Social Work (graduate) (SWGS)

SWGS 0766. MAINT MATRIC - NO MENTOR. (0 Credits)

Students who have been granted permission, for serious personal reasons, to take a leave of absence from the program register for this course each semester.

Attribute: ZAMM.

SWGS 0799. MAINT MATRIC - MENTORED. (0 Credits)

Intended for students who have completed all course requirements and require faculty mentoring and the use of the library and other university facilities while completing research and writing the dissertation.

Attribute: ZSMN.

SWGS 0930. PHD COMP EXAM-BASIC POLICY. (0 Credits)

SWGS 0931. PHD COMP EXAM-ADVANCED POLICY. (0 Credits)

SWGS 0932. PHD COMP EXAM-BASIC PRACTICE. (0 Credits)

SWGS 0933. PHD COMP EXAM-ADV PRACTICE. (0 Credits)

SWGS 0934. PHD COMP EXAM-RESRCH (QUAL). (0 Credits)

SWGS 0935. PHD COMP EXAM-RESRCH (QUAN). (0 Credits)

SWGS 0936. PHD COMP EXAM-THEORY. (0 Credits)

SWGS 5000. CH FIRST - CH ABUSE & MAL. (0 Credits)

SWGS 5001. INTRO - MANAGING HEALTH CARE. (0 Credits)

SWGS 5002. LMSW REVIEW COURSE. (0 Credits)

SWGS 5003. SW -CHILDREN-CONT ED. (0 Credits)

SWGS 5004. SW OLDER PEOPLE- CONT ED. (0 Credits)

SWGS 5005. CASC TRAINING PROGRAM. (0 Credits)

SWGS 5006. CLINICL SKILLS II (Assessment, Evaluation, Patient, Family, and Community Education). (0 Credits)

The course uses the development of the 12 core functions and the global criteria to enhance the participant’s skill level in screening, assessments, and intake. All participants conduct multiple types of screenings used during the interview for client intake and reassessment.

SWGS 5007. ETHICS, CONFIDENTIALITY,AND COUNSELOR WELLNESS; SECTION IV (45.5 hours). (0 Credits)

Course will raise awareness of ethical professional practice to assure the health, safety, and recovery of persons suffering from addiction and their families (NYS OASAS Ethics Trainers Manual) and introduce future practitioners to the values and principles of the profession, including a review of the Canon of Ethics for the practice of professional addiction counseling.

SWGS 5008. FAMILY COUNSELING AND DYNAMICS. (0 Credits)

This course is designed to give participants a comprehensive understanding of the family treatment, development, understanding life cycles, family dynamics, co-dependency, and basic family theories (systems).

SWGS 5009. GROUP COUNSELING. (0 Credits)

The course details multiple types of group counseling theory and practice. The course emphasizes practical working experiences in different types of chemical dependency services. The course accentuates dysfunctional group dynamics and developmental stages of groups.

SWGS 5010. INDIVIDUAL COUNSELING. (0 Credits)

The course outlines theoretical and individual counseling techniques used in multiple types of chemical dependency services. Concepts include modern theories of counseling, interviewing, goal setting, counseling roles and function, and application of each theory.

SWGS 5011. INTRO TO ADDICTION COUNSELING. (0 Credits)

This course will foster an understanding of America’s ambivalence regarding substance abuse, and how this ambivalence has resulted in a fragmented service delivery system that is often geared towards criminal justice interventions.

SWGS 5012. PHARMACOLOGY& PHYSICAL EFFECTS. (0 Credits)

This course will review basic pharmacology including how and why certain drugs cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) and target the CNS as the site of action.

SWGS 5013. SPECIAL POPULATION AND CULTURAL COMPETENCY COURSE. (0 Credits)

The course provides a thorough knowledge base and identification of populations suffering with addictions. It provides an overview of the special needs of each population with a focus on providing treatment. The course encompasses but is not limited to the listed populations: HIV/AIDS, Veterans, Latino(as), LGBT, etc.

SWGS 5014. CLINICAL SKILLSI(Treatment&Discharge Planning,Case Mgmnt,Record Keeping,Referal,&Service Coord). (0 Credits)

This course is designed to emphases the development and importance of Treatment Planning, Discharge Planning, Record Keeping, Referral, and Service Coordination. Participants practice comprehensive treatment planning, develop discharge plans for multiple types of chemical dependency services using appropriate grammatical principals and obtainable measurable objectives and integrated activities.

SWGS 5500. EXECUTIVE EDUCATION TRAINING. (0 Credits)

SWGS 6000. TRANSFER ELECTIVE. (3 Credits)

SWGS 6006. SOCIAL POLICY I: POLICY&PROFES. (3 Credits)

The first of two required courses covering the content of social welfare policies and services, this course introduces students to the ways American society has provided for human needs and addressed social problems through the social welfare institution, and to the underlying values, assumptions and philosophical perspectives that explain the development of this country¿s social welfare system. The major forms of social provision are addressed in an historical framework that traces the development, expansion, contraction, reorganization and (at times) their elimination. Special attention is given to how economic, political and social forces lead to differential policies and provisions with racial, class and gender dimensions, as well as to inequities, and social and economic injustices. The role of the social work profession in influencing social welfare is emphasized.

SWGS 6007. Social Policy II: Policy Practice and Human Rights Advocacy. (3 Credits)

This is the second of two required courses covering content on social welfare policies and services. Building on the first course, this course introduces the knowledge, skills and strategies necessary to examine the impact of specific social policies on clients, agencies, service delivery and practice, and to influence these policies as participants in the major arenas where policy is analyzed, formulated, implemented and changed. This course is offered with a broad focus upon diverse fields of practice or, alternatively with afocus on a specific practice area. Prerequisite: SWGS 6006. This Foundation- level course is usually taken while the student is in the Advanced phase of the program.

SWGS 6008. SW & THE LAW. (3 Credits)

The legal foundations for social welfare policies and programs are examined, including the history and development of the rule of the law, civil liberties and civil rights, sources of different systems of law, due process and legal institutions. Special attention is given to professional relations between lawyers and social workers, their differing values and ethical systems and on preparing social workers to practice in and with the courts.

SWGS 6009. SOC POL ANAL FOR MACRO PRAC. (3 Credits)

This course further develops the analytical and political skills needed by social work leaders to effectively address the multiple and complex social issues affecting communities, organizations, planning and administration. Students are exposed to advanced policy analysis skills such as fiscal analysis of government budgets and legislative analysis. The course explores the different ways in which social policies are made and implemented at each level of government, and ways in which analysis can be used by administrators, community and organizational practitioners to affect purposeful change. This course builds on basic policy skills and research principles from foundation-year courses by applying them to questions of policy suitability and effectiveness.

