Intellectual Property (IPGL)

IPGL 0105. PATENT PRACTICE SKILLS. (2 Credits)

The patent practice skills course provides students with the opportunity to learn and apply fundamental patent law skills to a variety of practical, real-life law firm and business scenarios. Through a series of fact based exercises and complementary text and case law readings, students will analyze a proposed invention, assess patentability, organize a patent procurement strategy including developing a patent specification, claims and related disclosure and prosecution documents. <p> Students will also learn the fundamentals associated with a freedom to operate analysis, basic principles of patent licensing, and patent due diligence protocols in connection with an IP related acquisition. <p> The final module will focus on post grant review procedures including preparation of IPRs, CBMs and PGR Petitions and related strategies in using these procedures. Post grant review tactics will be discussed in the litigation context, and the mechanics of preparing the Petition. The final project will be directed to preparing an inter partes review (IPR) Petition. <p> Students will explore cutting edge patent law issues in a practice-oriented context that will help them not only develop specific patent practice skills, but will help them understand and apply important patent law principles and cases.

Attributes: IPIE, JD, LAW.

Prerequisite: IPGL 0131.

IPGL 0130. COPYRIGHT LAW. (3-4 Credits)

This course examines the law of copyrights including discussions of subject matter, ownership, duration, rights, infringement, fair use and remedies.

Attributes: IPIF, LAWT.

IPGL 0131. PATENT LAW. (2-3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to patent law intended both for students intending to focus their practice on patents and for those preparing for a more general commercial practice. Patent law is a fascinating legal topic because of its combination of statutory and common law elements, its international aspects, and the thorny issues that accompany attempts to match the evolution of the law with the evolution of technology. Because of the importance of intellectual property assets and of technology in general, a basic familiarity with patent law is useful in virtually any commercial practice. The course focuses primarily on substantive patent law, including the law governing patentability and the law concerned with enforcing patent rights. A basic introduction to the United States patent system and the respective roles of the US Patent and Trademark Office and the courts will also be given.

Attributes: IPIF, LAWT.

IPGL 0135. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW. (3-4 Credits)

This course is designed as an introductory overview of the protection of intellectual property. The course will examine the policies underlying intellectual property law and will teach the basic principles of patent, copyright, and trademark law. Particular emphasis will be placed on the challenges of new technology to the legal regime for intellectual property.

Attributes: IPIF, LAWT.

IPGL 0156. BIOTECHNOLOGY PATENTS IN FOOD, DRUG AND VACCINE REGULATIONS. (2 Credits)

There is a thriving biotechnology industry in the United States today and well over 1,450 technology companies developing diagnostic and treatment technologies in medicine,creating more nutritional food and innovating new industrial processes. Yet this 30 billion dollar sector of the economy is not without controversy. The bio in biotechnology comes from living biological entities-people, plants,animals and even bacteria. People are the source of the raw material for the discovery of genes for research, diagnosis and therapy, raising a whole host of issues about rights and responsibilities and societal obligations.<br> Paper required.

Attributes: IPIE, LLM.

IPGL 0199. PATENTS&PHARMACEUTICAL INDUST. (2 Credits)

Pharmaceuticals are one of the few fields where most experts agree that without patent protection there would be little or no innovation. Research based pharmaceutical companies have since the early 60's consistently delivered successful new cures for the diseases that afflict us. However, the reputation of this industry along with pharmaceutical patents has never been worse. This course will try to answer why and what should be done about it.

Attributes: IPIE, LAWT, LLM.

IPGL 0203. LAW PRACTICE TECHNOLOGY. (2 Credits)

This course will cover the technological tools of law practice, giving students both an opportunity to use these tools and an understanding of their development. Students will explore case management systems, e-discovery tools, competitive intelligence solutions, firm-specific research portals, and some of the other rapidly evolving applications and devices confronting the 21st-century attorney. “Hands-on” use of these tools will be emphasized. Students will also explore the issues arising from new technological developments in law practice. These topics include new ethics requirements for more technologically savvy attorneys, the implications of technology on client confidentiality, and the automation of Alternative Dispute Resolution. Guest lecturers from local law offices may be invited to showcase examples of the technology adopted in their offices and the accompanying best practices.

