Communication and Culture (COMC)

COMC 1101. COMMUNICATIONS AND CULTURE: HISTORY, THEORY, AND METHODS. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the history, theory and methods of Communication Studies, Media Studies, and Cultural Studies. This course provides students with a basic theoretical foundation for understanding the interdisciplinary traditions of our field, an historical examination of key paradigms and theorists, and an overview of the methodological approaches used by scholars of mediated communication. We will explore the ways in which theory and methodology are inextricably intertwined and how their relationship shapes both inquiry and analysis. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

Prerequisites: COMM 1000 or COMM 1010.

COMC 2111. THEORIES OF HUMAN COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the study of human communication through a variety of theories that focus on language, meaning, symbols, performance, gender, race, culture, and political economy, among others. Students develop an awareness of the varied perspectives from which communication has been studied; ethical issues and complexities of human and mediated communication in the 21st century; and how communication concepts and theories help us better understand our lives, relationships, culture, and society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 2112. STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE. (4 Credits)

Introduction to strategic communication for students interested in advertising, public relations, health communications, social advocacy and political campaigns. Presents today's best practices used to research, design, implement and evaluate campaigns. Topics include: impact of the evolution of technology and the digital environment on delivery of campaigns, basic elements of a strategic media plan, ethics and regulation of strategic communications, and role of strategic communications in the process of marketing products, people, ideas, and social causes. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 2113. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the basic tools of behavioral research as applied to the study of interpersonal communication. Topics such as human relationships, communication competence, conflict negotiation, intercultural communication, communication and gender, and mediated interpersonal communication are covered. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMC 2117. LANGUAGE, CULTURE, AND CONSCIOUSNESS. (4 Credits)

An examination of how we use words and symbols as tools for thought and guides for action, how the structures of language and symbolic communication relate to the structures of consciousness and culture. Analysis of the role of language in understanding our world, constructing reality, and evaluating messages and information. Pragmatic strategies for avoiding misevaluation and misunderstanding, resolving conflict, and improving clarity of communication through awareness of language habits in interpersonal, organizational, and mediated contexts are emphasized. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 2121. INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the major approaches, theories and perspectives in the study of Communication and the Media.

Attribute: SSCI.

COMC 2159. COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

This course surveys the history of mass media, from Gutenberg's invention of the printing press until today. We will focus on the technological aspects of media. However, a key focus of this course will also be on how the development of new tech gained later widespread adoption, how these technologies directly and indirectly affected the contemporaneous socio-cultural environment, as well as their continued effect on society today. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 2166. MEDIA ADVOCACY AND SOCIAL MARKETING. (4 Credits)

Media advocacy is the strategic use of communication channels for the purpose of social justice and influencing public policy. Social Marketing seeks to develop and integrate marketing concepts with other approaches to influence behaviors that benefit individuals and communities for the greater social good. Guided by ethical principles, social marketing seeks to integrate research, best practice, theory, audience and partnership insight, to inform the delivery of competition sensitive and segmented social change programs that are effective, efficient, equitable and sustainable. This course offers a strategic framework for developing a social media advocacy program, using social and digital media to help shape public debate, mobilize public action and to speak directly to those with influence to help bring about social change. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 2175. PERSUASION AND PUBLIC OPINION. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2701): An examination of the theories and research on persuasion and attitude change, the strategies and techniques used by persuaders and the reception skills needed to be a critical consumer of persuasive messages. Topics such as the psychology of attitude formation and change, interpersonal influence, rhetoric, language and symbol use, culture and persuasion, persuasive campaigns and movements, political communication, advertising and propaganda, the sociology of mass persuasion and the ethics of persuasion are covered. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: JOUR, SSCI.

COMC 2221. FASHION AS COMMUNICATION: SYNTAX OF STYLE. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2601): This course is designed to teach key communication and cultural studies concepts through the lens of fashion. With the understanding that fashion is both a discourse and an industry, we use a broad range of examples to illustrate key cultural studies and communication studies concepts such as gender, production, media effects and the politics of representation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: FASH, WGSS.