SWGS 6012. INTERDIS:CHILD ABUSE/NEG. (3 Credits)

The course is designed for social work and law students to jointly study the efficiency and limitations of the professional responses of lawyers and social workers to the children and families that come to the attention of the child protection system and family court. This course will examine the legal, ethical and clinical standards that govern professional responsibilities to children and families. Dilemmas shared by practitioners in both professions and common ground for collaboration between the professions will be explored. This course is team-taught by members of the social work faculty and Law School faculty. Prerequisite: Completion of the Foundation requirements.

SWGS 6014. WOMEN, WORK AND POVERTY. (3 Credits)

This transverse elective course focuses on low income and working class women in the United States taking an interdisciplinary perscpective on issues of race, class and gender, and striving to understand their effects on women's quality of life and opportunites for advancement. More specifically, theory and empirical research are harnessed to examine the causes of womens's poverty and econominc dependence, women's experiences in the family and the workplace, and the impact of public policy on women. Various strategies for social change are critically analyzed as vehicles for achieving economic justice and parity for women.

Attribute: CEED.

Prerequisite: SWGS 6801 (may be taken concurrently).

SWGS 6015. PROFESSIONAL WRITING - SW. (0 Credits)

SWGS 6016. ETHNICITY & CULTURE / SW PR. (3 Credits)

This course examines the ways in which ethnicity and culture affect individuals and groups and their interactions with society and social institutions. In particular, it explores the ways in which ethnicity is influential in all areas of social work practice as the perceptions of clients, practitioners, administrators, and policy makers reflect their own ethnic backgrounds. Consquently, the social work relationship itself is shaped by ethnic values and beliefs. Understanding and being knowledgeable about the role played by ethnicity is critical for effective social work. The course presents a model that is applicable to all aspects of social work as it helps to clarify the ways in which ethnicity can affect perceptions. The influence of ethnicity throughout the life course as well as its role in work with immigrants, individuals, families, groups, agencies, and communities is examined. The course also explores the ways that heal th care and social policies impact on and relate ethicnically diverse persons. The focus of the course is the development of knowledge and understanding among students that can assist them in working effectively with diverse populations in diverse settings.

SWGS 6017. EMPOW PR IMMIGR & REFUGE. (3 Credits)

Empowerment Practice with Immigrants and Refugees is an advanced lecture-seminar course that focuses on critical approaches to practice with/in immigrants and refugees. This course builds on HBSE, social policy, research, and micro and macro practice content in the Foundation Curriculum. This course focuses on: 1) introduction of post-colonial perspective and theoretical representations of immigrant and refugee communities, 2) critical examination of the principles of empowerment practice and understanding of trauma and recovery, 3) effects of displacement and transnational migration on immigrant and refugee individuals and their communities; and 4) social service provision strategies pertaining to working with/in immigrant and refugee communities.

SWGS 6028. CHILD ABUSE. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on intervention with abused children and battered women from an ecological perspective. It highlights the need for trauma-specific interventions with individuals and families, as well as system-wide advocacy with social and cultural institutions that contribute to the continuation of abuse within family relationships.

SWGS 6030. DEATH & DYING. (3 Credits)

This course examines the experience of death as encountered by social workers in clinical practice. The focus is on providing a theoretical base forunderstanding the psychosocial aspects of loss, death and bereavement across the life cycle. Additional emphases includestrategies, techniques and goals of interventions in clinical work with the bereaved.

SWGS 6036. Social Work Practice with Service Members, Veterans and Their Families. (3 Credits)

This course, open to all advanced year social work students, explores the role of social work within the military in meeting the needs of active duty soldiers, veterans and their families. The course begins with an exploration of social work practice within the military from an historical perspective. The changing demographic makeup of the military and the implications for social work practice are also a part of this exploration. Issues related to the development of cultural competence and cultural sensitivity when working with the military are also explored. The course then focuses on developing an evidence-based understanding of the current social service, mental health, and health needs of active duty soldiers, veterans, and their families and the intervention methods being used to respond to these needs. While the needs of soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan are emphasized, the similar and different needs of veterans from previous conflicts are also considered. The challenges being faced by social workers in meeting the needs of military women, single parents, gay and lesbian soldiers and immigrant soldiers and their family members are also explored. Students analyze and critique current methods of intervention at all levels of practice and consider ways that the social work profession could further contribute to meeting the needs of active duty soldiers, veterans, and their families.

SWGS 6038. AGN & COM ASSESS & EVAL. (3 Credits)

Rationale: As professionals who intervene on behalf of vulnerable populations, social workers have an ethical obligation to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions with the individuals, families, organizations, and communities they serve. Contemporary social work practice requires that administrators and practitioners are accountable to multiple stakeholders, including policy makers, funders, agency executives, and clients. Social workers must be prepared to respond to stakeholders using research and quantitative and qualitative research and evaluation measures. Purpose: The purpose of this course is to prepare students for contemporary social work practice that demands that social workers are proficient in evaluating agency and community-based programs. Students who take this course will learn about a variety of evaluation methods, including their purpose, effectiveness, and efficiency. The range of philosophies, methods, and skills commonly used for evaluating human service programs and social work practice interventions will be covered. Special attention is placed on evaluating the extent to which social programs address diversity and empowerment across diverse populations and settings.

SWGS 6040. SOC WORK- HUMAN RIGHTS PE. (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the human rights perspective and an exploration of its intersection with social work values, ethics, theory, and practice. The learner is challenged to examine how adopting the human rights perspective could alter social work¿s service provision, administration, research, education, language, policy analysis, and advocacy.

SWGS 6050. HUMAN RIGHTS & SOCIAL JUSTICE. (3 Credits)

Foundations of the HR Social Justice perspective in social work.

SWGS 6102. CASE MGMT IN DIVERSE POP. (3 Credits)

This course examines principles of case management, models of service delivery, clinical issues in case management and the range of service delivery systems. Special attention is given to the diverse populations using case management (e.g., persons with HIV/AIDS, mental illness or frailty). The advocacy role of the social worker in case management is emphasized, as is the range of social work practice activities used in case management.

SWGS 6103. SOCIAL WORK AND AIDS. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the impact of HIV and AIDS upon individuals, families and communities. A knowledge base from social work, social sciences, psychology, psychiatry, medicine, law and public policy is used to explore policy and practice implications. Advocacy and case management interventions are stressed.

SWGS 6104. SPIRITUALITY & SOC WK PR. (3 Credits)

This course will explore a number of holistic concepts under the definition of ¿spirituality.¿ The many ways spirituality can be used in a variety of social work practice settings will be the main theme. A range of methods of spiritual practice and approaches to healing will be taught.

SWGS 6106. DOMESTIC VIOL:SW & LAW. (3 Credits)

This course, open to both social work and law students, explores the roles of social work and law in the field of domestic violence. The course is based on the premise that increased interdisciplinary understanding will lead to more effective intervention for both victims and perpetrators. Jointly taught by a social work professor and a law professor, the course provides students with both an historical and a contemporary perspective on the social and legal response to domestic violence. An understanding of the practice skills requiredin the performance of social worker and lawyer roles is emphasized. Specifically, students explore roles in detection, crisis intervention, assessment and intervention. Prerequisite: Completion of the Foundation requirements.

