Clinic (Law) (CLGL)

CLGL 060. ADVANCED ARBITRATION PRACTICUM. (1,2 Credits)

CLGL 0105. ADV POLICY & LEG ADV SEMINAR. (2 Credits)

CLGL 0129. PRO BONO SCHOLAR SEMINAR. (2 Credits)

CLGL 0199. INTRODUCTION TO INVESTOR-STATE ARBITRATION. (2,3 Credits)

This course will provide an overview of investment arbitration, a practice area that comprises principles of international law, dispute resolution, treaty law and public policy.  Special distinguishing features of investor-state arbitration disputes will be highlighted and explored, including the importance of nationality, consent to jurisdiction, defenses and damages.  Among the arbitration procedures examined will be those arising from bilateral investment treaties (BITs) and multilateral investment treaties (MITs), such as the Energy Charter Treaty (ECT) and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), as well as public contracts.  The course will also consider issues related to investment disputes under ICSID, UNCITRAL and ICC rules.

Attributes: ICE, JD, LAWB, LAWI, LDE, LIDR.

CLGL 0206. CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP: ADMINISTRATIVE & IMMIGRATION SEMINAR. (1 Credit)

This is a skills-focused practicum combining an immigration field-placement with a weekly seminar in support of and to complement the field experience. The course is designed to prepare students to creatively approach problems and develop strategies in administrative/quasi-judicial proceedings. Through field placements, case studies and, simulations, students will encounter typical scenarios from all phases of this type of an administrative practice with an emphasis on methods of developing facts including interviewing, direct examination, case theory development and planning, witness preparation, document identification and, opening and closing statements. Each week students will have an opportunity to discuss the experiences gained through working for an immigration service provider. During the seminar portion of the practicum we will engage in discussions and simulation exercises designed to mirror real life situations faced by lawyers in these proceedings. Complementary topics will include the right to counsel, the charging process, discovery , prosecutorial discretion, the intersection between criminal law and immigration, and the application of the Exclusionary Rule in the context of immigration proceedings. Rules of conduct and legal ethics will also be covered. The semester will conclude with a mock hearing at the immigration court. PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE: Students will have the opportunity to will work at one of several immigration service providers. It is expected that a student will work a minimum of 5 hours a week for 13 weeks. Visits to the immigration court at 26 Federal Plaza, the detained court at Varick Street, and the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit will be part of the practicum.

CLGL 0211. PRESIDENT SUCCESSION CLN SEM. (2 Credits)

For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: JD, LAW, LLM.

Corequisite: CLGL 0212.

CLGL 0212. PRESIDENT SUCCESSION CASEWORK. (2-3 Credits)

For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: JD, LAW, LLM.

Corequisite: CLGL 0211.

CLGL 0213. PROSPECTIVES ON THE TRIAL PROCESS. (2 Credits)

This is a seminar course for those law students whose passion is to try lawsuits. This not a course in the ABC’s of Trial Practice or a checklist of do’s and don’ts. This course will be about what works in the courtroom, the why and the how. It will be interactive and taught not just from books but from many years of real trial experience out of the mouths of some of the Nation’s very best jurists and trial lawyers.<br> Final Examination. There will be a take home assignment or exercise in a format to be determined. <br> Classroom Participation. In-class participation is a vital part of this class. To be fully prepared it is critical that you read the assigned materials which I believe you will find both enlightening and enjoyable. I intend this seminar class to be highly interactive and your questions will be as important as your answers to my questions. There are no perfect answers in this material because there is no right way to try a case. I expect each of you to attend all or most of the class sessions because this material really cannot be absorbed just from reading a book. <p> Course Material:<br> Winning At Trial: Insights From The Bench And Leading Litigators<br> Law Journal Press 2014<br> The Trial Lawyer: What It Takes To Win<br> by David Berg<br> American Bar Association 2003 .

CLGL 0215. CORPORATE AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY CLINIC SEMINAR. (2 Credits)

Efforts to promote corporate social responsibility are vital to the promotion of human rights and environmental sustainability. From the use of energy and natural resources for general operations to source material extraction and the processing, shipping, selling and, ultimately, disposing of products, to the terms of employment throughout these networks and effects on neighboring communities and global consumers alike, human rights and the environment are impacted by most every aspect of corporate activity. With these myriad touch points, corporations have a key role to play in the development and evolution of these important areas of law. With their wide reach, businesses have the potential to improve environmental and human rights conditions worldwide: They possess the technological and research capacities to innovate new methods of sourcing, production and disposal to promote greater health and safety for people and the planet alike. Indeed, corporate social responsibility cannot be achieved without the creativity, innovation and cooperation of the business community. The Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) clinic, directed by Professor Paolo Galizzi is designed to introduce students to the law and practice of corporate social responsibility, and expose them to the challenges and prospects for maximizing social and environmental outcomes alongside profits. Opportunities to promote sustainable development in global industry abound. Focusing on the intersection of industry, society and environmental sustainability, clinic participants will work on real-world projects to identify promising openings for early adopters and first-to-market innovators of sustainable policies, technologies, and business models. The seminar portion of the clinic will introduce students to the theory and practice of corporate social responsibility law. With guest lecturers who are experts in the field, students will learn about the history and modern development of CSR in the countries in which they will be working, as well as practical skills such as project research and design, stakeholder consultation, interview techniques, and proposal drafting and development. For the fieldwork component, participants will research and design a concrete CSR project in cooperation with national and international partners.

Attributes: ICS, INLJ, JD, LAWB, LAWI.

CLGL 0219. CORPORATE AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY CLINIC CASEWORK. (3 Credits)

Efforts to promote corporate social responsibility are vital to the promotion of human rights and environmental sustainability. From the use of energy and natural resources for general operations to source material extraction and the processing, shipping, selling and, ultimately, disposing of products, to the terms of employment throughout these networks and effects on neighboring communities and global consumers alike, human rights and the environment are impacted by most every aspect of corporate activity. With these myriad touch points, corporations have a key role to play in the development and evolution of these important areas of law. With their wide reach, businesses have the potential to improve environmental and human rights conditions worldwide: They possess the technological and research capacities to innovate new methods of sourcing, production and disposal to promote greater health and safety for people and the planet alike. Indeed, corporate social responsibility cannot be achieved without the creativity, innovation and cooperation of the business community. The Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) clinic, directed by Professor Paolo Galizzi is designed to introduce students to the law and practice of corporate social responsibility, and expose them to the challenges and prospects for maximizing social and environmental outcomes alongside profits. Opportunities to promote sustainable development in global industry abound. Focusing on the intersection of industry, society and environmental sustainability, clinic participants will work on real-world projects to identify promising openings for early adopters and first-to-market innovators of sustainable policies, technologies, and business models. The seminar portion of the clinic will introduce students to the theory and practice of corporate social responsibility law. With guest lecturers who are experts in the field, students will learn about the history and modern development of CSR in the countries in which they will be working, as well as practical skills such as project research and design, stakeholder consultation, interview techniques, and proposal drafting and development. For the fieldwork component, participants will research and design a concrete CSR project in cooperation with national and international partners.

Attributes: ICS, INLJ, JD, LLM.

CLGL 0292. CONSUMER LITIGATION CLINIC SEMINAR. (1-2 Credits)

Interested in litigation or wondering if you might be? Want experience with drafting pleadings, motions, and briefs, and appearing in court? Looking to join the community of public interest and private lawyers who are enforcing the rights of low-income consumers against unscrupulous merchants, lenders, assignees, and credit reporting agencies? In the CONSUMER LITIGATION CLINIC, students represent consumers in federal, state and local courts against lenders, debt collectors, and merchants. Our clients are often victims of identity theft, sued on debt they do not owe, or have judgments rendered against them in procedurally defective collection suits. Our clinic advocates for these consumers by raising available defenses and sometimes in affirmative litigation against debt collectors or merchants who have violated their rights under common law, the federal Truth in Lending Act (TILA), the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the FTC Holder Rule, and other federal and state consumer protection statutes. Working under the close direct supervision of a full-time attorney professor, students are expected to take primary responsibility for all aspects of their cases -- drafting pleadings, motions and briefs, appearing in court for oral argument and hearings, interviewing and counseling clients, negotiating with opposing counsel, and researching the law to evaluate the merits of claims and defenses. You will also join volunteer lawyers from throughout New York City (including many Fordham Law alums) to provide to unrepresented consumer defendants both limited representation through the Volunteer Lawyer of the Day program, and advice and assistance at CLARO (Consumer Legal Assistance and Referral Office), both located in the NYC Civil Court.

