Medieval Studies (MVST)

MVST MTNC. MAINTENANCE – MEDIEVAL. (0 Credits)

MVST 0912. REQUIREMENT PREPARATION. (0 Credits)

For Ph.D. and Master's students, registration necessary to maintain continuous enrollment while preparing for a milestone requirement, such as comprehensive exam, Master's thesis, or dissertation submission.

Attribute: Z410.

MVST 0914. REQUIREMENT PREPARATION IN SUMMER. (0 Credits)

For Ph.D. and Master's students, registration necessary to maintain continuous enrollment while preparing for a milestone requirement during the summer. (e.g., to be used by Ph.D. students after the oral examination/defense and prior to receiving the degree).

MVST 0922. PHD COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION PREPARATION. (0.5 Credits)

MVST 0930. PHD CERTIFICATE COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION. (0 Credits)

MVST 0934. MASTERS COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION PREPARATION. (0 Credits)

MVST 0936. MASTER'S COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION-MEDIEVAL STUDIES. (0 Credits)

MVST 0937. MASTERS RESEARCH PAPER PREPARATION. (0.5 Credits)

For students preparing their MA thesis in Medieval Studies.

MVST 1210. LITERATURE AND SOCIETY. (3 Credits)

This course explores different literary genres (such as saga and myth, romance, ballads and poetry, drama and devotional treatises) from different medieval cultural contexts (such as Icelandic society, feudal society, the clergy and urban society). The texts chosen for study, as well as the particular societal contexts, will vary from instructor to instructor.

MVST 1250. TRADITIONS OF STORYTELLING. (4 Credits)

Comparative study of traditions of storytelling, placing questions of narrative form within global cultural and historical contexts. Selections from ancient forms of storytelling will be considered alongside modern examples from European and American literature. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: SLIT.

MVST 3057. MEDIEVAL GERMAN LITERATURE: POTIONS, PASSIONS, PLAYERS, AND PRAYERS. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the rich literary and cultural heritage of Medieval Germany. The texts will all be read in English translation, but we will go over some passages in their original languages in class to catch some of the flavor of the Medieval German. Topics covered will include pre-Christian charms, the epic of the Nibelungs, love poetry, and urban carneval plays. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, GERM.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

MVST 3102. MEDIEVAL WOMEN WRITERS. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 3210. KING, COURT, AND CRUSADE: WRITING KNIGHTLY LIFE IN THE HIGH MIDDLE AGES. (4 Credits)

This course will view the medieval world through a lens provided by the life and writings of one man, John of Joinville (d. 1317). John was a knight, a crusader, and a close friend of King Louis IX of France (canonized as Saint Louis). He wrote a Life of Saint Louis that is rich with information about his own life, as well as the saintly king's. We will use the Life to open an examination of key themes in the knightly experience in the high middle ages, including: power, faith, the crusades, noble culture, family and social relations. It will also consider the usefulness of biography/autobiography in understanding the past.

Attributes: AHC, HIST.

MVST 3500. THE KNIGHTS OF THE ROUND TABLE. (4 Credits)

In this course, we will look for the traces of King Arthur and his Knights in modern-day London and its environs. Reading the foundational texts of Arthurian literature right where it all happened, we will be able to go to the sites and see the artifacts that remain. We will be reading excerpts from the early annals and chronicles, which laid the foundation for Arthur’s fame in history, and we will follow the exploits of some of the most prominent members of the Round Table as they were depicted in medieval literature: Sir Gawain, the ladies’ man (Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Geoffrey Chaucer’s “Wife of Bath’s Tale), Sir Perceval, the Grail Knight (Chretiende Troyes, Perceval), Sir Tristrem, the knight who fell in love with his uncle’s wife, (Gottfried von Strassburg, Tristen and Isolde) and Merlin the sorcerer (in the modern rendition by Mary Stewart, The Crystal Cave). We are planning excursions that will take us to Winchester to have a look at the tangible, wooden, “Round Table,” Stonehenge, the mythical stone circle associated with Merlin and his craft, and Canterbury, the destination of the most important pilgrimage on English soil. In London, we will visit Westminster Cathedral, the British Library, Museums holding Arthurian artifacts, and the Crypt of St. Martin-in-the-Fields for some brass rubbing and afternoon tea. This immersion into medieval culture will allow us to read Arthurian literature in a way uniquely possible in London. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 3535. BUILDING THE IDEAL CITY. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the investigation of the role that economic concepts such as profit, work, utility, and exchange play in defining the ideal city as a realizable political project. Students will investigate ethical and economic concepts and their interrelation in the debate on the best form of State and government that developed from antiquity to modern American Utopian Communities. The course includes texts from various sources, philosophical, theological, society developed in time and influence modern political thought. The course focuses on the impact of the socio-economic doctrines of the Church in shaping the idea of a possible, realizable, ideal city.