SWGS 6108. SEXUALITY & SOCIAL WORK. (3 Credits)

This course presents an integrated approach to understanding human sexuality and the range of human sexual expression using the ecosystems and strengths perspectives. Students will learn to assess and to explore sexual issues that social workers frequently encounter in organizational practice settings and develop an overview of the social worker¿s professional role in helping clients with sex-related concerns. Models of practice applicable to individuals, couples, and families will be considered as well as practice models aimed at meeting organizational and community needs. Current and historical research will be examined to understand the context and development of diverse treatment models. Sexuality as it relates to GLBT populations, race and ethnicity, and cultural diversity are integrated within the course content. This course emphasizes the social worker¿s ethical responsibility to clients within diverse social work practice settings to promote the highest practice standards. This is a transverse elective.

SWGS 6109. Meeting the Challenge of Poverty: Capacity Building with Faith Communities. (3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to capacity building with the faith community on behalf of the poor. The stage will be set to consider the role of social work and faith communities through review of poverty in the U.S, the incumbent challenges the poor experience, and the role that different faith traditions have based on their belief in social justice as a lived mission. Specific methods for capacity building will include asset-based community development, use of a strengths perspective, empowerment practice and building sanctuary and understanding social work traditions of community development, advocacy and community-based clinical practice. Students will be introduced to faith capacity building initiatives in New York City, for example: housing collaboratives, congregational organizing, alternatives to incarceration ¿ creating refuge and sanctuary, mentoring programs for the formerly homeless, and emergency food services. This is a transverse elective.

Attribute: CEED.

SWGS 6110. FORENSIC SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE. (3 Credits)

Forensic Social Work Practice, prepares social workers to practice at the intersection of social work, public health, and the legal system in order to tackle contemporary social problems, such as health disparities and mass incarceration. Many forensic populations, such as racial and ethnic minorities, at-risk youth, the elderly, veterans, immigrants, LGBTQ persons, persons with disabilities, or those living in poverty or communities of violence often lack access to quality services and political, civil, social, economic, and cultural justice. Course participants learn and apply a human rights legal framework and social justice and empowerment theories to guide multi-level prevention, assessment, and interventions with historically underserved individuals, families, and communities. After completing the course, participants will increase their knowledge, values, and skills for collaborative empowerment practice with forensic populations in diverse practice settings, such as healthcare, social service, and legal settings, including protective services, the courts, and corrections.

SWGS 6206. PSYCH ASPECTS IN SW. (3 Credits)

This course uses a seminar approach to focus on the psychological dimensions of various theoretical, clinical, practice and philosophical aspects of social work. There is significant eclectic content and use of audiovisuals.

SWGS 6208. HUMAN BEHAV-SOC ENVIR I. (3 Credits)

The is the first of a two-semester course sequence. The course presents content from the behavioral sciences and related professional literature regarding those theoretical constructsand insights most relevant for social work practice. It uses an ecosystems perspective to coordinate and synthesize a broad range of knowledge pertinent to practice concerning the transactional and interactional aspects of large and small systems.

SWGS 6209. HUMAN BEHAV-SOC ENVIR II. (3 Credits)

The second semester course in the Human Behavior and Social Environment sequence discusses human development over the life course. Similarities and variations in personal and social functioning; in social, cultural and physical environments; in complex organizations and social institutions. All are examined for insights concerning the interplay between people and their environment. This focus includes biological, psychological and sociocultural factors and how the environment affects individual development. Prerequisite: SWGS 6208.

SWGS 6303. HUM SERV AGEN-THE CONT OF PRA. (3 Credits)

This course will focus on how agency goals, structure, members, technologies and relationships with the environment affect how and to whom services are provided. Emphasis is given to the skills and strategies social workers need to engage in organizational change and efforts to enhance the quality and delivery of services. This course is open to beginning nonmatriculated students as well as to all interested matriculated students in the Foundation or Advanced phase of the program.

SWGS 6319. SOCIAL JUSTICE - ORG & COMM. (3 Credits)

First in a three-course generalist social work practice sequence, this course examines the organizational and community context of social work practice from a social justice perspective. It places particular emphasis on oppression, institutional racism, economic and social discrimination and how these factors affect access to social services. Students consider how systemic oppression and socialjustice may emerge in agency, organizational and community settings. A strengthsbased, ecological assessment-planning-intervention-evaluation paradigm is used to focus learning and help students develop practice values, knowledge and skills relevant for work with larger systems. Concurrent field instruction is required; students in the Experienced and Employed Social Service Practitioners plan are exempt from the concurrent field instruction requirement, but must be enrolled in the field practicum laboratory course (SWGS 6907).

Corequisite: SWGS 6321.

Prerequisites: SWGS 6208 (may be taken concurrently) and SWGS 6209 (may be taken concurrently) and SWGS 6801 (may be taken concurrently) and SWGS 6802 (may be taken concurrently).

SWGS 6321. GEN SW PR IND FAM GRP ORG I. (3 Credits)

This second course in the generalist social work practice sequence covers the initial phase of the helping process with individuals and families and the middle phase with individuals. It focuses on building generalist practice skills in communication, interviewing, engagement, individual and family assessment, intervention planning, contracting and case documentation. Concurrent field instruction required; students in the Experienced and Employed Social Service Practitioners plan are exempt from concurrent field instruction requirement but must be enrolled in the field practicum laboratory course (SWGS 6907).

SWGS 6322. GEN SW PR IND FAM GRP ORG II. (3 Credits)

The third course of the generalist practice sequence continues to build skills of generalist practice, attending in greater detail to the processes of intervention, evaluation and termination. Particular attention is paid to the beginning and middle phases of work with families and groups, and the necessary tasks and skills involved in endings and transition for all system levels ¿ including the evaluation of practice. Skills involved in case management are addressed. Prerequisite: SWGS 6321; concurrent field instructionrequired;students in the Experienced and Employed Social Service Practitioners plan are exempt from concurrent field instruction requirement but must be enrolled in the field practicum laboratory course (SWGS 6907).

SWGS 6403. FAMILY ORIENTED TRTMT. (3 Credits)

This course provides an introductory overview of major themes of family intervention. The approach is eclectic and integrates theory and practice. The styles of Ackerman, Satir, Minuchin, Bowen and others are emphasized.

SWGS 6404. CRISIS INTERVENTION. (3 Credits)

This course emphasizes the theoretical base that guides crisis intervention and trauma treatment with individuals, families and groups across the life cycle. Case materials illustrate the assessment and resolution of crisis and trauma in a variety of contexts.

