Latin American and Latino Studies (LALS)

LALS MTNC. MAINTENANCE-GSAS. (0 Credits)

GSAS Administrative registration to maintain matriculation while away from the University with no contact with faculty, staff or advisors.

Attribute: ZAMM.

LALS 0912. REQUIREMENT PREPARATION. (0 Credits)

For Ph.D. and Master's students, registration necessary to maintain continuous enrollment while preparing for a milestone requirement, such as comprehensive exam, Master's thesis, or dissertation submission.

Attribute: Z410.

LALS 0914. REQUIREMENT PREPARATION IN SUMMER. (0 Credits)

For Ph.D. and Master's students, registration necessary to maintain continuous enrollment while preparing for a milestone requirement during the summer. (e.g., to be used by Ph.D. students after the oral examination/defense and prior to receiving the degree).

LALS 1003. BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE FOR SPANISH-SPEAKERS AND LEARNERS. (3 Credits)

An accelerated introductory course for students with knowledge of Spanish, this course concentrates on aspects of the Portuguese language that are most difficult for Spanish-speakers or learners, such as pronunciation, vocabulary, idioms, grammatical structures that are different from Spanish and particular to Portuguese, and introduces students to Brazilian media and culture.

LALS 1100. AFRO-LATIN AMERICA. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the central themes in the study of people of African descent in Latin America. In considering race and blackness in L. America we will pay attention to the flexibility of racial categories, the importance of gender and class, and the role of visual images in the making of racial identities.

Attribute: GLBL.

LALS 1503. BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE FOR SPANISH-SPEAKERS AND LEARNERS II. (3 Credits)

An intermediate course for students with knowledge of Spanish, this course focuses on Portuguese language as it contrasts with Spanish. Development of speaking, reading, and listening skills. Special practice in areas of grammar, linguistic structure, pronunciation and idioms that differ from Spanish. Emphasis on Brazilian media and culture. Fulfills the language requirement of the Latin American and Latino Studies major and minor. An elective of the LALS and the Spanish Studies minor.

LALS 2000. CULTURE AND IDENTITY IN FRENCH CARIBBEAN LITERATURE: FROM CHAOS-MONDE TO TOUT-MONDE. (3 Credits)

In this course we will read contemporary francophone literature from Martinique, Guadeloupe and Haiti, translated to English, in an effort to familiarize ourselves with the colonial and post-colonial history of the region, its cultural richness and its literary modes.

LALS 2005. AMERICAN PLURALISM. (4 Credits)

Contemporary and historical studies in the racial and ethnic diversity of American (U.S.) society with a special emphasis on the issues of race relations, migration and immigration and their relation to either (1) the distribution of economic or political power or (2) their cultural manifestations in literature, the arts and/or religion. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, PLUR.

LALS 3005. LATIN AMERICAN THEMES. (4 Credits)

This course allows students to explore ways to synthesize key topics in Latin American and Latina/o Studies (LALS) as an interdisciplinary field of study. It will compare the distinct approaches to these topics of the different disciplines represented by the LALS faculty (including History, Literature, Film Studies, Theology, Art History, Sociology, and Anthropology). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, COMC, COMM.

LALS 3007. SPANISH LINGUISTICS. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the linguistic study of the Spanish language. The course discusses the formal domains of language structure - including speech sounds and their mental representations, sentence structure and semantic meaning, as well as social realities of language use and language change across different varieties of Spanish in the world. The course is taught in Spanish.

Attribute: ASSC.

LALS 3275. HYBRID FUTURES: A PANORAMA OF MEXICAN SHORT FICTION. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the main themes of Mexican science fiction, from the late nineteenth century to today, using a panoramic approach that encompasses different forms of cultural production and media (literature, film, comics, street art, etc.). Through the science fiction lenses we will examine Mexico’s relation to technology and the processes of modernization, as well as the imagined future of labor, gender, and immigration, among other issues. We will frame Mexican science fiction as part of a larger Latin American tradition, while also discussing the connections to more mainstream (i.e. American and English) visions of the genre. All materials will be available online.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

LALS 3343. CRIME AND MINORITY RIGHTS. (4 Credits)

This course is designed to present an overview of the problems for decision in the promulgation, invocation, and administration of a law of crimes. Topics include theories of crime, the purpose of punishment, and specific types of crimes. The rights of minorities will be discussed within the context of a viable criminal law. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: URST.

