Greek (GREK)

GREK 1001. Introduction to Greek I. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the vocabulary and structure of ancient Greek, with emphasis on reading continuous passages. Attention to Greek history and civilization.

Attributes: MVLA, MVST.

GREK 1002. Introduction to Greek II. (3 Credits)

This course will enhance the reading, writing, speaking and listening skills acquired by students in Introduction to Greek I or from prior study. It will further promote a deeper understanding of Greek and its literary and cultural traditions.

Attributes: MVLA, MVST.

Prerequisite: GREK 1001.

GREK 1004. Intensive Ancient Greek. (4 Credits)

An accelerated introduction to the vocabulary and structure of the ancient Greek language. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: MVLA, MVST.

GREK 1501. Intermediate Greek I. (3 Credits)

A continuation of GREK 1002 or 1006 with an introduction to the reading of various prose authors.

Attributes: MVLA, MVST, THEO.

GREK 2001. Greek Language and Literature. (3 Credits)

Advanced reading in classical Greek authors.

Attributes: MVLA, MVST.

GREK 3008. Herodotus. (4 Credits)

A survey of Herodotus' Histories in Ancient Greek.

Attributes: AHC, ALC.

Prerequisite: GREK 2001.

GREK 3012. Plato: Socratic Dialogues. (4 Credits)

A study of the early Socratic dialogues: selected passages from: Laches, Lysis, (Charmides), Meno, Gorgias, (Protagoras), Euthyphro. A study of the basic philosophical problems raised by these dialogues. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, PHAN.

GREK 3034. Readings in Homer. (4 Credits)

Select readings in the Greek texts of Homer. Discussions of the literary, mythological and historical background of the Homeric texts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

GREK 3200. Readings in Greek. (4 Credits)

The study of Greek literary texts and grammatical practice for students above the elementary level in Greek. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

GREK 3211. Greek Prose Composition. (4 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to prose composition in ancient Greek, with particular attention on a variety of writing styles, grammar, and diction. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, MVST, OCST.

GREK 4999. Tutorial. (1 to 5 Credits)

Advanced-level courses will be taken either as tutorials in selected Greek texts or on the Rose Hill campus where students may select from among the offerings of the classics department there.

GREK 5001. Introduction to Greek I. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the vocabulary and structure of ancient Greek, with emphasis on reading continuous passages. Attention to Greek history and civilization.

GREK 5002. Elementary Greek II. (3 Credits)

This course will enhance the reading and writing skills acquired by students in Introduction to Greek I or prior study. It will further promote deeper understanding of Greek and its literary and cultural traditions.

GREK 5003. Intermediate Greek. (3 Credits)

A continuation of GREK 5002 with an introduction to the reading of various authors.

GREK 5004. Greek Language and Literature. (3 Credits)

Advanced reading in classical Greek authors.

GREK 5006. Intensive Ancient Greek. (4 Credits)

An accelerated introduction to the ancient Greek language Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

GREK 5012. Plato: Socratic Dialogues. (3 Credits)

A study of the early Socratic: dialogues selected passages from Laches, Lysis, (Charmides), Meno, Gorgios, (Protagoras), Euthypho. A study of the basic philosophical probes (questions raised by these dialogues).

GREK 5034. Readings in Homer. (3 Credits)

Readings and discussion of Homer's epic poetry. An appreciation of the Homeric style. Prerequisite: Remove prequisites.

Prerequisite: GREK 2001.

GREK 5205. Readings in Greek. (3 Credits)

The study of Greek literary texts and grammatical practice for students above the elementary level in Greek. Tailored to the needs of the enrolled students.

GREK 5211. Greek Prose Composition. (3 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to prose composition in ancient Greek, with particular attention on a variety of writing styles, grammar, and diction.

Attribute: MVST.

GREK 5300. Advanced Readings in Greek. (3 Credits)

Advanced readings in anceint Greek texts.

GREK 6008. Herodotus. (3 Credits)

A survey of Herodotus' histories. (N.B. this is the graduate version of GREK 3008)

GREK 6221. Greek Sympotic Poetry. (3 Credits)

Survey of poetry performed at the symposium. Analysis of the sympotic setting and the literature that emerges from it.

GREK 6222. Hellenistic Poetry. (3 Credits)

Hellenistic poetry consciously looked back to earlier Greek examples, and by an accident of history became the living Greek poetry encountered by the Romans who therefore in their own liking back to Greek literature saw it through Hellenistic eyes. This course will attempt to do the poetry justice in its own right, and to show how it served to mediate between classical and Roman.

GREK 6224. Apollonius of Rhodes. (3 Credits)

Close reading and analysis of Apollnius's "Argonautica."

GREK 6361. Euripides. (3 Credits)

Close readings of Herakles and Hippolytos in Greek, with emphasis upon dramaturgy, manuscript tradition and metrics. Students are expected to familiarize themselves with two commentaries chosen: G.W. Bond for the Herakles and W.S. Barret for Hippolytos (Oxford Press Paperbacks). The 12 remaining tragedies of Euripedes are read in English. Students are expected to give one to two reports during the term based on scholarly articles.

GREK 6432. Xenophon. (3 Credits)

GREK 6463. Greek Orators. (3 Credits)

GREK 6632. Plato. (3 Credits)

The dialogues read in class are considered from philosophical, literary, and historical points of view.