SWGS 6408. SW PRACTICE W/ CHILDREN. (3 Credits)

The focus of this course is on the application of theories, concepts and principles in the direct treatment of children. Adevelopmental and systemic perspective serves as the framework for assessing the child in the context of family and environment. A range of interventive modalities is presented, including individual, family and group treatment, as well as interdisciplinary collaboration and psychoeducational approaches.

SWGS 6409. PRAC OLDER PEOPLE & FAMS. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on direct practice with older people and their families. The course examines the social context of aging, the aging process, associated changes and the effects on older people and their families. Emphasis is on the nature of support systems and the social work role in maintaining and enhancing older people¿s functioning and well-being. The role of caregivers, when elders are limited in their capacity to function independently, is examined.

SWGS 6412. PRAC IN THE WORKPLACE. (3 Credits)

The focus of this course is on the individual as worker, the environment as defined by employing organizations, work itself, and social policy as it relates to the world of work. Special attention is given to: professional roles and ethical issues; models of service delivery like EAPs; opportunities and challenges in practice in workplace settings; and issues such as managing work and family, work transitions, diversity in the workplace, creating supportive work environments and organizational cultures and climate.

SWGS 6413. CLINICAL SW PRAC 1. (3 Credits)

The first of a two-course sequence in advanced clinical social work practice, this course expands and deepens the knowledge base of generalist practice, emphasizing advanced assessment with clients across the life cycle, and evaluation of practice. Treatment planning with individuals, families and groups are all explored. Special attention is given to the assessment of trauma. Prerequisite: SWGS 6319, 6321, 6322; concurrent field practice is required.

SWGS 6414. CLINICAL SW PRAC 2. (3 Credits)

This is the second of a two-course sequence in advanced clinical social work practice. Building upon a generalist approach to social work practice and an understanding of psychopathology and resiliency, it focuses on clinical decision making and interventions. It also examines ways in which specific models of intervention with individuals, families and groups can be tailored to client needs. Special attention is given to work with clients across the life cycle who are coping with vulnerable conditions or traumatic life events. Prerequisite: SWGS 6413; concurrent field practice is required.

SWGS 6415. SEM: CLINICAL SW PRAC. (3 Credits)

This required course assists students in integrating the knowledge gained in the required clinical practice courses and in field instruction. By developing and presenting an internship case, students demonstrate their ability to integrate theory and practice. Prerequisite: SWGS 6413; concurrent SWGS 6414 and field practice are required.

Prerequisites: SWGS 6413 (may be taken concurrently) and SWGS 6414 (may be taken concurrently).

SWGS 6417. PRAC: ABUSERS ALC & OTHE. (3 Credits)

This course examines the diagnostic and treatment implications for social work practice with alcoholics and those dependent on other drugs. Addictions are viewed from a bio-socio-psychological perspective. The diversified roles of the social worker are emphasized.

SWGS 6418. SCHOOL SOCIAL WORK PRACT. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the knowledge, values and skills appropriate for social work practice within the school setting. Understanding of the school context and its politics is highlighted. Special attention is given to working with students, teachers, parents and administrators as well as on interfacing with the community. Emphasis is placed on the tasks of social assessment for educational planning, the formulation of goals and objectives,record keeping, accessing school resources and external referrals. Theoretical approaches include problem solving, crisis and role theory, play therapy, brief treatment and group treatment.

SWGS 6420. CLIN SW PRAC II ADULTS & FAM. (3 Credits)

Clinical Practice 2 with adults and families expands and develops the knowledge base of Clinical Practice 1, emphasizing advanced clinical practice with groups, clinical interventions with adults across the life cycle, practice monitoring and evaluation, and endings and follow-up in clinical practice. This course builds on the theoretical and conceptual frameworks covered in Clinical Practice 1 by helping students to understand and apply clinical strategies and practice models that emerge from those frameworks, are guided by client needs, and are informed by empirical and research evidence. Case examples will be selected that demonstrate clinical practice with diverse client populations from various cultural groups.

SWGS 6421. CLIN SW PRAC II ChIL YTH & FAM. (3 Credits)

Clinical Social Work Practice II with Children, Youth, and Families uses a developmental framework within a dynamic ecosystems perspective that is trauma-informed as a foundation for advanced clinical practice. Attachment theory anchors assessment and intervention with preschoolers and their families; theories and models of play therapy and social competency are examined as ways to promote social and emotional men-tal health for school-aged children. Intervention with adolescents focuses on individual youth as well as fam-ily system intervention, group practice in school and residential contexts, and community-based multi-system models. The role of prevention, early intervention, and trauma-specific interventions are explored in relation to children, youth and their families. This advanced clinical practice course focuses on the use of evidence to inform practice and the implementation of evidence-based treatment models as they support best-practices. This course aims to create reflective practitioners who can make differential assessments, understand the use and purposes of different modalities of intervention, and learn to develop integrated treatment interventions that are theoretically informed and research-based. The multiple modalities examined in this course include culturally responsive work with parent-child dyads, psycho-education for multi-family groups, parent educa-tion, individual, group and family interventions as well as community based practices.

SWGS 6422. INDIV ORIENTED TREATMENT. (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the principles, premises and practices of a selected sample of current theories andmethods of intensiveindividual treatment. Examining and comparing the clinical dimensions of history-taking, diagnosis, symptomatology, time and relationship, it focuses on critical appraisal of commonalties and differences across theories with a view toward developing an integrated approach to direct social work treatment of individuals.

SWGS 6424. WOMENS ISSUES IN SW PRAC. (3 Credits)

This course explores the evolving theory of women¿s psychological development with an emphasis on the implications for social work intervention. Through an examination of the impact of gender throughout the life cycle, the course seeks to increase understanding of gender-related premises underlying professional social work practice and the issues women clients present.

SWGS 6426. COGNIT & BEHAV SW PRACT. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the theory and practice of cognitivebehavioral social work. Several common problems of children, adolescents and adults are examined, including aggression, depression and anxiety disorders. Techniques that effectively treat these problems such as cognitive reframing, behavior modification, assertiveness training, stress management, the use of homework and bibliotherapy and the evaluation of practice will be introduced.

SWGS 6427. BRIEF TRTMT: CURR MODELS. (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the theory, premises, practice principles, method and techniques used in the major current brief treatment models. It examines these elements, the models from which they are drawn, and the client populations and problems best served by a brief approach. The effi- cacy of these different approaches is also examined.

SWGS 6428. SOC WK PRAC WITH ADOLESC. (3 Credits)

Adolescence is explored within a developmental context in this course. The importance of maturational norms, family dynamics, class and cultural factors and peer group influence are examined. Particular attention is paid to adolescents at psychosocial risk and to the development of assessment and intervention skills with the adolescent client.