IPGL 0204. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE & THE LAW. (2 Credits)

This course surveys the ways in which law interacts with emerging technologies. We will consider a variety of controversies involving, for example, virtual currency, health technologies, surveillance, and robotics.

Attribute: IPIE.

IPGL 0206. TECHNOLOGY AND PRIVACY LAW PRACTICUM. (3 Credits)

This 3 credit seminar for JD students will give students an understanding of and practical experience in privacy law set in the educational context. The seminar will have a doctrinal component through which students will learn the substantive law of privacy for educational records and school data (including FERPA, PPRA, COPPA, etc.). The practical skills component will then provide students with hands-on experience drafting privacy law training materials on educational technologies for public schools as well as working with online service contracts for school services. Appropriate seminar work product will be disseminated publicly through the Fordham Center on Law and Information Policy’s website.

Attributes: IPIS, JD, LAW.

IPGL 0213. TRADEMARKS IN PRACTICE. (2 Credits)

The two-credit seminar course will provide an overview of various subjects common to a general trademarks practice in the United States, presented from a practical, real world perspective. Course subject matter will be discussed in a chronological manner through the lens of a particular "client" hypothetically counseled by the class collective throughout the semester. The virtual "client" will first seek the class's guidance in adoption of a trademark, and then will require assistance with various issues subsequently faced by the client throughout the life of the mark. Specifically, the course will focus upon (i) due diligence and selection of a mark, (ii) USPTO registration and trademark prosecution, (iii) policing and protection of trademark rights vis-a-vis potential infringers, (iv) licensing and assignment, and (v) maintenance of trademark rights and registration. The course will include a writing component with periodic writing assignments designed to provide students with experience drafting common documents which are likely to cross a young attorney's desk in any general business or intellectual property firm, or within an in-house practice. Reading assignments will be required in advance of each class meeting so as to provide an introduction to a particular topic and background for robust class discussion. The course will discuss common law doctrine and statutory law by way of background in applying these concepts to concrete tasks required by clients in practice. Therefore, although students may first complete an introductory trademarks or intellectual property survey course, the seminar may also prove beneficial for LL.M. students outside of the IP/IT program who may not have a substantial background in intellectual property.

Attributes: LAWT, LLM.

IPGL 0215. SURVEILLANCE AND PRIVACY IN THE DIGITAL AGE. (2 Credits)

New technologies, from the Internet to cell phones to drones, have re-shaped the world in the past few decades. They have brought new modes of communications and new conveniences—as well as new opportunities for surveillance. This course will explore how the current constitutional and statutory frameworks address surveillance in the digital world and how laws and policies should regulate any threats to privacy posed by the use of emerging surveillance technology.

Attributes: CORC, CRCP, IPIE, LAWT.

IPGL 0223. TRADEMARK PRACTICUM. (2 Credits)

This two-credit seminar course for JD and LL.M. candidates, taught by an experienced attorney from an international intellectual property law firm, will provide a practical, hands-on approach to working as a business-minded, intellectual property lawyer, with a primary but non-exclusive focus on trademarks.  Throughout the semester, classes will consist of numerous workshops in which students will learn and apply basic aspects of U.S. trademark law and other, including some foreign, intellectual property laws and treaties.  Students will, at times, play the roles of in-house counsel, outside counsel, or the examining attorney in the U.S. Trademark Office.  Apart from workshops, the course will include occasional guest lectures by experienced practitioners in different settings.  The course is designed for students that have taken at least one introductory trademark or intellectual property survey course.

Attributes: IPIS, JD, LAWT.

IPGL 0227. INTELL PROP: ELEC & SOFTWRE. (2,3 Credits)

Electronics and software are central components of the real world and of the legal world. This course will explore the implications of intellectual property law, primarily patent law and copyright law, for electronics and computer software, with an effort to connect the legal rules to their real-world effects. The course will begin with a short, accessible introduction to the technologies, with the goal of providing students with sufficient familiarity to understand and appreciate the legal issues. The course will then move on to the two substantive legal areas. In patent law, the course will cover both basic doctrinal issues—including patentability (particularly of software), infringement, and exhaustion—and several current problems—such as standard-setting, the cellphone patent wars, and patent trolls. In copyright, the course will again cover both doctrine—such as copyrightability (of the structure of computer programs, for example) and fair use—and current issues—such as open-source licensing, Google Books, and linking. The primary focus will be on U.S. law, where these issues have been explored most fully, but there will also be references to Western Europe and East Asian jurisdictions.