GREK 6642. Aristotle's Rhetoric. (3 Credits)

Aristotle’s Rhetoric is a fascinating work that is as complex and influential as it is controversial. Despite unsolved questions about its actual composition and difficult afterlife, the Rhetoric continues to serve as the starting point for theoretical reflections on rhetoric, oratory, and prose writing. This course aims to provide an overall idea of the Rhetoric and delve into questions about its language, composition, subject matter, and position within Aristotle’s corpus. The work will be read in the original Greek and special topics for consideration include the commentary tradition and the impact and afterlife of the Rhetoric, particularly the way in which it has contributed to discussions about ancient emotions.

GREK 6932. Aeschylus. (3 Credits)

This course surveys a selection of Aeschylus plays in Ancient Greek in view of their literary-historical context, the history of scholarship, and recent developments in the field of Classics and Athenian Greek drama in particular.

GREK 6940. Sophocles. (3 Credits)

A survey of Sophoclean tragedy in Greek.

GREK 6961. Menander. (3 Credits)

This course is a survey of Menander's works in Greek.

GREK 6962. Managing Information in the Greek and Roman Worlds. (3 Credits)

The Process of Reading, Writing, Delivering and Disseminating: Managing Information in the Greek and Roman Worlds. This course will be based on Greek and Latin literary sources and on the papyri from Greek and Roman Egypt. It will give students notions of the paleography of the literary Greek and Roman papyri and, in general, of the literary papyrology in order to enable them to use some papyri. This course will inquire about the background of the creation, delivery, dissemination, and publication of the literary texts. Among the questions this course will address are the following: Did ancient readers make notes, and how did they use them in compiling their works? How can we explain the existence of different versions of some texts, for example of Plato, Dio, or Lucian? What are the salient characteristics of extempore delivery, and do they impact the widespread loss of declamations both Latin and Greek? In this course, students will be exposed to texts and authors outside the mainstream.

GREK 6963. Greek & Roman Pastoral Poetry. (3 Credits)

A seminar querying such critical metonyms as epic, bucolic, and pastoral by deconstructing texts that dramatize relatedness, belatedness, reception, and origin through metapoetic tropes stocking epic no more with heroes but with herders engaged with neither war nor animal husbandry, but with love engendering originary craft thematized as country chore and song. We'll take a brief look at bucolic memes in older epic as corralled by Sicilian Theocritus into idylls, which get rebranded into eclogue books at Rome: Virgil's Book of Bucolics—ten eclogues—supplanting bucolic Sicily with pastoral Arcadia; then the book of Calpurnius—seven eclogues—"Sicilian," anticipating books—bucolic, eclogue, pastoral-as tradition; and flower of metapoetic tropes from Dante, Petrarch, Mantuan, Sannazaro, Spenser, Pope, Wortley-Montague, or Frost. Texts may be studied in translations. Seminars, after introductory remarks, to develop by considering the texts. Intertextual relations further to be pursued in two short essays from bents peculiar to diverse readers: whether construing intertexts—Greek, Latin, Italian—philologically, rhetorically, theoretically of translation, or assaying translated texts from such standpoints as receptionistics, narratologism, cultural biastics, propagandism, courtiership, cognitive psychology and blending, metonymics, metaphorology: trahat sua quemque voluptas.

GREK 8888. What is Hellenistic Religion? (Texts, Archaeology, Epigraphy). (3 Credits)

"Hellenistic religion" used to be thought of as a stepping stone on the way to the monotheisms of the common era, with a focus on individual experience, spirituality and interiority, henotheism, and gradual erosion of communal ritual in the city. Recent research in Hellenistic history and epigraphy has entirely overturned this picture; we now understand that civic religion was alive and well, continuously adapting and transforming itself in the cosmopolitan Mediterranean of the Hellenistic empires while also developing new forms of religious experience, including a different role for emotions and the senses. Yet there is no study dedicated to the nature of religious change in this period. This course will seek to understand the character and degree of this transformation, while building on and developing existing theories of religious change. After introductory sessions on methods of studying Greek religion, current trends in Hellenistic history, and theoretical approaches to religious change, we will use late 4th-century Athens under Lykourgos and the uses of the past in Hellenistic Athens as a starting point for investigating characteristic religious phenomena of the Hellenistic period, such as festival and spectacle culture in Asia Minor; polistheoria and festival networks; the role of ritual, music, and performance in the Hellenistic city; religion and social structure, especially women's cults; and euergetism and cult finance, priesthood sales, sacred laws (especially the new law from Marmarini). We will look at the relationship between old and new gods, e.g., ruler cult, royal authority, and soteria; Alexandria and Athens; the Ptolemaic empire, Egyptian cults, and the Aegean islands; the Seleucids and the Red Sea; and finally at gods and worshippers on the move transforming the Mediterranean's cultic landscape, such the healing cults of Asklepius and especially the spread of Isis; foreign cults, religious associations, and economic interaction; diaspora religions and multi-cultural emporia such as Delos, Rhodes, and Demetrias; Phoenicians in a global Mediterranean; and Hellenistic Judaism. Time allowing, we will also examine the relationship between religion and philosophy.

GREK 8999. Independent Study. (3 Credits)

GREK 9101. Introduction to Greek I. (0 Credits)

GREK 9151. Intermediate Greek I. (0 Credits)

GREK 9201. Greek Language and Literature. (0 Credits)

Greek Language and Literature.

GREK 9320. Readings in Greek. (0 Credits)