Interdisciplinary (IDIS)

IDIS 0100. Fordham Pre-Law Institute. (0 to 3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of the U.S. legal system and U.S. law. Topics include Introduction to the U.S. Legal System, Constitutional Law and Legislation/Regulation, Foundations of Private Law, Criminal Justice, Civil Procedure and Litigation, Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility, and Legal Research and Writing. Classes are taught by Fordham Law School faculty, who will introduce the Socratic method of teaching common in legal education. Optional sessions will prepare students for the law school admissions process, the first year of law school studies, and legal professional development. One class will feature a conversation with law graduates working in various legal positions in the public and private sectors. This course is designed for those contemplating law school but all are welcome.

IDIS 0800. Pre-College Skills Development. (0 Credits)

This course, for entering first-year students students accepted through HEOP, is a developmental course with seminars aimed to enhance college survival skills by focusing on issues related to time management, study skills, personal growth, financial aid, and career planning. It is offered as part of the mandatory HEOP Summer Program for new first-year students.

IDIS 1001. Quantitative Skills Review Workshop for Social Studies. (0 Credits)

This workshop is the perfect opportunity to get a refresher or review of quantitative skills for those pursuing studies in the Sciences. While the workshop is designed for students in the Post-baccalureate /Pre-Medical/Pre-Health program, it is open to all students who need or would like instruction or a refresher in the listed subject areas. The workshop will provide students with the necessary foundation for Chemistry, Physics, Calculus, Psychology, and other courses needed to prepare for advanced science studies. The 5-session workshop, conducted in a relaxed setting, will cover essential topics that will help prepare you for a rigorous science curriculum. Topics will include a review of basic algebra, refresher on exponents and radicals, functions and graphs, logs and exponents, polynomial and rational equations, calculator use and exponential and logarithmic expressions. An optional trigonometry overview is available. In person lessons, video links and resources will be provided and in-class problem sessions will assist to increase your math skills and confidence.

IDIS 1002. MCAT Problem Solving: A Unique Approach for ESL. (0 Credits)

The purpose of this two-part workshop is to help students effectively handle the reading passages on the MCAT. General preparation strategies for the MCAT will be presented with a focus on the CARS portion of the exam, emphasizing careful and efficient reading of questions, and applying these techniques to the science sections of the test. While this material is designed specifically for pre-med students for whom English is not the first language, the workshop is for anyone who is struggling to handle the large amount of written material on the MCAT. The sessions discuss the structure of the MCAT while helping students identify and address the skills that are being tested. The workshop will provide techniques and strategies that can be adapted for dealing with the verbal aspects of the MCAT.

IDIS 1003. Health Professions Development Seminar. (0 Credits)

The CHP Development Workshop sets the preparatory framework for post-baccalaureate/pre-medical/pre-health students who have been selected to participate in the Committee on Health Professions process. The workshop, intended only for students who are in the Committee on Health Professions program, covers the requisite areas for their aspirant school application cycle, which includes strategies and techniques for MCAT test preparation and test taking, preparing narratives, interviewing skills, and the CHP portfolio process, which will lead to the CHP letter to support school applications. Prior approval from the program director is required.

IDIS 1005. College Skills Development-1. (3 Credits)

IDIS 1006. College Skills Development. (4 Credits)

This course, open to entering first-year students accepted through HEOP, is designed to enhance student skills related to college composition, critical reading, mathematical analysis, science, and economics. It is offered as part of the mandatory HEOP Summer Program for new entering first-year students. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 1007. College Skills Development-2. (3 Credits)

IDIS 1010. Critical Reading in the Disciplines. (3 Credits)

This course will provide students with the critical skills necessary to read successfully and use reference materials at the college level. Selections from disciplines such as literature, psychology, history, and natural sciences will be analyzed for information, main and subordinate ideas, logical structure, inference, tone, and irony. Written exercises and reports will measure students’ comprehension.