Attributes: JD, LLM.

IPGL 0228. IP & TECH IN GLOBAL CONTEXT. (3 Credits)

This course will provide students with an immersive introduction to U.S. Patent Law, Copyright Law and Trademark Law, and explore legal issues that arise out of the creation, innovation, distribution, and consumption of intellectual property driven goods and services in the United States and worldwide. In addition to the basics of Intellectual Property laws and policies, students will learn how and why U.S. patent law has become increasing harmonized with the patent laws of other nations, and how trade negotiations and trade policies impact the enforcement of multinational copyright and trademark treaties.

IPGL 0229. FASHION MODELING LAW. (2-3 Credits)

The seminar will provide a comprehensive overview of the legal, business and societal issues faced by fashion models and their agencies. Topics will include the structural, legal and regulatory constraints within which the industry functions; formation and dissolution of business relationships among fashion models, agencies and clients; intellectual property rights, use and and misuse, and litigation as a remedy; the effect of digital media and social networking on the fashion modeling business; immigration and finance concerns; and the signficant social and cultural issues relevant to the industry. An in-class final exam is required.

Attributes: FASL, LAWB, LAWF, LAWI, LAWT, LIP.

IPGL 0231. PATENT LITIGATION. (2 Credits)

The course covers all aspects of patent litigation from pre-filing considerations to appeal and is designed to address problems that arise in real-world lawsuits. Particular attention is devoted to initial pleadings, discovery, motion practice, and the use of technical experts at trial. The role of juries in patent litigation is also discussed, including the recent advent of so-called Markman Hearings. Lastly practical trial preparation techniques, trial practice, and the law of remedies will be explored.

Attributes: IPIS, LAWT, LIDR, LLM.

IPGL 0232. COPYRIGHT LITIGATION. (2 Credits)

In this course students are given a detailed hypothetical, usually in the field of literary property or the visual arts, and are asked to draft various court papers in a copyright infringement litigation. The first classes deal with certain pre-litigation issues, such as defining what actions are "arising under" copyright law, registration requirements, and the statute of limitations. Students are then asked to draft a copyright infringement Complaint based on the hypothetical. In subsequent classes students are asked to draft an Answer to the Complaint, a Document Request, a set of questions for use at the oral deposition of a witness, and possibly other court papers. Students will be provided with examples from actual copyright infringement lawsuits. The drafts will be circulated in advance of the class and will be discussed at the class. The course seeks to develop the skills needed to draft effective court papers in a copyright infringement lawsuit.

Attributes: IPIS, JD, LAWT, LLM.

Prerequisite: IPGL 0130.

IPGL 0293. FASHION LAW. (2-3 Credits)

This seminar explores the legal substance of style, with emphasis on current issues involving clothing and the global fashion industry. Topics will include the application of intellectual property law to fashion design; counterfeiting and alleged links to organized crime and terrorism; licensing agreements; import/export regulations and quotas; fashion financing; garment district zoning and urban planning; manufacturing and sustainability; consumer protection; sumptuary laws; and civil rights issues related to apparel. Schedule final exam required. If students wish to satisfy the writing requirement, they must complete a 25 page paper in addition the the scheduled final and may receive a 4th credit for the paper.

Attributes: FASL, IPIE, LAWB, LAWF, LAWI, LAWT.

