Theology (THEO)

THEO MTNC. MAINTENANCE-THEOLOGY. (0 Credits)

THEO 0912. REQUIREMENT PREPARATION. (0 Credits)

For Ph.D. and Master's students, registration necessary to maintain continuous enrollment while preparing for a milestone requirement, such as comprehensive exam, Master's thesis, or dissertation submission.

Attribute: Z410.

THEO 0914. REQUIREMENT PREPARATION IN SUMMER. (0 Credits)

For Ph.D. and Master's students, registration necessary to maintain continuous enrollment while preparing for a milestone requirement during the summer. (e.g., to be used by Ph.D. students after the oral examination/defense and prior to receiving the degree).

THEO 0922. PHD COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION PREPARATION. (0.5 Credits)

THEO 0930. PHD COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION-THEOLOGY. (0 Credits)

THEO 0934. MASTER'S COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION PREPARATION. (0.5 Credits)

THEO 0936. MASTER'S COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION-THEOLOGY. (0 Credits)

THEO 0938. MASTER'S CAPSTONE-THEOLOGY. (0 Credits)

Required interdisciplinary capstone project for all M.A. students in Theology.

THEO 0950. PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT. (1 Credit)

THEO 0960. PROPOSAL ACCEPTANCE. (3 Credits)

THEO 0970. Dissertation Mentoring-Theology. (0 Credits)

The Theology Ph.D. student is required to register for Dissertation Mentoring, which has a 3 credit fee, the semester after the student's proposal is accepted.

Attribute: Z407.

THEO 1000. FAITH AND CRITICAL REASON. (3 Credits)

An introductory theology course designed to acquaint students with the analytical study of religion and religious experience, and to give them some critical categories of evaluating the history of theological discourse. The academic study of some of the forms, concepts, experience, and theological formulations found in Christianity and various other traditions will be introduced.

Attributes: FRPT, REST, THFR.

THEO 1006. SIN AND SALVATION IN MEDIEVAL THEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

This Manresa seminar will provide a survey of Christian understandings of sin and salvation in the medieval West, c. 400-1500. Theologians whose writings on these topics will be considered include Augustine, Anselm, Peter Lombard, Thomas-Aquinas, Bonaventure, John Duns Scotus and Martin Luther.

Attribute: MANR.

THEO 1007. SINNERS, SAINTS, AND STORIES. (3 Credits)

This course will explore both the ways that biblical narratives have informed the traditional self-understanding of the western world and the ways in which that self-understanding has been complicated in the modern era. Of particular interest for this course is 1) the different biblical presentations of what it means to be a “sinner” or a “saint,” 2) the further reflection on these narratives and topics found in post-biblical literature, and 3) the competing narratives that may be found in the modern world.

Attributes: FRPT, MANR, THFR.

THEO 1010. RESTLESS HEART: QUEST. (3 Credits)

Many writers throughout history, have described their personal quest for the transcendent. Writers-both classical and popular, devout believers and atheeists, some reverent, some vulgar- describe this quest as a matter of first losing and then finding oneself. This seminar will explore the search of several of these writers though their autobiographies.

Attributes: EP1, FRPT, MANR, THFR.

THEO 1050. SYRIAC LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE I. (3 Credits)

This course is part of a two-semester introduction to Syriac, a dialect belonging to the Aramaic language branch. The first semester will introduce the scripts, cover grammatical foundations, and expose students from early on to the reading of texts. The second semester will be mostly spent reading Syriac literature, but some time will be devoted to select special topics in Syriac grammar. It is possible to take the first semester only.

Attributes: MVST, OCST, REST.

THEO 1800. INTERNSHIP. (1 Credit)

THEO 1999. TUTORIAL. (1 Credit)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

Attribute: GLBL.

THEO 2800. INTERNSHIP-THEOLOGY. (2 Credits)

THEO 2999. TUTORIAL. (1-2 Credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

Prerequisite: THEO 1000.

THEO 3100. INTRODUCTION TO OLD TESTAMENT. (3 Credits)

History, literature and religion of ancient Israel.

Attributes: MEST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1008.

THEO 3102. BOOK OF GENESIS. (4 Credits)

This fascinating and influential book of the Bible will be studied for its historical origins, literary forms, and theological ideas. In addition,the course will address the impact of the stories in Genesis on the development of western culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3105. THE TORAH. (3 Credits)

Study of different types of literature found in the first five books of the Hebrew Bible and of the methods for its interpretation. This course will focus on the process by which this material moved from oral tradition to written literature to sacred scripture in Israel.

Attributes: JWST, MEST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1002 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3120. THE PROPHETS. (3 Credits)

A study of prophecy in the Bible from its origin in the religious practices of the ancient Near East to the final literary shape of biblical books. Moses, Elijah, Amos, Hosea, Jeremiah, Isaiah and Ezekiel are among the figures to be studied.

Attributes: MEST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1002 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3200. INTRODUCTION TO NEW TESTAMENT. (3 Credits)

Christianity began as a Jewish movement. Jesus' followers worshipped the God of Israel and ordered their lives according to the Torah and other sacred texts. As Christians separated themselves from the synagogue, they began composing texts proclaiming the Gospel. This course will engage questions about the origin, development and authority of the Christian canon while reading parts of the New Testament in the historical context of first-century Hellenistic Judaism and the religious context of the canon.

Attributes: AMCS, CLAS, MVST, REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1002 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3207. THE FIRST THREE GOSPELS. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the gospels of Mark, Matthew and Luke. The formation of the gospels, the distinguishing characteristics of each, and the life and teachings of the historical Jesus.

Attribute: STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1002 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3212. GOSPEL OF JOHN. (3 Credits)

Literary and theological analysis of the fourth gospel; special attention to the theme of personal revelation in Jesus Christ, the motif of misunderstanding and the thematic unity of the gospel as a whole.

Attributes: AMCS, CLAS, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1002 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3250. JESUS IN HISTORY AND FAITH. (3 Credits)

A study of the early Christian understanding of Jesus' life and ministry as this understanding is expressed in the Gospels, and of the so-called problem of the "historical Jesus" which issues from a critical reading of these texts. This course will cover several divergent readings of Gospel texts by contemporary scholars.

Attribute: STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1002 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3301. CHRISTIAN TEXTS IN CONTEXT. (3 Credits)

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Attributes: CLAS, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1002 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3310. EARLY CHRISTIAN WRITINGS. (3 Credits)

A selective study of the writing of prominent Christian theologians from Justin Martyr to Augustine, concentrating on early beliefs concerning God, Christ, the Church and the sacraments.

Attributes: CLAS, MEST, MVST, OCST, REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1007 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3314. ST. AUGUSTINE OF HIPPO. (3 Credits)

A study of the life and thought of St. Augustine (354-431). Particular attention is given to his early philosophical writings, the Confessions, and his teaching on sin and grace. Students read Augustine's works in translation and write several short papers.

Attributes: CLAS, MVST, OCST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1004 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1000 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1003.

THEO 3316. BYZANTINE CHRISTIANITY. (3 Credits)

Historical and critical study of classic authors and texts in the Orthodox tradition including: Basil of Caesarea, John Chrysostom, John Climacus, John of Damascus, and Gregory Palamas.

Attributes: MEST, MVST, OCST, REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3320. AUGUSTINE, AQUINAS, AND LUTHER. (3 Credits)

This course provides a historical introduction to the life and thought of three of the most significant and influential theologians in the history of Christianity. The course will be divided into three units, one per theologian, and the general rubrics wilthin each unit will be "Faith and Reason" and "Nature and Grace."

Attributes: MVST, REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3330. MEDIEVAL THEOLOGY TEXTS. (3 Credits)

Historical and critical study of classic theological texts of Augustine, Pseudo Dionysius, Anselm, Bonaventure and Thomas Aquinas. Doctrine of God, the human person and Christ; relation of theology and philosophy.

Attributes: MVST, OCST, REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3332. CHRISTIANS, MUSLIMS, JEWS IN THE MEDIEVAL PERIOD. (3 Credits)

This Sacred Texts and Traditions course explores theological writings from Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Middle Ages. We will explore moments of both inter-religious conflict and peaceful co-existence, and we'll interrogate what this complex, distant history can teach us about possibilities of mutual understanding among members of Christian, Islamic, and Jewish faiths today.

Attributes: JWST, MVST, OCST, REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3340. CHRISTIAN MYSTICAL TEXTS. (3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to classic texts from the Christian mystical tradition with a primary focus on their close interpretation and analysis. Broader topics may include the nature of religious experience, explorations of the category of “mysticism” itself, gender and mysticism, and the interpretive issues at stake in comparing mystical texts across time and culture. Depending on instructor, course may focus on mystical texts from one particular period in the history of Christianity, or it may range from the patristic, medieval, modern, and/or contemporary periods. This course counts as core course in the Sacred Texts and Traditions serious.

