaper for possible publication. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 1761. THE POWER OF NEWS. (3 Credits)

This course studies the interaction between the American mass media, politics and public policymaking. We will examine some of the most important interactions between the press and politicians to answer questions about the role of media in American society. The point of the course is to demonstrate the power of news by examining in depth some of the most important interactions of media and American government. After all, the media is no longer just an institution that covers the news- the media now actually help shape the political process as an important political institution in their own right.

Attributes: EP1, FRSS, MANR, SSCI.

JOUR 2711. INTERMEDIATE MULTIMEDIA REPORTING. (4 Credits)

This course further develops the skills learned in Introduction to Journalism focusing on how to utilize medium effectively across platforms. Students will gain hands-on experience in multimedia reporting, taking into account the unique strengths of each medium. Students will focus on narrative technique and reporting while learning the technical skills required of each platform. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702 or COMM 2082 or COMM 2083.

JOUR 2712. INTERMEDIATE PRINT REPORTING. (4 Credits)

This is an intermediate reporting course which focuses on developing investigative skills through the use of human sources and computer-assisted reporting. Students will develop beat reporting skills, source-building and journalism ethics. Students will gather and report on actual news events in New York City. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 2714. RADIO AND AUDIO REPORTING. (4 Credits)

A survey of the historical styles, formats and genres that have been used for radio, comparing these to contemporary formats used for commercial and noncommercial stations, analyzing the effects that technological, social and regulatory changes have had on the medium. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 2722. INTERMEDIATE FEATURE WRITING. (4 Credits)

Developing necessary skills for writing soft news and human-interest feature stories for various news media. Creation of strong ideas, leads, narratives, quotations and interviews, as well as the blending of interesting material and personal writing style, are emphasized. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 2725. WRITING WORKSHOP. (4 Credits)

The writing workshop is about writing in all of its forms- press releases, op-eds, movie reviews, short stories, more. There is one writing assignment per week. The emphasis is on writing professionally, for either online or print publications. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 2735. VIDEO JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

Today, Video Journalists are offered a vast array of outlets and possibilities. From “basic” broadcast, to thousands of cable channels, satellite TV, and the internet. From transmedia to social media, twitters and texts, iThis and iThat, all the way to IMAX! What use3d to be called “simply” Television News, today covers a media cornucopia.From the most mundane, to extraordinary facts, fictions, ideas, sounds, pictures, and effects, the sky seems to be the limit. This class will help students bring that down to earth, to give birth to their ideas and imaginations, desires and dreams, in very concrete form. Together, we will explore the vision, the art, and the craft of Video Journalism, and create pieces that will (hopefully!) make people sit up, watch, and listen. Stories that will challenge them, make them think, and ideally inspire them to make their lives and the world a better place. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 2786. SPORTS WRITING AND REPORTING. (4 Credits)

In this course, students will read from the canon of great sportswriting, from print to broadcast to digital. To gain practice in this craft, students will also complete original reporting assignments in a range of forms, such as game story, column, feature profile, broadcast script, and live tweeting. The evolution of the sports genre will also be connected to essential social movements, such as civil rights, women’s liberation, and the consequence of big money following the birth of TV. For perspective, specific attention will be paid to the treatment of iconic modern American sports figures, including such seminal athletes as Babe Ruth, Muhammad Ali, Lance Armstrong and Serena Williams. Pre-Req: Introduction to Journalism (Jour 1701 or COMM 2082 or COMM 2083) or permission of instructor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: JOUR 1701 or COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 2787. FASHION JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

Fashion Journalism combines beat reporting with an emphasis on the cultural, artistic, social, historical and business aspects of fashion. An in-depth review of the history of fashion journalism sets the stage for students to learn and understand the digital revolution in fashion journalism and marketing​, ​ including ​social media, blogs and ​websites. Topics to be covered include: Catwalk and trend reporting, ​f​ashion criticism, feature and fashion writing. Course will enable students combine the love of writing with the interest in fashion and acquire the skills to become a fashion journalist using different media formats. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701.

