Italian (ITAL)

ITAL 1001. Introduction to Italian I. (5 Credits)

An introductory course that focuses on the four skills: speaking, reading, writing and listening providing students with a basic knowledge of Italian linguistic structures, vocabulary and culture, which studied interdependently, comprise the Italian Language.

Mutually Exclusive: ITAL 1002.

ITAL 1002. Introduction to Italian II. (3 Credits)

This course will enhance the reading, writing, speaking and listening skills acquired by students in Introduction to Italian I or from prior study. It will further promote a deeper understanding of Italian and its literary and cultural traditions.

Prerequisite: ITAL 1001.

Mutually Exclusive: ITAL 1001.

ITAL 1501. Intermediate Italian I. (3 Credits)

Intermediate Italian I will continue introducing students to the fundamentals of the Italian language, emphasizing the five main components of language acquisition (reading, writing, listening, speaking, and cultural competence) using a task- and content-based Italian learning program. Conducted in Italian.

Attribute: IPE.

Prerequisites: ITAL 1001 or ITAL 1002.

ITAL 1502. Intermediate Italian II. (3 Credits)

Intermediate Italian II will continue introducing students to the fundamentals of the Italian language, emphasizing the five main components of language acquisition (reading, writing, listening, speaking, and cultural competence) using a task- and content-based Italian learning program. Conducted in Italian.

Attribute: IPE.

Prerequisite: ITAL 1501.

ITAL 2001. Italian Language and Literature. (3 Credits)

A critical analysis of selected cultural and literary texts; composition, conversation, and review of pertinent grammatical structures.

Attribute: IPE.

Prerequisite: ITAL 1502.

ITAL 2201. Italian Community Engaged Learning: Art and Society. (3 Credits)

This course is part of the core language sequence and corresponds to ITAL 2001, Italian Language and Literature. In this course, students develop linguistic, cultural, and intercultural skills by studying Italian texts and artifacts in their sociopolitical context, with a focus on the period after World War II. By collaborating with an Italian cultural Institution in New York state, students will examine the interplay between the local U.S. community and the institution, with a focus on representation and access, and experience and reflect on the negotiation of communication in an intercultural setting. Must have taken ITAL 1502 or placement.

Prerequisite: ITAL 1502.

Mutually Exclusive: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 2400. Acting in Italian. (0 Credits)

Course focuses on improving diction, pronunciation, expansion of vocabulary and conversational skills through the study and performance of dramatic works.

Attributes: IPE, THEA.

ITAL 2500. Approaches to Literature. (4 Credits)

A basic course in Italian literature. Close readings in the major forms, prose fiction, poetry and drama, and an introduction to the varieties of critical strategies for reading them. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, IPE.

ITAL 2561. Reading Culture Through Literature. (4 Credits)

This course is designed to introduce students to different aspects of Italian cultural tradition and history by closely reading representative literary texts from the early and modern periods, in a variety of genres including poetry, narrative, and drama. Students will acquire a technical vocabulary and practice different interpretive strategies to speak to continue the study of Italian literature and culture at the advanced level. The course¿s thematic focus, and the primary texts and secondary sources may vary. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 2605. Italian Conversation and Composition. (4 Credits)

Composition with emphasis on improvement of grammatical skills and facility in Italian phraseology. Recommended for those students continuing in Italian as majors or minors, whose curricula will include historical surveys of Italian literature or civilization. Emphasized skills include letter writing, descriptions and exposition. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: IPE.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 2640. Classics of Italian Cinema. (4 Credits)

In this course we will explore selected masterpieces of Italian cinema focusing on the visual techniques and narrative strategies developed by world-renowned filmmakers such as Rossellini, Fellini, Visconti, Antonioni, Wertmuller, Tornatore, Benigni, and others. We will discuss how historical events, national, cultural and gendered Italian identies, fashion, and political and social issues have been represented or constructed by means of innovative and unique cinematic languages. Conducted in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: IPE.