Attributes: EP3, MVST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3345. THE BOOK OF REVELATION. (3 Credits)

The course includes a close reading of the final book in the Christian New Testament with special attention to contemporary biblical scholarship as well as various interpretations offered in times of crisis throughout Christian history.

Attributes: MVST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3360. REFORMATION TEXTS. (3 Credits)

This course will examine major Protestant and Catholic texts from the sixteenth century with attention to their religious, social and theological context and their importance for their respective ecclesial communities.

Attributes: EP3, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3361. PROTESTANT TEXTS. (3 Credits)

An exploration of major Protestant texts from the Reformation to the present, focusing on themes that have been especially prominent in Protestant Christian thought, e.g. sources of revelation, justification, ecclesiology, the role of images/material objects in worship, Christianity's relationship to culture, etc. Students will be introduced to major Protestant figures and movements within Protestant theology through careful reading of significant theological texts. The course will focus especially on texts from the 18-20th centuries, concluding with an exploration of theological diversity within contemporary Protestantism.

Attributes: REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3375. AMERICAN RELIGIOUS TEXTS. (3 Credits)

A critical and contextual reading of classical texts in American Religions History, focusing on diverse traditions and the crucial importance of religious perspectives to American culture, society, and self understanding.

Attributes: AMCS, AMST, PLUR, REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3390. CHURCH IN CONTROVERSY. (3 Credits)

A study of the Catholic Church's written responses to some of the major controversies and secular ideologies in the modern world. Some of these include the rationalism of the Enlightenment, 19th-century liberalism and nationalism, the varieties of socialism and various forms of 20th century totalitarianism.

Attributes: AMCS, REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3542. CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING. (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to modern Catholic social teaching. Major papal and conciliar documents will be read and critically examined from various Christian and non-Christian perspectives. Their relation to contemporary social issues will be explored.

Attributes: PJST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3546. THE BIBLE AND SOCIAL JUSTICE. (3 Credits)

A study of social justice in the Hebrew and Christian scriptures that involves historical, literary, theological, and ethical interpretations. Students will explore key biblical texts that address themes such as poverty, war, justice, power, and marginalization in historical context, within a history of interpretation, and in light of contemporary practice and theory.

Attribute: STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3610. CHRIST IN WORLD CULTURES. (3 Credits)

At the center of the Christian tradition stands the person of Jesus Christ. Yetfrom a global perspective, Christianity takes many forms in its many contexts. This course examines the ways in which the Christian faith interacts with diverse world cultures and asks the central question, how do cultural differences shape contemporary interpretations of Jesus as the Christ?.

Attributes: AMCS, GLBL, INST, LALS, REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3620. GREAT CHRISTIAN HYMNS. (3 Credits)

This course will examine the poetry of Christian hymnody, beginning with the New Testament to the present, in order to unpack the rich and divergent theology expressed through its language and symbol, metaphor and doxology.

Attributes: AMCS, MVST, REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3655. The Journey of Faith: Autobiography as Sacred Text. (3 Credits)

Spiritual autobiography carries the lifeblood of religious experience. Through the reading of selected autobiographies, this course provides an inter-religious study of the personal quest for the transcendent.

Attributes: REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3700. SCRIPTURES OF THE WORLD. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the inspired writings that have molded the religious life of humankind.

Attributes: MEST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3711. SACRED TEXTS OF THE MIDEAST. (3 Credits)

First, an introduction to selected sacred literature of Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Israel, with attention to the social and historical contexts of the writings. Then, a similar consideration of selected readings from the New Testament of Christianity and the Mishnah and Talmud of Judaism. Finally a study of the Qur'an, the rise of Islam, and some early Muslim writings.

Attributes: GLBL, INST, JWST, MEST, MVST, OCST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3713. CLASSIC JEWISH TEXTS. (3 Credits)

An exploration of Jewish beliefs through close readings of the Bible and post-Biblical Jewish texts (Mishnah, Talmud, midrash, liturgy). The course will focus on Jewish methods of biblical interpretation, legal discussion, and the relationships between texts, practice and theology in Jewish tradition.

Attributes: GLBL, JWST, MEST, REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3715. CLASSIC ISLAMIC TEXTS. (3 Credits)

This course explores the sacred texts of Islam including the Quran, and Hadith, medieval philosophical, liturigical and legal texts.

Attributes: GLBL, INST, MEST, MVST, REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3720. HINDU LITERATURE AND ETHICS. (3 Credits)

This course involves a study of the four aims of life (purushartha) in Hinduism: kama (enjoyment), artha (material gain), dharma (sacred law), and moksha (liberation). Readings, drawn from a variety of classic and modern Hindu texts, will be viewed in their historical contexts as developments in the evolution of Hinduism.

Attributes: GLBL, INST, REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3724. CLASSIC BUDDHIST TEXTS. (3 Credits)

This course is an in-depth study of the Buddhist textual tradition starting with the early sectarian canon in South Asia and progressing through Chinese Buddhism to Japan, with a strong emphasis on Zen Buddhism. We will explore these religious texts in terms of their historical, cultural and artist contexts.

Attributes: GLBL, INST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3725. BUDDHISM IN AMERICA: A MULTIMEDIA INVESTIGATION. (3 Credits)

This course traces the history of Buddhism in the United States from the nineteenth century to the present. It asks whether Buddhism in America is a single object of study, and whether we should understand it as a “religion.” It further explores different techniques and media at our disposal for considering the primary concerns of American Buddhists (using films, podcasts, etc.)

Attribute: STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1002 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3728. BUDDHIST MEDITATION. (3 Credits)

THEO 3731. JAPANESE RELIGIONS: TEXTS AND ARTS. (3 Credits)

This course is an in-depth study of Japanese religions and literary compositions of enduring influence, including examples of Japanese poetry, drama, koans, and manga. The course will focus on those relevant ritual, cosmological, and stereological aspects of Japanese religion that manifest themselves in these cultural landmarks.

Attributes: GLBL, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3785. SPIRITUAL EXERCISES AND CULTURE. (3 Credits)

This course will be a comparative study of spiritual exercises across religions and cultures. Beginning with the exercises of Ignatius of Loyola, we proceed to the reception of his exercises in diverse global Christian contexts, feminist theology, and modern psychology. We then study lesser-known Christian spiritual exercises and their relation to Ignatius. Working backward, the course then turns to the ancient Mediterranean exercises that gave birth to Christian exercises.We conclude by studying spiritual exercises in religions and spiritualities beyond Christianity. Questions about comparative theological method will surface throughou.

Attribute: STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1002.

THEO 3790. VISION AND FAITH. (3 Credits)

Vision and Faith will compare how the visual arts and faith both have the potential to open us out beyond ourselves. How are the two experiences alike, how are they different, and how can (should?) the enhance each other? The course will be structured around readings and visits to gallery and museum exhibitions.

Attribute: STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1004 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1000 or HPRH 1401 or HPLC 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010.

THEO 3822. THE BIBLE IN WESTERN CULTURE. (4 Credits)

Study of selected biblical narratives that have troubled readers and affected culture through the ages. Topic include theories of reading, effects of history on biblical interpretation, art as exegesis, the hidden influences of past readings. Texts include the stories of Adam and Eve, the sacrifice of Isaac, David and Bathsheba, Jonah, Jeremiah. Interpretations are studied in historical sequence to provide students with a model for investigating a biblical text of their own choosing. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP3, MEST, REST.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1004.

THEO 3826. WOMEN IN THE BIBLE. (4 Credits)

In this course, we will employ various traditional exegetical and recent feminist tools to examine figures from both the New and Old Testaments including Eve, Sarah, Hagar, Ruth, Elizabeth and the Samaritan women as well as figures from the extra-Biblical Apocrypha. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JWST.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3827. BIBLE AND HUMAN SEXUALITY. (4 Credits)

This course examines key biblical texts that have figured in discussions of human sexuality from antiquity to the present. In particular, it will explore how shifting paradigms of interpretation in different historical periods have informed the reading of the Bible in relation to sexual ethics, identity, and practice. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: WGSS.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1004.

THEO 3832. CHRISTIAN THOUGHT AND PRACTICE I. (4 Credits)

Christian Thought and Practice I surveys the variety of Christian thought and practice from the beginning of Christianity to the late antique period. The course aims to encourage a critical examination of such theological themes as; God, Chris, grace, church, sacraments and ethics. Topics will be situated within the broader historical study of social, economic, political and cultural forces. Students will engage a wide range of Christian texts, art, rituals and other artifacts including classical theology, sermons and literature. Engagement with traditional Christianity by everyday Christian men and women, reflected in such genres as memoirs, ethnography and historical writing will be studied, as well as influential philosophical critiques of Christianity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: OCST, REST.

