Communication and Media Studies

The Department of Communication and Media Studies at Fordham University (CMS) is dedicated to the interdisciplinary examination of human communication in an increasingly networked society. Just as digitalization and other forms of technological innovation yield a media environment that is constantly changing and evolving, sometimes in revolutionary ways, our diverse program keeps current with the most recent developments in theory and practice while staying true to its mission of emphasizing ethics and social engagement.

The department provides its students in all its programs with an interdisciplinary approach to the study of communication, including an emphasis on the media technologies, industries, and institutions that support the processes of mediated communication and their relationship to culture and society. The program blends theory and practice to prepare students for advanced study or careers in communications, all within the context of a rigorous liberal arts education supplemented by New York City’s resources as the media capital of the world. We pride ourselves on offering opportunities for undergraduate students to work directly with faculty members in scholarship and training for future careers in multiple communication and media-focused careers.

Effective fall 2016, the department now offers four new programs of study at Fordham College Rose Hill and Fordham College Lincoln Center, replacing a single undergraduate major and minor in communications for those two colleges.

  • Communication and Culture
  • Digital Technologies and Emerging Media
  • Film and Television
  • Journalism

The new areas of study allow students the opportunity to explore their interests in much greater depth than was possible within a single major or minor; both elective and required courses will now be better aligned with the specific interests of students and faculty in each area. Because of the transition to these new majors and minors, the original communications major and minor will no longer be offered to incoming students at FCRH and FCLC. (Students in PCS may still pursue a major or minor in communications.) All FCRH and FCLC students who are already majoring or minoring in communications will be encouraged to pursue one of the new majors or minors. Students who begin at Fordham after spring 2016 will only be permitted to pursue one of the new majors or minors, and may not major or minor in communications.

Note: Information about the Communication and Media Management area at Gabelli is listed separately. 

Course Prerequisites

  • COMM 1000 FUNDAMENTALS OF COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES or COMM 1010 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES must be taken before COMC 1101 COMMUNICATIONS AND CULTURE: HISTORY, THEORY, AND METHODS.
  • DTEM 1401 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES AND EMERGING MEDIA must be taken before DTEM 1402 DIGITAL CULTURES.
  • JOUR 1701 INTRODUCTION TO MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISM WITH LAB must be taken before any intermediate or advanced writing/reporting course (i.e., any JOUR course where the second two digits are 71 or 72).
  • FITV 1501 UNDERSTANDING FILM must be taken before FITV 2501 HISTORY OF FILM, 1895-1950 or FITV 3501 FILM THEORY AND CRITICISM
  • FITV 1601 UNDERSTANDING TELEVISION must be taken before FITV 2601 HISTORY OF TELEVISION or FITV 3601 TELEVISION THEORY AND CRITICISM.

Ethics, Law, and Policy Course Requirement

A course in ethics, law, and policy (ELP) is required for students majoring in communication and culture, digital technologies and emerging media, or film and television, as well as for students minoring in communication and culture or film and television. An ELP course is also required for students majoring or minoring in communication (FCRH/FCLC students enrolling prior to fall 2016 or PCS student).

The ELP requirement may be fulfilled by taking any course in COMC, DTEM, FITV, or JOUR with the last digit of 0, which includes the following courses:

CourseTitleCredits
COMC 3260MEDIA, REGULATION, AND THE PUBLIC INTEREST4
COMC 3310ETHICS AND POPULAR CULTURE4
COMC 3330PEACE, JUSTICE, AND THE MEDIA4
COMC 3350MEDIA LAW4
COMC 3370ETHICAL ISSUES IN MEDIA4
COMC 3380INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION4
COMC 4170DISSENT AND DISINFORMATION4
COMC 4340FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION4
COMC 4360COMMUNICATION ETHICS AND THE PUBLIC SPHERE4
COMC 4370ETHICAL CONTROVERSIES IN 21ST CENTURY MEDIA4
DTEM 2450COPYRIGHT AND DIGITAL MEDIA4
DTEM 4440PRIVACY AND SURVEILLANCE4
DTEM 4480DIGITAL MEDIA AND PUBLIC RESPONSIBILITY4
FITV 2670TELEVISION AND SOCIAL CHANGE4
FITV 4570FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE4
JOUR 3760THE JOURNALIST AND THE LAW4
JOUR 4750VALUES IN THE NEWS4
JOUR 4770MEDIA LAW AND JOURNALISM ETHICS4

Program Requirements

For all majors: To become a major in communications, communication and culture, digital technologies and emerging media, film and television, or journalism, a student must demonstrate an earned cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better or receive written permission from the associate chair or chair of the department. In addition, no D-grade work will be credited toward the major or minor.