LALS 3344. CRIME, LITERATURE, AND LATINOS. (4 Credits)

This course examines the relationship between criminal law and literature. We will study how writers use stories about the law to express ideas of humanity. We will also examine the interplay between law and morality and discuss how authors have viewed the criminal justice system, with particular emphasis on the experience of Latinos. The reading list will include criminal law and criminal procedure law, as well as works by Latino fiction writers such as Bodega Dreams, Carlito's Way, and House of the Spirits, and by non-Latino writers such as Billy Budd and The Trial. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COLI.

LALS 3346. LATINOS AND THE MEDIA. (4 Credits)

A seminar and workshop on the impact and influence of the news media on Latin Americans and U.S. Latinos and their image by acclaimed journalist and memoirist, Luisita Lopez Torregrosa, former national editor at The New York Times and author of the critically acclaimed memoires, Before the Rain: A Memoir of Love and Revolution and The Noise of Infinite Longing. This course will discuss and analyze the impact of negative labels and cultural and social typecasting on news written about Latin Americans and U.S. Latinos. It will also examine sources, such as films, memoires, and scholarly books, as alternative ways to transform and reinvent these images of Latin Americans and Latinos in the news. Students will learn to analyze the presentation of Latin American and Latino subjects in the news and compose news reports and essays that present more expansive and knowledgeable views of the lives and cultures of Latin Americans and U.S. Latinos. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: FCLC.

LALS 3352. POL ISSUES AND PROCEDURE IN CRIMINAL LAW. (4 Credits)

Utilizing the casebook and problem-solving approaches, this course will study the manner in which criminal laws are created and the effect on minority communities throughout the country. The course will examine such issues as the scope and nature of criminal liability, the insane defense and other defenses to crimes, as well as the purpose and effectiveness of traditional sentencing. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LALS 3359. CRIME: A CASE STUDY. (4 Credits)

An exploration of trial advocacy through an examination of a case from its inception to its conclusion. Examines each stage of the criminal justice process, issues related to the rights of minorities, the role race and the police play in the system. Course will culminate in a mock trial after analyzing issues arising from the substantive study of criminal law and procedure. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LALS 3400. SOCIAL REALITY: BOGOTA. (1 Credit)

This one week course in the capital of Colombia, Bogota, will explore contemporary social reality in one of Latin America's most representative and vibrant cities, with special emphasis on the way this nation's armed conflict has impacted its population and its modernization process and on current conflict resolution and civic participation through social service-learning projects.

LALS 3401. LATIN AMERICAN SOCIAL REALITY: PUEBLO. (1 Credit)

One-week study tour to Puebla, Mexico. The course will explore the socioeconomic reality of Puebla, Mexico. The city is the main source of Mexican immigrants to New York and has sites important for every major period of Mexican history. The tour will include lectures on history and contemporary issues as well as visits to sites important to the history and culture of Mexico.

LALS 3421. LATIN AMERICAN FICTION. (4 Credits)

A study of Latin American narrative forms. Selected readings from major Latin American writers. Topics such as unity, diversity, magic realism, the search for a national identity, literature and underdevelopment, etc. will be examined in their social and literary context. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: GLBL.

LALS 3435. BRAZILIAN LITERATURE AND FILM. (3 Credits)

This course examines some of Brazil's best known cinematic and literary classics in translation. We start with Jose` de Alencar's "Iracema" continuing through to works that treat the military dictatorships in Brazil during the 1960's and 1970's. Taught in English.

LALS 3437. AFRO-BRAZILIAN FILM, LITERATURE, AND CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This course examines central themes in Afro-Brazilian film, literature, and culture. We will study the depiction of slavery the depiction of slavery during the construction of syncretic religions such as Candomble and Macumba, the experience of Afro-Brazilian women, the image of favelas or shantytowns and conclude with Afro-Brazilian woman, the music and performance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, GLBL.

