Modern Languages (MLAL)

MLAL 1010. SPANISH COLONIALISM THROUGH FILM. (3 Credits)

Study of US and foreign cinematographic representations of Spanish imperialism and conquest, accompanied by readings and pertinent Colonial chronicles in translation.

Attributes: EP1, EP2, LALS, MANR.

MLAL 1100. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS. (3 Credits)

An introduction to linguistics, the study of language. The course surveys the core domains of theoretical linguistics including phonology, syntax, and semantics as well as select areas of applied linguistics. Taught in English.

Attributes: CLAS, COLI, ENGL.

MLAL 1210. LITERATURE AND SOCIETY. (3 Credits)

MLAL 1230. HISTORY AND THE NOVEL: DON QUIJOTE AND MODERN LITERATURE. (3 Credits)

MLAL 1240. TRAGEDY AND COMEDY. (3 Credits)

MLAL 1250. TRADITION OF STORY-TELLING. (3 Credits)

MLAL 1500. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLINGUISTICS. (3 Credits)

An introduction to psycholinguistics, also called the psychology of language. The course focuses on how the mind and brain acquire and process language across the lifespan and in different populations. Taught in English.

MLAL 2000. T&C: REMEMBERING ITALY'S LONG CENTURY IN LITERATURE, FILM, AND MUSIC. (3 Credits)

This course examines the way in which the literary and artistic forms of modern Italy represent political and social movements such as revolution, unification, modernization, and migration. We will focus on texts from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries that utilize differing modes -- such as fiction, nonfiction, film, poetry, and music -- and we will analyze how these texts draw upon, reflect and refashion the meaning of historical events. In juxtaposing texts of different types, we will explore the mechanisms by which symbols and ideas are inherited through and adapted to differing contexts. Taught in English.

Attributes: EP2, TC.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.

MLAL 2100. ADVANCED GERMAN GRAMMAR. (4 Credits)

The course is designed to help students gain more insight into the structure of the German language and to further develop and strengthen their knowledge of German grammar. Survey and practice of German grammar as well as more advanced features of German syntax and style. Course will be conducted in English with readings and exercises in German. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

MLAL 2601. RUSSIAN CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (4 Credits)

This course provides intensive practice of spoken and written language with an emphasis on vocabulary building and idiom fluency. The course uses various media from film to news sources in order to expand students' familiarity with contemporary Russian culture. Recommended for students interested in pursuing upper-level Russian literature and culture courses. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MLAL 2820. GERMAN TEXTS ON FILM. (3 Credits)

Subtle: Paralles and doppel ganger. Thix course investigates identity through paralles lives and uncanny encounters .

Attribute: COLI.

MLAL 3000. GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES. (4 Credits)

This course investigates contemporary theories of gender and sexuality from a range of disciplinary perspectives. The course explores how gender and sexuality function as dimensions of social identity, difference, inequality, and power. Students will be introduced to a range of theoretical schools that concern a range of identities, respond to earlier theoretical formulations, and engage activism and historical experiences. Students will be introduced to concepts such as the social construction of gender, queerness, gender difference, intersectionality, universalism, identity politics, reproductive justice, materialist and/versus symbolic theories, masculinity studies, critical race theory, sex positivity and pornography studies, and a range of feminist accounts of gender. The course foregrounds feminist, queer, critical race, postcolonial, and other critical scholarly literatures and methods. While it focuses on the contemporary period (after 1975), the course surveys a range of theories, situating them in social and political context. Disciplinary focus may vary from year to year, but the interdisciplinary character of the field will be retained. Taught in English. Coursework in Spanish for credit toward the Spanish major or minor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, LALS, PLUR, SPAN, WGSS.