IPGL 0299. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW & DESIGN. (2 Credits)

What do a couture gown and a semiconductor chip have in common? Neither adapts easily to the traditional categories of the intellectual property law system. IP assumes a fundamental division between expression and function, institutionalized in the separate forms of copyright and patent protection. Most of the created objects that we encounter in our daily lives, however – from the buildings in which we live to the clothes we wear to the icons on our computer screens – combine aesthetic, expressive, and functional elements. This seminar explores the concept of design as it relates to intellectual property law, including the domestic and international doctrines and mechanisms that address the perceived gap between art and craft. In the process, we will examine the theoretical underpinnings of IP law itself, along with the ways in which creative industries raging from fashion design to information technology to architecture (and many others) have responded to the challenges of the IP regime. Paper required.

Attributes: IPIE, JD, LAWT, LLM.

IPGL 0302. BEYOND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY: THEORETICAL & INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES. (2 Credits)

The course will explore the interconnection between intellectual property and related subjects, focusing this year on the challenges of advanced technologies, artificial intelligent, machine learning, robots and cyberspace, on intellectual property, privacy and other legal regimes in the 3A era (autonomous, advanced and automated). The course constitutes novel and non-traditional perspectives of the interconnections between advanced digital technologies and intellectual property laws. Each of the topics will be presented and discussed within the practical challenges as well as the theoretical background and international contexts, in the US and in comparative jurisdictions. Moreover, many of the topics are related to either drafts, suggestions or recommendations of international conventions being discussed by leading international organizations, especially WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization). The course will address, inter alia, the following topics: intellectual property, artificial intelligence, machine learning and robots, 3D printings, the challenges to intellectual property in the digital - cyberspace era and cyberspace privacy, theoretical justifications to intellectual property, the mainstream justifications as well as the hidden justifications, intellectual property rights in the workplace, traditional knowledge, intellectual property and gender, access to knowledge for persons with disabilities, freedom of association of workers from the entertainment sector vs. competition and antitrust laws and many more. The unique character of the course will be the involvement of the students in conducting legal research (US laws, comparative and international and theoretical aspects) and preparing a paper to be published and/or to be submitted (subject to certain limitations) to the relevant international organizations (i.e. WIPO). In this way the student will work on research projects that promote innovative recommendations through the design, implementation, and reform of relating conventions and have the opportunity to try to influence the policy makers. The students will gain not only knowledge and tools on contemporary advanced technologies issues as well as theoretical, international and comparative legal knowledge but also will acquire new ways of thinking and practical legal experience. The students of this course have the option to attend an international seminar in the most important intellectual property international organizations: WIPO in Geneva and also visit the Swiss Institute of Comparative Law in Lausanne, subject to the approval and conditions of the specific organization and the enrollment of a minimum number of students. Some of the final works will have the option of being published, under certain conditions. The course will include two academic hours of class presentations per week followed by one hour, once in 2-3 weeks, of consulting meetings and discussion with the students regarding their research.<p>It is highly recommended to take the fieldwork, but it is not mandatory. The students are most welcome to send any question, regarding the course, to Professor Shlomit Yanisky-Ravid, via email (shlomit.yanisky-ravid@yale.edu.

Attribute: LAWT.

IPGL 0303. BEYOND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY FIELDWORK. (1 Credit)

The course will explore the interconnection between intellectual property and related subjects, focusing this year on the challenges of advanced technologies, artificial intelligent, machine learning, robots and cyberspace, on intellectual property, privacy and other legal regimes in the 3A era (autonomous, advanced and automated). The course constitutes novel and non-traditional perspectives of the interconnections between advanced digital technologies and intellectual property laws. Each of the topics will be presented and discussed within the practical challenges as well as the theoretical background and international contexts, in the US and in comparative jurisdictions. Moreover, many of the topics are related to either drafts, suggestions or recommendations of international conventions being discussed by leading international organizations, especially WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization). The course will address, inter alia, the following topics: intellectual property, artificial intelligence, machine learning and robots, 3D printings, the challenges to intellectual property in the digital - cyberspace era and cyberspace privacy, theoretical justifications to intellectual property, the mainstream justifications as well as the hidden justifications, intellectual property rights in the workplace, traditional knowledge, intellectual property and gender, access to knowledge for persons with disabilities, freedom of association of workers from the entertainment sector vs. competition and antitrust laws and many more. The unique character of the course will be the involvement of the students in conducting legal research (US laws, comparative and international and theoretical aspects) and preparing a paper to be published and/or to be submitted (subject to certain limitations) to the relevant international organizations (i.e. WIPO). In this way the student will work on research projects that promote innovative recommendations through the design, implementation, and reform of relating conventions and have the opportunity to try to influence the policy makers. The students will gain not only knowledge and tools on contemporary advanced technologies issues as well as theoretical, international and comparative legal knowledge but also will acquire new ways of thinking and practical legal experience. The students of this course have the option to attend an international seminar in the most important intellectual property international organizations: WIPO in Geneva and also visit the Swiss Institute of Comparative Law in Lausanne, subject to the approval and conditions of the specific organization and the enrollment of a minimum number of students. Some of the final works will have the option of being published, under certain conditions. The course will include two academic hours of class presentations per week followed by one hour, once in 2-3 weeks, of consulting meetings and discussion with the students regarding their research.<p>It is highly recommended to take the fieldwork, but it is not mandatory. The students are most welcome to send any question, regarding the course, to Professor Shlomit Yanisky-Ravid, via email (shlomit.yanisky-ravid@yale.edu.