Internships

A significant feature of all the communication and media studies majors is the opportunity to participate in internships working under the direct supervision of professionals in media organizations, ranging from daily newspapers and television networks to public relations and advertising agencies and corporate communication programs.

Internship Requirements

  • For their first internship, ALL CMS students wishing to receive credit for that internship MUST enroll in COMM 4701 INTERNSHIP SEMINAR and successfully complete that course. This course is worth four credits and counts toward an elective in all four undergraduate majors.
  • For all subsequent internships, students may take a tutorial—COMM 4999 TUTORIAL—under the internship director on each campus: Typically, these internships are worth one (1) course credit and do not count as an elective.
  • All internships for academic credit must be approved by the department prior to registration. In general, students requesting academic credit for internships are expected to have a 3.0 cumulative GPA.
  • The department recommends about 15 hours per week of internship duty over a semester (e.g., two days per week, seven hours per day; or three days per week, five hours per day).

Independent Research

Independent studies enable both majors and minors to pursue special projects as part of their requirements. Students may register to study with a professor for an Independent Tutorial for one to four credits, based upon an agreement with the professor.

Extracurricular Activities

Majors who belong to affiliated professional organizations may be eligible to apply for membership in Lambda Pi Eta, the Communication Honors Society. They are also active in WFUV-FM, Fordham University’s highly regarded National Public Radio station; in a number of campus publications, including The Ram and The Observer, and Fordham Nightly News; and in many other student organizations.

Departmental Awards

Awards presented by the department include the Society of Professional Journalists/Sigma Delta Chi Award, the Herbert Robinson Award in Creative Writing, the Ralph W. Dengler, S.J., Award, the Ann M. Sperber Biography Award, the Kavanagh Award, and the Edward A. Walsh Scholarship for studies in communications.

Communications Course Renumbering

All course offerings formerly using the subject code COMM have been renumbered and assigned to the subjects COMC, DTEM, FITV, or JOUR, except for the departmental introductory course (COMM 1000 FUNDAMENTALS OF COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES) and internships (COMM 4701 INTERNSHIP SEMINAR). The list below identifies the equivalent new course numbers assigned to all COMM courses. Newly offered courses after Fall 2016 will only be assigned a number in the new subjects.

Note: The following table excludes some courses that may be discontinued and planned new courses not yet offered.