SWGS 6429. METHS OF GROUP INTERVENT. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on group practice as an integral part of social work intervention. It includes theories and methods of work with groups for prevention and treatment, and the use of groups in staff and team relationships. Theory and practice are integrated through an eclectic approach. Teaching is augmented by group exercises.

SWGS 6430. ADV CLINIC ASSESS& DIAGNOSIS I. (3 Credits)

This course, required for those electing a clinical concentration, covers clinical assessment and diagnosis from an historical and developmental point of view. Special attention is paid to the social work perspective in relation to the classification systems available to the practitioner. The course focuses on recognizing and understanding mental health and mental illness, and distinguishing between client dysfunction and client strength within an environmental framework. Prerequisites: SWGS 6208 and SWGS 6209.

SWGS 6431. ADV CLIN ASSESS & DIAGNO II. (3 Credits)

This course continues the work of biopsychosocial assessment from a social-work value base that was presented in Advanced Clinical Assessment and Diagnosis I. After a review of the core human rights and social justice values that serve as foundation for both 6430 and 6431, it focuses on specific areas of biopsychosocial well being and illness, beginning with those first observable in childhood and adolescence. In subsequent modules, the biopsychosocial functioning related to confronting trauma, connecting to reality, relating to others, managing the body experience, being cared for, and responding to the vicissitudes of life. The course presents the skills and knowledge for the differential assessment of people across the life span, emphasizing the importance of recognizing both strengths and vulnerabilities at all ages and in all areas of functioning. As in Advanced Clinical Assessment and Diagnosis I, at the conclusion of the course students should be able to: complete comprehensive assessments of mental well mental illness in various areas of biopsychosocial functioning; create working case formulations based on their assessments; critically utilize the DSM-IV when appropriate; and identify empirically informed interventions relevant to their case formulations and diagnoses.

SWGS 6433. RELATIONAL PR-CH/ADOL/ADULTS. (3 Credits)

This course will emphasize the application of relational theories ¿ attachment theory, ego psychology, object relations theory, self psychology and women¿s relational theory ¿ to social work practice. Risk and protective factors in child development will also be considered. Case materials of children, adolescents and adults will be discussed.

SWGS 6434. EVIDENCE BASED MH PRACT. (3 Credits)

This course is aimed at developing the knowledge and skills necessary for working with individuals with a diagnosis of serious mental illness using recovery-oriented, evidence-based practices. Students will become familiar with evidence-based practices, within a recovery-oriented paradigm, as a general approach to practice as well as specific evidence-based interventions to use for individuals with a diagnosis of serious mental illness. It is assumed that students will have a basic knowledge of serious mental illness as a pre- or co-requisite, however, a review will be provided. Students will learn to examine research literature to determine the various levels of support for specific interventions and essential principles for translating research into practice. In addition, they will identify the appropriate treatment outcomes that reflect effective, quality mental health practice. Each evidence-based practice presented will also be examined for its utility with diverse groups. Providing assessment and treatment to a diverse group of individuals with a diagnosis of serious mental illness is the focus of this course and will be discussed in detail. This is a clinical elective and there is a prerequisite ¿ SWGS6430 Advanced Clinical Assessment and Diagnosis.

Prerequisite: SWGS 6430.

SWGS 6435. CLINICAL PRAC & SPIRITUALITY. (3 Credits)

SWGS 6436. TRAUMA TRMT/CHILD & ADOL. (3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the common concepts underlying evidence-based treatment for traumatized children and adolescents, using a case analysis format. Trauma is broadly defined, and includes children and adolescents exposed to traumatic events including, but not limited to natural disasters, war, abuse and neglect, medical trauma and witnessing interpersonal crime (e.g. domestic violence) and other traumatic events. The course will highlight the role of development, culture and empirical evidence in trauma-specific interventions with children, adolescents and their families. It will address the level of functioning of primary caregiving environments and assess the capacity of the community to facilitate restorative processes.

SWGS 6437. CLINICAL SW PR W/ LATINOS. (3 Credits)

SWGS 6438. SW PRACTICE -LGBT INDIVIDUALS. (3 Credits)

SWGS 6439. EVID BASED PRACT CHILD& FAM. (3 Credits)

Pre-Requisite - SWGS 6901.

Prerequisite: SWGS 6901.

SWGS 6440. PR FOR CLIENT CTR MANAGEMENT I. (3 Credits)

SWGS 6441. PR FOR CLIENT CTR MGMNT II. (3 Credits)

SWGS 6443. SUICIDE ASSESSMENT & TREATMENT. (3 Credits)

SWGS 6444. INTERVENTIONS IN CLINICAL SW. (3 Credits)

Apply theoretical concepts to practice experience.

SWGS 6471. PALLIATIVE SOCIAL WORK. (3 Credits)

SWGS 6598. INTERNATIONAL AUDIT. (0 Credits)

Audit of a GSS course at an international campus.

Attribute: Z558.

SWGS 6599. CONTINUING EDUCATION SW. (0 Credits)

SWGS 6605. COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION 1. (3 Credits)

This course provides a history of community organizing, especially in the context of the social work profession andas a way of meeting the needs of vulnerable and at-risk populations and communities. Focus is on the various community organizing models and the array of roles and functions of community organizers. Emphasis is on practice strategies and tactics for assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating community organizing projects and campaigns.

SWGS 6607. PRACT W/ TASK-ORIENT GRP. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the knowledge and skills for effective work in and with a variety of a organizational task groups such as boards, committees, teams, staff meetings, workgroups, coalitions or administrative policy and decision making bodies. It examines group processes, tasks and functions, membership and leadership roles and effective group functioning. Experiential exercises provide opportunities for student self-assessment, insight and professional growth in relation to practice with groups. Concurrent field practice is required. Required Courses¿Track B (Client-Centered Practice and Management)

SWGS 6608. QUALITY MANAGEMENT. (3 Credits)

This course deepens the knowledge and skills of the social work administrator by focusing on management practices that are currently being used in response to the emphasis on measuring organizational performance. Total quality management andquality improvement approaches are applied to human service organizations. The course focuses on the tools and techniques used to define quality, assess problems and measure improvement.

SWGS 6614. INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY IN SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE. (3 Credits)

PREVIOUS TITLE: TECHNOLOGY IN SOCIAL WORK PRA.

SWGS 6615. SUPV & STAFF DEVELOPMENT. (3 Credits)

This course examines supervision and staff development as management functions in diverse agency settings and within the context of social work values and ethics. The philosophy, functions, principles and methods of supervision as well as staff development and training are covered. Emphasis is given to the knowledge and skills required to motivate and retain an effective and multicultural workforce, and to effectively supervise varying levels of staff (volunteers, nonprofessionals, professionals) during turbulent times.