Attribute: AHC.

MVST 3700. MEDICINE, MAGIC, AND MIRACLES: SICKNESS AND HEALTH IN THE EARLY MIDDLE AGES. (4 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to the systems of learned medicine of western Europe from Late Antiquity to the High Middle Ages. Using a wide range of sources, including medical texts, hagiography, liturgy, and modern scientific studies, we will explore the distinctions between medical theory and practice, the relationship of secular and ecclesiastical authorities to the compilation of medical knowledge and the fundamental question of what constitutes medicine and what does not. In addition, we will consider the changing definition of illness and health through an investigation of medieval responses to the cataclysm of the Black Death. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

MVST 3701. ROYAL SAINTS OF MEDIEVAL EUROPE: POLITICS, LITURGY AND GENDER. (4 Credits)

This course investigates how kings and queens became saints during the European Middle Ages, alongside broader debates about medieval notions of sanctity, gender, and power. Using varied sources including hagiography, liturgy, chronicles, and material culture, we will explore the reasons why royal saints were remembered and the ways they were venerated in the celebrations of the Church. Through a series of case studies, we will also consider the uses of royal saints as propaganda by church and secular authorities to legitimize their rule, promote ongoing Christianizing efforts, and engender zeal for the Crusades.

MVST 3800. CLOISTERS, CASTLES, AND KINGS: MEDIEVAL BAVARIA. (4 Credits)

This course will explore medieval secular and church history as it manifested itself in the literature and culture of Bavaria. Includes a study abroad component. Spring break visit to Regensburg and Munich. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GERM, MLL.

MVST 4003. WAR AND PEACE: JUST WAR THEORY. (4 Credits)

This is a Senior values seminar, usually offered in Philosophy. It is a course in applied ethics. It will involve the application of a normative ethical theory to the moral problems associated with war. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 4005. THE MEDIEVAL TRAVELER. (4 Credits)

This course follows the routes of pilgrims, crusaders, merchants, nobles and peasants as they charted a course for lands of promise and hoped-for prosperity. In Medieval Traveler, we will read selections from the diaries, chronicles, and historical literature written by and about travelers in the Middle Ages. We will begin and end with travelers who sought miracles, marvels, and new trading routes on the cusp of the known world. We will focus in particular on the practicalities of medieval travel, and well as the reasons for traveling: the sacred, the profane, and everything in between. This will be an interactive class, be prepared to discuss and debate issues of interest. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENGL, GLBL, HIST, ICC, OCST, REST.

MVST 4006. DANTE'S COSMOS SCIENCE, THEOLOGY AND LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This course investigates Dante's cosmos in the Divine Comedy through medieval science, theology, and poetry. Disentangling the context of the Comedy from Dante's encyclopedic culture through reading in the disciplines of his time will lead students to a deeper comprehension of the multidimensionality of Dante's universe than is possible through any singular disciplinary. The course will broaden students perception of the medieval cosmos in contrast with contemporary notions of cosmology. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, ITAL, MLL.

MVST 4007. MEDIEVAL FOUNDATIONS OF MODERNITY. (4 Credits)

This course retraces the foundations of modern consciousness in Petrarch's works through poetry and philosophy. Students will concentrate on Petrarch's library and philosophical works to explore the passage from a medieval to a humanist vision of the self and of the world. The interdisciplinary approach of the course will provide a deeper understanding of Petrarch's ideas on the educative role of the intellectual, the crisis of scholastic thought, and the emergence of a new perception of the self. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, ICC, ITAL.

MVST 4008. MEDIEVAL AUTOBIOGRAPHIES. (4 Credits)

Although writing about oneself is often considered classical or modern, and autobiography was not classified as a genre until the eighteenth century, a handful of medieval clerics, monks, mystics, nobles and merchants wrote about their own lives. These autobiographical accounts, and the conventions and societies that shaped them are the topic of the course. By asking both the questions of genre, narrative voice, subjectivity and authorship usually posed by literary analysis, and the historical questions of what such sources about past authors, audiences and the societies that read and copied the lives, the goal is to understand autobiography and the sources themselves from an interdisciplinary perspective. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: HIST, ICC.

MVST 4009. MEDIEVAL JERUSALEM. (4 Credits)

What has made Jerusalem so beloved to - and the object of continual strife for – Jews, Christians, and Muslims? This course will explore the ancient and medieval history of Jerusalem, from its Jebusite inhabitants before the time of King David through Suleiman’s construction of the modern city walls in the 1540s. Students will learn to analyze a variety of literature, through which we will explore the themes of sacred space, conquest, destruction and lament, pilgrimage and religious polemic. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, JWST, MEST, OCST, REST.