IDIS 1011. Introduction to Microsoft Word. (0.5 Credits)

This course provides students with a thorough review of the Word screen with its ribbon menus and of working in an existing Word document. Techniques to move through the document, to select and edit text, spell-check, and save and close are introduced. Printing with the print dialog box is covered. Learners will also create new documents with short lines and wrapped text and will use many key features: page setup and margins, page breaks, indented paragraphs including numbering and bullets, envelopes, and special fonts. Learners will work with memo, letter, and report document formats.

IDIS 1012. Intermediate Microsoft Word. (0.5 Credits)

This course covers intermediate-level Microsoft Word features related to selecting/editing text, symbols, and printing a multipage document. Word file management is covered. Designing Word tables is covered in detail, with formatting the table and individual rows for titles and formulas for totaling data in a table. Working with larger documents, including ones with multiple headers/footers, is also covered. Mail merge is shown merging Word lists, Access queries, and Excel spreadsheets, including sorting and selecting special records. Labels and envelopes are covered in mail merge and as individual items.

IDIS 1013. Advanced Microsoft Word. (0.5 Credits)

This course will help students master complex tasks involving collaboration, communication, security, long documents, mail merges, and automation. Students will gain experience tracking changes, comparing documents, combining documents, and other processes to help them collaborate with others more effectively. Students will continue to improve their collaboration practices by learning about document security, electronic forms, and cloud-sharing options. They will be introduced to ways to leverage communication features, including mail merge, language and translation options, and accessibility tools. Finally, the class wraps up with tools to help students work more efficiently, including task automation with macros and customizing your ribbon. This class is customizable to meet the unique needs of the attendees.

IDIS 1014. Introduction to Microsoft Powerpoint. (0.5 Credits)

This course begins with a thorough introduction to the PowerPoint screen, including ribbons and the screen layout. Working with an existing presentation, learners will create a new slide between existing slides, edit slides in outline view and slide view, change the order of slides, and apply animation in the slide sorter. Learners create a presentation from scratch after learning how to design a presentation; work with the title slide and bullet slides; select a template for design/color; customize the master slides; change layouts; enhance the presentation with clip art and photos; and print for outlines, handouts, speaker’s notes and slides.

IDIS 1015. Introduction to Microsoft Excel. (0.5 Credits)

This course provides students with a thorough introduction to the Excel environment, including screen layout, selecting with mouse, spreadsheet design, and the commands needed to create, copy, edit, format, save, print, and back up spreadsheets. The course also covers the use of the print-preview function and techniques for working with large spreadsheets. In addition, the formatting features such as bold, underlined text, wrapping text, and merging cells will be introduced. The general capabilities and limitations of Excel are also outlined.

IDIS 1016. Intermediate Microsoft Excel. (0.5 Credits)

This course provides learners with techniques to enable them to use Excel more effectively. The course covers how to set up and format more than one sheet simultaneously, creating 3D and other multi-sheet formulas, and working with formulas linked to different Excel files. The course will also introduce techniques for maximizing efficiency when managing lists of information. The course pinpoints the database components of Excel to sort, filter, and subtotal volumes of information within an Excel sheet. Time-saving pivot tables are explained and practiced to show how to quickly summarize information.

IDIS 1017. Advanced Microsoft Excel. (0.5 Credits)

In this course, students learn when and how to use macros. Learners will start by recording a simple set of actions. Building on the simple recorded macros, they will learn how to modify the code to make the macro more flexible and to incorporate decision-making and looping commands that allow the macro to repeat, as needed, based on the results in the cells. Learners will be introduced to Visual Basic in order to modify and enhance recorded macros and broaden their functionality and will practice using the Visual Basic debugger to step through and debug macros.

IDIS 1018. Introduction to Microsoft Project. (1 Credit)

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of project management through Microsoft Project, using time as the fundamental unit of measure. Students will learn to create a simple project plan, work with tasks in the project plan, produce a printed view of the project plan, and a Gantt chart. They will also use the feature to track actual time and progress and learn how to reschedule activities when projects slip or other activities intervene. In addition, learners will work with the existing reports and views available within MS Project.