Attributes: JD, LAWT.

Prerequisite: IPGL 0302 (may be taken concurrently).

IPGL 0304. TRADEMARK LAW. (2,3 Credits)

This course examines the law of trademarks, trade secrets, right of publicity and related doctrines. The emphasis will be on trademark law including discussion of subject matter, ownership, infringement and remedies.

Attributes: IPIF, LAWT, LIP.

IPGL 0307. ADV COPYRIGHT LAW. (2,3 Credits)

Paper required. Satisfies Writing Requirement. An in-depth analysis of selected areas of copyright law. Will have some guest speakers who will discuss copyright issues and practice in specific industries. Can use any copyright casebook you had for a course. Preferred casebook is Copyright Law, Joyce, et al., 9th edition. Prerequisite: Copyright Law or Intellectual Property Law or copyright course in other school, or for LL.Ms, without prerequisite course, experience in copyright law.

Attributes: IPIE, JD, LAWT, LLM.

Prerequisite: IPGL 0130.

IPGL 0308. TRADEMARKS AND FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION. (3 Credits)

This course is primarily directed towards reexamining how traditional applications of trademark law have been modeled, adapted, and then transformed by today¿s emphasis on branding, marketing, and digital technology. Special attention will also be paid to the role of constitutional protections, such as the First Amendment, in protecting fair uses, consumer commentary and artistic expression. The course is divided into roughly three parts: the first part focuses mostly on the role of trademark law in the creation of advertising, branding, and marketing, particularly with respect to today¿s most successful global brands. The second part of the course focuses on the role of consumers and artists, both internationally and domestically, who engage in artistic and political activity to challenge the expansion of branding. Here, special attention will be paid to artists, consumers, and parodists who utilize brands to critique corporations, and the case law that has been generated around their efforts in real space and in cyberspace. The final part of the course concentrates on the role of the First Amendment in governing artistic, commercial and political expression, particularly in light of recent legislative, judicial, and market developments in trademark law and fair use protections. Throughout, we will also feature a few guest speakers, including artists, activists and lawyers who work in this area. While some background in trademarks is preferred, it is not required. This course requires a written paper and a presentation, and the paper can be used to satisfy the writing requirement.

Attributes: JD, LAWT, LLM.

IPGL 0320. ART LAW. (2,3 Credits)

Integrally related to intellectual property, art law encompasses the complexities of international law, contract law, and Constitutional law. This seminar will examine the intersection between the law and the art world, a complex world of individuals, institutions, and expressive works. We will explore some of the legal issues associated with those intersections and relationships. The seminar will examine participants' roles, including artists; art patrons and consumers; art dealers and auction houses; government officials; art experts, such as museums, historians, and critics; as well as the "bad guys," such as forgers, thieves, and looters. We will analyze the relationships between art institutions and those who produce, collect, protect, and "deal" in art. The substance of the course is an exploration of legal issues, including but not limited to, expressive rights, intellectual property, and moral and economic rights. The course will also focus on the international movement of art in times of peace and war, as well as the preservation and protection of antiquities and cultural property. Student evaluation will be based on class participation, a final paper, and the completion of ongoing readings accompanied by short assignments. In addition to class meetings, students will also be required to view films, attend lectures, and visit museums outside of the regularly scheduled class time.