ITAL 2700. Filming the City Inside and Out: A Cinematic Journey Through Italy. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to Italian cinema by focusing on the representation of Italian cityscapes and urban life, as well as the dynamic between urban and “peasant” cultures, the urban center and the rural periphery, in modern Italy from the so-called “economic miracle” of the late 1950s to the present, by internationally renowned filmmakers such as Visconti and Antonioni (Milan), Ermanno Olmi (Lombardy), Pupi Avati (Bologna), Fellini (Romagna), Pasolini, Nanni Moretti and Ferzan Ozpetek (Rome), Mario Martone and Matteo Garrone (Naples), among others. At the same time, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of Italian film analysis. Through screenings, critical readings, class discussions, and essay writing, students will develop the appropriate Italian vocabulary and analytical skills to examine a film focusing on its historical and cultural context, and the narrative, visual and sound techniques it employs. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, IPE, ISEU, ITMO.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 2705. The Souths of Italy: Words, Images, and Sounds. (4 Credits)

In this course, we will explore the rich and diverse cultural production in Southern Italy in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries with the purpose of challenging general assumptions and stereotypes about the "South," and breaking through the North–South divide that has plagued Italian culture since Italy's unification in the 1860s. We will discuss literary texts, visual texts, and music, focusing on the legacy of the past, gender and family relations, urban culture and rural life, the push for modernization, and regional identities versus globalization, among other topics. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, INST, IPE, ISEU, ITMO.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 (may be taken concurrently) or ITAL 2561 (may be taken concurrently).

ITAL 2800. Italy and the Arts: Politics, Religion, and Imagination in Medieval and Renaissance Italy. (4 Credits)

This course is directed to undergraduates with interests in figurative arts, literature, the history of art, and the humanities. It explores the great changes that occurred in the arts and in their political and religious role during the period of Italian Renaissance humanism. The course concentrates on the 14th and 15th centuries and presents the multifaceted reality of Italian arts within the context of a rapidly changing society at the dawn of modernity. Students will explore the central role all arts play in one of the most fascinating periods in the history of ideas and creativity through a variety of texts, including literature, figurative arts, music, architecture, and theater from Giotto to Michelangelo. Students will learn about the artists’ conceptions of art, the political role of civil as well as religious patronage, the relation between literary and visual languages, and the birth and evolution of the figure of the artist. Readings include works by Saint Francis, Dante, Boccaccio, Giotto, Petrarch, Leon Battista Alberti, Leonardo da Vinci, and Michelangelo Buonarroti. This course includes the use of media and film. Taught in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE, ITMA, MVST.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 or ITAL 2561.

ITAL 2805. Gods, Demigods, and Men: Renaissance and Baroque Italian Theater. (4 Credits)

The course is designed to introduce students to the exploration of the theatrical production in Italy during the Renaissance and the Baroque, from Italian theater's rebirth in 15th century Florence to the masterpieces of ht 16th century. We will analyze the development of characters and their vision of truth, society and human relations, while investigating notions of subjectivity and gender. We will see how men, heroes, gods or half-human and half-supernatural creatures struggle against their own desire and lust (or against impediments and adverse fortune) in order to manipulate reality and resolve dilemmas. Readings will include plays by major authors such as Angelo Poliziano, Niccolo Macheavelli, Lodovico Ariosto, Torquato Tasso, Giordano Bruno, And Gian Lorenzo Bernini, and Opera librettos, such as the Orfeo by Alessandro Striggio, with music by Angelo Monteverdi. Some plays will be read entirely, others as selection. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: IPE.