IDIS 1100. The Adult Learner: Identity, Change, and Development. (3 Credits)

This seminar has been designed to encourage each student to study his or her own unique identity development in adulthood. Each adult learner will be assisted in examining their skills, values, goals, experience, educational background, learning style and personality. Students can use this information for both short and long term career, educational and life planning. This new self-discovery will be developed through assessment testing, occupational research, informational interviewing and consultations with career development and educational specialists. The course utilizes a combination of readings, lecture, class discussions, presentations, exercises, guest speakers and video material.

IDIS 1200. Seminar: Career Transition Leaders. (1 Credit)

Designed to enhance students’ personal/professional understanding of career development and life management skills to transition to a professional/corporate career. The course will assist students to obtain internships in a structured, interactive, open form. It will also offer access and networking with employers.

IDIS 1250. Foundations of Community and Public Health. (3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to community and public health. We will study the foundations of community and public health using readings and class discussions, and will examine prevailing community and health problems and new developments. There will be an emphasis on developing the knowledge base and skills necessary for a career in health education and health promotion. Topics will include definitions of health, community health, public health, and mental health, epidemiology, communicable and noncommunicable diseases, environmental health, health disparities in various population demographics, and racial and ethnic populations. Practitioners and experts in the field will be invited to give presentations to the class. Students will get opportunities to explore the various health issues and discuss prevalence of various diseases, with a focus on COVID-19, diabetes, asthma, and other diseases, as well as opportunities to participate in a volunteer experience in a clinical/hospital setting.

IDIS 1999. Tutorial. (1 Credit)

Tutorial.

IDIS 3015. Culture and Community. (4 Credits)

A study of culture and community in contemporary American society and lifestyles. The course will study the entire way of life that is faced by various groups in American life. An interdisciplinary consideration of the concepts of culture and community will be studied. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3020. War and New York City. (4 Credits)

This course is an explanation of the impact of war on the political, social, economic, and cultural development of New York City. The course will examine wars and times of conflict from several periods in American history, including, but not limited to: the American Revolution, the Civil War, WWII, and September 11th. An integral element of this course will be using the City itself as our classroom. We will be making several field trips to various locations of historical events, museums, etc.0 Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3025. Social Problems in America. (4 Credits)

This course will examine and study major issues and problems in contemporary American society in the context of individuals and community in a complex society. Research and writing will use an interdisciplinary approach. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3035. The Helping Professions: Theory and Practice. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the helping professions and the issues related to becoming a well-trained professional, including ethics, burnout, motivation, dual relationships, and boundaries. The class will also examine the major theories and the techniques used by psychoanalysis, cognitive behavioral therapy, group therapy, and others.

IDIS 3040. Gettysburg: A Study Tour. (4 Credits)

Three days and 51,000 casualties ¿ the Battle of Gettysburg was the turning point of the Civil War and a seminal moment in the history of the United States. So striking was the battle, President Abraham Lincoln vowed that the men who died there did not do so in vain ¿ in fact their sacrifice gave ¿a new birth of freedom¿ to the idea of democracy for the world. Robert E. Lee, deeply depressed at his failure, fearing he cost his nation the possibility of independence and peace, offered his resignation to Confederate President Jefferson Davis. This course will examine Gettysburg from several perspectives, including military and political strategy, Lincoln¿s Gettysburg Address, Davis¿ and Lee¿s reactions, and the battle¿s long-lasting impact on American society and mythology. The course includes an overnight field trip to the Gettysburg Battlefield. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3045. Presentation Strategies for Professional Impact. (4 Credits)

Competent and compelling presentations are important in all professional settings. In this class, students develop their public presentation and performance skills by exploring physical and vocal communication techniques. Taught in a workshop format, students explore verbal and nonverbal communication, use of visual aids, organization, and delivery through weekly action-oriented exercises. Students learn strategies to enhance their public persona and gain confidence through instructor and peer feedback, developing the ability to create presentations that have professional impact. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3050. A Bloody Lane and Forever Free: Antietam, a Study Tour. (4 Credits)