Attributes: IPIE, LAWT.

IPGL 0321. ART LAW PRACTICUM. (2,4 Credits)

The Art Law Practicum will focus on the relationship between intellectual property and art. Through discussions, assignments, class readings, visual materials, guest speakers, and field trips, this course will examine how copyright, moral rights, trademark, and rights of publicity affect the production and reception of contemporary art. Practical aspects of this course will include issues with interacting, advising, and representing contemporary artists and arts entities who work in and exhibit diverse artistic practices, strategies and media, such as appropriation art, photography, video/film, conceptual art, digital art, and organic materials. This course will also introduce students to major 20th Century and contemporary art movements and theories necessary to understanding contemporary art and law.

Attributes: LAWT, LLM.

IPGL 0329. FASHION LAW PRACTICUM. (2,3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Submission of an application to the Fashion Law Institute's university email address, fashionlaw@fordham.edu, with the subject header, "Application for Fashion Law Practicum Spring 2018," no later than MONDAY, OCTOBER 9, at noon. The application should consist of a maximum 200-word statement about the applicant's qualifications, a resume, and a transcript. Applications made in person, submitted in hard copy, or sent after the due date will be given lowest priority. Only students who receive notification that they have been accepted to the course will be permitted to register. The Registrar's Office will register accepted students. Please note that acceptance into the course and registration are contingent upon subsequent approval by the fashion house or other fashion-related company, nonprofit organization, or law firm to whom the applicant is assigned for the fieldwork component of the course.<p> This advanced seminar, which consists of both a classroom component and a fieldwork placement, will develop students' skills in the practice of fashion law. Students will complete a series of drafting assignments of increasing complexity, such as a cease-and-desist letter, a licensing agreement, a retail lease, a manufacturing agreement, an employment agreement, a consignment agreement, articles of organization and an operating agreement for a limited liability company, a model release form, sweepstakes rules, website terms of use, and a privacy policy and/or a complaint, each related to an aspect of fashion law. In addition, each student will be assigned to fieldwork placement at a fashion house or other fashion-related company, nonprofit organization, or law firm with a substantial practice in the field of fashion law.

Attributes: FASL, IPIS, LAWF, LLM.

IPGL 0510. FASHION LAW & FINANCE. (2 Credits)

Product design, manufacture, distribution, and sales within the fashion industry are engaged in on a global level. In order to fully and effectively manage a fashion company, it is necessary to implement a multinational strategy and to take advantage of the growing market. This course intends to introduce many of the aspects of finance and taxation that both affect and influence the fashion industry. The course will offer an introduction to subjects including corporations, federal taxation and international law all while exploring their unique effects on the fashion industry. During the course of the semester, outside speakers may be brought in to relate their experiences in the industry and elaborate on topics we discuss in class. Students do not need a background in finance or taxation as a prerequisite to taking this course and are encouraged to enroll so as to expand their knowledge of the fashion industry.We will begin by creating a hypothetical case study of a small fashion company which wants to expand. Initially it will need financing to get off the ground. Many years later it will be a global conglomerate. The course will walk through the evolutionary stages of a global fashion house.Course Requirements: Class attendance and preparation. Active class participation is strongly encouraged. Readings will be assigned weekly and you are expected to bring the assigned course materials to class. Class participation is also important.This class is a paper course.

Attributes: FASL, ICE, LAWB, LAWF, LLM.

IPGL 0521. INT'L & COMP. PATENT LAW. (2 Credits)

IPGL 0529. FASHION ETHICS, SUSTAINABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT. (2 Credits)

Ethics is a rapidly growing concern for fashion companies and their attorneys today. Topics covered in this seminar include ethical sourcing, design and manufacturing; supply chain monitoring; blood diamonds and conflict minerals; corporate reporting requirements; eco-chic or "green" fashion and environmental impact; the Federal Trade Commission’s Green Guides; fair trade; cruelty-free fashion; religious fashion; fashion-related nonprofits; corporate social responsibility and charitable co-branding; and fashion's role in international development, including ethical issues raised by clothing donations to the poor and to developing countries. Students may apply for an optional one-credit fieldwork placement at a fashion company, nonprofit organization, or law firm. Final paper required.