JOUR 2789. SPORTS BROADCASTING. (4 Credits)

This class will provide a detailed study in all aspects of the sports broadcasting industry. Students will be introduced to a wide array of techniques and philosophies for sports broadcasting, from fundamentals and essentials to advanced learning methods. The course will consist of discussions, critiques, learning exercises, take home assignments and hands-on practice and participation. The course assumes no prior experience in sports broadcasting.

JOUR 3711. ADVANCED MULTIMEDIA REPORTING. (4 Credits)

Advanced Internet Reporting picks up where Introduction to Journalism leaves off, offering students a way to continue their study of multimedia journalism in a converged setting. The class will be project-based, with students completing both breaking news and features assignments. Each story for the course will need to be done in both print and video form. Students will also have the option of producing audio or photo slideshow versions of their reports. Completed projects, with the student’s permission, will be posted on Fordham news sites like that of The Ram and WFUV News. This course differs from COMM 3083, Advanced Television Production (Bronxnet) in that it will also cover print, audio and photo. It differs from JOUR 3717/COMM 3978, Online Journalism, in that it will not focus on blogging or social media. PREREQUISITE: Intro to Journalism with Lab (JOUR1701/COMM 2083), Advanced Television Reporting (BronxNet) (COMM 3083), Intermediate Television Production (JOUR 3716), or permission of instructor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: DTEM.

Prerequisites: COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701 or COMM 3083 or JOUR 3716.

JOUR 3715. WRITING FOR BROADCAST NEWS. (4 Credits)

An overview of the skills required for the writing of news stories for radio and television including hard news and features. This course is designed to strengthen the student’s ability to write clearly, concisely and accurately for broadcast emphasizing critical thinking skills. Storytelling techniques are explored, as well as writing to film/videotape. Students will eventually write to deadline under simulated newsroom conditions. Four credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction. Outside of class, students will be required to screen specific news programming and submit critical essays evaluating content. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.Pre-Req: COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701 or Instructor permission.

Prerequisites: COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 3716. INTERMEDIATE TELEVISION PRODUCTION. (4 Credits)

A practical, intensive course in all aspects of television news production. Early in the semester, the course will focus on teaching students the basic skills needed to create high-quality television news, including how to write for broadcast, shoot video, edit video digitally, and create taped pieces for air. The course will also cover on-camera skills. Later in the semester, students will put their television skills into action by producing entire newscasts, where they will anchor, direct, and produce all the content. In addition, the course will also cover key journalism concepts including interviewing, story research and using online media resources. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.on.

Attribute: ZLB4.

JOUR 3717. ONLINE JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3978): Recent shifts in media technologies, corporate structure, and the organization of public life have combined to change the role and the practice of journalism. Exploring these changes as a context, this course will introduce conceptual and practical techniques of reporting, writing, and packaging news for the on-line environment today. Students will learn about and actively participate in doing journalism on-line. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: DTEM, NMDD, ZLB2.

Prerequisites: COMM 2083 or COMM 2082 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 3718. ON-AIR REPORTING. (4 Credits)

In this class, students will learn how to craft and present stories for air. The course will include lessons on how to build a news package, how to present for broadcast (both on television and for podcasts), and will include assignments with in-class deadlines. Class will feature visits from working journalists/news personalities in New York City. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3719. DATA JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

Obtaining, interpreting, visualizing, and displaying data are essential skills for journalists in the 21st century. This hands-on introductory course in data visualization will help students learn to use data to tell visual stories. Topics discussed will range from where to find data and how to evaluate sources to how to organize data to create visually appealing graphics that tell stories that can be grasped in an instant. Students will critique published visualizations to identify common pitfalls, as they create a data-based story to add to their portfolio. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: NMDD.