MLAL 3001. THE ITALIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE IN LITERATURE AND FILM. (4 Credits)

The Italian American experience has found cogent and compelling expression in numerous works of fiction, poetry, drama and cinema. The rich documents left by immigrants from the earliest times to the contemporary writers provide a rich body for exploring styles, achievements, traditions and, generally, the life of Italian Americans and their changing status and civic concerns. The course discusses the representation of Italian American identity, stereotypes, family relationships, sexual mores, political and social values. The contribution of Italian Americans to the various art forms of the American world will be highlighted. The discussions will include theories from the most recent ethnic studies. Authors and critics to be studied are Di Donato, Tusiani, Mangione, Ardizzone, Puzo, Barolini, Stella, Gardaphè, Marazzi, Scorsese, among others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MLAL 3007. SPANISH LINGUISTICS. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the linguistic study of the Spanish language. The course surveys the formal domains of linguistics - including phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, and sociolinguistics – with an exclusive focus on the Spanish language. The course is taught in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

MLAL 3010. POLITICS AND POETRY IN THE MIDDLE AGES: THE RISE OF VERNACULAR CULTURE IN THE MEDITERRANEAN. (4 Credits)

This course analyses the development of vernacular culture and literature in the Mediterranean during the Middle Ages. Students will explore the political, historical, and linguistic context within which vernacular languages and cultures emerged between the XI-XIII centuries. Following Dante’s On Vernacular language - the first linguistic and poetic “map” of the Middle Ages- students will retrace the interrelations linking the Italian vernacular culture to the other traditions within the “romance” domain in the Mediterranean. With the imperial court of Frederick II in Sicily, the Pope in Rome, and the most powerful centers of trade and finance in Florence and other Italian city-states, the Italian peninsula provides a special standing point for the analysis of the relationship between poetry and power in different political contexts: the court of the emperor Frederick II and the powerful communal republics in center and northern Italy will be the focus of the course. Among the texts, authors, and movements included are: Provencal and Italian trobadours; the “Sicilian School” and the encyclopedic culture at the court of the emperor Frederick II (poetry, law, philosophy, medicine, astronomy, translations); religious literature and the Tuscan School of poetry (S. Francis, Jacopone da Todi, Guittone d’Arezzo); the “New Sweet Style” (Guido Guinizzelli, Guido Cavalcanti, Dante Alighieri). Fulfills the Advanced Literature requirement of the core and satisfies the requirement of Minor and Major in Italian. Cross-listed with MVST and COLI. Taught in English with coursework in Italian for credit in Italian. ITAL 2500 or ITAL 2561 or Instructor's Permission Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITAL, MLL, MVST.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 or ITAL 2561.

MLAL 3022. PRINCIPLES OF WORLD LANGUAGE LEARNING AND TEACHING. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce undergraduate students to a variety of frameworks that inform good practices for foreign language learning and teaching. We will examine the implications of different views of the learner and the learning process on the teaching of world languages. We will discuss how different teaching methodologies respond to different learning contexts, needs, and purposes and we will be actively engaged in connecting theories and actual teaching practices with respect to various levels of instruction. Taught in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

MLAL 3040. CHINESE LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

This course will familiarize students with major topics concerning Chinese language and society. We will explore the ways in which the language helps shape and is shaped in turn by the social, cultural, historical and political situations in China. Conducted in English. Coursework in Chinese for credit toward the Mandarin Chinese minor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

MLAL 3043. MODERN CHINESE LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

Survey of modern Chinese literature: this course will introduce students to major writers and canonical works from China’s modern period. We will discuss formal aesthetics, historical contexts, cultural upheaval and transformation, gender and class relations, family and kinship, as well as dialogues between national and regional imaginaries. All readings in English (students may opt to read in Chinese). No previous knowledge of China or Chinese required. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GLBL.

MLAL 3045. WOMEN IN CHINESE LITERATURE AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

ln this course we will examine issues of gender and representation in the context of Chinese society. We will explore the roles that women have played in China, how women are portrayed in various Chinese texts and genres - poetry short stories and novels, and films - and how Chinese women write about themselves and others. This course is taught inEnglish and no prior knowledge of Chinese is required. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, INST.

MLAL 3047. CHINESE CULTURE: TRADITIONS AND TRANSFORMATION. (4 Credits)

This course provides a broad introduction to Chinese culture from earliest times to the contemporary period. Students will engage with diverse genres including philosophical texts, Buddhist sutras, folklore, modern fictions, films and visual materials. We will explore topics on Chinese culture, including philosophical and religious systems, the status of art, gender roles, encounters between tradition and modernity, and legacies of Maoism. All readings in English (students may opt to read in Chinese). No previous knowledge of China or Chinese required. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, GLBL.