Attributes: FASL, ICE, INLJ, LAWB, LAWF, LAWI.

IPGL 0615. CYBERSECURITY LAW AND POLICY WORKSHOP. (3 Credits)

This seminar will introduce students to the significant challenges that government, law enforcement and the private sector face in addressing cybersecurity risks. The seminar will focus on cyber threats that have significant legal, economic and social consequences and threats that jeopardize national security. Students will learn about US technological vulnerabilities, the existing legal and policy framework and the development of new policies to protect US interests including those for cyber-defenses and the protection of civil liberties.

Attributes: CORC, CRCP, INLJ, IPIE, JD, LAWJ, LAWT, LLM.

IPGL 0690. COPYRIGHT, TRADEMARK & TECHNOLOGY (IP Drafting). (2 Credits)

This is a drafting course that will focus on services that a “soft IP” associate can provide for clients operating in the field of emerging technologies. The class will focus on the ways technological advances will be used in television, marketing, advertising, video games, sports, parody, and music, and their impact on copyright, trademark, rights of publicity and privacy law. There will be no substantive patent law, and a technology background is not necessary. Most weeks, the class will have a guest “client” working in the field of emerging technology to propose a problem for which the students will draft a solution. Through these writing assignments, students will be exposed to the kinds of work product they will be expected to generate in the early parts of their careers in the field of copyright and trademark law. This will include drafting cease and desist letters, opinion letters, DMCA notices and subpoenas, and sections of briefs.

Attributes: IPIE, JD, LAW.

IPGL 0709. SUSTAIN, TECH LAW & POLICY. (2 Credits)

IPGL 0781. FASHION LICENSING. (2 Credits)

Every major fashion brand today is developing and securing its intellectual property – copyrights, trademarks, and patents. In this course, we will review the law and business of fashion licensing, the anatomy of a license agreement, and current trends in the industry in the US and worldwide. Cases regarding copyright and trademark infringement and counterfeiting will be discussed and reviewed. Monthly writing assignments with 1 final paper/presentation. Professor Angela Byun.

Attributes: FASL, IPIE, LAW, LAWF, LAWT, LLM.

IPGL 0799. LAW & THE VIRTUAL WORLD. (2 Credits)

Law and the Virtual World will examine how the Internet and the virtual worlds that comprise it have affected our legal norms, as well as our conceptions of community, jurisdiction, injury, and remedy.

Attributes: LAWT, LLM.

IPGL 0991. FASHION RETAIL LAW. (2 Credits)

This colloquium will explore legal issues related to fashion retailing, from single-brand boutiques to large multi-brand stores. Topics include the structure of fashion retailing; vendor relationships, including anti-trust considerations; pricing structures; labor and employment issues, including recruitment, compensation, non-competition agreements, and dress codes; advertising, including cobranding and social media issues; security; inventory control; online sales policies and the relationship between online and brick-and-mortar sales; and regulatory requirements.

IPGL 0992. CHINESE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW. (2-3 Credits)

