Gabelli School of Business

The Gabelli School of Business provides an innovative, rigorous, experience-based undergraduate education designed to cultivate future leaders of the business world. Through a unique dual foundation in business and the liberal arts, Gabelli School students learn to write compellingly and persuasively, deliver captivating presentations, comprehend events on a global scale, and understand how the lessons of the past influence our present. These are among the many traits that set Fordham business graduates apart.

Each Gabelli School student may customize a degree program that matches his or her goals. Within the school’s areas of study—accounting, alternative investments, business economics, communications and media management, entrepreneurship, finance, fintech, healthcare management, information systems, law and ethics, management, marketing, social innovation, sports business, sustainability, and value investing — students select majors, minors, and concentrations that give them the background they need to enter the career field of their choice.

The Gabelli School’s focus is unwaveringly global. In recognition of the fact that all commerce today is world commerce, each course weaves in international themes and exposes students to the inner workings of economies across the globe. Students have the opportunity to crystallize this particular element of a Gabelli School education through the secondary concentration in global business, which requires three internationally themed courses, proficiency in a foreign language, and either study abroad experience or a globally oriented internship.

The heart of the Gabelli School program is its dual core curriculum. The integrated business core’s 13 courses provide a solid grounding in business fundamentals while honing students’ ability to clearly express themselves, collaborate in teams, think strategically and creatively, and evaluate their own work. The liberal arts core, also 13 courses, combines economics, English, the fine arts, history, mathematics, philosophy, and theology to give Fordham business students an uncommonly well-rounded education.

There are other hallmarks of the Gabelli School education as well. One is a commitment to personal and professional development. Through a carefully planned four-year sequence, students become aware of their personal and career goals and chart concrete plans for attaining them. Another is a hands-on, experiential education. Gabelli School course assignments are crafted to replicate the situations that students will face as professionals and to develop the skills needed to handle them successfully. Students engage in business simulations, research actual firms, develop plans to launch their own companies, utilize industry-standard financial analysis software, and much more.

All of this happens in the business capital of New York City. With one campus on Fordham’s Rose Hill campus in the Bronx and the other at Fordham's Lincoln Center campus, the Gabelli School puts its students in extraordinarily close proximity to the fast-paced corporate world of Manhattan. More than 90 percent of Gabelli School students hold at least one internship while they are in college. Course syllabi include visits to the headquarters of multinational corporations, institutions such as the New York Stock Exchange and the United Nations, and the workplaces of scores of Fordham alumni. The Gabelli School of Business alumni network is extraordinarily strong; alumni routinely return to campus as guest speakers, act as mentors, and help students to find internships and jobs.

This high degree of alumni engagement is unsurprising given Fordham’s role as a Jesuit university, where helping others is a core value. The Gabelli School’s Jesuit identity comes into play in other ways, too, foremost among them the belief that business must serve a higher purpose than mere profit. Students are encouraged to think about how they, as business leaders, can contribute to the advancement of society and move the world forward in profound and lasting ways. They practice this concept from their earliest days as students, enrolling in local and international service-learning courses; volunteering as mentors and student leaders; launching socially conscious student businesses; and designing their own community service projects for additional credit.