LALS 3575. PAINTING THE EMPIRE: UNDERSTANDING THE SPANISH EMPIRE THROUGH ART AND LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

The Golden Age of Spanish art and literature (known as “el Siglo de Oro”) coincided with the configuration of Spain as a global empire after the rise of the Habsburg dynasty to the Spanish throne (from around 1550 to around 1650). This course proposes a study of the main social, political and cultural conflicts that conformed that empire from a multidisciplinary perspective that combines the works of the empire’s most famous painters (El Greco, Diego Velázquez, José de Ribera, among others) with the works of its most representative writers (Lope de Vega, Miguel de Cervantes, María de Zayas, among others); topics such as the symbolic construction and shaping of space, gender, national identity or social and religious relationships will be approached through a combination of visual and textual representations. The course will also take great advantage of the important collections of Spanish Renaissance and Baroque painting held at several New York institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art of the Hispanic Society of America, including visits to those institutions and field work. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

LALS 3600. LATIN AMERICA: CURRENT TRENDS. (4 Credits)

The objective of this course is to help students develop the basic tools for political analysis in the context of an overview of the current political environment and economic circumstances of Latin America¿s main players. The course will provide information and guidelines for understanding the present situation within each of the main influential countries in the region and the interrelationship among these countries. The relationship with the United States and other extraregional players with increasingly important roles in the region, as well as the influence of the Organization of American States will also be explored. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, PJST.

LALS 3601. LATIN AMERICAN ARCHEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Latin America is one of the great culture areas of the ancient and modern worlds. The peoples of the region developed unique civilizations long before the arrival of Europeans. This course considers the religion, hieroglyphic writing systems, architecture, political economy, myth, and history of Pre-columbian cultures of Mesoamerica, South America and the Caribbean. We examine the latest archaeological research and primary ethnohistoric documents to study the Maya, Zapotec, Aztec, Moche, Inca, and Taino culture. A broad historical and geographical sweep allows us a deeper understanding of how the Latin American past continues to shape the present. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: GLBL.

LALS 3602. CROSSING BORDERS: MIGRATIONS, GENDER, SEXUALITY. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LALS 3840. LATIN AMERICA THROUGH FILM. (4 Credits)

Major topics of Latin American cultural criticism through an examination of Latin American and Latino film production, with a special emphasis on the documentary as an alternative to mainstream cinema and television. Latin American media theories and cultural criticism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: FITV, INST.

LALS 3930. CONTEMPORARY CUBAN CULTURE STUDY TOUR. (1 Credit)

This one-week, one-credit, spring study-tour course will explore renewed importance of Havana as both a local and global purveyor of culture since the fall of Soviet-style socialism in the 1990’s. It will focus on the city’s vibrant contemporary cultural scene in music, art, dance, literature and film as exhibited in museums, galleries, workshops, concert halls, and community centers and will give students a lived sense of the issues, topics and concerns addressed by contemporary Cuban artists in new innovate forms that respond to local conditions of economic transitions and to a globalized world market.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2001.

LALS 4005. QUEER THEORY AND THE AMERICAS. (4 Credits)

Drawing from the often divergent traditions of Anglo and Hispanic America, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to queer methodologies for cultural and literary studies. Students will encounter foundational queer theoretical texts (both historical and contemporary) as well as novels, plays, and films, and will explore, for themselves, what queerness means and does. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ENGL, ICC.

LALS 4100. SPEAKING FOR/AS THE OTHER. (4 Credits)

What are the implications of giving voice to those who are "voiceless"? This course explores the role of writing and speaking during the encounter of black, Indian, mestizo and Hispanic cultures in Latin America and Latina/o United States. By examining these cultural encounters, the course examines the political and ethical implications of speaking for and as the other Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, EP4, VAL.

LALS 4200. PRAGMATISM AND IDEOLOGY: LATIN AMERICA. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: GLBL.

LALS 4347. LATINOS: FACT AND FICTION. (4 Credits)

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine the experiences of Latin Americans and Latinos. It employs literature and history to introduce students to the benefits of using multiple ways of acquiring knowledge. It then relies on other academic areas such as art and sociology to reinforce its interdisciplinary. As a capstone course, it allows students to incorporate disciplines from their own academic foundation. It covers topics such as politics, social justice, race, gender, and identity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, ICC.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

LALS 4900. TOPICS IN LATIN AND LATINO STUDIES. (4 Credits)

Advanced study of a Latin American or Latino topic. Must be approved by Chair/Associate Chair. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LALS 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

LALS 5001. LAT AMER & LATINO CULTRS. (4 Credits)

In-depth study of cultural phenomena (linguistic, literary, artistic, etc) and the intellectual, social and political contexts in which they manifest themselves in Latin America and U.S. Latino communities. The topics will be addressed from historical and contemporary perspectives. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, URST.