COMC 2234. MEDIA AND THE ARTS. (4 Credits)

An examination of the arts from cave painting to contemporary, electronic forms. Shifts in the form and style, the purpose and the role of the traditional fine arts will be studied in the technological and cultural contexts in which they occurred. Emphasis will be placed on the co-development of new arts and information technologies in the 20th century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: URST.

COMC 2236. THE ROCK REVOLUTION IN MUSIC AND MEDIA. (4 Credits)

From transistor radios to digital downloads, from AM to FM through the rise of MTV, and from Elvis to the Beatles to Woodstock, this course examines the media's role in the evolution of rock 'n' rock and it's impact on our society. We explore the often symbiotic relationship among the music, technology and personalities of an era that still reverberates today. The instructor is the long-time NY radio personality and rock historian Dennis Elsas, from WFUV. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

COMC 2258. MYTH AND SYMBOL OF AMERICAN CHARACTER. (4 Credits)

A study of the heart of American culture through an examination of the recurring myths and symbols found in journalism, public speeches, social commentary and the popular media. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, PLUR, REST.

COMC 2271. MEDIATED COMMUNICATION AND SOCIAL THEORY. (4 Credits)

This course uses primary sources to deepen students’ understanding of the interrelationship between media, culture, and society. One of the main objectives is therefore to build students’ reading and analysis skills by exposing them to difficult theoretical material in an environment designed to help them learn to read this kind of text. Students thereby gain a more nuanced understanding of the intellectual layout of the field by engaging directly with the theorists who have shaped its major debates. Finally, the course makes use of detailed textual analysis to apply these critical thinking skills to media texts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, NMDD, URST.

COMC 2277. MEDIA AND SEXUALITY. (4 Credits)

By all accounts, we have witnessed an explosion of LGBTQ representation in the media over the last decade. This course critically examines the terms of this new visibility, and inquires into the exclusions that accompany the recognition of certain queer and trans subjects. Through the study of media, film and popular culture, we will explore how representations of sex and sexuality are also central to the construction of ideas about race, class, gender, and nation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: WGSS.

COMC 2278. MEDIA, CULTURE, AND GLOBALIZATION. (4 Credits)

What is the role of the media in shaping our understanding of a globalized, interconnected world and our position within it? This course explores these questions by studying the role of the media in both producing and resisting forms of power, violence and inequality associated with contemporary globalization. In particular, we will examine how the media structures and mediates our relationship to others, and communicates powerful meanings about citizenship, national identity, security, and criminality. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: GLBL.

COMC 2329. INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA INDUSTRIES. (3 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 1011): An overview of the mass media communication industries; examining such issues as the institutional, social and technological histories of the media; the influence of economic factors in shaping content and issues governing regulatory policy.

Attributes: JOUR, SSCI.

COMC 2377. MASS COMMUNICATION AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2610): The class will examine mass communication and society through study of the structure of media, the interaction of individuals with media, the negotiation of culture within mediated contexts, the effects of media, and the interaction of media with institutions and other aspects of society. This course will help students to 1) begin mastering an approach to researching media, 2) build a foundation of knowledge about the ways in which our beliefs, values, and attitudes are shaped by media, and 3) negotiate the complex issues surrounding the collective experience of mass mediated culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, PLUR, SSCI.

COMC 3114. EFFECTIVE SPEAKING. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2501): A study of principles of effective communication with emphasis on the role of public speaking skills in professional life, the importance of critical thinking to communication and its significance in a democratic political system. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP3, JOUR.

COMC 3115. PERFORMANCE FOR BROADCAST MEDIA. (4 Credits)

This course will improve students’ performance skills in broadcast media (as well as give industry insight), whether they are on the path to sports broadcasting, hard news, comedy, the boardroom, or the latest viral web-show or podcast. A different on-air challenge will be presented each week where students will work on—then self-critique—their vocal delivery, body mechanics, and writing style. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMC 3157. MEDIA AND CIVIC ACTION. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the role of communication technologies, media institutions and participatory audiences in mobilizing social change and civic action. It works from a foundational assumption that media is a central component of democracy and civic life, but one with potential for both liberation and constraint. Grounded in theories of media power, communication networks and political discourse, case studies in the course will explore a variety of questions about the past, present and future of media and social mobilization. The course will provide theoretical, methodological and practical insights into the theory and practice of media and civic action. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 3171. ORALITY AND LITERACY. (4 Credits)

An examination of oral and literate modes of communication and their relationship to culture, consciousness and social organization. Topics include the nature of non literate cultures, oral tradition and mnemonics, the historical development of writing systems and their social and psychological impacts, theories and debates on oral and literate cultures, and mindsets. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, JOUR.