Prerequisites: THEO 1003 or THEO 1000 or THEO 1009 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1008 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010.

THEO 3833. CHRISTIAN THOUGHT AND PRACTICE II. (4 Credits)

Christian Thought and Practice II surveys the variety of Christian thought and practice from the late antique period through the middle ages. The course aims to encourage a critical examination of such theological themes as God, Christ, grace, church, sacraments, and ethics. Topics will be situated within the broader historical study of social, economic, political and cultural forces. Students will engage a wide range of Christian texts, art, rituals, and other artifacts including classical theology, sermons, and literature. Engagement with traditional Christianity by everyday Christian men and women, reflected in such genres as memoirs, ethnography and historical writing will be studied, as well as influential philosophical critiques of Christianity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3834. CHRISTIAN THOUGHT AND PRACTICE III. (4 Credits)

Christian Thought and Practice III surveys the variety of Christian thought and practice from the Reformation to the present. The course aims to encourage a critical examination of such theological themes as God, Christ, grace, church, sacraments, and ethics. Topics will be situated within the broader historical study of social, economic, political, and cultural forces. Students will engage a wide range of Christian texts, art, rituals, and other artifacts including classical theology, sermons, and literature. Engagement with traditional Christianity by everyday Christian men and women, reflected in such genres as memoirs, ethnography and historical writing will be studied, as well as influential philosophical critiques of Christianity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1004.

THEO 3836. CAPPADOCIAN THEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

This course examines in detail the thought of the fourth-century Cappadocian Fathers (Basil the Great, Gregory Nazianzen, and Gregory of Nyssa). Themes include their development of the Orthodox doctrine of the Trinity and Christ as well as their attitudes toward Biblical exegesis, hagiography, and asceticism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: OCST.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1004.

THEO 3837. GOD AS TRINITY. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the reasons why Christians conceptualize God as Trinity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3840. THEISMS AND ATHEISMS. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1004.

THEO 3843. RELIGIOUS FAITH AND DOUBT IN WESTERN THOUGHT. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3847. LATINO/A THEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

The course focuses on the theology and spirituality of U.S. Latino/as. Special attention will be given to how this explicitly contextual theology accounts for the role of popular religiosity, ethnicity, gender, race, and class in its reflection on Christian theological themes. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: LALS, MEST, MVST, PLUR.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1004.

THEO 3849. ESCHATOLOGY. (4 Credits)

An introduction to Christian eschatology with a biblical, historical, and contemporary component. Surveys biblical, apocalyptic, and New Testament teachings and developments in patristic, medieval, reformation, and modern Christianity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3850. 20th CENTURY THEOLOGIANS. (4 Credits)

This course traces major shifts in the 20th century theology as it has engaged pressing issues of the modern world such as atheism/secularism; suffering; hermeneutics of history; ecumenism; gender equality; race and ethnicity; religious pluralism; and evolution. The course will study the method and ideas of a major theologian such as Karl Rahner, Gustavo Gutierrez, or Rosemary Radford Ruether on each selected issue, and then read others who have critiqued and enrich understandings in this area. Students will be encouraged to see how the meaning of God-Humanity-Christ-Church-World gets rethought and their relations reconfigured in light of each approach. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1004.

THEO 3852. LGBTQ ARTS AND SPIRITUALITY. (4 Credits)

A broad examination of LGBTQ affiliations and identities considered through history and across religious traditions. The course juxtaposes the vision of mystics with artistic vision, identifying common spiritual elements in both. The course will culminate in an examination of the contemporary arts of NYC as an example of LGBTQ spirituality. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: REST, WGSS.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3854. IGNATIAN SPIRITUALITY. (4 Credits)

As a Jesuit university, Fordham's vision and spirit is grounded in the life and lineage of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the sixteenth century founder of the Society of Jesus. Focusing upon a contemporary appropriation of classic texts, this course offers a historical-critical, hermeneutical, and theological engagement with selected texts by Ignatius, including his Spiritual Exercises, Constitutions, Autobiography, Spiritual Journal, and letters. Additionally, we will examine various methods of Ignatian contemplation, meditation, discernment of spirits, and discernment of God's will in our lives. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3855. ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS. (4 Credits)

Since the early twentieth century, enduring moral and theological questions of human relationality and responsibility-previously only applied to individuals and human communities-have expanded to include the environment. In this class we will chart the genesis of environmental ethics from a historical point of view; identify and analyze significant claims and developments in environmental philosophy, ethics, and theology, especially vis-a-vis insights from ecology; and assess the importance of notions of value and justice in the first decades of the 21st century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3856. INTRODUCTION TO BIOETHICS. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to contemporary bioethics topics through (a) an overview of different meta-ethical approaches to understanding moral status and personhood, b) discussion and readings on how these approaches can be applied to unraveling the complex threads of contemporary bioethics arguments related to the treatment/care/use of individuals, animals and the environment: and (c) introduction to the legal and social contexts in which bioethics public policies are framed. In addition to engaging a substantial amount of theological and philosophical literature, students will also be exposed to multidisciplinary perspectives (in the form of both texts and guest speakers) from disciplines such as biology, psychology, sociology, feminism, and ecology. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: BIOE, PJST, REST.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3857. THEOLOGIES OF SEXUALITY AND GENDER (Service Learning). (4 Credits)

This course examines Christian theologies of sexuality and gender, exploring both the historical roots and the contemporary implications of different ways of thinking theologically about what it means to be a sexed, gendered, and sexualized human being. A required service learning component will provide an opportunity for students to interogate the complex structures (ecclesial/theological, political, economic and otherwise) that shape the experiences and possibilities of sexual minorities in an urban metropolis in the 21st century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3858. GENDER AND ASCETICISM. (4 Credits)

‘Gender & Asceticism’ treats issues of sexuality and bodily discipline between gender and sex, images of male and female, monasticism, fasting, and voluntary poverty. Most examples will be taken from the literature and practices of Late Antiquity (pre-Middle Ages). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: OCST.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1004.

THEO 3860. CONTEMPORARY CONVERSATIONS IN THEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Conceived as a “capstone” course for the theology major/minor, this course examines recent methodological developments in the disciples of theology and religious studies with particular emphasis on their intersection with contemporary critical theory. Particular topics to be engaged may include hermeneutics, historiography, secularism, the human subject, gender/sexuality, and the problem of political and/or moral action. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3861. WORKS OF MERCY/WORK FOR JUSTICE. (4 Credits)

This course examines the debates about the difficulties people have in making a living and about the practices of charity(works of mercy) and the justice advocacy of individuals, religious communities and voluntary associations. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP3, PJST.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3865. ETHICS OF RELATIONSHIPS. (4 Credits)

The course examines how culture affects the relationships that constitute what it means to be human. Topics include human dignity and dating, the virtues of friendship, intimacy, and spirituality, God and gender, justice/ charity and financial responsibility, sexual ethics, marriage and family. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: EP3.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3870. RELIGION AS HUMAN EXPERIENCE. (4 Credits)

Religion as Human experience aims to foster a broad knowledge of religion as a dimension of human experience. Through a consideration of various types of religions experience in a variety of different cultural contexts, this course will also introduce students to a selection of thinkers who try to define, comprehend, or critique religion. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMCS, PJST.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008.

THEO 3871. RELIGION AND FILM. (4 Credits)

The study of faith and doubt portrayed in cinema. Students will view and analyze films that present struggles of the human spirit, the secular portrayal of the Christ-figure, the role of the secular "messiah" or hero in Western society, the conflict between religious and secular authority, and the dilemmas of moral choice. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008.

THEO 3873. JESUS AND WORLD RELIGIONS. (3 Credits)

An exploration of the identity and mission of Jesus Christ in comparison with founding figures of other religions.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3874. RELIGION IN AMERICA. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMCS, PLUR.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3876. MUSLIMS IN AMERICA. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the history and experience of Muslims in the United States from the time of the slave trade to the present day. Through a close analysis of both primary and secondary materials, students will explore the rich diversity of US Muslim communities and their multi-faceted contributions to the global ummah and the formation of an "American Islam". Particular emphasis will be given to the impact of 9/11 and the "war on terror" on the representations, challenges, and the experience of Muslims in America. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: MEST, PLUR.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3877. RELIGION AND THE AMERICAN SELF. (4 Credits)

A course in historical theology that examines the role of religion in the formation of American social and political culture. The course will utilize various interpretive approaches to uncover how the 'American self' is both the most religious and the most secular in the industrialized West. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: MEST, PLUR.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008.

THEO 3881. CHINESE RELIGIONS. (4 Credits)

Chinese Religions introduces students to "The Three Teachings" (san jiao): Confucianism ancestors, divination, and bodily health. The course models multiple strategies for understanding Chinese approach to bodily practice. Major themes include human responsibility to the family, human dependent Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, INST.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008.