Antietam – September 17, 1862 was the single bloodiest day in American military history. The 23,000 casualties on that single day were four times the number of casualties at Normandy. The number of men who died in combat that day was twice the number who died in combat during the War of 1812, the Mexican War, and the Spanish-American War combined. Antietam ended the British and French momentum for recognition of the Confederacy and gave President Abraham Lincoln the opportunity to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. This course will examine Antietam from several perspectives, including military and political strategy, Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, Davis’ and Lee’s reactions, and the battle’s long-lasting impact on American society. The course includes a two night field trip to the Antietam Battlefield. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3055. Warriors, Monks & Merchants: The Silk Road from Antiquity to the Future. (4 Credits)

Globalization is sometimes considered a modern phenomenon, driven by new travel, commerce, and communication technologies. But people have moved throughout Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Europe for centuries to trade, fight, or spread religions. This course uses routes of movement to explore connections between and among regions people moved through and considers the effects of these movements on both people and the regions over time. Historically, this movement facilitated economic, cultural, political, and religious interactions between the East and West, commonly called the “Silk Road.”.

IDIS 3060. Civil War in Popular Memory. (4 Credits)

The Civil War has been the topic of over 50,000 books, thousands of websites, and hundreds of multimedia sources – ranging from films to television shows to comic books to video games. Americans have long been fascinated by the Civil War, which cost more Americans their lives than WW I, WWII, the Korean War, and Vietnam War combined. Much of what Americans know about the Civil War did not come from textbooks or scholarly sources or the classroom, but rather from popular culture. This course will explore how the Civil War is portrayed in popular culture and examine how Americans’ perception and memory of the Civil War has changed over time – change that often had more to do with American society at the time than the “facts” of the War itself Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3070. Baseball - the New York Game. (4 Credits)

Interdisciplinary course that will trace the relationship between baseball and New York society and culture. The course will study the early history of the game and historical developments as the emergence of the New York City professional teams in connection with government, culture and issues of society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3071. Baseball: The American Game. (4 Credits)

Baseball: The American Game is an interdisciplinary course that will trace the relationship between baseball and American society and culture. The course will study the early history of the game and historical developments during the emergence of the American professional teams in connection with government, culture, and issues of society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: HIST.

IDIS 3080. Winners and Losers in Literature and Film. (4 Credits)

Literature and film are filled with so-called “winners” and so-called “losers.” Who can claim these titles and why? Who decides and how? In analyzing these topics, we’ll explore what can be learned about the human condition in the individual and in society. Works discussed will include, Snow White; Goldilocks and the Three Bears; Death of a Salesman; Charlie Chaplin’s Little Tramp; Glengarry Glen Ross; My Left Foot, and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3090. Demoracy and Social Justice: A Global Perspective. (4 Credits)

Through a multi-disciplinary analysis, this course will explore global definitions of freedom, solidarity and the self within a social context. Readings will lead to discussions on resistance models influencing World Order and the criterion of an underclass, that must organize for transformative change for the sake of survival. Analysis of texts and classroom discourse will explore the development of a nation state, its emphasis on economic globalization, cultural difference and liberationist criticism, in conjunction with an analysis of social ethics and morality Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3800. Internship. (3 Credits)

Internship.

IDIS 3836. Fiction into Film. (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to study and analyze a variety of literary works and the cinematic adaptations made of those works. Our topics will include theme, narrative, film language, music and lyrics, costume design, scenic design, and more. The course will cover a variety of literary and cinematic genres and will include works by the authors Joyce, Baum, and King, and the directors Wilder, Hitchcock, and Coppola.

IDIS 3999. Tutorial. (3 Credits)

IDIS 4999. Tutorial. (1 to 4 Credits)