JOUR 3723. INTERVIEWS AND PROFILES. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3081): This course includes intensive work in developing and writing profiles accompanied by readings from Boswell to Mailer. This course will help students develop a personal interview style which complements their individual strengths. Students will examine various interview strategies and learn how to compile their notes into a cohesive and compelling narrative. In-depth critiques of profiles will be provided. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ENGL.

Prerequisites: COMM 2083 or COMM 2082 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 3724. FIRST PERSON JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

First person journalism is nothing new. As part of the New Journalism movement, reporters like Tom Wolfe and Joan Didion have been infusing their storytelling with subjectivity for decades. Still, the digital shift in journalism and explosion of social media has brought a new wave of first person journalism to the web. This course will explore the history of first person journalism and help students use first person perspective to bring reported pieces to life. Students will look critically at the form to consider the limitations of personal narrative in journalism. On that note, this course will not be limited to personal narratives. Students will also work on reported stories in which their experiences as journalists and citizens impacts their storytelling structure. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: LALS.

JOUR 3725. PROFILE AND BIOGRAPHY. (4 Credits)

Analysis and practice in applying the principles of biographical writing with the emphasis on contemporary forms in books and magazines. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3727. WRITING FOR MAGAZINES. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3084): Intensive practice in developing ideas into non-fiction pieces intended for general interest or specialized publications. Inquiries, field and library research, interviews, presentation of technical subjects to non-specialists. Students may wish to concentrate on areas in which they have particular interest or expertise. Note: Credit will not be given for both this course and COMM 4201/ JOUR 4727. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENGL, EP3.

Prerequisites: COMM 2083 or COMM 2082 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 3728. SPECIAL REPORTING: IN-DEPTH REPORTING. (4 Credits)

An in-depth reporting class focused on the production of a newspaper Special Report on a given topic each year. The class will use a team-based approach to develop a multi-element story package, in print format from conceptualization, through research, reporting, writing, editing, production and publication. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3729. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING. (4 Credits)

All great reporting is investigative reporting. There is some truth to that claim. But investigative journalism is not about breaking news, or what happened yesterday. It's an explanation of the complex machineries of big systems: policies, business, foreign policy, economics. It involved systematic, in-depth and original reporting, and it takes weeks, months, sometimes years, using multiple media tools: interviews, documents, data. It shows people how power works, and, at its best, it breaks through layers of deception and obfuscation. This is a hands-on course that will require students to study and analyze investigative journalism, major cases and techniques, and undertake investigative projects requiring on the ground reporting and writing. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: JOUR 1701.

JOUR 3741. JOURNALISM WORKSHOP: REPORTING. (2 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2211): A practical workshop course in writing news, features, commentary, reviews, and sports articles, or doing graphics, photography, multimedia and layout. The Rose Hill section is centered on giving students opportunities to write for The Ram, but students can also use the course to improve work being done for the paper, the Fordham Undergraduate Research Journal, Flash, Mode, and other student media at Rose Hill. Students not currently working for student media are also welcome in the Rose Hill section, where they will be taught basics of journalism and given the opportunity to publish articles in The Ram. At Lincoln Center there are four separate sections of the course. Each section has its own focus but all are related to involvement with THE OBSERVER. The sections are: Journalism Workshop/reporting, Journalism Workshop/photography, Journalism Workshop/layout and Journalism Workshop/multimedia.

Attributes: ENGL, NMDD.

JOUR 3742. JOURNALISM WORKSHOP: FNN. (2 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2212): A practical workshop for students working on Fordham Nightly News. The instructor will help students improve all aspects of broadcast journalism, including scriptwriting, shooting, editing and anchoring. All students in this course must volunteer to work on Fordham Nightly News, and will be producing the day's show as part of the workshop. NOTE: This is a 2-point class. Students who want a full 4-points of Journalism Workshop to equal a full course toward the major in Communication and Media Studies should also sign up for COMM 2211 concurrently, which focuses on basic journalism reporting skills and print writing. Journalism Workshop will NOT be offered at Rose Hill after Spring 2016.