Table of Renumbered Communications Courses

Old Number New Number Title
NewCOMM 1000Fundamentals of Communication and Media Studies
COMM 1010COMM 1010Introduction to Communication and Media Studies (to be discontinued after fall 2016)
NewCOMC 1101Communication and Culture: History, Theory, and Methods
NewCOMC 2112Strategic Communication Theory and Practice
COMM 2702COMC 2113Interpersonal Communication
NewCOMC 2117Language, Culture, and Consciousness
COMM 2012COMC 2159Communication Technologies and Society
COMM 2701COMC 2175Persuasion and Public Opinion
COMM 2601COMC 2221Fashion as Communication
COMM 2603COMC 2234Media and the Arts
NewCOMC 2236The Rock Revolution in Music and Media
COMM 2602COMC 2258Myth and Symbol of American Character
COMM 2000COMC 2271Theories of Media, Culture, and Society
NewCOMC 2277Media and Sexuality
NewCOMC 2278Media, Culture, and Globalization
COMM 1011COMC 2329Media Industries
COMM 2610COMC 2377Mass Communication and Society
COMM 2501COMC 3114Effective Speaking
COMM 3102COMC 3171Orality and Literacy
COMM 3502COMC 3172Principles of Advertising
COMM 3500COMC 3173Marketing and the Media
COMM 3501COMC 3174Public Relations
COMM 3350COMC 3186Sports Communication
COMM 3601COMC 3232Class, Taste, and Mass Culture
COMM 3571COMC 3235Popular Music as Communication
COMM 3111COMC 3237Gender Images and Media
NewCOMC 3247Race, Class, and Gender in Media
NewCOMC 3260Media Regulation and the Public Interest
COMM 3681COMC 3268Media and National Identity
COMM 3505COMC 3272History and Culture of Advertising
COMM 3110COMC 3330Peace, Justice, and the Media
COMM 3103COMC 3340Freedom of Expression
COMM 3112COMC 3350Media Law
COMM 3476COMC 3370Ethical Issues and Media
COMM 3104COMC 3373Mass Opinion: Its Measures and Meanings
COMM 3566COMC 3374Media Effects
COMM 3309COMC 3375Children and the Media
NewCOMC 3378Media, Millennials, and Civic Discourse
COMM 3106COMC 3380International Communication
COMM 4003COMC 4170Dissent and Disinformation
COMM 4607COMC 4177Communication for Social Change
COMM 4811COMC 4211Media and Modernity
COMM 4311COMC 4222Media and the Environment
COMM 4711COMC 4241Communication, Popular Culture, and Philosophy
COMM 4604COMC 4248Multiculturalism: Diversity and Media
COMM 4603COMC 4279Media and Popular Culture
COMM 4706COMC 4338American Political Communication
COMM 4411COMC 4348Religion, Theology, and New Media
COMM 4004COMC 4360Communication Ethics and the Public Sphere
COMM 2500DTEM 1401Introduction to Digital Technologies and Emerging Media
COMM 2525DTEM 1402Digital Cultures
NewDTEM 2411Digital Research Methods
NewDTEM 2412Digital Ethnography
NewDTEM 2413Participatory Methods
NewDTEM 2414Media Ecology
NewDTEM 2417Data Visualization
COMM 2523DTEM 2421Digital Production for New Media
COMM 2222DTEM 2425Digital Video Production I
COMM 2303DTEM 2427Digital Audio Production
COMM 2010DTEM 2459Social History of Communication Technology
COMM 2527DTEM 2471Writing for Online Media
COMM 3307DTEM 3476Social Media
NewDTEM 4440Privacy and Surveillance
NewDTEM 4470Values in Design
COMM 4005DTEM 4480Digital Media and Public Responsibility
COMM 2471FITV 1501Understanding Film
COMM 3332FITV 1601Understanding Television
COMM 3422FITV 2501History of Film, 1895–1950
COMM 3405FITV 2511Screenwriting I
COMM 2775FITV 2533Fashion, Costume, and Film
NewFITV 2534Fashion in British Film and TV
COMM 3320FITV 2601History of Television
COMM 3301FITV 2611Television Production I
NewFITV 2612Writing and Producing the Web Series
COMM 3470FITV 3501Film Theory and Criticism
COMM 3409FITV 3511Screenwriting II
COMM 3750FITV 3537Plays and Screenplays
COMM 3451FITV 3545Film and Television of Hitchcock
COMM 3425FITV 3551Film History, 1950 to the Present
COMM 3401FITV 3553Hollywood Genres
COMM 3438FITV 3555The City in Film and Television
COMM 3408FITV 3565The Documentary Idea
COMM 3407FITV 3571The Science Fiction Genre
COMM 3403FITV 3578American Film Comedy
COMM 3108FITV 3579Movies and the American Experience
COMM 3414FITV 3585Transnational Asian Cinema
COMM 3410FITV 3588Global Cinema
NewFITV 3601Television Theory and Criticism
COMM 3305FITV 3624Writing TV Dramas
NewFITV 3637Queer Studies in Film and Television
COMM 3489FITV 3638British Cinema and TV
NewFITV 3647Gender, Race, Class, and Television
COMM 3404FITV 3658Italian Americans on Screen
COMM 3310FITV 3678Television Comedy and American Values
COMM 4001FITV 4570Films of Moral Struggle
COMM 4708FITV 4625Writing TV Sitcoms
COMM 2083JOUR 1701Introduction to Multimedia Journalism (with Lab)
COMM 1500JOUR 1761The Power of News: Introduction to Press, Politics, and Public Policy
COMM 2302JOUR 2714Radio and Audio Reporting
COMM 2206JOUR 2722Intermediate Feature Writing
COMM 2202JOUR 2725Writing Workshop
NewJOUR 2787Fashion Journalism
COMM 3099JOUR 3711Advanced Multimedia Reporting
COMM 3010JOUR 3715Writing for Broadcast News
COMM 3083JOUR 3716Intermediate Television Production
COMM 3978JOUR 3717Online Journalism
NewJOUR 3718On-Air Reporting
COMM 3081JOUR 3723Interviews and Profiles
COMM 3080JOUR 3724First Person Journalism
COMM 3084JOUR 3727Writing for Magazines
NewJOUR 3728Special Report: In-Depth Reporting
COMM 2211JOUR 3741Journalism Workshop: Reporting
COMM 2212JOUR 3742Journalism Workshop: Layout
COMM 2213JOUR 3743Journalism Workshop: Multimedia
COMM 2214JOUR 3744Journalism Workshop: Photography
COMM 3205JOUR 3760The Journalist and the Law
COMM 3323JOUR 3763The Murrow Years
COMM 3333JOUR 3764TV News and Today’s World
COMM 3335JOUR 3765Television News
COMM 3321JOUR 3769History of TV and Radio News
COMM 3101JOUR 3772Newsmaking
NewJOUR 3776Social Media for Journalists
COMM 3082JOUR 3781Arts Journalism
COMM 3085JOUR 3782Science Journalism
COMM 3086JOUR 3783Theater Journalism
COMM 3941JOUR 3785Writing for the Media
COMM 4709JOUR 4713Podcasting
COMM 4201JOUR 4727Advanced Magazine Article Writing
COMM 4707JOUR 4733Photojournalism
NewJOUR 4741Practicum: The Observer
NewJOUR 4742Practicum: FNN
NewJOUR 4743Practicum: The Ram
NewJOUR 4744Practicum: WFUV
COMM 4002JOUR 4750Values in the News
COMM 4111JOUR 4766TV News Innovators
COMM 4606JOUR 4767History of Women’s Magazines
NewJOUR 4773Public Media
COMM 4611JOUR 4784Advanced Business Journalism
COMM 1800COMM 1098Internship
COMM 1999COMM 1999Tutorial
COMM 2800COMM 2098Internship
COMM 2999COMM 2999Tutorial
COMM 3800COMM 3098Internship
COMM 3999COMM 3999Tutorial
COMM 4800COMM 4098Internship
COMM 4701COMM 4701Internship Seminar
COMM 4705COMM 4705Special Topics
COMM 4801COMM 4801Internship Experience I
COMM 4901COMM 4901Internship Experience II
COMM 4999COMM 4999Tutorial