Chinese intellectual property law is a THREE credit condensed class, that we expect to complete after meeting for four hours per class session over TEN weeks. The class is a survey of developments in intellectual property law in China (patents, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets, licensing as well as US remedies). The class will enable students to provide basic strategic advice to clients on how China utilizes intellectual property for its own industrial development purposes, and what legal tools are available to mitigate these challenges. We will also analyze new developments as they appear during our course work, and we will have guest speakers from practice. Readings will be distributed by email and by readings on reserve. <p> For our EIGHTH OR NINTH class [or sixth class] we expect to schedule a study visit to Washington, DC where we will visit the USPTO, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and other agencies. In the past we met the Director and Deputy Director of the USPTO, the Chief Judge of the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and other important actors in Chinese IP. The study visit would likely take the place of two class sessions AND OUR CLASS SCHEDULE MAY BE ADJUSTED ACCORDINGLY. <p> There is no final exam. This class involves preparation of a final paper which is due one week before the commencement of final exams. The paper will involve examination of a particular problem under Chinese IP law, a comparison of that problem with practice in other countries, an analysis of the economic or social impact of the problem, and a proposed resolution of the problem, utilizing information and approaches discussed in class. Students may freely consult with Prof. Cohen in preparation of the paper. In prior years a significant percentage of students have been successful in having their papers published. The final grade is based on a class performance, paper presentation and final written paper. <p> There are no prerequisites for the class. Knowledge of IP law, Chinese law or Chinese language is helpful, but certainly not required. Students who have taken intellectual property law in China may find that the class approaches IP issues in China differently from their prior training, and that the class is not repetitive of their prior work.<p> Students with a particular interest in a specific field of IP law in China, such as life sciences patenting, software protection, geographical indications, protection for fashion designs, Chinese legal history, or US litigation to deal with Chinese IP infringement, will find ample opportunity to pursue their passions in class work and their final papers. This will be the third year that this class has been offered at Fordham. It was the first class on Chinese IP law taught in North America. Professor Cohen has 30 years' experience in this area. He was formerly a Visiting Professor at Fordham, who now leads the China team at the US Patent and Trademark Office. He was formerly the US IPR Attache at the US Embassy in Beijing (2004-2008). He is also on the faculty of Renmin (Peoples) University of China, and has worked in house at Microsoft, at Jones Day, as general counsel of a pharmaceutical company, and as a solo practitioner .

Attributes: ICE, IPIE, LAWI, LAWT, LLM.

IPGL 1321. CONTEMPORARY ART LAW AND PRACTICE FIELDWORK. (2 Credits)

Students in the course will gain an understanding of, and practical experience in, the corporate and transactional legal issues and concerns faced by visual artists and arts organizations and the legal professionals who represent and counsel them. The students’ experience will consist of two components, a seminar and supervised arts-related fieldwork related to The Art & Law Program (http://artlawoffice.com/education/art-law-program/). Additionally, the course will feature guest speakers with an expertise in authentication disputes, gallery-artist disagreements, as well as current copyright and trademark issues in art law. The seminar will cover theoretical and practical aspects of representation in corporate and transactional law. The substantive law in the seminar will include those areas typically faced by arts clients, such as artist-gallery relationships, copyright, moral rights, trademark, contracts, commissions, and entity formation, including nonprofit, tax-exempt corporations. Practical aspects will include issues with interacting, advising, and representing contemporary artists working in diverse strategies and media, from conceptual art to digital and organic materials. In order to facilitate the latter aspect, the course will also introduce students to major 20th Century art movements and theories necessary to understanding contemporary art. In the supervised fieldwork, students will spend eight to ten hours each week outside of class working on behalf of an artist currently in The Art & Law Program. The artists in The Art & Law Program all have diverse practices ranging from the fields of contemporary art, architecture, film, curating, and writing. Field work will consist of meeting with the artists; drafting memoranda stemming from student-artist meetings; and legal research and writing based on the artists’ questions. Students will also discuss ethical, tactical, legal and institutional issues that arise during class as well as their meetings with and research for the artists. Coursework from both seminar and fieldwork will be assigned. <br> No laptops allowed in class.

Attributes: JD, LAWT, LLM.

IPGL 1529. FASHION ETHICS FLDWK. (1 Credit)

Ethics is a rapidly growing concern for fashion companies and their attorneys today. Topics covered in this seminar include ethical sourcing, design and manufacturing; supply chain monitoring; blood diamonds and conflict minerals; corporate reporting requirements; eco-chic or "green" fashion and environmental impact; the Federal Trade Commission’s Green Guides; fair trade; cruelty-free fashion; religious fashion; fashion-related nonprofits; corporate social responsibility and charitable co-branding; and fashion's role in international development, including ethical issues raised by clothing donations to the poor and to developing countries. Students may apply for an optional one-credit fieldwork placement at a fashion company, nonprofit organization, or law firm. Final paper required.