ITAL 2910. Emigration in Literature and Film 1850-Present. (4 Credits)

Between 1880 and 1920, millions of Italians left the shores of the peninsula from various regions—Veneto, Liguria, Campania, and Sicilia, to mention only a few—and headed to other parts of the world to seek work, wealth, and a new way of life. Their first destinations were Argentina, Brazil, Venezuela, later the United States, and finally Canada. This course explores the causes of this mass exodus and the benefits reaped by the destination countries, as well as the conditions that immigrants found there. Narratives by De Amicis, Verga, Pirandello, Giacosa; filmmakers Crialese and Taviani; historian Colajanni; and Italian-American writers, such as Gambino, Helen Barolini, and others will be examined and discussed. The class will be conducted in Italian. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, IPE, ITMO.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 2999. Italian Internship. (2 Credits)

ITAL 3002. The Art of Translation. (4 Credits)

The study of transferring texts from one linguistic code into another; analysis of various elements of texts, literal and figurative meaning, style, syntax, etc. will be the focus of the course as well as hands on practice working with different types of texts translating form English into Italian and vice versa. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 3005. Translation: Theory and Practice. (4 Credits)

The patron saint of translators, Saint Jerome (347-420 AD)—translator of the Bible (along with some 70 other scholars), which came to be known as the Vulgate or the Septuaginta—advised that one should translate concepts and not words, a precept that he derived from Cicero (106-43 BC). But Dante (1265-1321) pointed out in "Convivio" that certain texts, especially poetic ones, cannot be "transmutati" without losing their original harmony and musicality. Benedetto Croce (1866-1952), a 20th-century philosopher and literary critic—nominated 16 times for the Nobel Prize—noted that every linguistic expression is an intuition that unites thought and speech indissolubly and therefore, translation for him is not possible because it must separate words and ideas, as the latter are transposed into another language. Ferdinand de Saussure (Geneva 1857-1913) suggested that the concept is inseparable from the words used to express it, thus leaning toward the impossibility of translation. But we also know that, somehow, translations work: They are done all the time, are useful, and are practical. But what can we conclude from the fact that one idea can be said in literally dozens of ways in another language? There are hundreds of translations of Dante in English: which "Divine Comedy" are we in fact reading when we read Dante in English? This course will deepen our understanding of translation and explore what it can and cannot accomplish. We will translate a variety of texts and see what Umberto Eco (1932-2016) meant by his book on translation, "Dire quasi la stessa cosa." Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, IPE.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 3011. Dante and His Age. (4 Credits)

Readings from Dante's Comedy in the light of the cultural production of his day including Proveneal and Sicilian lyric, influential philosophical texts, and economic and political changes in 13th-century northern Italy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE, MVLI, MVST.

ITAL 3012. Medieval Storytelling. (4 Credits)

Narrative tradition in medieval Italy from the Novellino to Boccaccio and Sercambi. Taught in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE, ITMA, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 or ITAL 2561.

ITAL 3020. Renaissance and Baroque Novella. (4 Credits)

This course will investigate the evolution of Italian narrative prose from the Renaissance to the Baroque. Particular attention will be devoted to the tradition of the unframed short story (Novella Spicciolata), but we will also explore collections of Novelle composed by major authors such as Bandello, Straparola and Basile. Taught in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE, ITRE.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 3021. Vice and Virtue in Medieval Italian Literature. (4 Credits)

Informed by Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and Aquinas' Summa as well as by writings of Andrea Capellanus, Abeland and others, this course discusses the ethical value systems sustained in works by Jacopome, G. D'Arezzo, Donte, Petrouea, Boccaecio, as they first expressed in Poetry and Prose. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE, ITMA.

ITAL 3030. Criminal Tales. (4 Credits)

Representation of violence in its political, organized and subversive manifestations in post-war Italy, its historical evolution, its sociological and anthropological interpretations. Films and various literature will be examined. Authors and directors: Rosi, Saviano, Wertmüller, Carofiglio, Camilleri, Mammarella, Ferrara, Salvatores, Giordana, among others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, IPE, ISEU, ISIN, ITMO.

ITAL 3050. Arts and Politics in Italian Humanism. (4 Credits)

This course analyzes the main characters of the early humanist movement in Italy. It focuses on arts and politics and presents authors such as Petrarch, Valla, Lorentl de Medres. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE, ITMA, ITRE.