Courses outside the department

The following courses offered outside the department have the COMM, COMC, DTEM, FITV, or JOUR attributes and count toward the coursework for the respective majors and minors offered by the department:

Courses with the COMC attribute:

CourseTitleCredits
AFAM 3134FROM ROCK-N-ROLL TO HIP-HOP4
CISC 4001COMPUTERS AND ROBOTS IN FILM4
COLI 4018CONTEMPORARY CUBAN CULTURE IN HAVANA4
DTEM 2414MEDIA ECOLOGY4
DTEM 2459SOCIAL HISTORY OF COMMUNICATION AND TECHNOLOGY4
FITV 3588GLOBAL CINEMA4
FITV 3647GENDER, RACE, CLASS, AND TELEVISION4
FITV 3678TELEVISION COMEDY AND AMERICAN VALUES4
HIST 3515MEDIA HISTORY: 1400 TO PRESENT4
JOUR 3764TELEVISION NEWS AND TODAY’S WORLD4
JOUR 4773PUBLIC MEDIA4
LALS 3005LATIN AMERICAN THEMES4
MKBU 3434INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATION3
MKBU 4443SPECIAL TOPIC: PERFORMING ARTS IN THE 21ST CENTURY3
NMDD 3020EXPLORATIONS IN DIGITAL STORYTELLING4
NMDD 3308PROFESSIONAL SOCIAL MEDIA4
NMDD 3880DESIGNING SMART CITIES4
PHIL 4444AI, SCI FI, AND HUMAN VALUE4
POSC 3316MASS MEDIA AND AMERICAN POLITICS4
POSC 3421POLITICAL THEORY IN POPULAR CULTURE4
SOCI 3000LATINO IMAGES IN MEDIA4
SOCI 4052AN ETHICS OF MODERN SELFHOOD: THE PURSUIT OF AUTHENTICITY4
SPAN 3005THEMES IN LATINA/O AND LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES4
SPAN 4018CONTEMPORARY CUBAN CULTURE IN HAVANA4

Courses with the DTEM attribute:

CourseTitleCredits
CISC 2540INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO GAME DESIGN4
CISC 4001COMPUTERS AND ROBOTS IN FILM4
COMC 4340FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION4
COMC 4348RELIGION, THEOLOGY, AND NEW MEDIA4
FITV 2425DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION I4
FITV 3425DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION II4
FITV 3571SCIENCE FICTION IN FILM AND TELEVISION4
JOUR 3711ADVANCED MULTIMEDIA REPORTING4
JOUR 3717ONLINE JOURNALISM4
NMDD 3220INTRODUCTION TO GAME NARRATIVE4
NMDD 3308PROFESSIONAL SOCIAL MEDIA4
NMDD 3450USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN: DESIGN FOR EMPOWERMENT4
NMDD 3880DESIGNING SMART CITIES4
NMDD 3890DATA VISUALIZATION AND REPRESENTATION4

Courses with the FITV attribute:

CourseTitleCredits
COLI 3840LATIN AMERICAN CULTURE THROUGH FILM4
COLI 4018CONTEMPORARY CUBAN CULTURE IN HAVANA4
DTEM 2425DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION I4
DTEM 3425DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION II4
JOUR 4766TELEVISION NEWS INNOVATORS4
LALS 3840LATIN AMERICA THROUGH FILM4
NMDD 3220INTRODUCTION TO GAME NARRATIVE4
SPAN 4018CONTEMPORARY CUBAN CULTURE IN HAVANA4
VART 1265FILM/VIDEO I4
VART 2265FILM/VIDEO II4

Courses with the JOUR attribute:

CourseTitleCredits
COMC 2113INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION4
COMC 2175PERSUASION AND PUBLIC OPINION4
COMC 2329INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA INDUSTRIES3
COMC 3114EFFECTIVE SPEAKING4
COMC 3115PERFORMANCE FOR BROADCAST MEDIA4
COMC 3171ORALITY AND LITERACY4
COMC 3172PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING4
COMC 3174PUBLIC RELATIONS4
COMC 3186SPORTS COMMUNICATION4
COMC 3237GENDER IMAGES AND MEDIA4
COMC 3260MEDIA, REGULATION, AND THE PUBLIC INTEREST4
COMC 3268MEDIA AND NATIONAL IDENTITY4
COMC 3272HISTORY AND CULTURE OF ADVERTISING4
COMC 3310ETHICS AND POPULAR CULTURE4
COMC 3330PEACE, JUSTICE, AND THE MEDIA4
COMC 3350MEDIA LAW4
COMC 3370ETHICAL ISSUES IN MEDIA4
COMC 3373MASS OPINION: MEASURE/MEAN4
COMC 3374MEDIA EFFECTS4
COMC 3378MEDIA, MILLENNIALS, AND CIVIC DISCOURSE4
COMC 3380INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION4
COMC 4170DISSENT AND DISINFORMATION4
COMC 4222MEDIA AND THE ENVIRONMENT4
COMC 4248MULTICULTURALISM4
COMC 4338AMERICAN POLITICAL COMMUNICATION4
COMC 4340FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION4
COMC 4348RELIGION, THEOLOGY, AND NEW MEDIA4
COMC 4360COMMUNICATION ETHICS AND THE PUBLIC SPHERE4
COMM 4701INTERNSHIP SEMINAR4
DTEM 2417DATA VISUALIZATION4
DTEM 2421DIGITAL PRODUCTION FOR NEW MEDIA4
DTEM 2425DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION I4
DTEM 2427DIGITAL AUDIO PRODUCTION4
DTEM 2471WRITING FOR ONLINE MEDIA4
DTEM 3463CIVIC MEDIA4
DTEM 3475DIGITAL MEDIA AND ADVOCACY4
DTEM 3476SOCIAL MEDIA4
DTEM 4480DIGITAL MEDIA AND PUBLIC RESPONSIBILITY4
DTEM 4488POLITICAL COMMUNICATION IN THE DIGITAL ERA4
FITV 1601UNDERSTANDING TELEVISION4
FITV 3425DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION II4
FITV 3565THE DOCUMENTARY IDEA4
FITV 3566DOCUMENTARY FILM4
FITV 3605TOPICS IN TELEVISION AND RADIO4
FITV 3629AMERICAN TELEVISION HISTORY: FIRST 60 YEARS4
FITV 3637QUEER STUDIES IN FILM AND TELEVISION4
FITV 3647GENDER, RACE, CLASS, AND TELEVISION4
HIST 3515MEDIA HISTORY: 1400 TO PRESENT4
NMDD 3308PROFESSIONAL SOCIAL MEDIA4
NMDD 3880DESIGNING SMART CITIES4
PMMA 5002PUBLIC JOURNALISM3
POSC 3316MASS MEDIA AND AMERICAN POLITICS4

Courses with the COMM attribute:

CourseTitleCredits
AFAM 3134FROM ROCK-N-ROLL TO HIP-HOP4
CISC 2540INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO GAME DESIGN4
CISC 4001COMPUTERS AND ROBOTS IN FILM4
CISC 4650CYBERSPACE: ISSUES AND ETHICS4
COLI 4018CONTEMPORARY CUBAN CULTURE IN HAVANA4
COMC 4348RELIGION, THEOLOGY, AND NEW MEDIA4
FITV 3535FILM ADAPTATION4
LALS 3005LATIN AMERICAN THEMES4
MKBU 3434INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATION3
MKBU 4443SPECIAL TOPIC: PERFORMING ARTS IN THE 21ST CENTURY3
NMDD 3020EXPLORATIONS IN DIGITAL STORYTELLING4
NMDD 3220INTRODUCTION TO GAME NARRATIVE4
NMDD 3308PROFESSIONAL SOCIAL MEDIA4
NMDD 3880DESIGNING SMART CITIES4
PHIL 4444AI, SCI FI, AND HUMAN VALUE4
POSC 3316MASS MEDIA AND AMERICAN POLITICS4
POSC 3421POLITICAL THEORY IN POPULAR CULTURE4
SOCI 3000LATINO IMAGES IN MEDIA4
SOCI 4052AN ETHICS OF MODERN SELFHOOD: THE PURSUIT OF AUTHENTICITY4
SPAN 3005THEMES IN LATINA/O AND LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES4
SPAN 4018CONTEMPORARY CUBAN CULTURE IN HAVANA4
VART 1124PHOTOGRAPHY I4
VART 1135VISUAL THINKING I4
VART 1265FILM/VIDEO I4
VART 2003GRAPHIC DESIGN & DIGITAL TOOLS4
VART 2265FILM/VIDEO II4
VART 2550DESIGNING BOOKS, "ZINES" AND CHAPBKS4
VART 3250DESIGN AND THE WEB4
VART 3267FILM AND THE CITY4

For more information

Visit the Communication and Media Studies department web page

Communication and Media Studies offers the following courses that count toward Core Curriculum requirements:

The following courses satisfy the social science core requirement:

CourseTitleCredits
COMM 1000FUNDAMENTALS OF COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES3
COMC 2121INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES3
COMC 2175PERSUASION AND PUBLIC OPINION4
COMC 2329INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA INDUSTRIES3
COMC 2377MASS COMMUNICATION AND SOCIETY4
JOUR 1761THE POWER OF NEWS3
DTEM 2459SOCIAL HISTORY OF COMMUNICATION AND TECHNOLOGY4

The following courses satisfy the advanced social science core requirement:

CourseTitleCredits
COMC 3171ORALITY AND LITERACY4
COMC 3172PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING4
COMC 3237GENDER IMAGES AND MEDIA4
COMC 3247RACE, CLASS, AND GENDER IN MEDIA4
COMC 3268MEDIA AND NATIONAL IDENTITY4
COMC 3350MEDIA LAW4
COMC 3374MEDIA EFFECTS4
COMC 3375CHILDREN AND MEDIA4
COMC 3380INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION4
COMC 3330PEACE, JUSTICE, AND THE MEDIA4
COMC 4267MEDIA AND SOCIAL AWARENESS4
DTEM 3476SOCIAL MEDIA4
FITV 3678TELEVISION COMEDY AND AMERICAN VALUES4
FITV 3571SCIENCE FICTION IN FILM AND TELEVISION4
JOUR 3760THE JOURNALIST AND THE LAW4

Selected sections of COMC 2121 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES satisfy the Eloquentia Perfecta 1 (EP1) requirement.

Specified sections of the following courses satisfy the Eloquentia Perfecta 3 (EP3) requirement:

CourseTitleCredits
COMC 3114EFFECTIVE SPEAKING4
COMC 3375CHILDREN AND MEDIA4
FITV 3565THE DOCUMENTARY IDEA4
FITV 3588GLOBAL CINEMA4
JOUR 3727WRITING FOR MAGAZINES4

The following courses satisfy the Values Seminar/Eloquentia Perfecta 4 (EP4) requirement:

CourseTitleCredits
COMC 4360COMMUNICATION ETHICS AND THE PUBLIC SPHERE4
DTEM 4480DIGITAL MEDIA AND PUBLIC RESPONSIBILITY4
FITV 4570FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE4
JOUR 4750VALUES IN THE NEWS4