JOUR 3743. JOURNALISM WORKSHOP: MULTIMEDIA. (2 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2213): A practical workshop course in writing news, feature, commentary or sports articles, or doing graphics and layout for The Observer. Students will work as writers or on the layout staff.

JOUR 3744. JOURNALISM WORKSHOP: PHOTOGRAPHY. (2 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2214): A practical course in public media journalism held at WFUV-FM. WFUV is a National Public Radio affiliate station based in Keating Hall on the Rose Hill campus. This workshop covers everything from broadcast writing and interviewing techniques to field reporting and journalism ethics and standards. Students will also spend time behind the microphone learning how to deliver news copy in a clear, conversational manner. The professor, George Bodarky, has extensive experience in commercial and public radio journalism, and has won multiple awards for his work. George is president of Public Radio News Directors Inc. and past president of the New York State Associated Press Board of Directors.

JOUR 3760. THE JOURNALIST AND THE LAW. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3205): An investigation of the legal concerns of the working journalist: prior restraint, shield law, libel, invasion of privacy, the Freedom of Information Act. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

Prerequisites: COMM 1000 or COMM 1010.

JOUR 3763. THE MURROW YEARS: 1938-65. (4 Credits)

This course traces the career and contributions to broadcast journalism of Edward R. Murrow, one of America's foremost reporters, from his remarkable accounts of London under German bombing attacks to his documentary work on the "See It Now" and "CBS Reports" series. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3764. TELEVISION NEWS AND TODAY’S WORLD. (4 Credits)

This course examines and analyzes the approaches of the three commercial networks and the Public Broadcasting Service to the major news stories of the day. Each class screens one of the network's evening news broadcasts and assesses its content, comparing story selection and presentation with the day's newspaper coverage. Emphasis is placed on students' comprehension of the week's salient news developments. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COMC.

JOUR 3765. TELEVISION NEWS. (4 Credits)

An examination of the growth and impact of television journalism. Technological and historical changes, techniques and influences of television news. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3769. HISTORY OF TELEVISION AND RADIO NEWS. (4 Credits)

Traces the history of electronic journalism, from its infancy in the 1930's to the present day; emphasis on the work of the most prominent broadcast journalists of these decades. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3772. NEWSMAKING. (4 Credits)

A critical study of news gathering and dissemination processes in the contemporary world with emphasis on their cultural, political, and economic effects in modern society. Factors that determine the worthiness of current events and journalistic interpretations reaching national audiences are considered. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3776. SOCIAL MEDIA FOR JOURNALISTS. (4 Credits)

This is a research and practice-based course on social media, aimed at journalists who will need to understand and use social media. Students will research historical and contemporary innovation relating to social media, and will then develop strategies for creating impact throughout the course of the semester with their own journalistic projects using social media. Readings, discussions, project critiques, and hands-on work will all be used methodologically to allow students to delve into the possibilities of social media. Students will come to understand the power and limitations of social media as both a reporting tools and a tool to aid in the marketing of powerful journalism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Mutually Exclusive: DTEM 3476.

JOUR 3781. ARTS AND CULTURE REPORTING. (4 Credits)

In this course, students will have the opportunity to apply their journalistic skills to the area of art and cultural reporting and criticism, including popular culture (television, movies, pop music, books, etc.) and the fine arts (theater, classical music, dance, and the visual arts, etc.). They will develop an ability to identify, describe, and evaluate for readers/viewers the full range of our culture’s creative output, including live shows and events. This includes recognizing the importance of the historical, social, and political context of what they are reporting on and reviewing. As budding arts and culture journalists, students will learn how to balance being both a reporter and cultural critic, and develop a strong, reliable voice. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3782. SCIENCE JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

At a time when science and technology permeate debates on everything from climate change to stem cell research, to nuclear power to genetically modified foods many Americans lack sufficient understanding of these basic science and health concepts. This course will explore fundamentals in science and medicine reporting emphasizing the essential research and story development skills needed bring complex medical, science and health issues to the general public. It will explore the scientific process, how to evaluate scientific and health information, ethical controversies, and what makes science and medical news. Students will learn how to break, report, translate, and illuminate scientific information, forging journalism that helps build scientific literacy equal to contemporary challenges. (Prerequisite- COMM 2082 or instructor's permission) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2082 (may be taken concurrently) or JOUR 1702 (may be taken concurrently).