THEO 3882. COMPARATIVE MYSTICISM. (3 Credits)

"This course frames questions about the possibilities of isolating religious practices as points of cross-cultural and inter-religious comparison through a thorough exploration of Greek, Syriac, and Russian Orthodox traditions of prayer in comparison with Islamic, Buddhist, Hindu, and Western Christian spiritual practices. In the course of this comparative study, we will consider the possibilities and challenges of cross cultural comparative study of religion, and in particular we will interrogate the critical imperative to distinguish “practice” from “dogma” as a basis for comparative studies."

Attributes: GLBL, OCST, REST.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1008 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1401.

THEO 3883. MEDICINE AND HEALING IN ISLAM. (4 Credits)

This course explores Muslim perceptions of health, disease, medicine and healing across time and space, and in conversation with the religious traditions of Islam. Through a focused set of topics and a variety of methodological approaches, students will investigate more broadly epistemologies of health, healing and disease, practical application of knowledge and wisdom, and cultural histories of the body. Specific topics will include medicine and the cosmos; health and the environment; astrology, magic and ritual; sex, childbirth and pediatrics; cosmetic surgeries and reproductive technologies; and perceptions of suffering and pain, disability, mental illness, and old age, as they are addressed in both medieval and modern contexts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP3, GLBL.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3954. APOCALYPTIC THEMES IN FILM. (3 Credits)

This course is a college level introduction to the use of apocalyptic terms, themes and rhetoric in contemporary films. Apocalyptic in religious writings is “crisis” literature. This assumption will be explained prior to surveying usage of apocalyptic in religious and secular films. Apocalyptic may have no religious implications. Students will develop a template of types of apocalyptic terms and usage as well as review film maker’s intentions.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 3960. RELIGION AND RACE IN AMERICA. (4 Credits)

This course explores the ways religion and race function in the American landscape as sources of both belonging and discrimination, in historical and contemporary perspectives. Special attention will be paid to theological discourses and religious communities as sites of both racism and race-justice. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, PJST, PLUR.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1008.

THEO 3961. RELIGION, SEX, AND CULTURE IN AMERICA SINCE 1700. (4 Credits)

This course explores the complex and shifting engagement among religion, sex, and culture in North America from the eighteenth century to the present. Its treats a variety of religious traditions and explores how faith communities defined sexuality and gender relations in theological and spiritual terms and, in turn, helped to shape approaches to sex and sexual morality in the broader American culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007.

THEO 3970. CATHOLICS IN AMERICA. (4 Credits)

History and culture of Spanish and French Catholicism in the colonial and post-colonial periods of the United States. Detailed study of English-speaking Catholicism from its beginnings to its present position. Relationships between Catholicism and American culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: PLUR.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008.

THEO 3993. WARTIME RELIGION IN U.S. HISTORY. (4 Credits)

This course explores American religion during the Civil War, World Wars I and II, the War in Vietnam, and the War in Iraq. The anxieties and passions of wartime open up dialogue on the "justice" of particular conflicts, but they also prompt reflection on more basic questions of human meaning, suffering, loss, and death, and the sources and boundaries of selfhood. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008.

THEO 3995. RELIGION AND THE AMERICAN SELF. (4 Credits)

A course in historical theology that examines the role of religion in the formation of American social and political culture. The course will utilize various interpretive approaches to uncover how the 'American self' is both the most religious and the most secular in the industrialized West. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: PLUR.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008.

THEO 3999. TUTORIAL. (3 Credits)

In this student-initiated program, the student may earn one additional credit by connecting a service experience to a course with the approval of the professor and the service-learning director.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1008.

THEO 4001. ART AND CHRISTIAN VALUES. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: SRVL.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008.

THEO 4005. WOMEN AND THEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

An examination of feminist/womanist approaches to the mystery of God. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMCS, EP4, PJST, SRVL, VAL, WGSS.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008.

THEO 4008. RELIGION AND ECOLOGY. (4 Credits)

A course to study the earth as a matter of ethical and religious concern. Starting with biblical texts and classical doctrines, students will analyze the resources of the Jewish/Christian traditions that value the natural world. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMCS, CORE, ENST, REST, STXT.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008.

THEO 4009. MEDIEVAL JERUSALEM. (4 Credits)

What has made Jerusalem so beloved to - and the object of continual strife for – Jews, Christians, and Muslims? This course will explore the ancient and medieval history of Jerusalem, from its Jebusite inhabitants before the time of King David through Suleiman’s construction of the modern city walls in the 1540s. Students will learn to analyze a variety of literature, through which we will explore the themes of sacred space, conquest, destruction and lament, pilgrimage and religious polemic. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, MEST, OCST.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008.

THEO 4010. DEATH AND DYING. (4 Credits)

An attempt to confront the reality of death, its practical consequences and its religious significance through D SEXUALITY (4.00 credits). A theology course that fulfills the senior values requirement in the college core. The course explores the theological interpretations of human sexuality. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: BIOE, SRVL, VAL.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008.

THEO 4011. THE NEW TESTAMENT AND MORAL CHOICES. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the principles of Christian living that emerge in the testimonies of Jesus and Paul as recorded in the New Testament and explore the ways in which they might apply these principles critically and responsibly in moral discernment of some of today's most debated and troublesome alternatives. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: SRVL, VAL.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1008.

THEO 4012. MORAL CHOICE OF THE FIRST CHRISTIANS. (3 Credits)

An exploration of how the first Christians made choices in all areas of life, including birth, sex, death, business, legal matters and politics. The course seeks to elicit a "grammar" of early Christian morals.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1008.

THEO 4013. RELIGION AND AMERICAN POLITICS. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary seminar explores the nexus of religion and American public life. After treating topics related to electoral politics (e.g. canidate religion, voter religion, "value voters," religious rhetoric), students will then engage a series of "hot topics" that encompass ( and often combine) both religious and political discourse. The goal is to provide students with two alternative, yet complementary methods of analyzing the intersection of religion and American politics- one from a political science perspective and one from a theological perspective. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMCS, AMST, ICC.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4020. FAITH THAT IMAGINES JUSTICE. (4 Credits)

Throughout the semester, we will explore a variety of reasons why "the arts" serve an increasingly important function in our contemporary culture where our ability to imagine and create "the good life" has become increasingly difficult given religious and cultural pluralism, isolated individualism, capitalist consumerism, and fragmenting tribalism. We will also examine the validity of the claim that religion/faith needs the arts and the arts needs religion/faith if either is to be authentic, relevant, vibrant, and socially efficacious. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: SRVL.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4025. FUTURE OF MARRIAGE 21ST CENTURY. (4 Credits)

An ethical examination of Christian marriage. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMCS, AMST, EP4, REST, VAL, WGSS.

Prerequisites: THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1000.

THEO 4027. THE ETHICS OF LIFE. (4 Credits)

Jewish, Christian, and Muslim traditions have yielded complex religious responses to ethical, human dilemmas involving life/death issues. This course examines some of those responses in relation to sexuality, love and family, punishment, health and disease, death, and the environment through the lenses of Jewish, Christian and Muslim authors, texts, and traditions. Students will investigate how such responses are crafted in a liberal, pluralistic society, and assess their own reactions to religious difference and challenges to their own fundamental values. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: BIOE, EP4, MEST, REST, SRVL.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4030. MORAL ASPECTS OF MEDICINE. (4 Credits)

The course examines the role of faith in the moral issues raised by advancements in medical science. The course will survey issues such as reproductive technologies, the patient-physician relationship, euthanasia and physician suicide, health care reform, AIDS and the human genome project. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: BIOE, EP4, REST, SRVL, VAL.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4036. HUMAN NATURE AFTER DARWIN (Interdisciplinary Capstone Core). (4 Credits)

This course enters contemporary theological, political and scientific debates about how to conceptualize human nature after Darwin. We read Epicures, Lucretius, Augustine, Aquinas, Darwin and contemporary theologians, political theorists and scientists. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4037. NATURE IN HISTORICAL AND ETHICAL PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

In anthropological, theological, and ethical discourse, nature has often been appealed to as that which is, by definition, outside of culture and history. However, nature’s meanings – especially in social-relational significations that it carries- have varied over time, according to a range of contexts and “controlling images.” This Interdisciplinary Capstone Course will analyze historical and contemporary methodologies and significations of the term “nature,” in ways that facilitate critical scrutiny of how this potent term is deployed in contemporary political, scientific, environmental, and religious discourse. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 4040. HOME, AWAY, AND IN-BETWEEN. (4 Credits)

This course draws on historical theology and literature to explore diverse human engagements with displacement. Reading focus on specific contexts and modes of displacement as they have upset and remade truth for those involved. Key examples include diaspora, quest, alienation, conversion, migration, and relocation. We will encounter characters and real-life actors whose experiences of these conditions-whether literal or metaphorical, whether cultivated or imposed-put them in highly charged space between feeling “at home” and “away.” In addition to studying the responses of literary characters and religious actors, we will explore the ways the disciplines of literature and theology themselves invite practitioners into experiences of disorientation and reorientation. We will also consider the relationship between literature and theology as ways of knowing about displacement and its meanings. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 4052. AN ETHICS OF MODERN SELFHOOD: THE PURSUIT OF AUTHENTICITY. (4 Credits)

The modern and postmodern self or identify, examined as a series of personal and moral conflicts and dilemmas. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, SOCI.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4105. RELIGION, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY. (4 Credits)

This course considers the intersections of religion, gender, and sexuality. In many parts of the world, including the United States, and in many religious traditions, cultural and religious identity and continuity hinge on gendered practices and closely controlled sexual regimes. The goal of this course is to understand how religious institutions, communities, doctrines, practices and traditions shape gendered ideologies and practices, debates about sexuality and gendered division of labor, and the lives of men and women who participate in these religious communities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009.