The following course satisfies the Interdisciplinary Capstone Core (ICC) requirement:

CourseTitleCredits
COMC 4222MEDIA AND THE ENVIRONMENT4
COMC 4241COMMUNICATION, POPULAR CULTURE, AND PHILOSOPHY4
COMC 4340FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION4
COMC 4348RELIGION, THEOLOGY, AND NEW MEDIA4
JOUR 4766TELEVISION NEWS INNOVATORS4
JOUR 4767HISTORY OF WOMEN'S MAGAZINES4

Communication and Media Studies courses

COMM 1000. FUNDAMENTALS OF COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES. (3 Credits)

This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamental approaches, theories and perspectives essential for an understanding of mediated communication, the industries that make it possible. Throughout the term we will explore many ways in which our symbolic environment both reflects and shapes life in the 21st century, from interpersonal to international relations, and everything in between.

Attributes: AMST, FRSS, SSCI.

Mutually Exclusive: COMM 1010.

COMM 1010. INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the major approaches, theories and perspectives in the study of Communication and the Media.

Attributes: FRSS, SSCI.

Mutually Exclusive: COMM 1000.

COMM 1098. INTERNSHIP. (1 Credit)

COMM 1999. TUTORIAL. (1 Credit)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

COMM 2098. INTERNSHIP. (2 Credits)

Supervised placement for students interested in work experience.

COMM 2999. TUTORIAL. (2 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

COMM 3098. INTERNSHIP. (3 Credits)

Supervised placement for students interested in work experience.

COMM 3999. TUTORIAL. (3 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

COMM 4000. COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES HONORS SEMINAR. (4 Credits)

An invitation-only course for the top students in the majors of the Department of Communication and Media Studies. The course topic will rotate every year, as will the instructor. Offered at both campuses. Counts as an elective towards any CMS major. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMM 4098. INTERNSHIP. (4 Credits)

Supervised placement for students interested in work experience. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMM 4701. INTERNSHIP SEMINAR. (4 Credits)

Juniors and Seniors only. Intern duty and seminar meetings during which students analyze their work experience in terms of the mass media as a whole. Written projects and selected readings geared to each student's internship will be assigned. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMM 4801. INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE I. (2 Credits)

Weekly intern duty and regular meetings with a faculty adviser during which students extend classroom experience into the real world. Written projects and readings relating to the internship are assigned. Seniors only.

COMM 4901. INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE II. (2 Credits)

Weekly intern duty and regular meetings with a faculty adviser during which students extend classroom experience into the real world. Written Projects and readings relating to the internship are assigned. Seniors only.

COMM 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

Communication and Culture courses

COMC 1101. COMMUNICATIONS AND CULTURE: HISTORY, THEORY, AND METHODS. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the history, theory and methods of Communication Studies, Media Studies, and Cultural Studies. This course provides students with a basic theoretical foundation for understanding the interdisciplinary traditions of our field, an historical examination of key paradigms and theorists, and an overview of the methodological approaches used by scholars of mediated communication. We will explore the ways in which theory and methodology are inextricably intertwined and how their relationship shapes both inquiry and analysis. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

Prerequisites: COMM 1000 or COMM 1010.

COMC 2111. THEORIES OF HUMAN COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the study of human communication through a variety of theories that focus on language, meaning, symbols, performance, gender, race, culture, and political economy, among others. Students develop an awareness of the varied perspectives from which communication has been studied; ethical issues and complexities of human and mediated communication in the 21st century; and how communication concepts and theories help us better understand our lives, relationships, culture, and society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 2112. STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE. (4 Credits)

Introduction to strategic communication for students interested in advertising, public relations, health communications, social advocacy and political campaigns. Presents today's best practices used to research, design, implement and evaluate campaigns. Topics include: impact of the evolution of technology and the digital environment on delivery of campaigns, basic elements of a strategic media plan, ethics and regulation of strategic communications, and role of strategic communications in the process of marketing products, people, ideas, and social causes. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 2113. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the basic tools of behavioral research as applied to the study of interpersonal communication. Topics such as human relationships, communication competence, conflict negotiation, intercultural communication, communication and gender, and mediated interpersonal communication are covered. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMC 2117. LANGUAGE, CULTURE, AND CONSCIOUSNESS. (4 Credits)

An examination of how we use words and symbols as tools for thought and guides for action, how the structures of language and symbolic communication relate to the structures of consciousness and culture. Analysis of the role of language in understanding our world, constructing reality, and evaluating messages and information. Pragmatic strategies for avoiding misevaluation and misunderstanding, resolving conflict, and improving clarity of communication through awareness of language habits in interpersonal, organizational, and mediated contexts are emphasized. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 2121. INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the major approaches, theories and perspectives in the study of Communication and the Media.

