Russian (RUSS)

RUSS 1001. Introduction to Russian I. (5 Credits)

An introductory course that focuses on the four skills: speaking, reading, writing and listening providing students with a basic knowledge of Russian linguistic structures, vocabulary and culture, which studied interdependently, comprise the Russian Language.

RUSS 1501. Intermediate Russian I. (3 Credits)

Intermediate Russian I will continue introducing students to the fundamentals of the Russian language, emphasizing the five main components of language acquisition (reading, writing, listening, speaking, and cultural competence) using a task- and content-based Russian learning program. Conducted in Russian.

Attribute: IPE.

Prerequisites: RUSS 1001 or RUSS 1002.

RUSS 1502. Intermediate Russian II. (3 Credits)

Intermediate Russian II will continue introducing students to the fundamentals of the Russian language, emphasizing the five main components of language acquisition (reading, writing, listening, speaking, and cultural competence) using a task- and content-based Russian learning program. Conducted in Russian.

Attribute: IPE.

Prerequisite: RUSS 1501.

RUSS 1901. Grammar Review Russia Speaker. (4 Credits)

For heritage speakers of Russian. Will improve the literacy of native Russian speakers. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: IPE.

RUSS 1999. Tutorial. (1 Credit)

RUSS 2001. Russian Language and Literature. (3 Credits)

A critical analysis of selected cultural and luterary texts; composition, conversation, and review of pertinent grammatical structures.

Attribute: IPE.

Prerequisite: RUSS 1502.

RUSS 2300. Russian From Intermediate to Advanced. (4 Credits)

This course helps students progress from Intermediate to Advanced proficiency (ACTFL) or form 1 to 2 on the ILR scale. We will develop 4 skills: 1)Engage in conversation to communicate information on autobiographical topics, as well as topics of community, national or international interest; 2)When reading, understand main ideas and supporting details of authentic narrative and descriptive texts; 3)When listening, understand main ideas and most supporting details in connected discourse on a variety of general interest topics, such as news stories, explanations, instructions, anecdotes, or travelogue descriptions; 4)In writing, use a variety of cohesive devices up to several paragraphs in length and exhibit control of the most frequently used syntactic structures and a range of general vocabulary. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: IPE.

Prerequisite: RUSS 2001.

RUSS 2500. Approaches to Literature. (4 Credits)

This course examines the masterpieces of the nineteenth-century Russian prose, using a broad selection of the excerpts from the literary works of Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy and Chekhov. One of the goals of the course is to analyze how these writers expanded the boundaries of the genres in which they worked, even as they exposed the acute social problems of their time. Taught in Russian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: IPE, OCST.

Prerequisite: RUSS 2001.

RUSS 2601. Russian Conversation and Composition. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: IPE.

RUSS 2640. Russian Short Fiction. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: IPE.

RUSS 2650. Media and the Russian State: News Outlets From 19th Century to Present Day Russia. (4 Credits)

This course consists of two primary components: 1) an intermediate/advanced Russian language study and 2) a survey of censorship in Russian and Soviet history. It is available to both intermediate and advanced students of Russian and fulfills a Russian language requirement. The language track offers Russian grammar instruction that will prepare students to read and research advanced Russian texts. The cultural component of this course offers a survey of censorship in Russian and Soviet history, spotlighting great works of art under censorship. The course takes its starting point with imperial censorship in the second half of the 19th century, including press censorship leading up to and during WWI. We continue with artists’ battles against Soviet censorship and Socialist Realism, using case studies of: writers Zamyatin, Boris Pilnyak, Boris Pasternak, and Joseph Brodsky; filmmakers Sergei Eisenstein and Aleksandr Askoldov; classical composers Shostakovich and Prokofiev; and Malevich’s Suprematism, which includes a class trip to observe MoMA’s permanent collection. Finally, we will analyze Putin’s state-sponsored news outlets and compromised freedom of expression in present day Russia. Heritage students will read original Russian texts and post responses in Russian. Scholarship and literature will be available in English for non-heritage speakers. Discussions will be in both Russian and English. Completion of 2001 or instructor approval required. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, IPE, OCST, PJMJ, PJST.

Prerequisite: RUSS 2001.

RUSS 3002. Genres and Styles Russian Literature. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to a wide variety of genres in both sychronic as well as in diachronic aspect. It will undertake a close analytical examination of a number of types of literary and folkloric texts. These masterworks of Russian literature will be analyzed in terms of their defining features such as their intrinsic imaginative system, language devices, themes, and ethical function, which are significant for the chronologically relevant cultural tradition. The course will enable students to perceive the literary works in their multi-dimensional depths as the students will engage in a deeper analysis of each text surveyed. The course will include texts from the present day to the distant Russian literary past. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, IPE.

RUSS 3250. Translating Russian Poetry, Music, Animation, Film, and Journalism. (4 Credits)

We will use the arts to grow our vocabulary and increase our cultural understanding. We will read and translate the poetry of Pushkin in the original Russian, hear and translate the great bards Okhudzhava and Vysotsky, watch and translate the great Soviet films "Autumn Marathon" and "Summer" and selected Soviet animations, and read contemporary journalism from modern Russian cultural magazines such as Znak, Polka, and Meduzza. Conducted in Russian.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: RUSS 2001.

RUSS 4999. Tutorial. (4 Credits)

RUSS 9101. Introduction to Russian I. (0 Credits)

RUSS 9151. Intermediate Russian I. (0 Credits)

RUSS 9152. Intermediate Russian II. (0 Credits)

RUSS 9201. Russian Language and Literature. (0 Credits)