MLAL 3057. MEDIEVAL GERMAN LITERATURE: POTIONS, PASSIONS, PLAYERS, AND PRAYERS. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the rich literary and cultural heritage of Medieval Germany. The texts will all be read in English translation, but we will go over some passages in their original languages in class to catch some of the flavor of the Medieval German. Topics covered will include pre-Christian charms, the epic of the Nibelungs, love poetry, and urban carneval plays. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, GERM, MVST.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

MLAL 3060. MAGIC AND REALITY IN RUSSIAN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

Explores the traditions of Mysticism and the Fantastic in Russian literature. By analyzing magical motifs both as an exploration of the inexplicable and as an artistic means to counter social and ideological oppression, students will develop their understanding of different periods and aspects of Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet culture. Selected readings include works by Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Bulgakov, Petrushevkaya and Pelevin, among others. Conducted in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, INST, OCST.

MLAL 3065. DOSTOEVSKY. (4 Credits)

This course explores the oeuvre of Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (1821-1881), one of the greatest Russian novelists and world literature’s most insightful psychologists. Select texts include: The Gambler, The Idiot, The Adolescent, The Brothers Karamazov (dubbed by Freud “the most magnificent novel ever written”), several short stories, etc. TAUGHT IN ENGLISH. May count toward Minor in Russian if course work is completed in Russian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: OCST, RUSS.

MLAL 3070. RUSSIAN VISIONS: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN RUSSIAN LITERATURE AND ART IN MID-19TH/EARLY 20TH CENTURY. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary course explores the interaction between the Russian visual arts and Russian literature during two artistically flourishing periods of Russian and early Soviet history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The first is the rise of the daguerreotype in Russia (and photojournalism shortly thereafter) in conjunction with the rise of the Natural School in Russian literature in the 1840s. The second is the pinnacle of the Russian avant-garde (1917-1932: and visual art from several movements such as Constructivism, Zaum, Russian Cubism and Cubo-Futurism) in conjunction with the brilliant work of dissident Soviet writers during this time. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, OCST, RUSS.

MLAL 3080. TOLSTOY, DOSTOEVSKY AND THE MEANING OF LIFE AND DEATH. (4 Credits)

We will read two works – one large book on Russian family life, one short meditation on death – from each of Russia’s two most famous authors: Leo Tolstoy and Fyodor Dostoevsky. We will read Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina (1878) and The Death of Ivan Ilych (1886) and Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov (1880) and The Dream of a Ridiculous Man (1877). Tolstoy and Dostoevsky are each profound psychologies and religious philosophers. While Tolstoy masters interpersonal and societal relations, Dostoevsky illuminates the extreme ranges of the human psyche. Tolstoy’s Levin in Anna Karenina asks “What is the meaning of life?” and Dostoevsky’s Ivan Karamazov struggles to reconcile God’s creation with the suffering of innocent children. The two novels were written in close proximity of 4each other and bear fruitful comparisons. Tolstoy’s The Death of Ivan Ilych explores the mind of a prestigious court official who is terminally ill. Dostoevsky’s The Dream of a Ridiculous Man reveals the story of a man who dreams his own death. These two great authors are often pitted against each other, but Dostoevsky himself described Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina as “flawless,” and Tolstoy adored Dostoevsky’s religious teachings in The Brother’s Karamazov expressed through the character of Father Zosima. This course shows how the works of the great Russian writers compliment our understanding of life and death. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, OCST.

MLAL 3115. HISTORY AND THE NOVEL: DON QUIXOTE AND MODERN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

Examination of the fundamental character, role and value of the Quixote as the first "modern" novel, as a unique product of Western civilization, and of its immediate influence, imitation and development in other Western literatures and cultures. The evolution and absorption of the Quixote's Cervantine and Quixotic features by subsequent prominent writers of prose fiction (and drama) will also be analyzed in itself, as a novel, as a theory of the novel, and as a literary exposition of humanity and its values. Taught in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

MLAL 3200. MACHIAVELLI'S UTOPIA. (4 Credits)

In this course we will analyze The Prince as well as Machiavelli's creative work (e.g., his theatrical piece The Mandrake Root and his short story Belfagor. By adopting an interdisciplinary approach for the examination of both the historical and the artistic context in which Machiavelli lived, we will address the question of how and why The Prince was misinterpreted by Italian and European intellectuals and humanists of Machiavelli’s time, leading to a misperception of many of the text's core ideas in an historical moment in which Europe was steadily transforming itself into a domain of absolutism (we will read Reginald Pole, Innocent Gentillet, Erasmus, Montaigne, among others). We will retrieve the original cultural context in which Machiavelli wrote: a climate of strong limitation of political creativity and liberty, which lead Machiavelli to compose The Prince (1513 ca.) inspired by an utopian desire for a new leader who could reconcile all the contradictions of Italy. Course taught in English. Coursework in Italian for credit in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITAL.

