Humanitarian Studies (HUST)

HUST 3001. Humanitarian Action Workshop. (1 Credit)

Fordham University, in coordination with the Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs (IIHA), conducted the First National Workshop of the Jesuit Universities Humanitarian Action Network (JUHAN) this summer. Approximately 160 Undergraduate students from 20 member Institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities (AJCU) attended this Workshop to broaden their knowledge and understanding on global humanitarian initiatives and the challenges it faces. The three-day Workshop consisted of a main plenary session each day focusing on contemporary topics followed by breakout sessions- where students were given an opportunity to attend lectures on cross-cutting and sectorial issues as well as participate in sessions to develop their skills required to be effective in this field. On the final day of the conference, the students met in teams to utilize the knowledge they gained from the workshop and draw an action plan on what initiatives/projects they would implement on their home campuses. The Academic Director of the Institute will meet with the Fordham delegation periodically in the Fall semester to help implemet the proposed action plans.

HUST 3500. Famine, Food Security, and Nutrition. (4 Credits)

Increasing global inequality, the effects of climate change, violent conflict and many other factors mean that currently almost forty million people worldwide are in need of food assistance. Starvation and hunger are vast and complex global issues with medical, political and moral importance. This course will examine the wide range of humanitarian attempts to help people suffering from food and nutrition crises, from individual clinical interventions to treat childhood starvation, through to regional attempts to predict the timing and severity of famines and respond to them, and innovative approaches like cash transfer schemes. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: HUST 4001.

HUST 4001. The Humanitarian System: Past, Present, and Future. (4 Credits)

In this course, students will consider both theoretical and applied approaches to humanitarian action. The course will be centered on ways of thinking and actions that bridge these two responses. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, ISIN, MEST, PJCR, PJST, SOIN, URST.

HUST 4002. International Humanitarian Action and New York City. (4 Credits)

Fordham has long been a world leader in the academic study of humanitarianism and in professionalizing aid work. This course examines international responses to humanitarian crises. We explore the range of actors in emergencies, including faith based organizations, secular international NGOs, United Nations agencies and more. We will examine their motives, capabilities and histories using case studies of the various problems to which they respond: violence, genocide, famine, and displacement and human rights abuses. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HUST 4100. Refugee and Asylum Law. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the evolution of international law governing refugees and asylees from the establishment of the United Nations to the present, and the forms of relief available to refugees and asylees, both immediate and long term. This course will also examine the national responses to the influx of refugees and asylees in four specific countries to be used as case studies: Australia, Hungary, Sweden, and the United States. Legal remedies often reflect the mores and values of nations; accordingly, we will explore the moral and ethical questions presented by the migration policies and asylum law systems of the countries to be studied, including the practice of mandatory and remote detention, extraterritorial adjudication, safe third-country agreements, and the attendant violations of civil and human rights. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: HPSE, PJEC, PJST.

HUST 4200. Forced Migration and Humanitarian Action. (4 Credits)

Forced migration is a central issue in the provision of humanitarian and assistance. This course will examine the causes of forced migration, including violent conflict, natural disasters, development projects, human trafficking and others, and will use a variety of case studies to examine international responses to forced migration, the migrant experience, legal and human rights around migration, and the role of human agencies and NGOs in responding to forced migration. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: HPSE, INST, ISIN, LAHA, LALS, PJCR, PJST.

HUST 4300. Gender-Based Violence in Humanitarian Settings. (4 Credits)

In this course students will examine the myriad causes and consequences of gender-based violence (GBV) in humanitarian settings through legal, historical, political, social, and economic lenses at the national and international levels. GBV is a well-documented public health and human rights issue that is underresourced and poorly responded to in most countries across the globe. In crisis settings, existing systems for physical and social protection are further destabilized or destroyed; we will examine existing international guidelines and identify programming that has sought to address GBV and intervene in GBV in humanitarian settings. This course will use a range of case studies and will emphasize the perspectives of affected populations. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: HCWL, PJGS, PJST, WGSS.

HUST 4500. Evolution of Development and Humanitarian Aid Systems. (4 Credits)

This course digs deeply into the political economy, politics, infrastructure, design, incentives, and dilemmas related to the current international development and humanitarian aid system. Blending both practitioner and theoretical perspectives, this course takes a critical approach to the evolution of aid systems, with reflection on historical and economic context, interests and motivations, and perceptions of success and failure, among other topics. There is special emphasis on the perspectives and vantage points of affected populations. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, ISIN, PJEC, PJST, SOIN.

Prerequisite: HUST 4001.

HUST 4501. Humanitarianism and Global Health: Unequal Access for the Displaced and Marginalized. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the greater impact of global health crises on marginalized groups—conflict affected, displaced, women, the elderly and LBGQT communities. Exploring through case studies the way international actors—including development institutions, UN agencies, states, private companies, foundations and humanitarian actors—respond to health crises. Trauma, epidemics disease, access to food, gender and human rights will be topics of concern. Four-credit courses that meets for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENST, ESEL, HPSE, INST, ISIN.

HUST 4800. International Humanitarian Internship. (4 Credits)

The Undergraduate course on Humanitarian Action: Theory and Application offers an introduction to humanitarian aid work and provides an understanding of the complexities and challenges the key actors face in an applied context. The course focuses on teaching the common principles of the world of humanitarian affairs, with a cross-cutting, interdisciplinary perspective that also analyzes gender, age differences, human rights frameworks, and indigenous cultural approaches to conflict and post-conflict phenomena. In addition to these teach topics, students would have an opportunity to intern at prominent international humanitarian organizations in New York. These would help them gain the necessary exposure and understanding of the dynamics of such organizations and their mission. Students would be required to meet with, and relate their experiences with the professor periodically and be mentored on how best to utilize the skills they gain to further advance their interests in humanitarian aid work. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, ISIN, SOIN.

Prerequisites: HUST 4001 and HUST 4500.

HUST 4801. Summer Humanitarian Internship. (1 Credit)

This course offers students the opportunity to reflect on internship with an international humanitarian on intergovernmental organization in New York City.

HUST 4888. Senior Thesis Seminar. (4 Credits)

The seminar is designed to assist Humanitarian Studies Major students through the main stages of their thesis: formulating appropriate questions; undertaking effective research to answer those questions; organizing, analyzing and communicating findings and arguments. The seminar is a single-semester course, taken in students’ senior year. The students will meet weekly to discuss problems of common interest under the guidance of faculty members from a variety of disciplines drawn from the major committee. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: SOIN.

Prerequisites: HUST 4001 and HUST 4500.

HUST 4999. Tutorial. (1 to 4 Credits)

HUST 5010. Humanitarian Negotiation. (3 Credits)

Many humanitarian aid professionals believe that negotiation is perhaps the activity in which they spend most time both in field and headquarters situations. Almost everything that humanitarian workers need to achieve has to be negotiated with donors, host governments, local structures, communities, beneficiaries, other humanitarian agencies and their own staff. This course gives students an understanding of negotiation theory together with practical historical and current applications. All types of negotiation are examined, from road blocks and negotiations in situ for access to negotiations for peace agreements far from the conflict. Theoretical lectures will be supported with group scenario based exercises.

HUST 6000. International Diploma in Humanitarian Assistance. (0 to 8 Credits)

The International Diploma in Humanitarian Assistance (IDHA), the flagship program of the Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs, equips mid-career professionals to drive the humanitarian sector of the future in a more effective, sustainable, and dignified direction. Students will also develop a holistic perspective on global humanitarian issues to propel them to the next level in their careers, helping them create positive social change both in and out of the field.