German (GERM)

GERM 1001. INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN I. (5 Credits)

An introductory course that focuses on the four skills: speaking, reading, writing and listening providing students with a basic knowledge of German linguistic structures, vocabulary and culture, which studied interdependently, comprise the German Language.

Attribute: ZLB1.

GERM 1002. INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN II. (3 Credits)

This course will enhance the reading, writing, speaking and listening skills acquired by students in Introduction to German I or from prior study. It will further promote a deeper understanding of German, and its literary and cultural traditions.

Prerequisite: GERM 1001.

GERM 1501. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I. (3 Credits)

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts. Conducted in German.

Attribute: ZLB1.

Prerequisites: GERM 1001 or GERM 1002.

GERM 1502. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II. (3 Credits)

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts. Conducted in German.

Attribute: ZLB1.

Prerequisite: GERM 1501.

GERM 2001. GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. (3 Credits)

A critical analysis of selected cultural and literary texts; composition, conversation, and review of pertinent grammatical structures.

Attribute: ZLB1.

Prerequisite: GERM 1502.

GERM 2100. ADVANCED GERMAN GRAMMAR. (4 Credits)

The course is designed to help students gain more insight into the structure of the German language and to further develop and strengthen their knowledge of German grammar. Survey and practice of German grammar as well as more advanced features of German syntax and style. Course will be conducted in English with readings and exercises in German. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 2500. APPROACHES TO LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

A basic course in German Literature. Close readings in the major forms, prose fiction, poetry, and drama and an introduction to the varieties of critical strategies for reading them. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

GERM 2601. GERMAN CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (3 Credits)

Intermediate-level conversation with some composition. Optional course for students wishing additional practice in self-expression in German. May be taken simultaneously with GERM 1502 or higher.

GERM 2650. BUSINESS GERMAN. (4 Credits)

Development of oral proficiency used in daily communication within the business world, preparing the students both in technical vocabulary and situational usage. Introduction to specialized vocabulary in business and economics. Readings in management, operations, marketing, advertising, banking, etc. Practice in writing business correspondence. Prerequisite: GERM 2001 or permission of instructor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: IPE.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 2800. GERMAN SHORT STORIES. (4 Credits)

This course follows the development of the short story as a genre in German literature with particular emphasis on its manifestation as a means of personal and social integration from the middle of the 20th century to the present day. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3010. FRISCH AUS DER PRESSE: MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

Further development of language skills through analysis and discussion of current texts from a variety of sources such as German-language newspaper articles, films, songs, internet, radio and TV programs, literature excerpts. Specific topics will vary based on students' interests. Work on different types of writing like description, argumentation and creative writing. ln class activities include discussions, paired and group work, and presentations. ln German. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3050. THE SOUND OF MUSIC: GERMAN MUSIC AND MUSICAL GENRES. (4 Credits)

This course traces the history of German music from the Middle Ages to Deutsche Popmusik, from German Lieder to German Schlager, New German Wave to Hip Hop. In-class activities include listening exercises, discussions, paired and group work, presentations on topics related to the music, events, and cultural foci covered. Drawn from authentic German realia, lyrics, interviews, articles, reading assignments will focus on both the music as well as its socio-political context. While engaging authentic German texts and music, it will be the goal of the course to advance stylistic and grammatical overall competence while fine-tuning listening and speaking skills in German. Taught in German. Prerequisite: GERM 2001 or Instructor's Permission. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3051. SURVEY OF LITERATURE I. (4 Credits)

A general survey of the history of German literature from the beginning of the 18th century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3052. SURVEY OF LITERATURE II. (4 Credits)

A general survey of the history of German literature from the beginning to classicism (ca.500-1832). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

GERM 3057. MEDIEVAL GERMAN LITERATURE: POTIONS, PASSIONS, PLAYERS, AND PRAYERS. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the rich literary and cultural heritage of Medieval Germany. The texts will all be read in English translation, but we will go over some passages in their original languages in class to catch some of the flavor of the Medieval German. Topics covered will include pre-Christian charms, the epic of the Nibelungs, love poetry, and urban carneval plays. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, MVST.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3250. POETRY OF THE GOLDEN AGE. (4 Credits)

18th and 19th century German poetry including works by Goethe, Schiller, Holderlin, Heine and prominent Romantics. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

GERM 3302. GERMAN THROUGH THE SENSES. (4 Credits)

In this course, we focus on texts which read the world through the experience of one particular sense: smell , hearing or taste. Grenouille the protagonist of Patrick Suskind's novel Das Perfum (Perfum, 1985), creates a fragrance which is bottled desirability, becoming a mass murderer in the process. Similarly, the musical genius portrayed in Robert Schneider's Schlafes Bruder (1992) cannot find love in real life and chooses death, the brother of sleep, instead. Franz Kafka's "Hungerkunstler" ("A Hunger Artist," 1922) has turned starvation into an art form, whereas Bella Martha (Mostly Martha), the chef in Sandra Nettelbeck's 2001 film, can only handle her life when she is in the kitchen. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