ITAL 3051. Survey of Literature. (4 Credits)

The social and cultural background of Italian literature with selected readings and analysis of some of the most representative authors of the time. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 3062. Ethics and Economic Value in Medieval Literature. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the literary representation of economic values such as profit, work, and utility as they emerge in medieval texts. Students will analyze these values within the critical perspective of the 13th to 15th century authors as seen in their political, historical, and literary contexts. This course includes works from early European lyric poetry, and authors such as Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Erasmus, and Leon Battista Alberti. Students will learn to set their discussions in the broad perspective of European intellectual history. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE, ITMA.

ITAL 3063. Saturian Spirits: Art and Literature in Italy. (4 Credits)

As an examination of different literary genres of the Italian Renaissance and Baroque (novella, theatre, poetry, autobiography and epic poems), this course will focus on some of the most important courts of the peninsula (Firenze, Urbino, Mantova, Ferrara, Venezia and Roma), and will explore the relation of the visual arts to the literary production of eminent writers and artists (Brunelleschi, Alberti, Pico della Mirandola, Poliziano, Boiardo, Ariosto, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, Leonardo, Cellini, Vasari, Tasso, Striggio, Marino). In addition to engaging in close-readings of key works, students will be encouraged to investigate other art forms such as paintings, sculpture, architecture and music, in an attempt to address the questions: What role did patronage of the arts play during the Renaissance and Baroque? What did it mean to be a writer and an artist in Italy between the 15th and 17th centuries? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE.

ITAL 3065. Lies and Liars in Medieval and Renaissance Italian Literature. (4 Credits)

In the late medieval and Renaissance periods, philosophers, writers, scientists, and artists regularly addressed the problem of how reality, truth, and untruths were strictly intertwined in contradictory ways. In this course, we will analyze the various forms of deceit in order to explore their implications with regard to freedom and power (both political and personal), sincerity or clarity and opacity of the self. We will read works written by leading authors such as Dante, Boccaccio, Leon Battista Alberti, Lorenzo Valla, Luigi Pulci, Matteo Maria Boiardo, Machiavelli, Ariosto, Galileo, Giordano Bruno, and Torquato Accetto. Taught in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ITRE.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 or ITAL 2561.

ITAL 3111. New Italian Cinema. (4 Credits)

The representation of social and cultural issues elaborated in the dramatic, multimedia discourse of playwrights and film directors such as Pirandello, Fellini, Moretti; in works that include Six Characters, La Dolce Vita, La Vita e Bella. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, INST, IPE, ISEU.

ITAL 3120. Renaissance Literature. (4 Credits)

A study of the principal poets and writers of the 15th and 16th centuries. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE, ITRE.

ITAL 3125. Magnificence and Power: The Medici and Renaissance Florence. (4 Credits)

The course is dedicated to the study of the relationship between culture and politics. In particular we will discuss how the practice of power and the exercise of patronage affected Florentine writers in 15th and early 16th centuries, during the period of Medici’s supremacy. It will be central to the course to verify why the Medicean government was surprisingly far from being simply a repressive and propagandistic political regime. Indeed, Florence, during those years, became an extraordinary place for the arts and, in particular, for literature. Many Florentine masterpieces were produced in different genres (novella, theatre, poetry, autobiography, epic poems, dialogue) and were influential in the development and the shaping of 16th century European culture-at-large. This course will focus on the literary production of eminent writers and artists such as, but not limited to, Alberti, Pico della Mirandola, Poliziano, Lorenzo de’ Medici, Luigi Pulci, Machiavelli, Michelangelo. In addition to engaging in close-readings of key works, students will be encouraged to investigate other art forms such as painting, sculpture, architecture and music, in an attempt to address the questions: What role did Medici patronage of the Arts play during the Renaissance in Florence? What did it mean to be a writer and an artist in Florence between the 15th and 16th centuries? Course taught in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE, ITRE.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 or ITAL 2561.

ITAL 3215. Love and Honor in the Renaissance Courts. (4 Credits)

This course will focus on some of the most important courts of the Peninsula (in particular Firenze and Ferrara) and will explore the epic poems of eminent writers such as Pulci, Bolardo, Ariosto, Tasso, and Marino. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE, ITRE.