JOUR 3783. THEATER JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

JOUR 3785. WRITING FOR THE MEDIA. (4 Credits)

Analysis and practice of writing for a variety of print, broadcast, and online media. Exploring different media contexts such as news, entertainment, public relations, and advertising, the approach in this course assumes that media writers tell stories, that they write for multiple formats, and that they engage in ethical activities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3788. INTERNATIONAL REPORTING. (4 Credits)

For decades an aura has surrounded international correspondents, the corps of reporters who cover foreign governments, war fronts and conflict zones to bring the news out of some of the world’s most dangerous, complex and influential places. They risk lives and freedom in the struggle to dig out the truth behind government propaganda and military secrecy, whether in battlefields or presidential palaces or besieged regions. This course will define and explore the underpinnings of international reporting and its evolution from the mid-20th century to the digital age. Students will study and practice reporting, writing and video skills. We will examine the importance of understanding foreign cultures, histories and languages, discuss the work and lives of major foreign correspondents, and examine where the art of foreign correspondence stands today. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: JOUR 1701.

JOUR 4713. AUDIO REPORTING AND PODCASTING. (4 Credits)

This class will teach students how to create professional level audio reports and podcasts. Students will learn the major theories and practices of audio journalism. They will also develop practical skills on how to choose stories for audio journalism, write for broadcast, gather and use sound, interview for audio, edit audio journalism, and promote their work. Students will work on both short- and long-form projects. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 4727. ADVANCED MAGAZINE ARTICLE WRITING. (4 Credits)

Planning, researching, and writing magazine articles. Emphasis is placed on preparing manuscripts of professional caliber. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 4733. PHOTOJOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

American photojournalism emerged in the late 1920s and has an increasing role to play in bith news and feature reporting in today’s digital world. As online journalism and its audiences take shape, visual storytelling is finding new modes and roles. This course will introduce students to the contemporary practices and production of photojournalism. It will be conducted in a manner similar to the real working world of professional journalism while also touching on the aesthetic, technical, cultural, and historical forces that have shaped its evolution into the present day. Students will be responsible for taking pictures with their own cameras and producing their own digital images, photo slideshows and visual reporting. While the emphasis of the course will be on picture taking and visual storytelling, students will also learn how to edit their own photographs and hot to prepare selected images in Adobe Photoshop. (Pre-requisite COMM 2082 or JOUR 1702 or instructor's permission) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 4741. PRACTICUM – OBSERVER. (4 Credits)

A practical workshop course in writing news, features, commentary, reviews and sports articles for The Observer, the student newspaper at Lincoln Center.  Student will take assignments for The Observer to gain writing experience and clips. In class, students will workshop articles to improve them before publication. We will also address basic journalism skills, including interviewing, researching, and using online-media resources. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 4742. PRACTICUM – CAMPUS TELEVISION NEWS. (4 Credits)

This course teaches provides a way for students to gain practical experience in journalism by working on Fordham’s student news broadcast, Fordham Nightly News, under the supervision of a professor. Students will learn to generate stories, research, report, write, shoot, edit and present news on television, using Fordham Nightly News as a learning laboratory. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 4743. PRACTICUM – RAM. (4 Credits)

This course teaches provides a way for students to gain practical experience in journalism by working on Fordham’s student newspaper, The Fordham Ram, under the supervision of a professor. Students will learn to research, report, write, shoot, edit and design, using The Ram as a learning laboratory. Because The Ram is not just a print newspaper but also exists in digital form, students will have the opportunity to tell stories across multiple platforms. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 4744. PRACTICUM – WFUV. (4 Credits)