SWGS 6616. PROG & PROPOSAL DEV. (3 Credits)

Students learn, step-by-step, to develop and prepare proposals, design programs, seek foundation funding and respond to grant requests. Attention is given to what makes programs and proposals effective and would enhance the likelihood of funding. Emphasis is on how program proposals relate to both organizational mission and funding interests and offer opportunities to serve underserved, neglected, vulnerable and at-risk populations.

SWGS 6617. ADMINISTRATION 1. (3 Credits)

The first of a two-semester course sequence in administration, this course introduces the key knowledge and skills needed to effectively manage human service programs, units or agencies. Content focuses upon the generic requirements of managers, regardless of organizational role, function, position or setting. Different perspectives are used to examine the manager¿s job in human service organizations. Special attention is given to becoming a manager, possible obstacles to effective management and issues around leadership, motivation, gender, ethnicity and race. Prerequisite: SWGS 6319, 6321, 6322; concurrent field practice is required.

SWGS 6618. ADMINISTRATION 2. (3 Credits)

The second of a two-semester course sequence, this course focuses on significant management areas including strategic planning, designing and restructuring organizations; managing finances; managing a diverse and multicultural workplace; evaluating programs, performance and agencies; and managing the environment. Cases are used to examine the theories and skills that provide a framework for management practice. Prerequisite SWGS 6617; concurrent field practice is required.

SWGS 6620. CLIENT CENTERED MGT I. (3 Credits)

The first of a two-semester course sequence in the management of direct service agencies, this course broadens and deepens the knowledge base of macro generalist practice, introduces the concept of client-centered management, and focuses on the management roles of social workers engaged in practice with clients. It focuses on knowledge and skills in relation to the planning, design, and administration of community-based programs, and in working with communities and organizations to insure quality services are available and accessible especially to populations-at-risk. Prerequisite: SWGS 6319. 6321, 6322; concurrent field practice is required.

SWGS 6621. CLIENT CENTERED MGT II. (3 Credits)

This is the second of a two-course sequence in advanced management. It expands upon managerial roles and skills for improving or changing programs and service delivery. Special attention is given to interagency collaboration, enhancing community capacity, and managing programs and agencies faced with challenges related to funding, staffing, competing values and changing environments. Prerequisite: SWGS 6620; concurrent field practice is required.

Corequisite: SWGS 6414.

SWGS 6624. INT SOCIAL DEV-GLOBAL CXT. (3 Credits)

This course aims to expand students¿ understanding of the global context and to equip students to work with diverse communities locally or internationally. International social development increasingly becomes the core component of change, hence the essence of social work as a profession with international coherence and global reach. As small communities everywhere are part of a larger machinery affecting the social and economic tapestry of the world, it is crucial for social work professionals to gain a better understanding of significant global issues, and to be prepared to engage in global social development, as agents of change. The course will focus on enhancing students¿ skills in the areas of community building; community needs assessment and capacity mapping; community organizing; stakeholder analysis; and advocacy. The course is designed around the following themes: (1) international social development and social work ¿ theoretical perspectives and the roles of a social worker in the global context; (2) globalization, global issues and the consequences of these issues for communities and their residents from an international perspective; (3) human rights and the implications of choosing to become an agent of change from a human rights¿ perspective; and (4) international social development ¿ current approaches; best practices and future trends. This is an administrative elective.

SWGS 6625. FUNDRAISING. (3 Credits)

A significant portion of work in the social welfare arena involves the nonprofit sector, which depends on philanthropic resources and public funding to function and survive. Resource development in the nonprofit sector relates to every dimension of social work practice. On a micro level, funding supports the direct services provided by social workers and other human service professionals. On a macro level, organizational administrators and community leaders collaborate with foundations and other philanthropic entities to support organizational, community, and societal change. This course introduces students to resource development and stewardship via two predominant channels: fundraising and grant making. The course emphasizes supporting the well-being of vulnerable populations. In addition to the development of foundational knowledge and concrete skills, the course conceptualizes philanthropy and fundraising within the framework of human rights, social justice and the NASW Code of Ethics.

SWGS 6627. LEADERSHIP & MACRO PRAC I. (3 Credits)

frameworks of human rights, social and economic justice, and empowerment. Our students will become social workers who are committed to social change in all forms, transforming and building capacities in communities and organizations, through inclusive and collaborative strategies, via anti-oppressive practices, increasing access to resources, innovations, and collaborations.

SWGS 6628. LEADERSHIP & MACRO PRAC II. (3 Credits)

The two-semester Leadership and Macro Practice course prepares social work practitioners who operate from the frameworks of human rights, social and economic justice, and empowerment. Our students will become social workers who are committed to social change in all forms, transforming and building capacities in communities and organizations, through inclusive and collaborative strategies, via anti-oppressive practices, increasing access to resources, innovations, and collaborations.

SWGS 6700. SOCIAL WORK STUDY ABROAD. (3 Credits)

Summer study through U.S. schools of social work on international issues.

SWGS 6705. COMP INT'L SOC WELF. (3 Credits)

This course explores the similarities and differences among helping systems in the United States and other societies. This includes consideration of historical, economic, political and social forces which influence the nature and functioning of those systems. Other topics covered include social development and the globalization of social problems.

SWGS 6801. SW RESEARCH 1. (3 Credits)

This is the first of a two-course sequence that culminates in the completion of a research project and presentation of a research report. This course introduces students to social work research and focuses on various phases of the scientific method from the preparation of a research question developed by the class to the point of data collection.

SWGS 6802. SW RESEARCH 2. (3 Credits)

In this second course in the foundation research sequence, students implement the proposed class research projects. The course includes content on data collection and analysis, how to interpret the theoretical and practical meaning of findings for social work practice, and how to report on and present data. Basic computer skills and statistical concepts (SPSS) are presented through ¿hands on¿ training in the computer laboratory. Prerequisite: SWGS 6801.

Prerequisite: SWGS 6801.

SWGS 6806. PROGRAM EVALUATION. (3 Credits)

The use of evaluative research in social welfare planning, program development and theory building is examined. Recent evaluations of social work practice, including interventions on a social policy, neighborhood, family and individual level, are reviewed. Traditional research designs are considered, but emphasis is placed on emerging models of evaluation. Course is appropriate for students preparing for direct service practice. Note: Research students, with approval from the director of the doctoral program, may enroll in the SWGS 7000 course serieslisted in the Doctoral Course Offerings.

SWGS 6812. ADVANCED RESEARCH I. (3 Credits)

This is the first of a two-course sequence in which students design and conduct an original research project submitted as a master¿s thesis. The course focuses on techniques of a literature review, definition of a research problem, hypothesis formulation, design of data collection instruments and writing a research proposal. Prerequisite: SWGS 6805 (unless a waiver has been obtained by examination); concurrent field practice required.

SWGS 6813. ADVANCED RESEARCH II. (3 Credits)

This is the second of a two-semester sequence in which each student completes an original research project as a master¿s thesis. The course focuses on advanced data analysis using statistical software, including data management, data transformations, presentation of data using tables and graphs and report writing. Prerequisites: SWGS 6805 (unless a waiver has been obtained by examination) and SWGS 6812; concurrent field practice is required.