THEO 4411. RELIGION, THEOLOGY, AND NEW MEDIA. (4 Credits)

An interdisciplinary capstone course, this course examines the historical and theoretical signifcance of the intersection between communication, technologies and relegious communities. Drawing on the disciplinary methods and assumptions of both communication and media studies and theology, the course will ask students to critically and theoretically explore the significance of religion as a cultural phenomenon as well as to take seriously the theological significance of media practices as articulated by religious subjects. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMCS, AMST, ICC.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4450. LITURGICAL THEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

This course will study the Roman Catholic liturgy, its history and theology. We come to understand a culture in part by examining its rituals. Through the lens of, the liturgy-its scripture, symbols and sacraments- we get a closer look at the story of the church. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4455. EUCHARIST, JUSTICE, AND LIFE. (4 Credits)

This course explores the intrinsic relationship between celebrating the liturgy, especially the Eucharist, and living lives of justice, peace, and social responsibility. Such topics as world poverty, hunger, immigration, violence, global warming, and the care of the planet will be examined. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP4, VAL.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4520. ANIMALS, ANGELS, AND ALIENS: BEYOND THE HUMAN IN CHRISTIAN THOUGHT. (3 Credits)

Contemporary theologians focus almost exclusively on the human. Indeed, some prominent theologian’s explicitly claim that all theology can be understood as anthropology. But in this course we will use both new trends and ancient sources to push beyond the human into other areas of concern. The Christian (and Jewish) traditions have very interesting things to say, for instance, about non-human entities like animals, angels and even aliens. In addition to looking carefully at these sources, we will think about their implications for contemporary moral and political issues surrounding food production and consumption, lab experiments, ecological protection, and even cyborg technology and transhumanism.

Attributes: ENST, EP3.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4570. ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN ETHICS. (4 Credits)

This Course will explore the two-thousand year tradition or Orthodox Christian Ethics. Students will be asked to resolve modern moral dilemmas by reading ancient Orthodox texts and their modern commentators. As such, the purpose of the course is twofold: 1) to develop an understanding of Christian ethics within an Orthodox theological perspective; 2) to develop the ability to make ethical judgments and to reflect critically on those judgments on established Orthodox theological principles. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP4, OCST, VAL.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4600. RELIGION AND PUBLIC LIFE. (4 Credits)

The course explores the role of religion in public life, focusing primarily on American democracy and its separation of church and state. The course will focus on religion's voice in public debate over issues such as health, poverty, and biomedical and economic issues, whether specifically religious arguments and language should have place in public discourse, and the role of discourse in a pluralistic society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMCS, AMST, EP4, MEST, VAL.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4610. MALCOLM, MARTIN, BALDWIN, AND THE CHURCH. (4 Credits)

This course will engage the social thought and religious faith of these persons, both individually and in relation to each other.  We will examine the challenges each posed both to Christian faith and to U.S society - especially their critiques of American understandings of justice; the relevance of religious faith to the struggle for racial justice; and the response of the Catholic Church to these men, the movement they represented, and the enduring reality of racial injustice. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009.

THEO 4620. OSCAR ROMERO: FAITH AND POLITICS IN EL SALVADOR. (4 Credits)

This course will investigate the life and ministry of Oscar Romero of El Salvador. Coming to office ina period of socio-political and religious upheaval, Romero functions as a lens through which students can explore important themes including: the nature and impact of liberation theology, the effects of US Cold War foreign policy, power in the Catholic Church and numerous issues involvingthe relationship between religion and politics. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009.

THEO 4630. G.O. DEEPER. INTERDISCIPLINARY INQUIRIES. (4 Credits)

This Interdisciplinary Capstone Course is designed to build on (1) what these students have learned by offering them an opportunity to consider their immersion experience in light of critical inquiries in sociology, anthropology, & critical social theory; associated with (2) conflict studies, cultural studies, & postcolonial theory, & (3) in theology. The course is designed above all to cultivate skills to describe, analyze, and evaluate critical issues in local practices pertaining to personal life, family life, social and political life, housing, work, and indigenous cultures, including faith cultures of practice and belief. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009.

THEO 4840. JESUS AND SALVATION. (4 Credits)

This course explores Christian belief in Jesus Christ (Christology) with an emphasis on how this belief is intertwined with the understanding of salvation (soteriology). Reflecting on the biblical accounts of salvation in Jesus, along with examining the development of classic christological doctrine, students will inquire how this tradition relates to critical issues raised today. How is Christian belief in Jesus and salvation relevant to questions of identity, religious pluralism, global inequality, and environmental crises? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1010 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1007.

THEO 4847. THEOLOGIES OF LIBERATION. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the challenge of living Christian values in a global community marked by severe poverty, structural injustice and the threat of ecological devastation. The study of the values of Jesus, Catholic social teaching and various Christian theologies of liberation will inform the students' consciences on issues of economic justice, the distribution of wealthand power and the proper use of the earth's resources. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP4, PJST, SRVL, VAL.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4849. GOD AND EVILS. (4 Credits)

This course analyzes biblical, theological, and literary texts and evaluates the ways in which these texts understand how to characterize the various forms of evils in the world, account for God's allowing these evils in creation, and how humans can and should work to remedy those evils. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4850. THEOLOGY AND HUMAN SUFFERING: A COMPARATIVE APPROACH. (4 Credits)

Questions about the nature and meaning of human suffering occupy a central place in every religion, past and present. This course looks comparatively at traditions of theological reflection and religious practice in order to ask: what do they say about pain and suffering? It is an inevitable part of embodied existence? An opportunity for spiritual maturation? A matter of mental perspective? What happens when religion itself becomes the source of pain and sorrow? This course explores these questions comparatively, focused on texts and practices with the Buddhist and Christian traditions. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: SRVL.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1004 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4853. SPIRITUALITY AND POLITICS. (4 Credits)

This course will examine three twentieth-century Roman Catholic movements that espoused both a novel approach to spirituality/mysticism and embodied a distinctive politics on three different continents: the French Catholic revival, the Catholic Worker movement in the U.S and liberation theology in Latin America. The twentieth century witnessed a remarkable engagement of Catholics with the meaning of their faith and its role in social and political issues of their times, particularly around issues of war and poverty. From each of these three sites of renewal, the students will ask questions such as: How did these new movements come about? How are their views articulated in various texts and embodied in personal and communal practices? What is the legacy of these twentieth-century movements’ spirituality and politics for us today? As an interdisciplinary seminar, students will rely on the methodological approaches in the disciplines of history and systematic theology to pursue these questions. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMCS, ICC, PJST, REST.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4870. ECONOMIC FOUNDATIONS OF CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING. (4 Credits)

This course explores the economic thought that has served as the basis of the Church's teaching on issues like capitalism, socialism, poverty, wages, unions, the environment, and economic responsibility from Leo XIII's encyclical Rerum Novarum to the present and current economic research that may guide future Church teaching. This will be done through lectures, readings from primarily 19th and 20th-century economic works, and discussion of how these works' ideas are evident in papal encyclicals and other Church documents. The course will include case studies of how Catholic social teaching has influenced national social and economic policies in Europe and the U.S. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMCS, ICC, REST.

Prerequisites: ECON 1100 or ECON 1200 or ECON 1150 or ECON 1250 or THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1004 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010 or HPLC 1401.

THEO 4950. CHRISTIANITY AND GENDER/SEXUAL DIVERSITY: INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES. (4 Credits)

Employing perspectives from history, theological ethics, and LGBT studies, this course will investigate what it means to take queer perspectives on Christianity sexuality, and discipleship. Readings will include biblical, historical, and contemporary materials that seek to illuminate the ways in which Christians and Christian communities have responded to sexual and gender diversity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or THEO 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1401 or THEO 1002 or THEO 1003 or THEO 1005 or THEO 1006 or THEO 1007 or THEO 1008 or THEO 1009 or THEO 1010.