This course teaches provides a way for students to gain practical experience in journalism by working in the news department of WFUV, Fordham’s public media station, under the supervision of a professor. Students will learn to generate stories, research, report, write, gather and present news on radio and possibly on video and in print, using WFUV as a learning laboratory. Students taking this course should already be involved in the WFUV News Department. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 4745. CAMPUS JOURNALISM PRACTICUM. (4 Credits)

This course teaches provides a way for students to gain practical experience in journalism by working on a student media outlet at Fordham under the supervision of a professor. Students will learn to research, report, write, shoot, edit and/or design, using one of the campus publications as a learning laboratory. prereq: OUR 1701 or COMM 2083 or permission of instructor Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2083 or COMM 2082 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 4750. VALUES IN THE NEWS. (4 Credits)

Values in the News examines the ethical and moral codes and standards observed, or violated, by the news media in the United States. These standards are under scrutiny in this challenging transition from traditional or legacy media to digital journalism and the advent of various platforms including citizen journalism and social media. Students will analyze contemporary and historical examples of ethical violations and ethical questions in print, television, cable and digital news. The class will research, interpret, analyze and write about these cases and will explore the obstacles journalists face trying to adhere to a set of ethical rules. This seminar is writing intensive and requires class debate. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, EP4, VAL.

JOUR 4766. TELEVISION NEWS INNOVATORS. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 4111): This Interdisciplinary Capstone Course bridges the disciplines of Media Studies and History. It surveys the most prominent figures in the history of electronic journalism--producers, executives, anchors, correspondents--and explains how their work shaped the course of American history. Innovators whose work is studied include Edward R. Murrow, Walter Cronkite, Ted Koppel, Barbara Walters, Mike Wallace, Ed Bardley, Roone Arledge, Ted Turner and Roger Ailes. We discuss the historical episodes covered by these innovators including World War II, McCarthyism, the Civil Rights movement, the Vietnam War, the Iran Hostage Crisis and the 1991 Gulf War before investigating how the coverage of these events in and of itself affected their outcomes. Sections R01 and R02 meet concurrently. Open only to Rose HIll students. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, FITV, ICC.

JOUR 4767. HISTORY OF WOMEN'S MAGAZINES. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the history and mission of women's magazines from the 19th century to the 21st century with special emphasis on magazines such as Godey's Lady's Book, Lady's Home Journal, and Cosmopolitan. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, WGSS.

JOUR 4770. MEDIA LAW AND JOURNALISM ETHICS. (4 Credits)

Media Law and Journalism Ethics will introduce students to the legal and ethical issues confronting the media on a daily basis. Journalists, in particular, face complicated decisions as technology changes the way news is produced. With communication tools increasing the speed at which news is gathered and disseminated, media industries are growing more powerful. As the journalism industry shifts from traditional newspapers and broadcasting to social media, podcasts and blogs, the rules and limitations also change. This course will explore ethical principles that govern journalism, such as freedom of expression, the right to privacy and the public's right to know. Students will develop an understanding of the ethical and legal issues that are unique to journalism in a Democracy, and become more critical consumers of news media.

JOUR 4773. PUBLIC MEDIA. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COMC.

JOUR 4784. BUSINESS JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

If money makes the world go round, as the famous saying goes, then following the money is a creative way to discover gripping stories that can make you stand out as a journalist. But how do you find the money angle? This course will teach you to understand business and economics, and also how to tell financial stories creatively. Over the course of the semester, students will learn ways in which they can "follow the money" in order to tell great multimedia stories about people and institutions. Students will also learn about financial concepts and markets including stocks, bonds, and balance sheets. The course assumes no background in economics or finance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702 or COMM 2082 or COMM 2083.

JOUR 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.