MVST 4654. MEDIEVAL LONDON. (4 Credits)

This course draws on material and documentary sources to explore the townscape of medieval London-its wards, streets, and buildings- and the social life of its people, including their daily routines, work, and rituals. We will examine such documentary sources as chronicles, charters, and wills, along with material evidence from human skeletons, excavated houses and churches, coins pottery and clothing.

Attributes: HIST, ICC.

MVST 4998. STUDY TOUR: MEDIEVAL SPAIN. (4 Credits)

One of the great medieval pilgrimage routes, the Camino de Santiago crosses northern Spain from the passes of the Pyrenees to Santiago de Compostela. This study-tour will consider the legends of the Camino, some of its many surviving monuments, and the modern revival of the pilgrimage by walking for two weeks with the peregrinos/-as from Leon to Santiago de Compostela. This class will meet periodically at Fordham before the walk to discuss reading assignments and prepare. A journal is required at the end of the course. Fees and travel costs not included. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP3, ICC, LALS.

MVST 4999. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1-9 Credits)

MVST 5024. MEDEIVAL POLITICAL THOUGHT. (3-4 Credits)

MVST 5031. BYZANTIUM, ISLAM AND THE WEST. (4 Credits)

This course is a seminar specifically designed around an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art opening in March 2012. Byzantium and Islam: Age of Transition (7th-9th century). The exhibition offers a unique opportunity to study not only the impact on the visual arts of the interaction of the Byzantine and Islamic cultures at this critical historical period, but also to examine the art of architecture of Carolingian France and Visigothic Spain from this perspective. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 5050. WORLD OF LATE ANTIQUITY: INTRO TO HISTORY, ART AND CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This course offers an introduction to the history, art and culture of the Late Antique world from the third to the sixth century. We will explore the older narratives of decline in this period alongside powerful alternatives proposed by scholars more recently, drawing on both primary sources and monuments and critically examining the secondary literature that studies them. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CLAS.

MVST 5070. MANUSCRIPT CULTURE. (4 Credits)

Introduction to principles, materials, and study of medieval manuscripts and primary documents as well as to problems of evaluation of the cultural contexts of their production and use. Ancillary topics will include manuscript illumination, the resources of codicology and paleography, the preparation and evaluation of modern editions, the assessment of readership and patronage, material philogy and the materialism of the middle ages, the development of libraries. Students will do hands-on work with primary sources at the Morgan Library, the rare book collection of the New York Public Library, and the rare books and manuscripts collection in Walsh Library. Final projects will be tailored to the students' primary research areas and expertise. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 5077. EDITING MEDIEVAL TEXTS. (4 Credits)

This is a course in the theory and practice of editing, especially as it relates to medieval texts, with most of the examples coming from Middle English. We'll give attention to documentary, historical, and aesthetic approaches, and we will spend som etime exploring digital methods and concerns. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ENGL.

MVST 5078. MEDVL BOOKS & MATERIALS. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 5095. MEDIEVAL PILGRIMAGE. (4 Credits)

Pilgrimage will be conceptualized broadly, entertaining a variety of aims for travel and also considering the pilgrimage form as a purely conceptual exercise as well as a journey with more practical aims. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 5100. CULTURES OF MUSIC AND SOUND IN THE MEDIEVAL WORLD. (4 Credits)

Music and Sound enriched every facet of pre-modern life, liturgy and ritual above all. This interdisciplinary seminar introduces medievalists - especially those without formal musical education- to the cultures of medieval and Renaissance music. It should enable students from any discipline to engage music and the sonic more fully in their research and teaching. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 5200. MEDVL IBERIAN LIT & SOC. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 5201. THE RENAISSANCE OF THE 12TH CE. (4 Credits)

This graduate seminar explores the religious, intellectual, literary, and cultural contours of the "long" 12th Century with equal weight given to the diversity of medieval sources that survive and to modern historiographic interpreptations. The class will include visits to the Coisters musuem and to the Morgan library. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 5202. MEDIEVAL MONSTERS: TERRORS, ALIENS, WONDERS. (4 Credits)

Taught in conjunction with an exhibition of medical manuscripts ad the Morgan Library & Museum, this course examines the vital role played by monsters in medieval art and culture. The course is taught by the curators will include gallery visits and meetings at the Morgan and will involve original research and work on an online exhibition.