ITAL 3280. The Italian Short Story. (4 Credits)

TBA Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ITRE.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 (may be taken concurrently) or ITAL 2561 (may be taken concurrently).

ITAL 3452. Italophone Migrant Literature From Africa and Beyond. (4 Credits)

In this course, we will read works written by contemporary Italophone writers, those who have adopted the Italian language initially to document their experience of migration and later to reflect creatively on their culture and country of origin as well as on Italian society and history. What stories do these writers tell? What personal and historical experiences do they describe and give voice to? What languages and narrative techniques do they employ? What is the cultural impact and political relevance of their work in contemporary Italy when considered in Mediterranean, European, and global contexts? We will consider questions of representation; gender, ethnic, racial, and religious identity; and political and cultural pluralism with a dual aim. First, to explore how Italian society has changed or resisted changing in the last decades by confronting its imperial past and current neo-colonial ambitions under the sustained pressure of mass immigration and global mobility. And second, to discuss how these original artistic voices, and the testimony they give, have enriched Italy’s literary canon and tradition while also fostering a novel understanding of Italy’s cultural history. Please note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GLBL, INST, IPE, ISAF, ISEU, ISIN, ISME, ITMO, PJRC, PJST.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 (may be taken concurrently) or ITAL 2561 (may be taken concurrently).

ITAL 3500. Comedy and Satire in Italian Cinema. (4 Credits)

Commedia all'Italiana or satirical comedy represents a major contribution to world cinema with a significant approach to modifying social injustice, prejudice, and abuses. A broad range of styles and film techniques provide a forum to analyze film language and visual experiences. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE.

ITAL 3530. The Stage and Society Since 1700. (4 Credits)

Social changes, traditions and reforms, love, family and economics as they are interpreted and cast on the stage by renowned playwrights such as Goldoni, Giacosa, De Filippo, Di Giacomo, Pirandello and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE.

ITAL 3550. Italian Unification: Film/Literature. (4 Credits)

Realism and idealism in the achievement of Italian unification analyzed in the works of filmmakers such as Blasetti and Scola, and in writers like Foscolo, Mazzini, Garibaldi, Lampedusa and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE, ITMO.

ITAL 3553. Italy From Unification to 1945: Literature, Culture, and Society of the Modern Period. (4 Credits)

This course will focus on major cultural figures such as Carducci, Pascoli, D’Annunzio, Ungaretti, Svevo, Montale, and Calvino, among others, and will explore their relationship with and contribution to the social conditions and developments of their times. Taught in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, IPE.

ITAL 3625. The Modern Italian Theater. (4 Credits)

Italian playwrights such as: Pirandello, Betti, Fabbri, Dr. Filippo Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, IPE, ITMO.

ITAL 3650. Italy at War. (4 Credits)

In this course we will read literary works—narrative, theater, and poetry—written in Italy during three key periods of its modern history, namely World War I, World War II, and the so-called "years of lead" (the late 1960s through the early 1980s). We will discuss the response of ltalian writers and intellectuals to war, fascism, and terrorism by focusing our attention particularly on the techniques that they use to represent, exalt, or denounce individual and collective violence, and to support or critique extreme ideologies, whether on the right or on the left of the political spectrum. In Italian. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, IPE, ISEU, ITMO.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 (may be taken concurrently) or ITAL 2561 (may be taken concurrently).

ITAL 3701. Italian Women Writers. (4 Credits)

Outstanding Italian women writers such as Colonna, Morra, Deledda, Ginzburg, Morante, Maraini, Loy. Taught in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, IPE, ISEU, ITMO, WGSS.

ITAL 3901. Narrative and Film. (4 Credits)

The development, trends, and interplay of literary texts and Italian film in the history of the Italian cinema from its origins to today. Films by DeSica, Visconti, Bertolucci, Pasolini, Taviani, Bellocchio, Rosi, and Tornatore. Literary works by Pirandello, Bassani, Levi, Boccaccio, Cain and Verga. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, IPE, ITMO.