COMC 3172. PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3502): A study of advertising strategies and promotional appeals. Professional guidance in the creation of advertising: the planning, designing and writing of campaigns for all media and for multimedia campaigns with special emphasis on copywriting. Juniors and Seniors only. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, JOUR, NMDD.

COMC 3173. MARKETING AND THE MEDIA. (4 Credits)

A survey of marketing/advertising techniques and approaches utilized for print, radio, television, out-of-home and direct marketing. Niche marketing opportunities created by cable, infomercials, syndication and the Internet are also examined. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 3174. PUBLIC RELATIONS. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3501): Provides knowledge of the basic concepts of public relations and instruction in the use of various media in reaching specific publics.Through lectures, writing assignments, and in-class workshops, students will learn the basic concepts of public relations and the methodology of using various media to reach specific audiences. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

Prerequisites: (COMM 1010 or COMC 2121) and (COMM 1011 or COMC 2329).

COMC 3175. ADVERTISING AS COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

One of the most valuable resources in our economy is our attention. Advertising is a form of communication designed to capture that attention. What do advertisers know about how to achieve that goal, and what techniques do they use in today’s global, digital media environment? This course provides a broad overview of the theory, research and practices associated with advertising as a mode of communication. Themes to be covered include: the history of advertising in the US, the organization and evolution of the ad industry, types of advertising, ethical and regulatory issues, the role of market research and the impact of new media forms on the advertising industry. Students will learn the steps to developing and justifying a creative brief and a media plan, as well as to think critically about advertising texts. This course covers both theory and practice, training students to engage with this form of communication from the perspective of advertising planners, consumers and critics. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 3178. HUMOR AS COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

Each day, most people participate in humorous exchanges. We seek out movies, television programs, YouTube videos, memes, books, and, of course, people that make us laugh. Cross-culturally societies appreciate a good sense of humor. Few would argue that humor is not highly valued. This course will focus on theoretical, empirical, and ethical approaches to humor, with a view to understanding it as a communications tool in a variety of contexts, including relationships, organizations, families, medicine, law, education, intercultural relations, entertainment, and politics. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 3186. SPORTS COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3350): A survey of sports communication from analytical and practical perspectives. Written assignments address topics covered, including sports reporting and writing, advertising, and public relations. Pre-Req: COMM 1000 or COMM 1010 or Instructor permission. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, JOUR, ZLB2.

Prerequisites: COMM 1000 or COMM 1010.

COMC 3231. AESTHETICS AND THE MEDIA. (4 Credits)

A study of the development of aesthetic and formal issues in the media: representation, narration, and convention. Critical methodologies. Reading. Film and television viewings. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 3232. CLASS, TASTE, AND MASS CULTURE. (4 Credits)

An examination of cultural hierarchy and conflicting notions regarding the "ideal" form and content of the symbolic environment. Drawing from various critiques of the mass media, this course explores the ways in which debates about cultural and aesthetic standards reflect socio-economic and political concerns. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, PLUR.

COMC 3235. POPULAR MUSIC AS COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

Current issues in popular music studies-mediation, globalization, authenticity, identity, community, etc.- covering a wide range of popular musics in North America. Regular reading and listening assignments. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, COLI, URST.

COMC 3237. GENDER IMAGES AND MEDIA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3111): This course introduces students to ways in which ideas about gender develop over time and within different cultural contexts and the practical implications of those ideas. We bring critical thinking and discussion to readings from scholarly research and popular media to explore narratives around gender, including those at the intersection of race, sexual preference and ethnicity, to deepen awareness of and appreciation for multiple perspectives. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, COLI, JOUR, WGSS.