SWGS 6901. FIELD WORK I. (4,5 Credits)

Actual practice with a limited work load under close supervision designed to assist the student in applying theory to practice and to enable the student to master fundamentals of generalist practice. Includes 10 two-hour seminar sessions. Fourteen hours per week from September through July; 21 hours per week from September through May. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ZMAL.

SWGS 6902. FIELD WORK II. (4,5 Credits)

Actual practice with a limited work load under close supervision designed to assist students in applying theory to practice and to enable students to adapt fundamentals of practice to a particular concentration and field. Includes 10 two-hour seminar sessions. Prerequisite: SWGS 6901; Advanced Standing students are exempt from this prerequisite. Fourteen hours per week from September through July; 21 hours per week from September through May. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ZMAL.

SWGS 6904. INTERNATIONAL FIELD LAB. (3 Credits)

SWGS 6907. FIELD PRACTICUM LABORATO. (3 Credits)

This required laboratory course for students who enter as experienced employees in the social services complements the Generalist Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families and Groups I and II. The focus is on the integration of classroom learning with practice. Assignments are closely related to issues covered in these practice classes. Class participation, process recording, presentations, role-playing and focused journal writing are important tools in the course. Upon satisfactorily completing this course, students will receive three credits and will be eligible for SWGS 6908, Combined Field Work in the following academic year.

SWGS 6908. COMBINED FIELD WORK. (7,8 Credits)

Open only to students admitted to the Experienced and Employed Social Service Practitioner plan, this course combines a review of fundamentals of practice with a focus on applying fundamentals in a particular concentration and field of practice. Students are in placement 28 hours per week from September through May, and are required to attend 10 twohour seminar sessions during the work day or in the evening. Prerequisite: SWGS 6907.

Prerequisite: SWGS 6907.

SWGS 6911. FOUNDATION FIELD INSTRUCTION. (5 Credits)

SWGS 6912. ADVANCED FIELD INSTRUCTION. (5 Credits)

SWGS 6918. COMBINED FIELD INSTRUCTION. (7,8 Credits)

SWGS 7002. ADV STAT IN SOC WELF. (3 Credits)

Building on SWGS 7012, this course covers such topics as ANCOVA, MANCOVA, linear regression methods, logistic regression, and an introduction to path analysis. The course links theory, statistics, hypothesis testing and measurement. Students are expected to be proficient in the use of SPSS statistical package.

SWGS 7003. QUAL METH SW RESEARCH. (3 Credits)

This course explores the conditions under which qualitative research methods are desirable and feasible, the nature of qualitative information, and the relationship between the researcher and the research subject. Methods of qualitative research, as well as the process of developing inferences from findings are examined.

SWGS 7004. PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE. (3 Credits)

This course examines theory and theory development and their roles in social work. Focus is on social work epistemology, salient issues in social work theory, and the critical appraisal of ways of knowing.

SWGS 7005. THEORIES OF SOCIAL WORK. (3 Credits)

This course explores, critically examines and compares the major theories of social work practice with individuals. It covers the historical contexts in which theories emerged, their underlying assumptions and their empirical support. The course draws on the works of major social work thinkers as it spurs students to consider implications for theory development and research.

SWGS 7006. PROGRAM PERFORMANCE/PRACTICE. (3 Credits)

Evaluation of program performance and practice.

SWGS 7007. EVIDENCE IN SOCIAL WORK. (3 Credits)

This course reviews and critically appraises the evidence base for social work practice theory. Topics covered include the nature of evidence, theories of change, research on social work¿s effectiveness, and frameworks for the analysis of social work practice theory.

SWGS 7008. FAMILY AND GROUP WORK. (3 Credits)

This course parallels in format and structure SWGS 7005. In it, students examine the major theories of group work and family practice, the evidence base for practices, and innovations in practice, research and theory.

SWGS 7011. STATISTICS LAB. (0 Credits)

This lab class is taken with SWGS 7012, Statistics I.

SWGS 7012. STATISTICS I. (3 Credits)

This course introduces the statistical techniques most commonly used in social welfare research. The course will include the following topics: an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics, level of measurement, frequency distribution, cross-tabulations, measures of central tendency, parametric vs. nonparametric statistics, normal curve, z scores,confidence intervals, introduction to significance testing, t scores, chi square, correlation and one way ANOVA. Computer analysis using statistical software is taught with an emphasis on interpretation of results.

SWGS 7013. STATISTICS 2 LAB. (0 Credits)

This lab class is taken with SWGS 7002, Statistics II.

SWGS 7102. ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY. (3 Credits)

This course examines the major theoretical perspectives that describe and explain organizational behavior and organizational processes, including classical, human relations, political economy and organizational culture approaches. Emphasis is placed on the application of organizational theory to human service organizations and the management of them.

SWGS 7200. SOC POL THEO & ANALYSIS. (3 Credits)

SWGS 7202. BIOETHICS PRINCIPLES. (3 Credits)

This course will include an overview of the philosophical foundations of the principles of medical ethics and present a methodology for their employment in the attempted resolution of these questions. Of particular importance will be consideration of the issues of patient and professional autonomy, confidentiality, informed consent, distributive justice and the movement toward managed care, euthanasia and physician assisted suicide. The course will be conducted as a seminar centered on the analysis of case studies.

SWGS 7300. INTERNSHIP. (3 Credits)

This course or SWGS 7301 provides social work experience for non-M.S.W. doctoral students in a research, policy-making or educational setting. Can be taken during a regular semester or during the summer semester for 140 hours.

SWGS 7301. INTERNSHIP. (6 Credits)

This course provides experience for non-M.S.W. doctoral students in a research, policy-making or educational setting. It can be taken for two semesters, during the academic year or summer session, for 280 hours in lieu of SWGS 7300.

SWGS 7302. INTERNSHIP. (6 Credits)

This two semester course provides experience for doctoral students in a practice, research, policy-making or educational setting. It can be taken for two semesters during the academic year or summer session, in lieu of SWGS 7300 or 7301.

SWGS 7408. INDEPN'T STUD CHILD/FAM. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to assist students in further developing their understanding of problems and issues in services to children and families. The student, with the aid of a mentor, will select one area of special interest for extensive reading, study, and investigation.

SWGS 7409. CHILD & FAMILY MH POLICY. (3 Credits)

SWGS 7420. RES IN MH/FAM/CHILDREN. (3 Credits)

This course examines current research in policy, service delivery and practice in mental health and with children and families. Emphasis is placed on the identification of necessary knowledge, research gaps and the application of effective research methods. This course may be substituted for SWGS7403 or SWGS 7614 in the curriculum.