MLAL 3202. ARIOSTO TO GALILEO: THE INVENTION OF MODERNITY IN RENAISSANCE ITALY. (4 Credits)

Ariosto and Galileo represent two chronological ends of a revolutionary intellectual period in the Italian Renaissance culture. Between the years 1516 (date of the first edition of Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso) and 1610 (date of edition of Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius), Italian civilization contributed significantly to the shaping of a new idea of reality. The course is dedicated to the study of this particular period in which masterpieces such as the Furioso, Torquato Tasso’s pastoral poem Aminta, and his epic poem Jerusalem Delivered, as well as Galileo’s works (Sidereus Nuncius, Copernican Letters, Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems) become the founding texts of a new realism that questioned and distrusted appearances and, by doing so, prepared the intellectual background where Galileo could develop his new scientific method and discover intellectual models useful for his innovative comprehension of the natural world (with strong implications about the separation of theology and science). Recent scholarship insists on the deep influence that literary humanism had on Galileo’s mind who, no surprise, was a reader, a writer of literature and also a literary critic (for example he wrote about Ariosto and also an incomplete commentary on Tasso’s Jerusalem). The course is therefore dedicated to the study of the relationship of literature to the History of Science with close reading of the above mentioned works and also following an interdisciplinary approach devoted to the exploration of the artistic civilization around Ariosto, Tasso and Galileo. Taught in English with coursework in Italian for credit in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

MLAL 3210. ISLAM AND ITALY. (4 Credits)

From Medieval Sicily to the Renaissance and the modern world, the involvement of Arab culture in Italy has been both varied and enduring in nature. This course examines interaction between these two cultures from the 900s to today. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

MLAL 3300. LITERATURES AND CULTURES OF MODERN ISRAEL. (4 Credits)

The course will explore major themes in modern Israeli literature, film, art, and popular culture. Among topics discussed will be the social and cultural dynamics of Israeli history and contemporary life, constructions of identity, questions of ethnicity, nationality, gender, war, and conflict, and more. Texts and assignments will be in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

MLAL 3307. GERMANY AND MIGRATION. (4 Credits)

Migrants have played a role in many countries' culture. Germans started coming to the U.S. in the 17th century, and about 17% of Americans have German ancestry. Migrants entered Germany starting around the turn of the 20th century, and today about 21% of Germany's population has a migration background. How do migrants assimilate and learn the language of their new country? What influences do migrants have on a country's culture and language? In the first part of the semester, we will examine the migration of Germans to the United States, and in the second part we will focus on migration into Germany. Taught in ENGLISH. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ASSC, COLI.

MLAL 3402. INTRODUCTION TO RUSSIAN DRAMA. (4 Credits)

this course examines the modern Russian theatrical tradition from the nineteenth century to the present and explores a range of plays that include works by Pushkin, Gogol, Ostrovsky, Chekhov, Bulgakov, Shvarts, Petrushevskaya, Pelevin, Grishkovets, among others. Conducted in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, OCST.

MLAL 3405. MASTERPIECES OF RUSSIAN FILM. (4 Credits)

Examining some of the most critically acclaimed works of Russian, Soviet, and post-Soviet cinema, students will gain an insight into a variety of historical, cultural, and social contexts through the creative lens of Dziga Vertov, Sergei Eisenstein, Andrei Tarkovsky, Alexander Sokurov, Kira Muratova, Larissa Shepitko, and other Russian-language directors. The course focuses on analyzing cinematic "texts" through critical watching, reading, thinking, and writing. Taught in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, OCST.

MLAL 3410. ARAB CINEMA: HISTORY AND CULTURAL IDENTITY. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, MEST.