LALS 5004. TESTIMONY & REVOLUTION:READING TESTIMONIOS BY MEN AND WOMEN FROM CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICA. (4 Credits)

This course is about how self-consciously radical or 'revolutionary' working people (workers and peasants), as well as those middle class protagonists who claim to speak on behalf of the subaltern, see themselves through autobiography/testimonies and how others (historians and social scientists) have chosen to see and represent them. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: PJST.

LALS 5005. CONTEMP CUBAN CULT HIST. (3-4 Credits)

An exploration of the cultural transformations that have shaped Cuban society from the Revolution of 1959 to the present-day "special period" of economic change through the examination of its literature and film.

LALS 5006. LATINO NEW YORK. (3-4 Credits)

LALS 5007. WORKING WITH SURVIVORS. (3-4 Credits)

LALS 5008. CUBA:REV,LIT & FILM. (3,4 Credits)

The evolution of Cuban culture as seen in literature and film from the early years of the revolution of 1959 to the contemporary post-Soviet "special period." Literary texts from writers such as Barnet, Morejon, Desnoes, Piners, Lezama Lima, Arenas, Valdes, Ponte, and Pedro Juan Gutierrez will be studied, as well as representative films from directors such as Gutierrez Alea, Sola, and Perez.

Attribute: PJST.

LALS 5010. LATIN AMERICAN MIGRATIONS. (3,4 Credits)

Geographical, cultural and linguistic migration has been a major theme of Latin American fiction since its very beginnings. Throughout the 20th Century, the myth of entering modernity through geographical displacement became the cause of major transformations in the Latin American landscape: from the gradual emptying out of rural areas to the unplanned explosions of cities into megalopolis of overwhelming complexity. In recent decades, ever more complex dislocations of culture and identity have flourished with the increasing number of people leaving their country of origin to try their luck elsewhere, either within the continent or in the US, Europe, or Asia. In dialogue with recent critical discourse on migrancy, racism, globalization, hybridity and transnationalism, the Latin American fiction to be read and analyzed in this course will foster a discussion on the rapidly changing dynamics of the multiple cultural and linguistic identities of increasingly nomad Latin Americans of different social, racial and linguistic backgrounds.

LALS 5020. LALS RESEARCH SEMINAR. (3-4 Credits)

This course focuses on the writing of the M.A. capstone and the presentation of the capstone to a peer audience.

LALS 5021. LALS SEM FOR SERV LEARN/RES. (3-4 Credits)

LALS 5035. LATINO JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

A hands-on reporting and writing workshop with a focus on Latin American and Latino subjects. Students will uncover, investigate and produce pieces on local and international issues of special relevance to Latinos, including news articles, profiles and features. The course will evaluate the local media's reporting on Latino minorities and will examine the work of American foreign correspondents who work in Latin America, as a way to study the region and the job of reporting abroad. Students will also be expected to debate issues examined in news articles and books. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LALS 5520. LALS RESEARCH SEMINAR. (4 Credits)

The course focuses on the writing of the MA capstone and the presentation of the capstone to a peer audience. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LALS 5907. CAR DIASPORAS:LONDON & NY. (4 Credits)

"Caribbean Diasporas: London and New York," This course will compare the experience of immigration and the formation of diasporic communities in two cities with strong connections to the Caribbean. It will explore the causes of and pace of immigration and the complexity of trans-national identities and politics. The topics discussed in depth include: New York and London's tie to the slave economies of the Caribbean; major Caribbean plitical exiles in London and New York (Jose Marti, C.L.R. James); and the tensions between national and diasporic identities in the two cities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LALS 6000. LATIN AMERICA: CURRENT TRENDS. (3 Credits)

The objective of this course is to help students develop the basic tools for political analysis in the context of an overview of the current political environment and economic circumstances of Latin America¿s main players. The course will provide information and guidelines for understanding the present situation within each of the main influential countries in the region and the interrelationship among these countries. The relationship with the United States and other extraregional players with increasingly important roles in the region, as well as the influence of the Organization of American States will also be explored.

LALS 8999. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (4 Credits)