SWGS 7502. POL DEV IMPL ELDERLY. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on major policies determining entitlements for older persons in the United States, roles of governmental and private sectors, inequities in American society affecting older persons. A second focus is on comparative analysis of gerontological social policy in other countries, including Third World nations. A third component is the synthesis of strategies for effective social policy for older persons.

SWGS 7503. RESEARCH ISS AGING. (3 Credits)

This course includes a survey of practice and theoretical knowledge of aging developed through research efforts. Work will focus on the content and the methodology of research studies and their contributions to theory, policy and practice in the field of aging. Emphasis is on identification of knowledge in aging and application of research methods.

SWGS 7508. THEORIES PRAC OLDER PERS. (3 Credits)

This course will focus on different theories on aging and the range of programs which have developed to meet the differential needs of older people. Practice issues relevant to diverse older populations such as the frail elderly; healthy, active older persons; ethnic and racial minorities; and isolated persons will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on emerging theories on aging and research efforts designed to expand knowledge of the aging process.

SWGS 7509. INDEPN'T STUD IN GERONTO. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to assist students in further deepening their understanding of problems and issues in gerontology. The student, with the aid of a mentor, will select one area of special interest for extensive reading, study and investigation.

SWGS 7605. SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

This course examines the principles, policies, philosophies and processes of learning and teaching in social work. It reviews the historical evolution of social work education and develops implications for classroom and field instruction.

SWGS 7606. TCHNG FOR THE PROFESSION. (3 Credits)

This course examines in depth the philosophy, principles, processes and pragmatics of teaching and learning in classroom and field setting. Emphasizes 1) educational concepts, premises, models, frameworks and 2) planning effective curriculum and teaching strategies.

SWGS 7610. WOMEN AND POVERTY. (3 Credits)

This course will focus on low-income women in the USA. Attending to the multidisciplinary dimension of race, class and gender, the course will explore ways in which poverty affects quality of life, opportunities, choices and human potential. Contemporary policy issues will be explored and varied social change strategies critically analyzed for their potential in achieving economic justice for women.

SWGS 7616. IND'L STUDY IN MENTAL HE. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to assist students in deepening their understanding of problems and issues in mental health. The student, with the aid of a mentor, will select one area of special interest for extensive reading, study and investigation.

SWGS 7620. THEORIES IN MH/PSYCH DEV. (3 Credits)

SWGS 7700. SURVEY RESEARCH METHODS. (3 Credits)

This course examines methods used in descriptive research, including descriptive research designs, principles of causality, sampling data, data collection and ethical issues.

SWGS 7710. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH MTDS. (3 Credits)

This course examines experimental and quasi-experimental designs, experimenter and statistical controls, threats to internal and external validity, and strategies for analyzing significance and effectiveness of outcomes.

SWGS 7720. MEASUREMENT. (3 Credits)

This course examines quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection in social work research. Among the topics covered are scale construction, case studies, qualitative approaches to data collection and use of existing records. Data analysis is linked to principles of measurement and measurement theory.

SWGS 7730. DATA MANAGEMENT & ANALYSIS. (3 Credits)

This course covers topics related to data management and analysis, including using data files, calculating sample size, preparing data analyses plans, and maintaining the quality of one¿s data at each phase of the research enterprise.

SWGS 7740. GRANTSMANSHIP. (3 Credits)

This seminar will cover the knowledge and skills necessary to prepare grant applications for both government and foundation funding; covering applications for applied research projects as well as those proposing program demonstrations, clinical trials and evaluation.

SWGS 7781. POVERTY AND RACE. (3 Credits)

This course provides and overview of U.S. social polices. It reviews the evolution of American social welfare policies, social welfare theories, and examines the condition, conceptual framework and empirical evidence of policies that target poverty in the United States. Particular emphasis is placed on the impact of policies on marginalized and disenfranchised populations.

SWGS 7782. POLICY IMPLEMENTATION. (3 Credits)

Drawing on theories of implementation and innovation, this course provides an in-depth examination of policy implementation in different fields of practice. It focuses on factors that promote and hinder policy implementation, as well as the historical contexts in which major policies have been implemented.

SWGS 7783. POLICY ANALYSIS SEMINAR. (3 Credits)

Using available frameworks for policy analysis, this course encourages students to critically analyze existing policies. It considers the implications of these analyses for the study of policy development, implementation and evaluation.

SWGS 7791. ADVANCED SEMINAR I. (1,2 Credits)

Concurrent with or following their advanced year research methods and specialization courses, all students take three advanced seminars. A faculty member with expertise in children and families, gerontology, or mental health research leads each seminar. The purpose of the seminars is to expose students to current research issues and methods in these substantive areas. In the process of examining such topics as the state of knowledge in each field, debates and controversies, research design, and emergent policy and practice themes, students ate helped to develop and refine their research and scholarly interests in ways that lead to dissertation ideas.

SWGS 7792. ADVANCED SEMINAR II. (1,2 Credits)

Concurrent with or following their advanced year research methods and specialization courses, all students take three advanced seminars. A faculty member with expertise in children and families, gerontology, or mental health research leads each seminar. The purpose of the seminars is to expose students to current research issues and methods in these substantive areas. In the process of examining such topics as the state of knowledge in each field, debates and controversies, research design, and emergent policy and practice themes, students ate helped to develop and refine their research and scholarly interests in ways that lead to dissertation ideas.

SWGS 7793. ADVANCED SEMINAR III. (1,3 Credits)

Concurrent with or following their advanced year research methods and specialization courses, all students take three advanced seminars. A faculty member with expertise in children and families, gerontology, or mental health research leads each seminar. The purpose of the seminars is to expose students to current research issues and methods in these substantive areas. In the process of examining such topics as the state of knowledge in each field, debates and controversies, research design, and emergent policy and practice themes, students ate helped to develop and refine their research and scholarly interests in ways that lead to dissertation ideas.

SWGS 7800. RESEARCH PRACTICUM. (0 Credits)

This one semester course is designed to provide advanced year students with practical experience in social work research. Students are expected to work under the supervision of a faculty member on some aspect of an ongoing research endeavor.

SWGS 7801. TEACHING PRACTICUM. (0 Credits)

This one semester course is designed to provide advanced year students with practical experience in teaching at a graduate or undergraduate level. Students may fulfill this requirement by teaching a graduate or undergraduate level course or by working as a teaching assistant for a faculty member for seven hours per week.

SWGS 7901. PLAY THER-PRESCH & LATEN. (3 Credits)

SWGS 7902. TREATMENT PLANNING. (3 Credits)

SWGS 7903. TREATMENT OF ADOLESCENTS. (3 Credits)

SWGS 7905. INTERNSHIP FALL. (6 Credits)

SWGS 7906. INTERNSHIP SPRING. (6 Credits)

SWGS 7907. FAMILY ISSUES & INTERVEN. (3 Credits)

SWGS 8999. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (3 Credits)