MLAL 3440. ARABIC LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. (4 Credits)

A survey of Arabic literature from the 6th century A.D. to the present, this course will explore the development of the literary genres of the Arabic canon, while keeping a keen (and critical) eye on the political, cultural, religious and social circumstances that have accompanied – and, in many cases, given rise to – their development. Some of the questions the course will explore are: What is considered “literature” in the Arabic canon? What is the relationship between literature and politics? What impact has the Quran had on Arabic literature? What is the role of women in the Arabic literary tradition? What kind of dialogue has there been between Arabic and “Western” literatures? What is “commitment” in contemporary Arabic literature? Class discussions will be in English. All readings will be in English translation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GLBL, MEST.

MLAL 3442. ARAB CULTURE AND NEWS MEDIA. (4 Credits)

The American news media portrays the Arab world as one of endless political upheaval and repression, with a culture shaped strictly by Islam. This course broadens students' understanding of contemporary Arab societies through the study of Arab TV/radio/print/internet news, propaganda and cartoons from those sanctioned by government-run outletsto those of national-resistance activists, democracy-promoting movements and even jihadists. The news is used in this course to investigate cultural issues, including authority and decision-making, religion, gender and family dynamics, in Arab societies as well as to explore American-Arab relations. Through a study of media, students can compare Arab culture as portrayed by American media and American culture as portrayed by the media in Arab world. The class is conducted in English, with materials in English and Arabic with English subtitles. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, MEST.

MLAL 3450. THE ARAB SPRING IN ARABIC LIT. (4 Credits)

A suwey of Arabic literature from 2011 to the present, this course will explore the development of tfie literary gertres of the Arab Spring in the Middle East. What is the relationship between literature and politics? We will read short stories, poetry graphic novels, blogs,and Facebook pages ol prominent literary and social figures, redefining and modernizing the notion of what is literature in order to try and workout whether the revolulion could have been predicted, and how it took place. Class discussions will be in English. All readings will be in English translation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, INST, PJST.

MLAL 3474. THE ARAB ISRAELI CONFLICT: CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES. (4 Credits)

The Arab-Israeli conflict is one of the longest and most controversial conflicts in the world. Through careful analysis of Israeli literature and film, this course provides a nuanced cultural and political history of Arab-Israeli relations. Our texts emphasize the dialectic relationship between art and politics, representation and history, as well as aesthetic and ethics. The course thus explores the effect of art on politics, and the effect of politics on art. Specifically, we examine how art is instrumental in producing 1) "imagined communities" with stable national identities and 2) political resistance that disrupts these hegemonic metanarratives. We also consider the internal dynamics of Israeli society as represented in literature and film, especially tensions between the Jewish-Arab, Ashkenazi-Mizrahi, and religious-secular communities. By analyzing canonical and more contemporary stories, poems, and films (including those by S. Yizhar, Amos Oz, Said Kashua, Mahmoud Darwish, among others) we explore the dialectic between art and politics in Israeli society since 1948.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, JWST, MEST, MLL.

MLAL 3475. OPPOSITIONAL THOUGHT IN ISLAMIC LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This class will explore various schools of thought and practice in Islamic liteature. Works will range from the writings of early Islamic scholars like Al-Ashari, Mutazila, Al-Ghazali, and Rumi to the resurgence of the literalist approach to Islamic scripture in the contemporary Arab world. The course will be taught in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

MLAL 3500. WRITING UNDER GERMAN CENSORSHIP: A CULTURE OF BANNED BOOKS. (4 Credits)

This course examines the politics of censorship of literature in German society during the twentieth century. Books, articles, pamphlets, and magazines have been classified threatening to the regime, they have been seized from libraries and bookstores across Germany, they have been burned on bonfires during nighttime parades, and they were eliminated from all media. Writers and creators have been infiltrated and observed, fined, jailed, tortured or killed in the name of governmental censorship. We will examine a range of systems and orchestrated campaigns of censorship of the Nazi regime aswell as the government of the former German Democratic Republic. We will look at the implementation of censorship, and we will read important authors who have been banned or self-censored within the larger context of twentieth-century Germany. Taught in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

MLAL 3504. STUDY TOUR: BERLIN TALES: GERMANY'S KIEZ. (4 Credits)