COMC 3247. RACE, CLASS, AND GENDER IN MEDIA. (4 Credits)

This class analyzes representations of social class, racial and ethnic identity, and gender and sexuality in media. We begin our work with two assumptions. First, that media both shape and are shaped by social conceptions. Second, that these categories—race, class, and gender—are embodied, that is, they describe different physical bodies that inhabit real, lived environments. From there, students learn to identify central themes and problems in representing differences of race/ethnicity, social class, and sexuality in fiction and nonfiction media. The class will use a mixture of hands-on activities with contemporary media (such as blogging, journaling, and online discussion) plus more traditional readings about theories of representation and embodiment. The course is intended as a learning environment where students are able to do more than simply identify stereotypes. Rather, they intervene in these representations, actively critiquing stereotypes and moving past them towards a reflective attitude about the relationship between society as it is lived for people of different racial, sexual, and class groups—and the image of those groups as depicted in media. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, LALS, PLUR, WGSS.

COMC 3260. MEDIA, REGULATION, AND THE PUBLIC INTEREST. (4 Credits)

This course explores the history and grounding of U.S, telecommunications regulation in the precedence of utilities, emphasizing private control while developing a national infrastructure, as opposed to the European model of media as social agency. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMC 3268. MEDIA AND NATIONAL IDENTITY. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3681): An examination of case studies showing how national identity is inferred and organized by mass media. Questions include: How is nationalism produced by media discourse? How are outsiders portrayed? Who draws the boundaries between inside and outside, and how? Texts will include television, radio, print journalism, music and films. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, COLI, GLBL, INST, JOUR, PJST.

COMC 3272. HISTORY AND CULTURE OF ADVERTISING. (4 Credits)

An examination of advertising practices. A review of the social and technological history of American advertising beginning with the print media. Social and interpersonal meanings imbedded within the publicity images of both print and television are examined as well as the continuing penetration of advertising and marketing strategies in media culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, JOUR.

COMC 3310. ETHICS AND POPULAR CULTURE. (4 Credits)

For many people, popular culture -- specifically television and film -- is their first exposure to complex ethical issues and resulting decision-making processes. Yet, despite the fact that pop culture plays a large part in shaping our moral standpoint, it is often overlooked as a source of academic ethical discourse. This course will examine the relationship between ethics and popular culture throughout the past century: from sideshows and Vaudeville to reality shows and social media. It will look at ethical issues in the entertainment industry and media, how we learn about ethics from pop culture, and how to be an ethical consumer of a variety of media. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMC 3330. PEACE, JUSTICE, AND THE MEDIA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3110): This course analyzes the ways in which the media represent the issues of peace and justice. Considering the relevance of peace and justice for democratic practices, the variety of media depictions of such issues will be analyzed. Topics such as environmental and economic justice, poverty and the poor, race and gender, war and peace, and media ethics and values will be covered. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, JOUR, PJST.

COMC 3350. MEDIA LAW. (4 Credits)

This course is designed to introduce the communication and media studies major to the basic issues in the field of media law. Examined here are the Constitutional principles underlying the major Supreme Court cases that have established the parameters governing the use of communication technologies in the country. Special focus will be given to the various legal changes posed by new media. Juniors and Seniors only. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, JOUR, NMDD.

COMC 3370. ETHICAL ISSUES IN MEDIA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3476): Review of some basic ethical principles and examination of media related issues such as freedom of expression, the right to privacy and the public's right to know. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, JOUR, NMDD.

COMC 3373. MASS OPINION: MEASURE/MEAN. (4 Credits)

A humanistic survey of disciplined viewpoints about the significance of public opinion in political affairs, human cognition, leadership, religious faith, and aesthetic judgments. The complementary and at times conflicting approaches of philosophical history and the sociology of knowledge are principally employed. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMC 3374. MEDIA EFFECTS. (4 Credits)

What are the effects of mass media on society? This question lies at the heart of mass communications. While many people feel that it is “obvious” that the media have a powerful effect on society, social scientists remain divided on the issue. Reviewing both classic and contemporary literature, we will trace the various models that have been offered as possible explanations for the mechanism of media influence. Juniors and seniors only. Pre-requisite either COMM 1010 or COMM 1011. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, JOUR, NMDD.