MVST 5205. COURT CULTURE MED IBERIA. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the cultural, social, political and religious tensions that helped to form medieval Iberian courtly communities from the 10th to the 15th centuries. The unique situation of Iberia during this period , when the centralization and consolidation of sovereignty occured in different religious and cultural contexts (Islamic and Christian) and political territories (Castile, Aragon) allows for a diverse, rich and contrasted analysis of medieval court culture. Our approach will be multidisciplinary and include literary texts, artistic manifestations, legal codes, religious writings, and chronicles. Among the courts to be studied will be the Omeyan court of the 10th century Cordoba, the Muslim kingdoms of 11th century Granada and Zaragoza, the Christian courts of Alfonso X of Castile and Jaume I of Aragon, and the late medieval court of Isabella Ferdinand. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 5300. OCCITANIA: LANGUAGE AND POWER. (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to the cultural world of a medieval “south”: Occitania. Texts in Old Occitan include documentary writing, historical narrative, and the poetry of the troubadours. Topics include urban/rural communities, gender and power, the Albigensian crusade and its aftermath and the beginning of vernacular book production.

MVST 5305. Writing East: Outremer and Identity in the Middle Ages. (4 Credits)

As the stage for the central events of the Gospel narrative, the lands of the eastern shore of the Mediterranean long occupied a central place in the collective imagination of Latin western Europe. Over the course of the Middle Ages, however, increasingly frequent encounters resulting from trade, pilgrimage, and crusade not only enriched the European image of the East, but vastly enhanced the significance to how medieval Christians approached the eastern Other. This course will trace the rise of a discourse of differences centered in what was called in England and France, "Outremer," the land beyond the sea. Together with medieval literary productions, histories, letters and travel narratives, we will read works from the growing body of scholarship on this important topic. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 5570. MEDIEVAL CRUSADES. (4 Credits)

This course adopts an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the medieval crusades in the Levant, southern France, Iberia, and the Baltic, with attention paid to the Islamic and Byzantine perspectives. The sources to be discussed include chronicles, charters, sermons, literary texts, songs, and hagiography, as well as architectural and artistic monuments and objects. Among the themes to be treated are crusader motivations, crusades and memory, European 'colonization', women and family in crusading society, crusading liturgies, the military orders, and diplomacy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 5707. Meditation, Contemplation, and the Spriritual Senses. (4 Credits)

The late Middle Ages saw an astonishing proliferation of texts, practices, and styles of devotion seeking to draw human beings closer to God through the body. New emphasis on Christ's humanity and Aristotelian natural philosophy prompted the rediscovery of the five corporeal senses and their cognitive processes in devotional literature. In this course, we will examine the languages, knowledges, desires, and anxieties surrounding the senses in a diverse corpus of texts, probing them for their theological import as much as for their literary design. Major authors: Aristotle, Augustine, Origen, Hugh of St. Victor, Bonaventure, Richard Rolle, Chaucer, Margery Kempe, Meditationes Vitae Christi. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 6209. THEMES IN PRECONQUEST LIT. (4 Credits)

This course is an advanced-level seminar on the language and literature of Anglo-Saxon England. We will read (in Old English) texts including poetry, homilies, saints' lives, and chronicles. Substantial attention will also be given to Anglo-Saxon palaeography and relevant critical literature, with the aim of providing students with the resources needed for the scholarly study of OE. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 6232. FR OF ENG:DOC & LIT CULT. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on law, mercantile, medical and other forms of documentary and civic texts in the French of England, as well as literary texts, both the well-known and the under-researched: texts with Middle English versions will be included wherever possible. For newcomers to the subject, a linguistic practicum, which should be regarded as obligatory, is offered in the hour preceding the class meeting: some knowledge of modern French is a must. Some linguistic work together with seminar student presentations and discussion takes place in each class. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 6700. MEDIEVAL SCHOLASTICISM. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary graduate course will provide an introduction to the history, theology, and philosophy of the Scholastic movement in the High Middle Ages. Topics to be considered include: the economic, social, political, religious, and educational transitions that together constitute the "renaissance of the twelfth century"; the rise of open urban schools and the development of the university; and characteristic modes of thought and discourse in scholastic theology and philosophy. Thinkers to be examined include Anselm of Canterbury, Hugh and Richard of St. Victor, Peter Abelard, the shcool of Laon, Peter Lombard, Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Bonaventure, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MVST 8100. INTERNSHIP FOR MEDIEVALISTS. (1 Credit)

This is the obligatory tutorial to be taken in conjuction with any inernship taken at libraries, museums, or other institutions of professional interst to medievalists. The student will meet with the instructor regularly to reflect on their intership experience and document their work in an appropriate format (journal, blog etc)

MVST 8500. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH. (1-4 Credits)

MVST 8501. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH. (1 Credit)

MVST 8999. TUTORIAL. (4 Credits)