This course will take us on a journey-a journey that will start in the urban sphere of New York City in a classroom reading historical texts and cultural narratives on the metropolis Berlin. But during Spring Break 2012, we will also have a truly unique opportunity of traveling together to discover the actual streets of Berlin, the center of modernity in Germany itself. We will read authors who present conflicting views and engaging perspectives on four distinct Berlins: The Jewish Berlin of the Weimar Repyblic, Berlin during the Third Reich, the City as the Capital of East Germany, and lastly, Berlin as booming Metropolis of the 21st Century. And together, we will visit Berlin to discover different life styles, the pulse of minorities, and the nostalgic feeling of Ostaglie or present day Berlin. TAUGHT IN ENGLISH. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

MLAL 3535. BUILDING THE IDEAL CITY. ETHICS AND ECONOMICS FOUNDATIONS OF REALIZABLE UTOPIAS. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the investigation of the role that economic concepts such as profit, work, utility, and exchange play in defining the ideal city as a realizable political project. Students will investigate ethical and economic concepts and their interrelation in the debate on the best form of State and government that developed from antiquity to modern American utopias.

Attribute: ALC.

MLAL 3600. WOMEN'S VOICES IN GERMAN AND AUSTRIAN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the role of women in German and Austrian society in particular on literary and theoretical texts produced by women in the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. To articulate their ideas and to establish themselves on a public stage, women writers have used different forms of expression over the course of time such as letters, diaries, poems, novellas, political pamphlets, theoretical articles, dramas and essays. We will study the different genres by exploring questions of gender, authorship, personal, national and transnational identities, and the politicization of the private sphere within the cultural context of Germany and Austria. By analyzing literary texts of authors like Lou Andreas-Salome , Else Lasker-Schuler, Anna Seghers, Ingeborg Bachmann, Marlen Haushofer, Monika Maron, Herta Muller and Julia Franck and drawing on visual arts, film, and feminist theory, we will still situate German-speaking women writers with a global context. Topics to be considered in relation to the literary texts are women as writers and artists, sexuality and bodies, friendship and intimacy, politics and political activism, as well as writing and identities. TAUGHT IN ENGLISH. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GERM, WGSS.

MLAL 3607. TOPICS IN MULTILINGUALISM. (4 Credits)

This course discusses the historical and contemporary underpinnings of multilingualism in the globalized world. The course content includes discussion of empirical social and cognitive research on multilingualism as well as multilingual language education and policy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, GLBL, LALS.

MLAL 3624. MUSIC AND NATION IN THE ARAB WORLD. (4 Credits)

Though music is a domain of individual expression, it may alos reflect or respond to social, cultural and historic influences of a time and place. This course explores the ways in which music acts as an exprssion of national identity in the Arab world. It considers this relationship in a region where the idea of nation has multiple meanings, and where conflicting factors such as regional diversity and the notion of pan-Arabism exists. Specifically, the course focuses on how particular types of music, including the Aleppian, Waslah, Al-Qasida al-ghinaiy, and Al-Muwashah, have affected the development and embodiment of national identity in the 20th century. Course materials are presented in English, however students of Arabic language are encouraged to Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, MEST.

MLAL 3701. VILLAINS, VAMPS AND VAMPIRES: AN INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN CINEMA. (4 Credits)

Film is a powerful art form and means of communications. The messages embedded in the mesmerizing images often escape us, and we miss the opportunity to understand something about the culture that produced it. With this class we will attempt to explore 20th – and 21st Century ideas and concepts of German identity, culture, history and politics through German film analysis and readings around the topics and genres of villains, vamps and vampires. Each of these genres deal with our most primal nature and its fears: our nightmares, our vulnerability, our alienation our revulsions, our terror of the unknown, our fear of death, our loss identity, and last but not least our often ambiguous relationship to power and sexuality. With this course we intend to read German Cinema through these genres from its inception in the 1890’s until the present. It includes an examination of early expressionist and avant-garde films from the classic German cinema of the Weimar era, fascist cinema, postwar rubble films, New German Cinema from the classic German Cinema from the 1970’s, post 1989 heritage films as well as 21st Century German Films. TAUGHT IN ENGLISH. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, AMST, COLI.