Attributes: BFS, INLJ, JD, LDF, LDS, PIS.

Prerequisite: CLGL 0350 (may be taken concurrently).

CLGL 0293. CONSUMER LITIGATION CLINIC FIELDWORK. (2-3 Credits)

Interested in litigation or wondering if you might be? Want experience with drafting pleadings, motions, and briefs, and appearing in court? Looking to join the community of public interest and private lawyers who are enforcing the rights of low-income consumers against unscrupulous merchants, lenders, assignees, and credit reporting agencies? In the CONSUMER LITIGATION CLINIC, students represent consumers in federal, state and local courts against lenders, debt collectors, and merchants. Our clients are often victims of identity theft, sued on debt they do not owe, or have judgments rendered against them in procedurally defective collection suits. Our clinic advocates for these consumers by raising available defenses and sometimes in affirmative litigation against debt collectors or merchants who have violated their rights under common law, the federal Truth in Lending Act (TILA), the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the FTC Holder Rule, and other federal and state consumer protection statutes. Working under the close direct supervision of a full-time attorney professor, students are expected to take primary responsibility for all aspects of their cases -- drafting pleadings, motions and briefs, appearing in court for oral argument and hearings, interviewing and counseling clients, negotiating with opposing counsel, and researching the law to evaluate the merits of claims and defenses. You will also join volunteer lawyers from throughout New York City (including many Fordham Law alums) to provide to unrepresented consumer defendants both limited representation through the Volunteer Lawyer of the Day program, and advice and assistance at CLARO (Consumer Legal Assistance and Referral Office), both located in the NYC Civil Court.

Attributes: BFS, INLJ, JD, LDF, LDS, PIS.

CLGL 0298. IMMIGRANT RIGHTS CLINIC CSWK. (2,3 Credits)

Provides students with an opportunity to provide direct legal representation to individuals in a range of immigration matters. In doing so, students are able to respond to a vital need for quality representation for indigent non-citizens who are facing deportation and/or seeking legal status in the United States. Students in the IRC generally work with a student partner over the course of the semester. The team will assume direct responsibility for all aspects of their cases and engage in a full range of lawyering skills. This may include client and witness interviewing, legal research and writing, fact investigation and development, counseling, affidavit drafting, motion practice, advocacy, production of evidence, witness preparation and trial work. You may also have an opportunity to work on litigation and advocacy projects in collaboration with community organizations For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="https://www.fordham.edu/info/23685/clinics" target="_blank">https://www.fordham.edu/info/23685/clinics</a>

Attributes: ICS, INLJ, JD, LAWI, LDF, LDS, PIS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0299.

CLGL 0299. IMMIGRANT RIGHTS CLINIC SEM. (2 Credits)

provides students with an opportunity to provide direct legal representation to individuals in a range of immigration matters. In doing so, students are able to respond to a vital need for quality representation for indigent non-citizens who are facing deportation and/or seeking legal status in the United States. Students in the IRC generally work with a student partner over the course of the semester. The team will assume direct responsibility for all aspects of their cases and engage in a full range of lawyering skills. This may include client and witness interviewing, legal research and writing, fact investigation and development, counseling, affidavit drafting, motion practice, advocacy, production of evidence, witness preparation and trial work. You may also have an opportunity to work on litigation and advocacy projects in collaboration with community organizations For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: ICS, INLJ, JD, LAWI, LDF, LDS, PIS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0298.

Prerequisite: CLGL 0350.

CLGL 0301. MEDIATION & ADR RESEARCH & WRITING. (1 Credit)

Students examine access to justice policy issues associated with mediation and ADR processes in both court-connected and private programs and produce writings that will be helpful to stakeholders (judges, parties, lawyers, mediators and arbitrators). Writings include “best practices” standards, practice manuals for mediators, guidelines for pro se parties. Pre-requisites<br> a. Permission of the instructor <br> b. Students must have completed or be currently enrolled in the ADR Survey course or the Mediation Clinic Seminar .

CLGL 0303. CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP: CIVIL/CRIMINAL FIELDWORK. (2 Credits)

Under the supervision of a mentor field attorney, students observe and assist in the lawyering process. Students must secure their own field placements, approved in advance by the Externship Program. Depending on the field placement, experiences may include research, writing, client contact, court appearances, and observation. Externs must complete 10 hours of fieldwork a week for 13 weeks during (20 hours a week for 8 weeks during the summer) over their semester. Students must also be enrolled in the seminar appropriate to their placement. The seminar will focus on guided self-reflection on issues including ethics, public interest and government lawyering, the development of one’s professional identify, and practical skills such as legal research. Students must sign up through the Externship Program and be approved to enroll.

Attributes: EXP, JD.

Prerequisite: CLGL 1303 (may be taken concurrently).

CLGL 0305. CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP: CRIMINAL JUSTICE FIELDWORK. (2 Credits)

Under the supervision of a mentor field attorney, students observe and assist in the lawyering process. Students must secure their own field placements, approved in advance by the Externship Program. Depending on the field placement, experiences may include research, writing, discovery, and observation. Externs must complete 10 hours of fieldwork a week for 13 weeks during (20 hours a week for 8 weeks during the summer) over their semester. Students must also be enrolled in the seminar appropriate to their placement. The seminar will focus on guided self-reflection on issues including ethics, criminal practice, the development of one’s professional identify, and practical skills such as legal research. Students must sign up through the Externship Program and be approved to enroll.

Attributes: JD, LDS.

Corequisite: CLGL 1305.

CLGL 0307. CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP: JUDICIAL FIELDWORK. (2 Credits)

Judicial externs have the opportunity to work for a judge and the judge’s staff. Students must secure their own field placements and will gain valuable experience in learning how the judicial process works. During this externship, students will complete various assignments for each judge. Set assignments may include drafting opinions, legal research, watching trials, sitting in on settlement discussions, and observing the selection of a jury. The seminar will focus on guided self-reflection on issues including ethics, judicial practice, the development of one’s professional identify, and practical skills such as legal research Students must sign up through the Externship Program and be approved to enroll.

Attributes: JD, LDS.

Corequisite: CLGL 1307.

CLGL 0311. CLIN EXTERN:STEIN SCHOLARS. (2 Credits)

Stein Scholars with civil fieldwork placements located in NYC or the NYC metropolitan area may apply to register for this course. See the Externship Program web page at http://law.fordham.edu/externship.htm for the Course Registration Application. Class meetings: There are no class meetings for this course but students are required to also be registered for the Stein Scholars Civil Externship Seminar (Course ID CLGL1311).

CLGL 0312. CLIN EXTERN:OUT-OF-TOWN. (2 Credits)

Students with qualifying fieldwork placements located outside of the NYC metropolitan area may apply to register for this course. Applications are due no later than April 7, 2009. See the Externship Program web page at http://law.fordham.edu/externship.htm for the Course Registration Application. Class meetings: There are no class meetings for this course but students are required to also be registered for an Out of Town Externship Seminar (Course ID CLGL1312).

CLGL 0313. CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY FIELDWORK. (1,2 Credits)

Under the supervision of a mentor field attorney, students observe and assist in the lawyering process. Students must secure their own field placements, approved in advance by the Externship Program. Depending on the field placement, experiences may include research, writing, drafting, and observation. Externs must complete 10 hours of fieldwork a week for 13 weeks during (20 hours a week for 8 weeks during the summer) over their semester. Students must also be enrolled in the seminar appropriate to their placement. The seminar will focus on guided self-reflection on issues including ethics, copyright and trademark law, the development of one’s professional identify, and practical skills such as legal research and drafting. Students must sign up through the Externship Program and be approved to enroll.

Attributes: IPIS, JD.

CLGL 0320. INTRODUCTION TO MEDIATION. (2 Credits)

Introduction to Mediation is a combined skills and theory course focused on consensual problem solving. Beginning with an overview of negotiation techniques, the course will focus on the role of the mediator and explore the theory, practice and techniques of the mediation process. In addition, the students will learn how to structuring the mediation process, manage emotional issues in negotiations, learn the techniques necessary to conduct an effective mediation, with an emphasis both on absorbing the fundamental points of law as well as learning how to guide people to informed decision-making as a mediator. Role plays, simulations and exercises will be integrated throughout the course to provide experiential learning of the material.