THEO 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

Prerequisites: THEO 1000 or HPRH 1001.

THEO 5000. BIBLICAL HEBREW INTRO. (4 Credits)

This course is an intensive introduction to the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of Biblical Hebrew. By the end of the course students will be able to read passages from the Hebrew Bible with the help of a dictionary, and will have learned sufficient vocabulary to ensure a rewarding reading experience. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

THEO 5015. TEACHING THEOLOGY. (0 Credits)

Classical and contemporary discussions on the practice of teaching theology, particularly as understood in the Roman Catholic tradition, introducing the field of professional theology and its relationship to other disciplines, and engaging in careful, critical reflection on the vocation of the teaching theologian.

THEO 5017. THEOLOGY DISSERTAION SEMINAR. (0 Credits)

A colloquium for workshopping dissertation chapters in progress.

THEO 5025. EXODUS IN HEBREW. (3 Credits)

This course combines exegesis of Exodus in Hebrew with intermediate-level study of biblical Hebrew. We will read chapters 1-24 and 32-34 of Exodus in Hebrew. Our study of the Hebrew language will progress from a review of grammatical forms to a more advanced understanding of the syntax of biblical Hebrew.

THEO 5071. ELEMENTARY COPTIC II. (3,4 Credits)

Completion of Coptic grammar and reading of Biblical texts in Sahidic Coptic. Continuation of Elementary Coptic I. Other students welcome subject to instructor approval.

Prerequisite: THEO 5070.

THEO 5072. CHRISTIAN TEXTS IN COPTIC. (3 Credits)

Intermediate and advanced readings in Coptic, which may include biblical, monartic, and Gnostic texts.

THEO 5075. SYRIAC LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE I. (3 Credits)

This course is the first of a two-semester introduction to Syriac, a dialect belonging to the Aramaic language branch. The first semester will introduce the Estrangela and the Serto scripts, cover grammatical foundations, and expose students from early on to the reading of texts. The second semester will be mostly spent reading Syriac literature, but some time will be devoted to select special topics in Syriac grammar.

Attributes: MVST, OCST, REST.

THEO 5076. SYRIAC LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE II. (3 Credits)

This course is the second of a two-semester introduction to Syriac, a dialect belonging to the Aramaic language branch. The first semester introduced both the Estrangela and the Serto scripts, covered grammatical foundations, and exposed students from early on to the reading of texts. The second semester will be mostly spent reading Syriac literature, but some time will be devoted to select special topics in Syriac grammar.

Attribute: MVST.

THEO 5080. BIBLICAL GREEK INTRO. (3,4 Credits)

This course an intensive introduction to the grammar and syntax of New Testament Greek. Sufficient attention will be devoted to vocabulary to enable rewarding experience iin reading an exegesis.

THEO 5090. BIBLICAL ARAMAIC. (3-4 Credits)

An introduction to the language through comparison with Hebrew morphology and readings from the Aramaic sections of the Old Testament.

THEO 5230. ADVANCED GREEK. (3 Credits)

This course includes both a rapid review of Greek grammar and syntax, and also intermediate/advanced readings from Hellenistic and/or early Christian texts.

THEO 5300. HIST OF CHRISTIANITY I. (3-4 Credits)

Development of central concepts of Christianity from the Apostolic Fathers to the Reformation.

THEO 5301. HIST OF CHRISTIANITY II. (3-4 Credits)

Catholic and Protestant theologies after the first century of the Reformation, from the 17th to the 20th centuries, including both European and USA theological developments.

THEO 5400. TOPICS IN ISLAM: TEXTS & TRADITIONS. (3,4 Credits)

This course explores major topics in Islam, including notions of revelation, God, law, thological speculation, gender issues, philosophy, mysticism and science. Comparisions with Jewish and Christian materials will be brought to bear on the topics for discussion when relevant.

THEO 5550. NEW METHODS:AMERICAN RELIGION HISTORY. (3 Credits)

The past thirty years have produced significant changes in the ways historians, theologians, and ethnographers describe, explain, and theorize Americans' religious worlds. Problems include how to account for the experiences of women and racial and ethnic minorities, the relationship of doctrine to practice, the legacy of the enlightenment, the religious meanings of objects and places, the importance of borders and identity, and the significance of class in theological expression. This course investigates new answers to these and other questions, assessing them in light of their contributions and limitations in the effort to make sense of North America's past and present. The work of the semester involves close reading of contemporary historical and ethnographic texts, covering periods from the colonial era to the present. The emphasis rests both on American religious history and on new ways of making sense of religious lives, which may be applicable beyond the North American context.

THEO 5620. Introduction to Systematic Theology. (3 Credits)

An introduction to major schools and methods in contemporary systematic theology.

THEO 5630. SYSTEMATIC LIBERATION THEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

The course will examine theologies of liberation originating among marginalized peoples of the Americas. In addition to studying their origins and major figures, the course will focus on how liberation theologies rethink a range of themes in systematic theology including: Christology, anthropology, soteriology , and ecclesiology.

THEO 5640. Introduction to Theological Ethics. (3 Credits)

This introductory course will examine the sources and methods of Christian ethics, as well as contemporary questions in the discipline including gender and identity, racism, and bio-and environmental ethics.

THEO 5820. OLD TESTAMENT INTERPRETATION. (3-4 Credits)

Introduction to the multi-faceted project of interpreting the religious literature of ancient Israel and the sacred Scriptures of the church, in order to develop competence in a variety of exegetical approaches to the Old Testament. These include patterns of patristic and medieval interpretation, the classic modern methods of scholarly analysis, and selected contemporary approaches.

THEO 5890. NEW TESTAMENT INTERPRETATION. (3-4 Credits)

History, literature, and religion of the New Testament, studied in the context of the time and circumstances that produced them.

THEO 6026. SECOND TEMPLE JUDAISM. (3 Credits)

A survey of the literature and history of both Palestinian and Diaspora Judaism of the Second Temple period, including late biblical texts, Apocrypha, Pseudepigrapha, Qumran Scrolls, Philo and Josphus.

THEO 6031. THE PSALMS. (3 Credits)

THEO 6039. BIBLICAL ETHICS. (3 Credits)

This course will explore a number of ways that the Bible has been used to inform ethical behavior. Special attention will be paid to the ethical implications of different interpretive approaches to the biblical text, as well as to the fact that the Christian Bible has two testaments, each of which contains a variety of approaches to ethics.

THEO 6130. MATTHEW MARK AND METHOD. (3 Credits)

This graduate seminar offers both detailed analysis of Gospels of Matthew and Mark and a survey of contemporary critical methods as applied to these Gospels. Sessions will examine the two texts through the lenses of Christology; Discipleship and Ethics; Feminist Criticism; Form Criticism; "Historical Jesus"; Literary Criticism; Political Theology; Postcolonial Criticism; Redaction Criticism; and Text Criticism.

THEO 6192. GRECO-ROMAN CONTEXT/XTNT. (3 Credits)

This course creates a context for understanding the encounter of early Christianity with Greco-Roman culture by exploring Hellenistic and Roman history, politics, religion, social relations, economics, education, rhetoric, philosophy, literature, and the theatre.

THEO 6194. HISTORY THEORY & XTIANITY. (3 Credits)

This course will provide a thorough introduction to recent developments in historiography and critical theory in light of the so-called "linguistic turn." It will also explore the methodlogical relevance of these theoretical shifts fro the study of pre-modern Christianity/historical theology.

THEO 6196. EARLY CHRISTIAN RITUAL. (3 Credits)

This graduate seminar surveys the evidence for ritual practices in the first few centuries of Christianity. Through engagement with theoretical literature on ritual and identity formation, we will explore what can be known about early Christian practices and interrogate our means of knowing it. Much of the course will focus on the rituals of initiation and their diverse interpretations in ancient sources, but other topics will be covered as time allows. Prior study of early Christian history and/or New Testament is recommended.

THEO 6198. SELF IN EARLY CHRISTIANITY. (3 Credits)

An examination of different notions of "the self" in early Christianity with particular attention to ancient ideas about status, gender, ethnicity, and cultural identity, as well as their implications for Christians in the pre-Constantinian era.

THEO 6211. Paul, Prisoner and Martyr: Political Theology in Early Christianity. (3 Credits)

A close reading of the authentic letters of Paul from prison (Philippians and Philamon), supplemented by an investigation of the image of Paul as the "prisoner of Christ" in Calossians, 2 Timothy, 3 Corinthians, the Acts of the Apostles, and the Acts of Paul.