GERM 3303. BORDERS AND CROSSINGS. (4 Credits)

Doors, gates, walls, and other borders between inside and outside, home and society, me and you, define our daily lives. And to define means to mark off, to draw boundaries. While animals usually stayk within their confined territory, man is the animal that continually resets, violates, and strives to cross these borders. In this course, you will encounter many exciting contributions to German and Austrian literature and film in the 20th-21st centuries. Our focus will be borders and barriers-physical, ideological, intellectual, and metaphysical. Furthermore, we will discuss border/crossings between cultures, countries, identities, reality, and fiction. Throughout this course, you will be exposed to texts and films that will expand and challenge your consciousness regarding the "other" and the (im)possibilities of interpersonal and intercultural communications. Taught in German. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3307. GERMANY AND MIGRATION. (4 Credits)

Migrants have played a role in many countries' culture. Germans started coming to the U.S. in the 17th century, and about 17% of Americans have German ancestry. Migrants entered Germany starting around the turn of the 20th century, and today about 21% of Germany's population has a migration background. How do migrants assimilate and learn the language of their new country? What influences do migrants have on a country's culture and language? In the first part of the semester, we will examine the migration of Germans to the United States, and in the second part we will focus on migration into Germany. Taught in ENGLISH. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ASSC, COLI.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3310. DEEP IN THE FOREST: THE PAGAN-CHRISTIAN ENCHANTMENT OF THE FAIRY TALE. (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to study how the intertwining of Germanic and Christian mythic worlds serves to create the long lasting enchantment of the Grimms' Fairy Tales. The world of myth and fairy tale will be explored from the point of view Realization theory, which emphasizes the effect which myths and stories attempts to elicit from the reader, as described by William Grimm. In contrast to the Grimms' approach to fairy tale enchantment as awakening the human heart, we will also read three tales by Tieck, where there is fear that there is danger lurking deep in the forest of enchantment. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3371. 19TH CENTURY REALISM. (4 Credits)

The course examines representative fiction of the period by authors such as Droste-Hulshoff, Gotthelf, Keller and Fontane. Basic characteristics and common features of the realist mode of writing are established and the author's perception and depiction of reality are explored with particular emphasis upon the tension between individual ethics and the norms set by society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

GERM 3501. THE GERMAN SCENE POST 89. (4 Credits)

This course highlights cultural, educational, political, and economic trends in German society after reunification. Positive and negative aspects of the social welfare state are discussed. Examples from film, art, and music will illustrate the contemporary cultural scene. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

GERM 3550. LITERATURE IN THIRD REICH. (4 Credits)

This course will elucidate the tenents of National Socialism Literatur politik and discuss representative works of three main groups of German authors: Heimatdichtume and Blut-und-boden-Literatur; Tarnliteratur and exilliteratur; and the unpublished works of the so-called "Inner Emigranten." Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

GERM 3566. DEUTSCHLAND 1968: PROTEST, HIPPIES, UND TERRORISTEN (TAUGHT IN GERMAN). (4 Credits)

1968 stands out as a major symbolic and maybe even actual turning point in German politics and societal self-awareness. As we will learn, it is the results of both Germany’s Nazi past, perceptions of Western imperialism, and new demands for freedom by various groups throughout both Germany and the rest of the world. This course will look at various political and social protest and opposition movements in Germany since 1968. We will determine what certain groups believed in, analyze their statements and actions, and try to understand how their world acts as an important framework for understanding Germany in the twentieth century. We will investigate historical and societal conditions as well as aesthetic implications which turned political engagement into acts of terror and terrorism by looking at 20th century German literature, film, and painting. TAUGHT IN GERMAN Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

GERM 3601. GERMAN LITERATURE SINCE 1945. (4 Credits)

Examines aspects and themes from different phases of German literature after 1945, the period immediately following WWII, characterized by reflection upon the moral and political implications of National Socialism (Zuckmayer, Boll, Aichinger), the question of identity and the impact of technology on the prose of the '50s and '60s (Wolf, Frisch) and contemporary trends (Straus, Schlink). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

GERM 4063. THOMAS MANN/HERMAN HESSE. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

GERM 4998. SENIOR THESIS TUTORIAL. (4 Credits)

Independent research, supervised by a faculty in the language, leading to the completion of a senior thesis.

GERM 4999. TUTORIAL. (3-4 Credits)

Study of a particular aspect of German literature or thought. Independent research and readings. Weekly or bi-weekly meetings with faculty adviser. Designed for majors with permission of instructor.

GERM 5001. GRADUATE READING IN GERMAN I. (0 Credits)

GERM 5002. GRAD.READG.IN GERMAN II. (0 Credits)

GERM 9101. INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN I. (0 Credits)

GERM 9151. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I. (0 Credits)

GERM 9201. GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. (0 Credits)