Attributes: JD, LDE, LIDR, LLM.

CLGL 0321. MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS AGREEMENT (LLM ONLY). (2 Credits)

This is an agreement - centered mergers & acquisitions course; it covers merger & acquisitions law through a sequential study of acquisition agreements. This course is intended to build skills for those intending to practice, or simply to understand, mergers & acquisitions transactions. The course will emphasize private company M&A, although public M&A will be discussed. The course is aimed at LLM students and accordingly will cover cross-border transactions. Both group projects and individual work are used. The course culminates in a mock acquisition exercise. There will be no final exam. Readings will cover practical drafting issues and M&A issues, will include fewer cases than most courses and will include business school courses as well. There are no prerequisite, as all necessary financial analysis, accounting. fiduciary duty and contracts principles will be covered in the course.

Attributes: LAWB, LAWI, LLM.

CLGL 0322. ARBITRATION: DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES. (2 Credits)

This course presents a review of domestic and international commercial arbitration from both a theoretical and practical perspective. As well as examining the statutory underpinnings of arbitration and related case law, the course focuses on the practical aspects of serving as counsel in business arbitrations, based on Professor Moxley’s over 35 years as an arbitrator in hundreds of cases with the American Arbitration Association and a trainer of counsel and arbitrators for the New York State Bar Association. The course will include as guest lecturers partners from major law firms specializing in international arbitration. <p> Students should emerge from the course confident in their ability to advise clients as to whether to choose litigation or arbitration and able to pick up an arbitration file and know best how to represent their client in the case. The course should also be helpful to students competing in arbitration moot court competitions. <p> Students may choose between a (1) take-home open book exam and (2) a 25-page paper, which can be used to satisfy the writing requirement.

Attributes: ICE, JD, LDE, LIDR, LLM, LWR.

CLGL 0331. CLN EXT:STEIN OUT OF TOWN SEM. (1 Credit)

CLGL 0335. MEDIATION CLINIC SEMINAR. (2,3 Credits)

In the fieldwork portion of the course, students mediate cases in Small Claims Court under faculty supervision. The types of disputes which students typically mediate include those between landlords and tenants and employers and employees, as well as claims of defective goods and services. In the seminar, students explore the legal, policy and professional responsibility issues of mediation practice. Primary emphasis is placed on the non-adversarial role of the lawyer-mediator. Students also consider the role of the attorney advocate in mediation. The course requirements include submission of weekly case journals, an oral class presentation and the option of either a take-home final exam or a research paper. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: JD, LDF, LDS, LIDR.

CLGL 0336. MEDIATION CLINIC CASEWORK: MANHATTAN. (1 Credit)

Fieldwork consists of mediating cases in Small Claims Court under faculty supervision. Students mediate a variety of disputes including landlord-tenant, employer-employee, and defective goods and services. In addition to the mediation casework, the course requirements include attendance at the weekly seminars, submission of weekly case journals, an oral and written theory presentation and a take home exam or research paper. The seminar will explore the legal, policy and professional responsibility issues of mediation practice by lawyers. Primary emphasis is on the non-adversarial role of the lawyer-mediator. Students also consider the role of the attorney-advocate in mediation. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: JD, LAW, LDF, LDS, LIDR, LLM.

CLGL 0339. ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION. (3 Credits)

Traditionally, law students are invited to consider adjudication as the most significant and acceptable, if not the sole means of resolving disputes. Yet, we know that the resulting picture distorts the social reality and the role of the lawyer in contemporary America. Other processes are available, and are increasingly turned to for resolving disputes. Moreover, even in ordinary litigation, most cases are never finally adjudicated but are settled after negotiation between the parties or with the helping nudge from the judge. This course will give the student both a survey and a chance to work through simulations of the variety of dispute resolving processes that are currently employed by lawyers and others in America today. Notes/Miscellaneous: Take-home exam.

Attributes: JD, LDE, LIDR, LLM.

CLGL 0344. INTRODUCTION TO THE DEAL. (3 Credits)

This practice-oriented course introduces students to business and legal issues common to commercial transactions, whether a multi-million dollar M&A deal, a license agreement, or a public offering. Among the topics covered are (i) how to draft a term sheet, (ii) how to translate a term sheet into contract provisions, (iii) how to use due diligence to identify business and legal issues, (iv) how to understand and draft provisions with financial language, (v) how to negotiate a business deal, (vi) how to understand and draft opinion letters and (vii) closings. The course is conducted partly through lectures and partly through in-class exercises and in-class role plays that are designed to help students develop some of the skills required to represent clients in commercial transactions effectively. This course can be used to satisfy the skills requirement.

Attributes: BFS, JD.

CLGL 0350. FUNDAMENTAL LAWYERING SKILLS. (3 Credits)

In the Fundamental Lawyering Skills course, students learn fact analysis, interviewing, counseling, negotiation, case theory and planning. Teaching methodologies include lecture, demonstrations, student role plays and critiques. Students are required to submit written materials in connection with the role plays. This course and Trial Advocacy provide students with a basic understanding of lawyering skills. Fundamental Lawyering Skills is a pre-requisite or co-requisite for all of the live client clinics. Notes/Miscellaneous: Pre-requisite: Civil Procedure .

Attributes: EXP, JD, LAW, LDS.

Prerequisite: CVGL 0101.

CLGL 0358. FEDERAL LITIGATION CLINIC SEM. (2,3 Credits)

Three-credit fieldwork in federal criminal defense of those accused of felonies, as well as in federal civil actions involving civil rights and intellectual property. Two-credit seminar covering topics related to fieldwork is a co-requisite. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: JD, LDF, LDS, LIDR, LLM, PIS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0359.

Prerequisite: CLGL 0350.

CLGL 0359. FEDERAL LITIGATION CLNC CSWK. (3 Credits)

Three-credit fieldwork in federal criminal defense, federal civil defense and intellectual property. Students deal with high stakes matters and are involved in strategy, discovery, brief drafting, deposition taking, oral argument and other court appearances as well as a myriad of other critical lawyering tasks. Two+ credit seminar covering topics related to fieldwork is a co-requisite. Fundamental Lawyering Skills is a co-requisite. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="https://www.fordham.edu/info/23685/clinics" target="_blank">https://www.fordham.edu/info/23685/clinics</a>

Attributes: INLJ, JD, LDF, LDS, LLM, PIS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0358.

Prerequisite: CLGL 0350.

CLGL 0365. FAMILY ADVOCACY CLINIC SEMINAR. (2 Credits)

Students in the Family Advocacy Clinic represent clients whose children have disabilities. Students advocate for these families in a variety of proceedings including: special education, foster care and adoption benefits and proceedings to obtain services for children with special needs. Cases primarily take students into administrative forums where they are permitted to conduct hearings and argue appeals. Some of those cases also end up in N.Y. State and federal trial and appellate courts. The Clinic is designed to prepare students to become independent, self-motivated practitioners prepared for the demands of practice in all kinds of legal settings. Students also develop particular competence in pro bono and public interest practice. First, students learn the basics of client representation by working directly with their clients, handling all aspects of a client's case from interviewing, through counseling, discovery and negotiation, to final settlement or litigation. Second, students learn a collaborative, interdisciplinary practice, as they join students in Fordham's graduate social work program to develop legal and non-legal remedies to solve client problems. The interdisciplinary aspect of the clinic is unique and provides students with the opportunity to expand their litigation and transactional skills through learning how to access and evaluate experts from a variety of disciplines. Third, students learn how to take on policy and legislative issues when client problems can best be resolved by such approaches. Notes: Prerequisite: Fundamental Lawyering Skills and pre-approval from Clinic Depart. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: INLJ, JD, LDF, LDS, LLM, PIS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0366.

Prerequisite: CLGL 0350 (may be taken concurrently).