THEO 6214. OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

An examination of recent attempts to use the Old Testament as a resource for systematic theological thought. Among the topics to be considered are the nature of devine revelation in creation and history and the implications of the human response to that revelation.

THEO 6300. APOSTOLIC FATHERS. (3 Credits)

A seminar in the body of first and second century Christian literature known as the "Apostolic Fathers," so as to gain an understanding of this literature as an expression of the life and thought of its authors and the churces in which it arose and was preserved. A secondary concern of the course involves the use of the Apostolic Fathers as histoical sources for the reconstruction of the social experience of the early Christians.

THEO 6305. INTRO TO RABBINIC LITERATURE. (3 Credits)

In this course, students will explore the vast corpus of rabbinic literature and the historical, intellectual, religious, social, legal and political circumstances in which rabbinic Judaism developed in Palestine and Babylonia between the first and seventh centuries C.E. Students will gain experience reading different genres of rabbinic texts; become familiar with cutting-edge scholarship in the field; experiement with various methodologies in the study of late antiquity; and learn about a formative period in Jewish history.

THEO 6359. NORTH AFRICAN CHRISTIANITY. (3 Credits)

The course "North African Christianity" introduces students to the physical and cultural environment of early Christian communities in North Africa and to the theologies Africans produced between the origins of African Christianity in the second century and the Middle Ages. Subjects include Tertullian, Cyprian, stories of martyrs and literature of the Donatist controvesy (with Augustine). Some attention will be paid to archaeology and, if possible, pseudo-Cyprianic literature.

THEO 6360. ALEXANDRIAN THEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Reading and interpretation of selected writings of Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Athanasius, Didymus the Blind, and Cyril of Alexandria, against the background of the pagan and Jewish traditions of Alexandria.

THEO 6365. CAPPADOCIAN FATHERS. (3 Credits)

A wide-ranging but analytic reading of the most important writings of Basil of Caesarea, Gregory Nazianzus and Gregory of Nyssa, with particular attention to the doctrine of the Trinity, to Christian anthropology, and to spirituality.

THEO 6367. Byzantine Christianity: History and Theology. (3 Credits)

The graduate-level survey course introduces students to the theological ideas and historical transitions that captivated the minds of Eastern Christians from the 8th to the 15th centuries. Through a careful reading of primary sources (in English translation) and the scholarly debates about those sources, we will explore the Iconoclastic controversies, the expansion of Christianity to the Slavs, the experience of Christians living under Islamic authority, and a host of issues related to rupture between Eastern and Western Christianity. In most circumstances, successful completion of this course authorizes doctoral studnts in Theology to teach the undergraduate cognate course.

THEO 6400. Theological Anthropology and Human Diversity. (3 Credits)

As the subdiscipline of "theological anthropology" speaks about the nature of our being human, how does it take into account the great variety in evidence among human beings? Particularities of race, religion, culture, disability, sexual orientation and gender iwll be placed in conversation with classic text.

THEO 6425. ST.AUGUSTINE IN CONTEXT. (3 Credits)

This course investigates the life and writings of Augustine of Hippo in the context of late antiquity including philosophical and religious influences upon him as well as the controversies and archeological remains of his ministry.

THEO 6426. ST AUGUSTINE OF HIPPO. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the life and thought of St. Augustine that will include an examination of his principal theological controversies (e.g. against manichaeism .

THEO 6444. Medieval Modernists: Modern Appropiations of Medieval and Ancient Christianity. (3 Credits)

In twentieth century Europe, an astonishing range of intellectuals were animated and energized by the study of pre modern and early modern Christianity. For theologians, historians, philosophers, and literary figures, Christian medieval and patristic sources were galvanizing forces of transformation, and harbingers of ethical, theological, and political renewal. This course investigates the various appropriations of medieval and ancient Christianity from the Catholic nouvelle theologie movement (Henri de Lubac, M.D. Chenu, and Jean Danielou in particular), literature (Charles Peguy), philosophy, (Hannah Arendt and Luce Irigaray), and historiography (Michel de Certeau), along with secondary works by Amy Hollywood, Joan Wallach Scott, and others.

THEO 6445. AFFECT, EMOTION, AND RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE. (3 Credits)

This course examines recent work in affect theory and the history of emotions (and their philosophical antecedents) as potential resources for historical and theological accounts of religious experience.

Attribute: MVST.

THEO 6456. MEDIEVAL LITURGY. (3 Credits)

A study of the written sources and architectual setting of liturgy in the West from the 6th century to the eve of the Reformation. Special attention will be given to the liturgy of the Eucharist in the Roman Rite, the liturgical calendar, and the Liturgy of the Hours.

THEO 6461. MYSTICAL THEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Examines the influences of Neoplatonic philosophy and the writings of Pseudo-Dionvsius on medieval Latin Christianity, with attention to both "negative" theological language and reflection on the paths to and modes of union with God. Modern deconstructive, psychoanalytic, and feminist approaches to mysticism will also be considered.

THEO 6463. FROM LOLLARDS TO LUTHER. (3 Credits)

This course offers an introduction to the key themes, events, and thinkers of Christianity during the transition from what historians refer to as the late medieval to whtat they call the early modern period. Topics will include theological method; humanism; heresy and reform; gender; scripture; and the realtionship between the church and civil society.

THEO 6465. ASCETICISM & MONASTICISM. (3 Credits)

THEO 6466. HAGIOGRAPHY. (3 Credits)

THEO 6480. XIANIZING THE BARBARIANS. (3 Credits)

The course examines the "Christianizing" of pagan peoples (Roman, Germanic, Slavic) during the late ancient and medieval periods. We begin with two basic questions: what evidence is there for the "Christianization" of Europe? And how do we explain it? .

THEO 6490. CHRISTIANITY AND VIOLENCE. (3 Credits)

This course explores the often ambivalent relationship between Christianity and violence in the pre-modern world. Readings include a broad range of primary sources including martyr acts, liturgical hymns, canon law, and Crusader chronicles as well as influential scholarly assessments of the history of Christianity and violence.

THEO 6505. HISTORIES OF COLONIALISM, EMPIRE, THEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

This interdisciplinary course traces the interconnected histories of colonialism, European empire, and Christian theology in the 15th-20th centuries, with focus on the 18th-20th centures. Special attention will be given to questions of historiography and theoretical method: the pairing of material history and philosophical/theological inquiry, the creation of "religion" as a discursive category, the role of Christian theology in funding, resisting, or augmenting imperial projects, and the diversity of Christian forms of like birthed in the circum-Atlantic world.

THEO 6510. SOCIALLY ENGAGED THEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

This course will examine the tradition of theology engaged with social concerns and emerging from within broader social movements. Students will be invited to participate in current social projects with local organizations as part of our exploration.

THEO 6543. Aesthetics, Religion, and Modernity. (3 Credits)

This course will explore the rise of "aesthetics" as a category to supplant, explain, enrich, and/or revive religious discourse within the philosophical and economic projects of Western modernity. Focus will be given to the historical conditions that made aesthetics a compelling rival or reviver of traditional religious belief and practice in the 18th-20th centuries.

THEO 6544. BELIEF AND UNBELIEF TOL & INTO. (3 Credits)

Descriptions: This graduate seminar explores two related phenomena: the historical development of varieties of religious belief and unbelief; and the practice of religious tolerance and intolerance in modern Europe and North America. Since course readings focus on major historical transitions in theological, social, cultural, political, and intellectual life, students will encounter a range of methodological approaches and source materials and will develop a broad interpretive framework for understanding Western religious history since the sixteenth century.

THEO 6551. U.S. RELIGIOUS HISTORY. (3 Credits)

This course consists of two parts: a survey of classic works in American religious history, followed by student immersion in archival work at manuscript collections in the New York City area. Students will conduct original historical research on sites of religious significance located in Metropolitan New York.

THEO 6553. READINGS IN AMERICAN RELIGION. (3 Credits)

This course offers an historical study of theology in America that is attentive to contemporary discussions of theory, method, and historiography. Readings include primary and secondary sources in American theology and religious history from the coming of the Europeans to the 1980s. Topics may include: Colonialism and Borderlands Theologies, Puritanism, the American Enlightenment, Slave Religion, Evangelicalism, Transcendentalism, the Black Church, Immigrant Catholicism, New Thought, Mormonism, Social Gospel, Fundamentalism, U.S. Catholic Counterculture, Neo-Orthodoxy, U.S. Buddhism, Civil Rights, Liberation Theology, the Nation of Islam, and Eco-Theology.

THEO 6600. MODERN ORTHODOX THEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Examination of Twentieth-Century Orthodox Theological Texts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

THEO 6606. THEOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (3 Credits)

THEO 6615. Rahner, Lonergan, and Transcendental Method. (3 Credits)

Lonergan and Rahner represent two distinctive approaches to what is frequently called "transcendental method" (although Lonergan had reservations about the term as applied to him). This course will examine Lonergan's often neglected but crucial philosophical work insight, along with Rahner's more specifically theological writings. The two will be compared with each other as well as with contemporary and post-modern critics.