COMC 3375. CHILDREN AND MEDIA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3309): This course explores the controversy surrounding children's media. Topics such as the role of media in socialization and learning, the effects of media content and communication technologies on children's behavior, thought and emotions are examined. The functions that media perform for children, and the efforts to design media specifically for children are considered. Various forms such as television, popular music, film, video games, fairy tales and children's literature are explored. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, EP3.

Prerequisites: COMM 1000 or COMM 1010.

COMC 3378. MEDIA, MILLENNIALS, AND CIVIC DISCOURSE. (4 Credits)

This political communication course is being taught by the host of "The Open Mind" on public television, and will discuss how media and politics are evolving in the digital era and politicians are trying to reach out to Millennial voters. The course will investigate: (1) the Millennial media consumer/voter (2) the space of public (old and new) media, and (3) the character of our political discourse. The course will also focus on the 2016 presidential campaign for lessons in how politics is playing out in journalism and social media today. This course also counts toward Journalism, as it concerns the social construction of the news media. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMC 3380. INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3106): Comparative study of media systems of different countries. The role of the media in the formation of the concept of nationality. Theories of communication development and the debate around the international flow of information. How the media informs us about other countries and how, through the media, we form our conception of the world. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, GLBL, INST, IPE, JOUR, LALS, NMDD.

COMC 4114. SPEAKING FOR CHANGE. (4 Credits)

This advanced public speaking course trains students in a variety of long-form presentation scenarios in an effort to develop sophisticated techniques of storytelling and persuasion in a contemporary communication landscape. The course will emphasize rehearsal and performance techniques, storytelling structures, visual aids, speaking without notes, and exploration of societal issues and values of great personal importance. Students’ practice will culminate in a 20-minute public speaking engagement for the Fordham community. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMC 3114 or COMM 2501.

COMC 4170. DISSENT AND DISINFORMATION. (4 Credits)

An exploration of the moral and ethical conflict between conscience and convention, principle and group loyalty, received wisdom and freshly perceived evidence, from disparate disciplines which converge on the continuity of ancient religious and political dissent with modern forms of dissent and the social control measures they provoke in modern mass-mediated society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: JOUR, SRVL.

COMC 4177. COMMUNICATION FOR SOCIAL CHANGE. (4 Credits)

This course provides students with a disciplined understanding of the communications industry through the exploration of communications techniques being used today to promote social change. The course blends guest lectures from leaders in their field with practical training in proven communications tactics to prepare students for advanced study or careers in communication. By the end of the course students will come to understand that you can "do well while doing good". Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 4211. MEDIA AND MODERNITY. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 4222. MEDIA AND THE ENVIRONMENT. (4 Credits)

This course looks at the variety of ways in which media depict the natural world through stories, narratives, and images of nature and the environment in both fiction and non-fiction formats, as well as persuasive forms of communication. In assessing how our relationship with nature is mediated through culture and media, we will look at a broad spectrum of genres from films, documentary, TV, magazines, advertising, environmental journalism and conservation campaigns. We will compare such media images and narratives to key environmental texts on major topics in ecology, fining points of convergence and difference and assessing the consequences. We will examine the ways in which popular formulations of the natural world influence public opinion, human behavior and environmental policy. Using case studies we will examine informational, educational, and persuasive campaigns designed around topics such as transportation, chemical production, food and agricultural practices, and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ENST, ICC, JOUR, PJST, ZLB2.

COMC 4241. COMMUNICATION, POPULAR CULTURE, AND PHILOSOPHY. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 4711): This course will draw from the fields of Communication and Philosophy, exploring the ways in which the two disciplines complement and inform one another, each offering a route to a deeper understanding of issues of concern to both fields. Our terrain of inquiry will be contemporary popular culture, in the forms of mass, digital and social media. Calling upon a diverse range of scholarship from both intellectual traditions, we will examine the ways in which popular forms of mediated communication can help to engage a mass audience in timeless philosophical issues, as well as inviting us to ponder newer kinds of philosophical questions, unique to our time. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, URST.