CLGL 0366. FAMILY ADVOCACY CLINIC CASEWORK. (2-3 Credits)

Students in the Family Advocacy Clinic represent clients whose children have disabilities. Students advocate for these families in a variety of proceedings including: special education, foster care and adoption benefits and proceedings to obtain services for children with special needs. Cases primarily take students into administrative forums where they are permitted to conduct hearings and argue appeals. Some of those cases also end up in N.Y. State and federal trial and appellate courts. The Clinic is designed to prepare students to become independent, self-motivated practitioners prepared for the demands of practice in all kinds of legal settings. Students also develop particular competence in pro bono and public interest practice. First, students learn the basics of client representation by working directly with their clients, handling all aspects of a client's case from interviewing, through counseling, discovery and negotiation, to final settlement or litigation. Second, students learn a collaborative, interdisciplinary practice, as they join students in Fordham's graduate social work program to develop legal and non-legal remedies to solve client problems. The interdisciplinary aspect of the clinic is unique and provides students with the opportunity to expand their litigation and transactional skills through learning how to access and evaluate experts from a variety of disciplines. Third, students learn how to take on policy and legislative issues when client problems can best be resolved by such approaches. Notes/Miscellaneous: Pre-requisite: Fundamental Lawyering Skills. Must co-register also for the Family Advocacy Clinic Seminar. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="https://www.fordham.edu/info/23685/clinics" target="_blank">https://www.fordham.edu/info/23685/clinics</a>

Attributes: INLJ, JD, LDF, LDS, LLM, PIS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0365.

CLGL 0370. ARBITRATION PRACTICE. (2-3 Credits)

"I have expanded the number of credits for this course in order to provide students with more skills development with respect to the drafting of arbitration agreements, distinguishing arbitration from other ADR processes, and conducting arbitration hearings, including the pre-hearing stage. Grades will be based on class participation and a final paper and/or take home examination. The Paper may satisfy the school's writing requirment. I expect to be assisted in the course by Adjunct Professor Joel Davidson and several outside speakers, including the present and former general counsel of the American Arbitration Association.” .

Attributes: JD, LAWB, LAWI, LDE, LLM.

CLGL 0371. PUBLIC INTEREST LAWYER FLDWK. (2 Credits)

CLGL 0372. CRIMINAL DEFENSE CLINIC SEM. (2 Credits)

IN THE CRIMINAL DEFENSE CLINIC (CDC), students are out front representing clients in Manhattan Criminal Court. From the outset, CDC students take complete responsibility for the representation of their clients. Under the supervision of faculty members with extensive experience in criminal practice, students interview and counsel clients and investigate their cases - including visiting alleged crime scenes, interviewing witnesses and drafting subpoenas. Students gain experience drafting motions and other legal documents, as well as arguing those motions in court. They develop case theory and strategy and negotiate with Assistant District Attorneys. The CDC also pursues reform-orientated litigation and projects such as civil and administrative proceedings that grow out of the many civil consequences that arise out of the criminal charges our clients face. Another component of our work encompasses the representation of clients convicted of serious offenses seeking parole, affirmative civil rights litigation and habeas litigation on behalf of clients indefinitely imprisoned by the U.S. military at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Further, CDC students benefit from interdisciplinary collaboration with a graduate fellow in Forensic Psychology supervised by Dr. Barry Rosenfeld and Social Work graduate students supervised by Kathy Ho, LMSW, LCSW. This partnership permits students to understand and address the social and psychological issues that are so often part of their clients' cases. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: INLJ, JD, LDF, LDS, LIDR, LLM, PIS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0373.

Prerequisite: CLGL 0350.

CLGL 0373. CRIMINAL DEFENSE CLINIC CASEWORK. (1-3 Credits)

IN THE CRIMINAL DEFENSE CLINIC (CDC), students are out front representing clients in Manhattan Criminal Court. From the outset, CDC students take complete responsibility for the representation of their clients. Under the supervision of faculty members with extensive experience in criminal practice, students interview and counsel clients and investigate their cases - including visiting alleged crime scenes, interviewing witnesses and drafting subpoenas. Students gain experience drafting motions and other legal documents, as well as arguing those motions in court. They develop case theory and strategy and negotiate with Assistant District Attorneys. The CDC also pursues reform-orientated litigation and projects such as civil and administrative proceedings that grow out of the many civil consequences that arise out of the criminal charges our clients face. Another component of our work encompasses the representation of clients convicted of serious offenses seeking parole, affirmative civil rights litigation and habeas litigation on behalf of clients indefinitely imprisoned by the U.S. military at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Further, CDC students benefit from interdisciplinary collaboration with a graduate fellow in Forensic Psychology supervised by Dr. Barry Rosenfeld and Social Work graduate students supervised by Kathy Ho, LMSW, LCSW. This partnership permits students to understand and address the social and psychological issues that are so often part of their clients' cases. Notes/Miscellaneous: Coregister for Criminal Defense Clinic Sem. Prerequisite: Fundamental Lawyering Skills. Recommended: Criminal Procedure, Professional Responsibility, Trial Advocacy and/or Evidence. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: INLJ, JD, LDF, LDS, LIDR, LLM, PIS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0372.

CLGL 0378. ADVANCED CLIENT COUNSELING. (3 Credits)

This three-credit offering offers in-depth exploration of client counseling. Building upon Fundamental Lawyering Skills, students probe the complexities of the decision-making process in client representations. Demonstrations and in-class role plays afford students the opportunity to assess challenges that confront the lawyer as counselor. Drawing upon cutting-edge legal scholarship, this course will elucidate the advantages and limitations of the conventional traditionalist/paternalist and client-centered/client-autonomous counseling modes and will champion the emerging school of “engaged client-centeredness,” a model which represents a reasoned compromise between extremes on the continuum.Through adherence to the experiential learning approach, the class will realistically replicate the practice setting. All course simulations find their roots in actual representations that have been minimally modified to safeguard continuing attorney-client privilege and/or work product doctrine obligations. Upon completion of this seminar, students will possess a more robust understanding of, and appreciation for, an all-too-often underdeveloped skill of transactional and litigation/courtroom practice. Prerequisite: Fundamental Lawyering Skills. This course may be used to satisfy the skills requirement.

Attributes: JD, LAW.

Prerequisite: CLGL 0350.

CLGL 0381. SECURITIES LITIGATION AND ARBITRATION CLINIC SEMINAR. (2 Credits)

This clinic allows students to represent clients in securities arbitrations at the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA). FINRA was created in July 2007 through the consolidation of National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) and the member regulation, enforcement and arbitration functions of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). Students are given the opportunity to advocate for clients at arbitrations, negotiate with opposing counsel, participate in mediations, prepare witnesses to testify, including expert witnesses, interview prospective clients, analyze stockholder and investment documents, counsel clients, draft legal documents and develop their advocacy skills while deepening their substantive knowledge of securities laws and becoming acquainted with the functioning of the securities industry. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: BFS, JD, LAWB, LAWI, LDF, LDS, LLM, PIS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0382.

Prerequisite: CLGL 0350.

CLGL 0382. SECURITIES LITIGATION AND ARBITRATION CLINIC CASEWORK. (2-3 Credits)

This clinic allows students to represent clients in securities arbitrations at the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA). FINRA was created in July 2007 through the consolidation of National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) and the member regulation, enforcement and arbitration functions of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). Students are given the opportunity to advocate for clients at arbitrations, negotiate with opposing counsel, participate in mediations, prepare witnesses to testify, including expert witnesses, interview prospective clients, analyze stockholder and investment documents, counsel clients, draft legal documents and develop their advocacy skills while deepening their substantive knowledge of securities laws and becoming acquainted with the functioning of the securities industry. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: BFS, JD, LAW, LAWB, LAWI, LDF, LDS, LLM, PIS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0381.

CLGL 0390. CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP: NYC COUNCIL FIELDWORK. (2 Credits)

Through an externship with the New York City Council, you'll have the opportunity to work directly with the lawyers who serve the City's legislative body. You'll gain valuable experience in government and improve your legal skills, particularly in the areas of research and drafting. Working at the Council, you'll not only conduct legal research, draft legal memoranda and legislation, but also attend Council meetings and hearings, and prepare sections of Committee briefing papers. Most importantly, you'll participate in the legislative and policy decision-making process with Council staff. In the New York City Council Externship Seminar, you'll learn about the City's legislative process, including the roles played by the City Council and the Mayor's Office. You will study the relevant portions of the City Charter and Administrative Code and analyze state and federal preemption doctrines and case law relating to the powers of the Council. Moreover, you will have the opportunity to draft a piece of legislation and raise questions relating to fieldwork conducted on behalf of the Council. Contact the Externship Program to apply.

Attribute: LPI.

Corequisite: CLGL 1390.