THEO 6616. CONTEMP THEOL OF TRINITY. (3 Credits)

An introductory survey of the historical development of the doctrine and an exploration of contemporary interpretations of the Trinitarian mystery in Lonergan, Rahner, and Muhlen.

THEO 6620. GOD IN CONTEMP THEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Contemporary rethinking of the doctrine of God in the context of modern atheism, secularism, and the encounter of world religions, seen in the light of the history of theology. Doctrine of the Trinity. Human knowledge of God. God and the world.

THEO 6621. GOD IN COMPARATIVE THEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Examination and comparison of notions of God or the Absolute (Brahman, Dharmakaya, etc.) in major theological traditions: Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist. Classic texts will be read.

THEO 6630. CHURCH IN CONTEMP THEOL.. (3 Credits)

Some contemporary ecclesiologies from the point of view of the Church's relationship with the world.

THEO 6642. POLITICAL THEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

This course will discuss and critically analyze contemporary theologies of the political, with attention being given to the recent debate over political liberalism. Texts from a variety of theologians and theological perspectives will be examined, as well as recent attempts at political theology by non-theologians.

THEO 6651. THE LITURGY: HOW CHRISTIANS WORSHIP. (3 Credits)

This course will focus on the Roman Catholic liturgy – leitourgia – the people’s work for God. We will draw a list of topics concerning three areas: the theory of liturgical reform, the history of the “Mass,” and related concerns for the liturgy, e.g., the role of justice, inculturation, feminist worship, music, and architecture.

THEO 6656. THEO OF LOUIS-MARIE CHAUVET. (3 Credits)

Louis-marie Chauvet has developed a theology of sacrement that offers a reinterpretation of human existence. Scholars are exploring its implications, both ecumenically and internationally. This course will examine Chauvet's methodological shift from metaphysics to a theology of symbol as meidation. He offers a way to understand sacrament and sacramentality that appreciates the significance of human bodiliness. Both primary and secondary sources will be read and critqued within the context of other prominent theologians of teh 20-21st century, including Rhaner and Schillebeeckx. There will be optional opportunities to read some of Chauvet's writing in their original French.

THEO 6657. EUCHARIST & WORLD TODAY. (3 Credits)

This course will put Eucharistic theology and practice dialogue with concerns regarding hunger, violence, and exploitation in our contemporary world.

THEO 6671. CONTEMPORARY CHRISTOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Current trends in Christological theology, including those of the post-Vatican II era (e.g., Rahner, Schillebeeckx, et. al.)

THEO 6674. ECOLOGICAL THEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

In the light of contemporary scientific understandings of the cosmos and attendant ecological concerns, this course will study reinterpretations of Christian doctrine and ethics of the last 40 years that have been in dialouge with these developments.

THEO 6710. ISSUES IN FUNDAMENTAL MORAL THEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Fundamental moral theology has undergone dramatic shifts in understanding since the moral manuals. It is now characterized by a pluralism in method and perspective that would have been inconceivable. This advanced seminar will examine several issues in the field of fundamental moral theology that have received recent critical attention. Among these will be topics such as conscience and its formation, culturally entrenched social evil, change in magisterial teaching, the concept of natural law, the influence of cultural pluralism on moral formation and reasoning, and the role of the “sensus fidelium” in moral doctrine.

THEO 6721. AFRICAN AMERICAN THEOLOGICAL ETHICS. (3 Credits)

This course, which surveys African American theological and social ethics, is open to both M.A. and Ph.D. students.

THEO 6730. CHRISTIAN ECOLOGICAL ETHICS. (3 Credits)

This course examines distinctly Christian approaches to ecological ethics, including comparative historical perspectives, methods, and key topics.

THEO 6731. CHRISTIAN ECOLOGICAL ETHICS. (3 Credits)

This course examines distinctly Christian approaches to ecological ethics, including comparative historical perspectives, methods, and key topics.

THEO 6732. ETHICS AND ECONOMICS. (3 Credits)

An examination of contemporary economic social issues with the aid of Catholic social teaching, and with a critical use of economic science. The social issues examined include-but are not limited to-poverty, pollution control, protectionism, unemployment, and inflation.

Attribute: CEED.

THEO 6733. THEOLOGY & SCIENCE. (3 Credits)

This graduate-level course attends to the history, methodologies, content of conflict, and major questions that have occured at the intersections of scientific and theological inquiry.

THEO 6734. THE BEAUTY OF JUSTICE. (3 Credits)

This course explores potential intersections between theories of "the beautiful" and "the good" in both classic and contemporary Christian theology and ethics. It also examines practical examples of this intersection in the lived practices of the Christian community in order to evaluate the viability of a faith that seeks beauty for addressing a variety of social justice problems including environmental racism, urban poverty, conflict resolution, and global health.

Attribute: CEED.

THEO 6735. ECOLOGICAL ETHICS. (3 Credits)

This course considers the rise of ecological consciousness, environmental history, and ethical reflection in light of western philosophical and theological traditions. It aims to provide students with substantial, foundational knowledge in twentieth and twenty-first century environmental thought as well as emerging approaches to global environmental problems.

THEO 6737. GOD/MYSTERY OF SUFFERING. (3 Credits)

David Hume has articulated what many consider to be the problem of evil for the Western theistic traditions. Indeed, for nearly three hundred years, philosophers of religion and philosophers of religion and philosophical theologians have attempted to resolve the problem of the alleged inconsistency of God's infinite goodness, power, knowledge, and the reality of human suffering, especially innocents' suffering. The presumption of the present seminar is very simple. Hume's pithy rendering does not articulate the problem-or at least the whole problem. In light of this presumption, this seminar shall critically examine the various ways Christians have responded to suffering. The goal of this seminar is to have the students be able to understand the history of responses to the problems of evils in the Christian traditions, and to evaluate those responses.

THEO 6738. The Mystical-Prophetic Turn in Modern Catholic Theology. (3 Credits)

The course analyzes the thought of Johann Metz, Gustavo Gutierrez, and David Tracy as responses to the challenges of late modernity. By identifying the authors' contexts and influences, investigating their central ideas, and engaging their critics, the course explores the philosophical and theological implications of the mystical and prophetic traditions of Christianity retrieved by political, liberation, and public theologies for contemporary thought. Other thinkers to be considered include: Rahner, Lindbeck, Ratzinger, Balthasar, Gadamer, Adorno, Ellacuria, Johnson, Goizueta, Dionysius, John of the Cross, and various biblical authors.

THEO 6740. CATHOLIC SOCIAL THOUGHT. (3 Credits)

Catholic social thought as found in the social encyclicals, emphasizing their theological contexts, social scientific constructs, historical backgroundm and philosophical presuppositions.

Attribute: CEED.

THEO 7222. NEW PERSPECTIVES ON PAUL. (3 Credits)

This course will examine contemporary interpretations of Paul from the post-World War II period to the present. Topics will include the so-called "New Perspective" and recent engagements with Paul in continental philosophy.

THEO 7731. RELIGION AND REVOLUTION. (3 Credits)

Using El Salavador (1975-1995) as a case study, the course will examine theological and socio-political questions that emerge when believers engage in revolutions. Primary focus on theological figures and themes such as Oscar Romero, Jean Donovan, Ignacio Ellacuria, comunidades de base, the preferential option for the poor, and Christology, will be supplemented with interdisciplinary reflection on critical theory (Marx et al.), postidealist epistemology (Zubiri), and postcolonial identity (Bhabha).

THEO 7736. BIOETHICS. (3 Credits)

This course attempts to put the Roman Catholic and broadly Christian bioethical traditions in conversation with their secular interlocutors -- toward the end of examining whether or not these traditions have a place in public bioethical discourse and what that contribution might look like. Among the issues to be examined are distribution of healthcare resources, reproductive and other biotechnologies, the moral status of 'the other' in bioethics, and withdrawal/ refusal of medical treatment.

THEO 8998. IUDC CONSORTIUM TUTORIAL: ADVANCED SYRIAC READINGS. (3 Credits)

This course is an independent study/tutorial for IUDC Consortium students from member schools, and offers an exploration of linguistic and theological aspects of Syriac writings from Late Antiquity.

THEO 8999. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (4 Credits)

THEO 9000. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR. (0 Credits)

The seminar introduces advanced doctoral students to the job search process, provides help in compiling a strong application dossier, prepares students for interviews and job talks, advises students about negotiating offers, and assists students in strategizing their career paths within and beyond the academy. In addition to a number of seminar meetings, students will receive individualized attention, help editing their application materials, and practice with interviews and job talks.

THEO 9999. DISSERTATION DIRECTION. (1 Credit)