COMC 4248. MULTICULTURALISM. (4 Credits)

African Americans and their Media: Innovators, Agitations, Audiences and Entrepreneurs. This course will examine mass media, outlets owned and targeting African Americans from historic, economic, social and media studies perspectives. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: JOUR, PLUR.

COMC 4267. MEDIA AND SOCIAL AWARENESS. (4 Credits)

This course examines the relationship between media and social awareness and how different media interact with our social awareness. The course explores the ways we receive and evaluate images, narratives, representations of events, and depictions of peoples and groups. Students investigate the production of media representations across a broad spectrum of outlets, formats, genres, and programming in print, broadcast, and new media. The course also focuses on the roles and functions of media in society and culture, as well as the public's need for information and knowledge in a 21st century environment of globalization, convergence, and technological and economic change. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

COMC 4279. MEDIA AND POPULAR CULTURE. (4 Credits)

An exploration of various forms of contemporary popular culture and their meanings in modern life. Theoretical approaches are discussed and various media texts such as film, television, advertising images, popular icons, music and style are analyzed. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, URST.

COMC 4338. AMERICAN POLITICAL COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 4706): This survey course addresses political communications in the American context. Students will examine the activities of key political actors (elected officials, institutions, organizations, public and the media) and will engage with key works in the field to assess how political actors use mediated public practices to bolster narratives, create consensus, and allocate power and resources. Major topics for consideration include: the public sphere and public opinion; propaganda and public relations; presidential rhetoric; electoral politics and campaigning; journalism, the news, political humor, and public life; research on media and new media effects; meditation of identity politics (age, religion, race, gender, and sexual orientation); and political advocacy, civic engagement, and social movements. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMC 4339. COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA IN THE AGE OF TRUMP. (4 Credits)

The unconventional events of the 2016 presidential campaign and the unprecedented practices, pronouncements and nascent policies of President Trump are expected to have profound effects on the presidency, political campaigning and news media practice for years to come. This course will examine questions and issues related to the Trump presidency. The course will cover such topics as the President's use of Twitter, his rhetoric, his attacks on the mainstream media, the rise of "fake news," coverage of Trump, and issues related to celebrity.

COMC 4340. FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION. (4 Credits)

The opposing historical trends of authoritarian centralism and libertarian pluralism are traced through a variety of political orders, philosophies, and communication systems. The interplay of technological forms of communication predominant social values is examined and specific cases are subject to evaluative judgments. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, DTEM, ICC, JOUR, NMDD, PJST.

COMC 4348. RELIGION, THEOLOGY, AND NEW MEDIA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 4411): An interdisciplinary capstone course, this course examines the historical and theoretical significance of the intersection between communication, technologies and religious communities. Drawing on the disciplinary methods and assumptions of both communication and media studies and theology, the course will ask students to critically and theoretically explore the significance of religion as a cultural phenomenon as well as to take seriously the theological significance of media practices as articulated by religious subjects. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COMM, DTEM, ICC, JOUR.

COMC 4360. COMMUNICATION ETHICS AND THE PUBLIC SPHERE. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 4004): This course deals with the policy decisions and ethical issues facing society in the telecommunications age. Of special concern are the ethical issues raised by the melding together of heretofore discrete media into vertically integrated, profit oriented, corporations. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, EP4, JOUR, PJST, VAL.

COMC 4370. ETHICAL CONTROVERSIES IN 21ST CENTURY MEDIA. (4 Credits)

Mass media have long played a significant role not only in the ways society informs and communicates with itself, but also in the manner in which it reproduces its social mores and reality. With the rise of digital and social media, these dynamics are both disrupted and deepened, even as they continue to evolve. Students who plan to pursue careers in the media (professional and academic) will be faced with an unusually challenging array of difficult choices that carry with them potent ethical repercussions. This course explores contemporary ethical debates in media on the levels of theory, institutions, audiences and practices. It strives to equip future media professionals with sensitivity to moral values under challenge as well as the necessary skills in critical thinking and decision-making for navigating their roles and responsibilities in relation to these challenges. For all students, the class also hopes to hone ethical insights as media consumers as well as participating citizens in media-saturated societies.

Attributes: EP4, VAL.

COMC 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.