CLGL 0391. COMMUNITY ECON DEV. CLINIC SEM. (2 Credits)

FORDHAM'S COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CLINIC REPRESENTS GROUPS FIGHTING FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE IN LOW-INCOME COMMUNITIES AND LOW-WAGE WORKFORCES. As general counsel, the Clinic helps to sustain effective organizations and build institutions -- childcare centers, health clinics, workers centers, co-ops-- that empower participants while providing desperately needed services and opportunities. It supports local efforts to shape development, limit gentrification and win community benefits agreements. It helps small grassroots groups to incorporate, write bylaws and obtain tax exemption. You will learn basic skills of transactional business lawyering in a nonprofit social justice setting. You take charge of work for non-profit start-ups and join teams with faculty and outside counsel on more complex projects. You meet with clients and present to their members. You interview, counsel, negotiate, advocate, mediate, facilitate, and organize. You write legal documents, policy papers and community legal educational materials. You learn to collaborate with each other and with clients, community activists, and other lawyers. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: INLJ, JD, LLM, PIS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0392.

Prerequisite: CLGL 0350 (may be taken concurrently).

CLGL 0392. COMMUNITY ECO DEV. CLN CSWK. (2-3 Credits)

FORDHAM'S COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CLINIC REPRESENTS GROUPS FIGHTING FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE IN LOW-INCOME COMMUNITIES AND LOW-WAGE WORKFORCES. As general counsel, the Clinic helps to sustain effective organizations and build institutions -- childcare centers, health clinics, workers centers, co-ops-- that empower participants while providing desperately needed services and opportunities. It supports local efforts to shape development, limit gentrification and win community benefits agreements. It helps small grassroots groups to incorporate, write bylaws and obtain tax exemption. You will learn basic skills of transactional business lawyering in a nonprofit social justice setting. You take charge of work for non-profit start-ups and join teams with faculty and outside counsel on more complex projects. You meet with clients and present to their members. You interview, counsel, negotiate, advocate, mediate, facilitate, and organize. You write legal documents, policy papers and community legal educational materials. You learn to collaborate with each other and with clients, community activists, and other lawyers. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: INLJ, JD, LLM, PIS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0391.

CLGL 0397. HOUSING RIGHTS CLINIC SEM. (2 Credits)

In this clinic, students will provide representation to people facing eviction from their homes or needing assistance to assert their right to habitable housing. Every student will have the opportunity to appear in court or administrative tribunals, as well as to negotiate with adversaries, under clinical supervision. Students will work mainly out of the Legal Aid Society¿s Manhattan Housing Court Office. Knowledge of Spanish is a plus.

Attributes: JD, LAW.

CLGL 0398. HOUSING RIGHTS CLINIC CSWK. (3 Credits)

In this clinic, students will provide representation to people facing eviction from their homes or needing assistance to assert their right to habitable housing. Every student will have the opportunity to appear in court or administrative tribunals, as well as to negotiate with adversaries, under clinical supervision. Students will work mainly out of the Legal Aid Society¿s Manhattan Housing Court Office. Knowledge of Spanish is a plus.

Attribute: LAW.

CLGL 0419. TRIAL & ARBITRATION ADVOCACY. (3 Credits)

Sections of this course are taught by trial lawyers. The course deals with techniques and strategies in civil and criminal litigation. Students face typical problems from all phases of trial practice with an emphasis on methods of developing facts, including direct examination, cross examination, exhibit introduction, impeachment, opening and closing statements. A lecture and demonstration of the above skills is presented to all students enrolled in the Trial & Arbitration Advocacy sections for the first eight weeks of the semester. For the entire semester, students meet once a week with their individual instructor. Evidence is a PRE- OR CO-requisite for Trial & Arbitration Advocacy sections. (Students may register for Trial & Arb. Advocacy if they have previously taken Evidence OR are taking Evidence in the same semester as Trial & Arb. Advocacy.) This course satisfies the professional skills requirement.

Attributes: JD, LAW, LDF.

Prerequisite: EDGL 0202 (may be taken concurrently).

CLGL 0423. ADVANCED TRIAL ADVOCACY COMPETITION TEAMS. (2,3 Credits)

*exact meetings during the posted times to be announced.

Attributes: JD, LAW.

CLGL 0425. ADV TRIAL & ARB ADVOCACY. (2,3 Credits)

Students learn advanced techniques (in comparison with the introduction in Trial & Arbitration Advocacy) in direct and cross-examination, argument to the Court and jury, submission of effective trial memoranda, and other skills of the litigator. The emphasis is on student performances in class by the student-advocate’s handling of relatively complex evidentiary and tactical problems during trial. This course satisfies the professional skills requirement. Prerequisite: Trial & Arbitration Advocacy .

Attributes: JD, LAW, LDF.

Prerequisite: EDGL 0202 (may be taken concurrently).

CLGL 0426. ADVANCED APPELATE ADVOCACY. (2,3 Credits)

The Advanced Appellate Advocacy class is designed to refine students' overall mastery of the art of appellate advocacy. This course supports and supplements the activities of the Moot Court Board in covering all aspects of appellate work, with a particular focus on developing oral advocacy. The substance of the course will be presented through three types of class days. First, at the beginning of every semester, a research librarian from the Fordham Law Library will present a tutorial targeted to address the unique issues arising in different legal areas. This will include identifying and accessing authorities such as rare treatises, as well as helping students to locate and review decisions from courts with specialized experience. This will give the students a foundation for both the written and oral arguments that they will be making. At this first class, the students must also sign up to judge selected rounds of oral arguments, or to present oral arguments later in the semester if they are competitors. The second type of class will encompass the practice of oral arguments using the Mulligan or Wormser problems. The professor will discuss how researching and writing briefs is the foundation for the later oral presentation. Competitors will give their oral arguments with their fellow classmates acting as judges. This will be followed by the professor and the students giving their comments and suggestions on the material. The end of the class will be reserved for the students to work together either as a whole or in groups on particular oral argument skills, such as introductions, conclusions, answering questions directly, roadmapping, or developing policy arguments. The third type of class will require the competition teams to present their oral arguments as practice for the actual competitions. The judges will be those students who signed up at the first class. This will be followed by comments from the professor and the students. Finally, the class will, either as a whole or in breaking up into groups, workshop the competitors' arguments.<p> Registration is with the permission of the professor and is limited to the Editorial Board, competitors, and competition editors.

Attributes: JD, LAW.

CLGL 0430. INTL HUMAN RIGHTS CLIN CSWK. (3 Credits)

The Walter Leitner International Human Rights Clinic aims to train a new generation of human rights lawyers and to inspire results-oriented, practical human rights work throughout the world. The clinic works in partnership with grassroots justice organizations on international human rights projects, including mobile legal aid clinics, legal and policy analysis, public interest lawsuits, submissions before human rights bodies, fact-finding and report writing, and human rights trainings. Students enrolled in the clinic participate in casework and a companion weekly seminar course that provides training in human rights advocacy skills and encourages critical reflection regarding the theory and practice of human rights. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: ICS, INLJ, JD, LLM.

Corequisite: CLGL 0431.

CLGL 0431. INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CLINIC SEMINAR. (2 Credits)

THROUGH REAL-WORLD HUMAN RIGHTS LAWYERING EXPERIENCES, the Walter Leitner International Human Rights Clinic trains Fordham Law School students to be strategic, reflective, and creative social justice advocates. The Clinic works in partnership with grassroots justice organizations on human rights projects focused on the sexual health and rights of marginalized populations and access to justice. The Clinic employs a range of advocacy methods including legal and policy analysis, human rights trainings, public interest lawsuits, submissions before human rights bodies, and direct legal assistance. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: ICS, INLJ, JD, LLM.

Corequisite: CLGL 0430.

CLGL 0449. MEDIATION AND NEGOTIATION PRACTICUM. (2 Credits)

This seminar is designed to provide an overview of negotiation and mediation theory and a forum in which to hone negotiation and mediation skills. The focus of the course will be on learning, practicing, and sharpening negotiation and mediation skills through simulated exercises. Registration is with the permission of the Professors and is limited to members of the Dispute Resolution Society.<p> This seminar supports and supplements the activities of the Dispute Resolution Society in preparing the Vis International Arbitration Moot team in brief writing and oral argument preparation. The fall semester we will start with an overview of international commercial law and arbitration theory and practice, and discuss the representation of clients in this respective process. The seminar focuses on learning, practicing, and sharpening arbitration knowledge and skills through the Vis competition problem. Eight hours of class time in the fall semester will be conducted on an interactive online learning platform, with free access to the platform provided by the professor.