MLAL 3710. FIN-DE SIECLE VIENNA: KLIMT, CAFES, AND CEMETERIES. (4 Credits)

Vienna at the turn of the 19th to the 20th century was an important center for intellectuals, artists, architects, the opera and literature as well as the sciences not only for Austria, but for the rising movement of Modernism in Europe at large. In Vienna, this intellectual ferment was played out less in universities or elite salons but rather in the cafes and artist studios of their time. There, the Viennese celebrated life and pleasure but also concerned themselves with death quite happily; they sing and write about it, play with it and build monuments to it. This course will examine various aspects of the Viennese contribution to the birth of Modernism and address the most important authors and artists of their time. We will discuss Jugendstil and Impressionism, the architecture of Adolf Loos and Otto Wagner, authors like Arthur Schnitzler, Robert Musil, and Hugo von Hofmannsthal, and give an introduction to the psychoanalysis of Sigmund Freud, whose "Interpretation of Dreams" and "Studies on Hysteria" left their mark on the period. But most excitingly of all during spring break of 2015, we will also have the truly unique opportunity of traveling together to discover the actual streets of Vienna, visit the "Zentralfriedhof" and marvel at Gustav Klimt’s "Beethovenfries" at the "Wiener Secession". Taught in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, INST.

MLAL 3800. CLOISTERS, CASTLES, AND KINGS: MEDIEVAL BAVARIA. (4 Credits)

This course will explore Medieval secular and church history as it manifested itself in the literature and culture of Bavaria. Includes a study abroad component. Spring break visit to Regensburg and Munich. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GERM, MVST.

MLAL 3820. MEMORY AND IDENTITY IN MODERN ITALY. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the historical and cultural process of nation building in the 19th- and 20th-century Italy. Particular attention will be paid to the formation and conceptualization of an Italian national identity as presented or questioned in literary works by Bufalino, Consolo, Levi, Morante, Sciascia and Tomasi di Lampedusa, and films by Blasetti, Rossellini, Scola, the Taviani brothers and Visconti. Conducted in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

MLAL 3822. THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the cycle of stories, known as the Arabian Nights or 1001 Nights. In the first half of the course we will read some of the major tale cycles and study the relevant historical and cultural contexts. In the second half of the course we will consider a number of adaptations- novels, plays, and films- that have been inspired by the Nights. Class discussion will be in English. All readings will be in English and in Englsih Translation.] Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, MEST.

MLAL 3999. TUTORIAL. (3 Credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

MLAL 4005. QUEER THEORY AND THE AMERICAS. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

MLAL 4010. ANNI DI PIOMBO / YEARS OF LEAD: CULTURE, POLITICS, AND VIOLENCE. (4 Credits)

The period from the late 1960s to the early 1980s in Italy, known as “anni di piombo” or years of lead, was characterized by intense social and political unrest, and terrorist activities. The 1969 bombing in Piazza Fontana in Milan and the 1980 bombing of the train station in Bologna serve as the tragic bookends of a decade of political violence culminating in the kidnapping and murder of Aldo Moro by the Red Brigades in 1978. In this course, we will study these years by closely examining the cultural production of the time – literature, film and other media. We will pay particular attention to the social and political motivations underlying extremist activism, both left- and right-wing, as represented in literature and the popular press, and to writers’, filmmakers’ and intellectuals’ diverse responses to politically motivated violence, whether to criticize the terrorists themselves or to question the state-sponsored “strategy of tension”. We will also discuss the ways in which these experiences have been revisited and reimagined in recent years, and their relevance for today’s Italy. Taught in English with texts in Italian and English translation. Coursework in Italian for credit toward the Italian major or minor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, EP4, ITAL, VAL.

MLAL 4347. LATINOS: FACT AND FICTION. (4 Credits)

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine the experiences of Latin Americans and Latinos. It employs literature and history to introduce students to the benefits of using multiple ways of acquiring knowledge. It then relies on other academic areas such as art and sociology to reinforce its interdisciplinary. As a capstone course, it allows students to incorporate disciplines from their own academic foundation. It covers topics such as politics, social justice, race, gender, and identity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, ICC, LALS.

MLAL 4999. TUTORIAL. (2,4 Credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

MLAL 8999. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (4 Credits)