ITAL 3910. Italy Today. (4 Credits)

This course explores the cultural and sociopolitical development of Italy since the end of World War II. Emphasis will be placed on multiculturalism and multilingualism, women and minorities, the impact of the media on culture, politics and society, terrorism and the Mafia, and migration to and from Italy. Classes are conducted in Italian. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, IPE, ISEU, ITMO.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 or ITAL 2561.

ITAL 3920. Words on Fire: Poetry/Soc. Today. (4 Credits)

This course examines the evolution of current Italian poetry through the analysis of the literary, cultural, and social influences on a variety of contemporary poetic works. Readings will include poems by celebrated masters, as well as by young emerging poets living in Italy and abroad. Class discussions will address the lively discourse on poetry and criticism currently unfolding in a variety of mediums, such as newspapers, magazines, literary journals (printed and online), and blogs. Authors include Eugenio Montale, Giuseppe Ungaretti, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Giovanni Raboni, Antonella Anedda, Amelia Rosselli, Valerio Magrelli, Alberto Bertoni, Fabio Franzin, Alberto Casadei, Milo De Angelis, Paolo Valesio, Davide Rondoni, and Maria Luisa Spaziani, among others. Class conducted in Italian. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, IPE.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 4006. Dante's Cosmos: Medieval Science, Theology, and Poetry in the Divina Commedia. (4 Credits)

This course investigates Dante's cosmos in the Divine Comedy through medieval science, theology, and poetry. Disentangling the context of the Comedy from Dante's encyclopedic culture through reading in the disciplines of his time will lead students to a deeper comprehension of the multidimensionality of Dante's universe than is possible through any singular disciplinary. The course will broaden students' perception of the medieval cosmos in contrast with contemporary notions of cosmology. Taught in English with readings and writing in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, IPE, MVLI, MVST.

ITAL 4010. Anni Di Piombo/Years of Lead: Culture, Politics, and Violence. (4 Credits)

The period from the late 1960s to the early 1980s in Italy, known as “anni di piombo” or years of lead, was characterized by intense social and political unrest, and terrorist activities. The 1969 bombing in Piazza Fontana in Milan and the 1980 bombing of the train station in Bologna serve as the tragic bookends of a decade of political violence culminating in the kidnapping and murder of Aldo Moro by the Red Brigades in 1978. In this course, we will study these years by closely examining the cultural production of the time – literature, film and other media. We will pay particular attention to the social and political motivations underlying extremist activism, both left- and right-wing, as represented in literature and the popular press, and to writers’, filmmakers’ and intellectuals’ diverse responses to politically motivated violence, whether to criticize the terrorists themselves or to question the state-sponsored “strategy of tension”. We will also discuss the ways in which these experiences have been revisited and reimagined in recent years, and their relevance for today’s Italy. Taught in English with texts in Italian and English translation. Coursework in Italian for credit toward the Italian major or minor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, EP4, IPE, ITMO, VAL.

ITAL 4800. Italian Internship. (2 to 4 Credits)

ITAL 4998. Senior Thesis Tutorial. (4 Credits)

Independent research, supervised by a faculty in the language, leading to the completion of a senior thesis.

Attribute: IPE.

ITAL 4999. Tutorial. (1 to 6 Credits)

Study of a particular aspect of Italian literature or thought. Independent research and readings. Weekly or bi-weekly meetings with faculty adviser. Designed for majors with permission of instructor.

Attribute: IPE.

ITAL 5090. Italian for Reading. (0 Credits)

This course provides students with the skills for reading Italian. It combines instruction of basic structures of grammar and syntax with the application of techniques in building vocabulary, reading comprehension and translation practice in a collaborative learning setting. Students will read texts from various disciplines in the humanities and social sciences and will gain practical experience in translation and research methods.

Attributes: IPE, MVSG.

ITAL 9101. Introduction to Italian. (0 Credits)