Attributes: JD, LAW, LDE.

CLGL 0459. ADVANCED MEDIATION AND NEGOTIATION PRACTICUM. (1,2 Credits)

CLGL 0509. APPELLATE LITIGATION CLN SEM. (2 Credits)

CLGL 0510. POLICY & LEGISLATIVE CLINIC FIELDWORK. (1,2 Credits)

Students represent and work with community-based organizations as policy advocates. We assess and recommend changes in law, regulations and public policy based on the needs of our clients and our analysis of the law. Our projects are subject to change, but we currently are working with organizations that work on issues concerning environmental justice and child & family rights. Through our seminar and our fieldwork, students will have the opportunity to develop a range of lawyering skills, which may include: interviewing and counseling clients; conducting legal research and analysis; drafting proposed legislation, state and local regulations, legislative memos, and community-oriented educational materials; developing a ¿case theory¿ (i.e., a plan of action) based on the identified community needs; and advocating before and meeting with state and local elected officials, members of appropriate executive departments, community leaders, bar leaders, and others who may have an impact on our clients¿ desired goals. Notes/Miscellaneous: Must coregister for Urban Policy Clinic Fieldwork. Pre- or co-requisite: Civil Procedure; Fundamental Lawyering Skills. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: INLJ, JD, LLM, PIS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0520.

Prerequisite: CLGL 0350.

CLGL 0512. LEGISALTIVE AND POLICY ADVOCACY CLINIC CASEWORK. (2 Credits)

CLGL 0519. APPLELLATE LITIGATION CLINIC CASEWORK. (1-3 Credits)

CLGL 0520. POLICY & LEGISLATIVE CLININIC FIELDWORK. (3 Credits)

Students represent and work with community-based organizations as policy advocates. We assess and recommend changes in law, regulations and public policy based on the needs of our clients and our analysis of the law. Our projects are subject to change, but we currently are working with organizations that work on issues concerning environmental justice and child & family rights. Through our seminar and our fieldwork, students will have the opportunity to develop a range of lawyering skills, which may include: interviewing and counseling clients; conducting legal research and analysis; drafting proposed legislation, state and local regulations, legislative memos, and community-oriented educational materials; developing a ¿case theory¿ (i.e., a plan of action) based on the identified community needs; and advocating before and meeting with state and local elected officials, members of appropriate executive departments, community leaders, bar leaders, and others who may have an impact on our clients¿ desired goals. Notes/Miscellaneous: Must co-register for Legislative and Policy Advocacy Clinic Seminar. Pre or co-requisite: Civil Procedure Fundamental Lawyering Skills. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="https://www.fordham.edu/info/23685/clinics" target="_blank">https://www.fordham.edu/info/23685/clinics</a>

Attributes: INLJ, JD, LLM, PIS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0510.

Prerequisite: CLGL 0350 (may be taken concurrently).

CLGL 0529. CIVIL COURT SETTLEMENT FIELDWORK. (1 Credit)

Students will work with parties in Civil Court (Chambers of Judge Shlomos Hagler) facilitating negotiations regarding a wide variety of civil litigation issues. Both competitive and cooperative bargaining skills are emphasized Students enrolled in this course must have completed the Mediation Clinic. <p> Enrollment is with the permission of Professor Jacqueline Nolan-Haley. Fieldwork will be supervised by Professor Liz Crowe.

CLGL 0559. ARBITRATION PRACTICUM. (2 Credits)

The Arbitration Practicum is only open to DRS students and it prepares them for competing in the International VIS arbitration competition in Hong Kong and Vienna. In addition to covering the basics of international arbitration, the course covers the CISG, the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods. This will include domestic arbitration but the course is only opened to DRS students as it was created specifically to help the competitors.

CLGL 0590. SOCIAL JUSTICE CLN SEMINAR. (2 Credits)

The Social Justice and Dispute Resolution Seminar is open to all students and is required of all students enrolled in the Social Justice and Dispute Resolution Clinic. We will address theoretical and practical questions concerning both Social Justice and Dispute Resolution. We will seek to define both terms and to determine when it is appropriate to use dispute resolution techniques in the context of social justice disputes or impasses. Readings will include noteworthy case studies from which lessons can be drawn. On occasion, guest speakers will join us. Students will be expected to participate in at least one problem-solving simulation that arises in the context of social justice or community-based disputes.

Attributes: INLJ, JD, LLM.

CLGL 0592. SOCIAL JUSTICE CLN FLDWK. (3 Credits)

The new Social Justice and Dispute Resolution Clinic is part of the Feerick Center, whose purpose is to address social policy problems facing those without access to justice, solving problems endemic to urban settings and disproportionately affecting the poor. Students likely will conduct legal and social policy research; help interview key City government officials, public interest lawyers, and service providers; and provide guidance in implementing the Center¿s first significant problem-solving project, which probably will address the needs of homeless families. The seminar will focus on academic and practical aspects of using alternative dispute resolution techniques to achieve social justice.

Attributes: INLJ, JD, LLM.

CLGL 0615. INTERNATIONAL LAW AND DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA CLINIC SEMINAR. (2 Credits)

The seminar portion of the clinic introduces students to the law and theory of international development as well as such practical skills as project research and design, proposal drafting, and interview techniques. For the fieldwork component, participants are assigned to teams to research and design a concrete development project. The same course is taught simultaneously at partner law schools in Africa, and each team of Fordham Law students is partnered with a team of African law students to develop a project, with the opportunity to travel to Africa for one week mid-semester to meet their African teammates in person and take part in project planning/implementation on the ground. Partnering with African law professors, non-governmental organizations, and government and private actors, the teams have the chance to apply what they have learned in seminar through their very own small-scale, sustainable project.

Attributes: ICS, INLJ, JD, LAW, LLM.

CLGL 0616. INTERNATIONAL LAW AND DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA CLINIC CASEWORK. (3 Credits)

The seminar portion of the clinic introduces students to the law and theory of international development as well as such practical skills as project research and design, proposal drafting, and interview techniques. For the fieldwork component, participants are assigned to teams to research and design a concrete development project. The same course is taught simultaneously at partner law schools in Africa, and each team of Fordham Law students is partnered with a team of African law students to develop a project, with the opportunity to travel to Africa for one week mid-semester to meet their African teammates in person and take part in project planning/implementation on the ground. Partnering with African law professors, non-governmental organizations, and government and private actors, the teams have the chance to apply what they have learned in seminar through their very own small-scale, sustainable project.

Attributes: ICS, INLJ, JD, LLM.

CLGL 0629. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND INFORMATION LAW (SAMUELSON-GLUSHKO) SEMINAR. (2 Credits)

The seminar focuses on lawyering as it relates to the practice of Intellectual Property and Information Law. Topics include challenges in representing individual and corporate clients, trademark applications, patent applications, litigation strategies, and negotiating IP agreements. There is a simulation component to the seminar that goes through common issues IPIL attorneys may face and has four writing assignments. The seminar also devotes time to allow students to share information about their matters and get the perspective of their fellow students on how a problem the student is facing may be solved. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="https://www.fordham.edu/info/23685/clinics" target="_blank">https://www.fordham.edu/info/23685/clinics</a>

Attributes: IPIE, JD, LAWT, LDF, LDS, LLM.

Corequisite: CLGL 0639.

Prerequisites: CLGL 0350 and IPGL 0135 or IPGL 0130 or IPGL 0304 or IPGL 0131.

CLGL 0639. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND INFORMATION LAW (SAMUELSON-GLUSHKO) CASEWORK. (2-3 Credits)

The Clinic has a wide range of clients seeking assistance, including entrepreneurs, small business owners, authors, artists, musicians, actors, playwrights, designers, inventors, and non-profit organizations. The Clinic assists these clients in a variety of matters that fall into one of five categories: Litigation, Deals, Risk Counseling, and Patent applications and Trademark registrations. • Litigation. Clinic students may represent people in court, usually on the defendant side, but it is possible that we will represent plaintiffs. Students may also represent non-parties in a litigation, most commonly as amicus curiae. The majority of the Clinic’s cases are in federal court but the Clinic may also appear in state court to protect a client’s privacy. • Deals. Clinic students assist clients in negotiating and drafting agreements that have an IP component such as trademark licenses, copyright assignments, ghostwriting contracts, software developer agreements, and non-disclosure agreements. • Patent applications and Trademark registrations. Students assist clients in all aspects of obtaining federal trademark and patent protection, including counseling on the availability of a mark or patentability of an invention, filing an application, and responding to inquires or refusals made by the USPTO. • Risk Counseling. In addition to counseling clients as part of the above matters, Clinic matters include advising clients on how to avoid or mitigate risk. Most commonly, this takes the form of counseling clients on the steps to take to protect IP rights through trade secrets laws, what privacy rights clients may have, whether clients are infringing someone else’s IP rights, and how fair use may be used to avoid infringing another person’s rights. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="https://www.fordham.edu/info/23685/clinics" target="_blank">https://www.fordham.edu/info/23685/clinics</a>

Attributes: IPIS, JD, LAWT, LDF, LDS, LLM.

Corequisite: CLGL 0629.

CLGL 0694. LEADERSHIP FOR LAWYERS. (1 Credit)

Lawyers often assume leadership roles, sometimes relatively early in their careers. We will explore the responsibilities and challenges lawyers face in leadership roles across various practice settings including public interest organizations, law firms, government offices and businesses. The course will help students think about, analyze and develop key aspects of effective leadership. <p> Topics will include styles and characteristics of leadership; methods of effective leadership; forms of influence; management of conflict; elements of effective communication; articulation of vision and leadership of teams. <p> Students will assess their own leadership abilities and style and will engage in exercises, readings, discussions, and reflections to develop their own strengths and build their skills. Students will also interact with lawyers who currently serve in leadership roles. <p> There are no pre-requisites for this seminar nor do you have to have had a leadership role in the past. Admission to the course is selective and the course is capped at 10 students. Students who wish to be considered for the class must e-mail this completed form to Professor Radvany (radvany@fordham.edu) no later than 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, October 26th. Accepted students will be notified by e-mail by the end of the day on Saturday, October 28th. <p> Why are you interested in this class? What do you hope to get out of it? <p> Please explain what, if any, leadership roles you have had in the past? (None required) <p> Please explain any other ways you have explored issues relevant to this course, including personal experience, courses in college and law school, other graduate study, and volunteer work.

CLGL 0708. THE STORYTELLING PROJECT. (2 Credits)

CLGL 0750. ENTREPRENEURIAL LAW CLINIC SEMINAR. (2 Credits)

New for Fall 2017, students will help in the Entrepreneurial Law Clinic’s formation--representing clients, participating in community outreach, and providing services to entrepreneurs via pop up clinics. The clinic assists early stage traditional start-ups and social enterprises with a range of legal issues, including entity formation, structuring internal compensation structure for founders, negotiating investment or loan agreements, as well as drafting shareholder, operating, vendor and/or service agreements.<br> Faculty<br> The course will be taught by Professor Bernice Grant, who is the Senior Director of the Entrepreneurial Law Program and the LSLS, Inc. Supervising Attorney of this clinic.

CLGL 0752. ENTREPRENEURIAL LAW CLINIC CASEWORK. (2 Credits)

New for Fall 2017, students will help in the Entrepreneurial Law Clinic’s formation--representing clients, participating in community outreach, and providing services to entrepreneurs via pop up clinics. The clinic assists early stage traditional start-ups and social enterprises with a range of legal issues, including entity formation, structuring internal compensation structure for founders, negotiating investment or loan agreements, as well as drafting shareholder, operating, vendor and/or service agreements.<br> Faculty<br> The course will be taught by Professor Bernice Grant, who is the Senior Director of the Entrepreneurial Law Program and the LSLS, Inc. Supervising Attorney of this clinic.

CLGL 0780. NEGOTIATION AND MEDIATION. (2 Credits)

"When assisting individuals and groups in resolving disputes, lawyers who act as negotiators and mediators frequently find themselves working with parties from diverse cultural backgrounds. Some of these individuals may speak different languages and/or be from different racial or ethnic backgrounds. To serve as competent negotiators and mediators and to develop a positive relationship with disputing parties, lawyers must be able to navigate the different cultural settings they will encounter.<p>In this seminar, students will examine the theory and practice of negotiation and mediation as well as the behaviors and attitudes that contribute to cultural competence. Students will also be provided the opportunity through simulations to enhance their skills as culturally competent negotiators and mediators."

Attributes: JD, LAW, LDE, LIDR, LLM.

CLGL 0807. LAWYERS AS FACILITATORS. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to help students develop skills and an understanding of the practice of facilitation, mediation and arbitration in the legal , business and community contexts . Lawyers work on matters that require groups of people to work together in order to solve problems, reach decisions and resolve conflicts . The course will focus on opportunities for students to develop the skills necessary for acting as a facilitator , whether as a facilitator of meetings, people in conflict or with problem solving. Through simulations, exercises , readings and discussions in a range of contexts from facilitations in religious institution reorganizations, to mediations for breaches of contract and employment agreements to sports arbitration, students will practice and explore some of the challenges inherent in these different methods of resolving disputes.<p> Students will be graded based on simulations, group exercises and brief written assignments.<p>Professor Feerick is the founder of the Law School's Center for Social Justice, a member of the faculty for many years, and former Dean of the Law School. He has enjoyed a wide experience in domestic and international conflict resolution and former partner at Skadden Arps. Professor Lindal Gerstel is a general commercial litigator with Anderson Kill. As a member of various mediation court panels, and member of the Commericial panel of the American Arbitration Association, Professor Gerstel's focus of practice is in the field of ADR .

Attributes: JD, LDE, LIDR, LLM.

CLGL 0870. PROSECUTION CLINIC SEMINAR. (2 Credits)

PROSECUTORS NEVER TAKE A BACKSEAT DURING A CASE, so we don't ask our students in the Prosecution Clinic to take one, either. You will be front and center: working with police officers, interviewing victims and witnesses, determining charges, drafting accusatory instruments, and representing the People of the State of New York at arraignment in Queens County. In this recently established clinic, students work in the Queens County District Attorney’s Office, under the aegis of Judge Richard Brown, the District Attorney, and handle their own prosecutorial caseload from inception through trial and sentence. Students are supervised by two of the DA's most skilled professionals: Fordham Law alum Kevin Duddy '85, Director of Trial Advocacy, and his Deputy Director, Jennifer Naiburg. During the semester, you will experience the unique role of the prosecutor as both advocate and impartial public servant sworn to pursue justice. In both the courtroom and the classroom, you will take a problem-solving approach to each case, learning firsthand the impact of the criminal justice system on all its stakeholders: the victims, the accused, the witnesses, the police, and the public. Along with your supervising attorneys, you will develop case theory, conduct motion practice and pre-trial hearings, visit crime scenes, negotiate plea agreements, prepare evidence, and bring their cases to trial. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: INLJ, JD, LDF, LDS, LIDR, PIS.

Prerequisite: CLGL 0350.

CLGL 0873. PROSECUTION CLINIC FIELDWORK. (3 Credits)

PROSECUTORS NEVER TAKE A BACKSEAT DURING A CASE, so we don't ask our students in the Prosecution Clinic to take one, either. You will be front and center: working with police officers, interviewing victims and witnesses, determining charges, drafting accusatory instruments, and representing the People of the State of New York at arraignment in Queens County. In this recently established clinic, students work in the Queens County District Attorney’s Office, under the aegis of Judge Richard Brown, the District Attorney, and handle their own prosecutorial caseload from inception through trial and sentence. Students are supervised by two of the DA's most skilled professionals: Fordham Law alum Kevin Duddy '85, Director of Trial Advocacy, and his Deputy Director, Jennifer Naiburg. During the semester, you will experience the unique role of the prosecutor as both advocate and impartial public servant sworn to pursue justice. In both the courtroom and the classroom, you will take a problem-solving approach to each case, learning firsthand the impact of the criminal justice system on all its stakeholders: the victims, the accused, the witnesses, the police, and the public. Along with your supervising attorneys, you will develop case theory, conduct motion practice and pre-trial hearings, visit crime scenes, negotiate plea agreements, prepare evidence, and bring their cases to trial. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: INLJ, JD, LDF, LDS, LIDR, LLM, PIS.

CLGL 0921. TAX CLINIC SEMINAR. (2,3 Credits)

Although students are under the supervision of attorney-professors, you are expected to take primary responsibility for all aspects of their cases. This may include interviewing and counseling clients; gathering and analyzing facts and evidence; conducting legal research; drafting memoranda; preparing pleadings, motions and other court papers, and meeting with the IRS to negotiate a settlement. If settlement efforts fail, the student may have the opportunity to take the case to trial. Students do not need to have extensive experience with tax law to enroll and succeed in this Clinic. Through the seminar and supervision, you will be given the tools necessary to advocate on behalf of your clients. This Clinic provides legal representation only. We do not prepare tax returns, provide bookkeeping or other accounting services. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: BFS, JD, LAWB, LAWI, LDF, LDS, LLM, PIS.

Prerequisite: CLGL 0350 (may be taken concurrently).

CLGL 0923. FEDERAL TAX CLINIC CASEWORK. (2-3 Credits)

Although students are under the supervision of attorney-professors, you are expected to take primary responsibility for all aspects of their cases. This may include interviewing and counseling clients; gathering and analyzing facts and evidence; conducting legal research; drafting memoranda; preparing pleadings, motions and other court papers, and meeting with the IRS to negotiate a settlement. If settlement efforts fail, the student may have the opportunity to take the case to trial. Students do not need to have extensive experience with tax law to enroll and succeed in this Clinic. Through the seminar and supervision, you will be given the tools necessary to advocate on behalf of your clients. This Clinic provides legal representation only. We do not prepare tax returns, provide bookkeeping or other accounting services. For more details, select desired clinic of interest at <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory" target="_blank">http://www.fordham.edu/info/23920/clinics_directory</a>

Attributes: BFS, JD, LAW, LAWB, LDF, LDS, LLM, PIS.

CLGL 0930. SOCIAL JUSTICE: DIRECTED RESEARCH. (2 Credits)

CLGL 0936. KOREA SUMMER EXTERNSHIP. (2,3 Credits)

CLGL 0937. IRELAND SUMMER EXTERNSHIP. (2,3 Credits)

CLGL 0938. GHANA SUMMER EXTERNSHIP. (2-3 Credits)

CLGL 0939. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILTY CLINIC FIELDWORK. (3 Credits)

CLGL 1129. PRO BONO SCHOLAR CSWK. (12 Credits)

CLGL 1130. PRO BONO SCHOLAR CASEWORK. (10 Credits)

CLGL 1206. CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP: ADMINISTRATIVW IMMIGRATION FIELDWORK. (2 Credits)

This is a skills-focused practicum combining an immigration field-placement with a weekly seminar in support of and to complement the field experience. The course is designed to prepare students to creatively approach problems and develop strategies in administrative/quasi-judicial proceedings. Through field placements, case studies and, simulations, students will encounter typical scenarios from all phases of this type of an administrative practice with an emphasis on methods of developing facts including interviewing, direct examination, case theory development and planning, witness preparation, document identification and, opening and closing statements. Each week students will have an opportunity to discuss the experiences gained through working for an immigration service provider. During the seminar portion of the practicum we will engage in discussions and simulation exercises designed to mirror real life situations faced by lawyers in these proceedings. Complementary topics will include the right to counsel, the charging process, discovery , prosecutorial discretion, the intersection between criminal law and immigration, and the application of the Exclusionary Rule in the context of immigration proceedings. Rules of conduct and legal ethics will also be covered. The semester will conclude with a mock hearing at the immigration court. PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE: Students will have the opportunity to will work at one of several immigration service providers. It is expected that a student will work a minimum of 5 hours a week for 13 weeks. Visits to the immigration court at 26 Federal Plaza, the detained court at Varick Street, and the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit will be part of the practicum.

CLGL 1303. CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP: CIVIL/CRIMINAL SEMINAR. (1 Credit)

Under the supervision of a mentor field attorney, students observe and assist in the lawyering process. Students must secure their own field placements, approved in advance by the Externship Program. Depending on the field placement, experiences may include research, writing, client contact, court appearances, and observation. Externs must complete 10 hours of fieldwork a week for 13 weeks during (20 hours a week for 8 weeks during the summer) over their semester. Students must also be enrolled in the seminar appropriate to their placement. The seminar will focus on guided self-reflection on issues including ethics, public interest and government lawyering, the development of one’s professional identify, and practical skills such as legal research. Students must sign up through the Externship Program and be approved to enroll.

Attributes: EXP, JD.

Corequisite: CLGL 0303.

CLGL 1305. CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP: CRIMINAL JUSTICE SEMINAR. (1 Credit)

Under the supervision of a mentor field attorney, students observe and assist in the lawyering process. Students must secure their own field placements, approved in advance by the Externship Program. Depending on the field placement, experiences may include research, writing, discovery, and observation. Externs must complete 10 hours of fieldwork a week for 13 weeks during (20 hours a week for 8 weeks during the summer) over their semester. Students must also be enrolled in the seminar appropriate to their placement. The seminar will focus on guided self-reflection on issues including ethics, criminal practice, the development of one’s professional identify, and practical skills such as legal research. Students must sign up through the Externship Program and be approved to enroll.

Attributes: JD, LDS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0305.

CLGL 1307. CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP: JUDICIAL SEMINAR. (1 Credit)

Judicial externs have the opportunity to work for a judge and the judge’s staff. Students must secure their own field placements and will gain valuable experience in learning how the judicial process works. During this externship, students will complete various assignments for each judge. Set assignments may include drafting opinions, legal research, watching trials, sitting in on settlement discussions, and observing the selection of a jury. The seminar will focus on guided self-reflection on issues including ethics, judicial practice, the development of one’s professional identify, and practical skills such as legal research Students must sign up through the Externship Program and be approved to enroll.

Attributes: JD, LDS.

Corequisite: CLGL 0307.

CLGL 1311. CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP: STEIN SCHOLAR SEMINAR. (1 Credit)

In this seminar, Stein Scholars who are participating in criminal justice externship fieldwork placements will explore issues such as: ethical issues in practice; biases in the legal profession; alternatives to litigation in resolving disputes; tools for effective research and writing; and balancing the demands of personal and professional life. Students also must be registered for Clinical Externship: Stein Scholars Criminal Justice Externship Fieldwork (Course ID CLGL0311). Class meetings: Four class meetings, dates TBA.

CLGL 1312. CLN EXTERN: OUT OF TOWN SEM. (1 Credit)

Students with qualifying fieldwork placements located outside of the NYC metropolitan area may apply to register for this course. Applications are due no later than April 7, 2009. See the Externship Program web page at http://law.fordham.edu/externship.htm for the Course Registration Application. Class meetings: There are no class meetings for this course but students are required to also be registered for an Out of Town Externship Seminar (Course ID CLGL1312).

CLGL 1313. CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SEMINAR. (1 Credit)

CLGL 1321. CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY CLINIC SEMINAR. (1 Credit)

Under the supervision of a mentor field attorney, students observe and assist in the lawyering process. Students must secure their own field placements, approved in advance by the Externship Program. Depending on the field placement, experiences may include research, writing, drafting, and observation. Externs must complete 10 hours of fieldwork a week for 13 weeks during (20 hours a week for 8 weeks during the summer) over their semester. Students must also be enrolled in the seminar appropriate to their placement. The seminar will focus on guided self-reflection on issues including ethics, copyright and trademark law, the development of one’s professional identify, and practical skills such as legal research and drafting. Students must sign up through the Externship Program and be approved to enroll.

Attribute: IPIS.

CLGL 1390. CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP: NYC COUNCIL SEMINAR. (1 Credit)

Through an externship with the New York City Council, you'll have the opportunity to work directly with the lawyers who serve the City's legislative body. You'll gain valuable experience in government and improve your legal skills, particularly in the areas of research and drafting. Working at the Council, you'll not only conduct legal research, draft legal memoranda and legislation, but also attend Council meetings and hearings, and prepare sections of Committee briefing papers. Most importantly, you'll participate in the legislative and policy decision-making process with Council staff. In the New York City Council Externship Seminar, you'll learn about the City's legislative process, including the roles played by the City Council and the Mayor's Office. You will study the relevant portions of the City Charter and Administrative Code and analyze state and federal preemption doctrines and case law relating to the powers of the Council. Moreover, you will have the opportunity to draft a piece of legislation and raise questions relating to fieldwork conducted on behalf of the Council. Contact the Externship Program to apply.

Attribute: LPI.

Corequisite: CLGL 0390.

CLGL 1440. MEDIATION, NEGOTIATION & ARBITRATION PRACTICUM II. (1 Credit)