Attribute: SSCI.

COMC 2159. COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

This course surveys the history of mass media, from Gutenberg's invention of the printing press until today. We will focus on the technological aspects of media. However, a key focus of this course will also be on how the development of new tech gained later widespread adoption, how these technologies directly and indirectly affected the contemporaneous socio-cultural environment, as well as their continued effect on society today. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 2166. MEDIA ADVOCACY AND SOCIAL MARKETING. (4 Credits)

Media advocacy is the strategic use of communication channels for the purpose of social justice and influencing public policy. Social Marketing seeks to develop and integrate marketing concepts with other approaches to influence behaviors that benefit individuals and communities for the greater social good. Guided by ethical principles, social marketing seeks to integrate research, best practice, theory, audience and partnership insight, to inform the delivery of competition sensitive and segmented social change programs that are effective, efficient, equitable and sustainable. This course offers a strategic framework for developing a social media advocacy program, using social and digital media to help shape public debate, mobilize public action and to speak directly to those with influence to help bring about social change. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 2175. PERSUASION AND PUBLIC OPINION. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2701): An examination of the theories and research on persuasion and attitude change, the strategies and techniques used by persuaders and the reception skills needed to be a critical consumer of persuasive messages. Topics such as the psychology of attitude formation and change, interpersonal influence, rhetoric, language and symbol use, culture and persuasion, persuasive campaigns and movements, political communication, advertising and propaganda, the sociology of mass persuasion and the ethics of persuasion are covered. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: JOUR, SSCI.

COMC 2221. FASHION AS COMMUNICATION: SYNTAX OF STYLE. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2601): This course is designed to teach key communication and cultural studies concepts through the lens of fashion. With the understanding that fashion is both a discourse and an industry, we use a broad range of examples to illustrate key cultural studies and communication studies concepts such as gender, production, media effects and the politics of representation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: FASH, WGSS.

COMC 2234. MEDIA AND THE ARTS. (4 Credits)

An examination of the arts from cave painting to contemporary, electronic forms. Shifts in the form and style, the purpose and the role of the traditional fine arts will be studied in the technological and cultural contexts in which they occurred. Emphasis will be placed on the co-development of new arts and information technologies in the 20th century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: URST.

COMC 2236. THE ROCK REVOLUTION IN MUSIC AND MEDIA. (4 Credits)

From transistor radios to digital downloads, from AM to FM through the rise of MTV, and from Elvis to the Beatles to Woodstock, this course examines the media's role in the evolution of rock 'n' rock and it's impact on our society. We explore the often symbiotic relationship among the music, technology and personalities of an era that still reverberates today. The instructor is the long-time NY radio personality and rock historian Dennis Elsas, from WFUV. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

COMC 2258. MYTH AND SYMBOL OF AMERICAN CHARACTER. (4 Credits)

A study of the heart of American culture through an examination of the recurring myths and symbols found in journalism, public speeches, social commentary and the popular media. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, PLUR, REST.

COMC 2271. MEDIATED COMMUNICATION AND SOCIAL THEORY. (4 Credits)

This course uses primary sources to deepen students’ understanding of the interrelationship between media, culture, and society. One of the main objectives is therefore to build students’ reading and analysis skills by exposing them to difficult theoretical material in an environment designed to help them learn to read this kind of text. Students thereby gain a more nuanced understanding of the intellectual layout of the field by engaging directly with the theorists who have shaped its major debates. Finally, the course makes use of detailed textual analysis to apply these critical thinking skills to media texts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, NMDD, URST.

COMC 2277. MEDIA AND SEXUALITY. (4 Credits)

By all accounts, we have witnessed an explosion of LGBTQ representation in the media over the last decade. This course critically examines the terms of this new visibility, and inquires into the exclusions that accompany the recognition of certain queer and trans subjects. Through the study of media, film and popular culture, we will explore how representations of sex and sexuality are also central to the construction of ideas about race, class, gender, and nation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: WGSS.

COMC 2278. MEDIA, CULTURE, AND GLOBALIZATION. (4 Credits)

What is the role of the media in shaping our understanding of a globalized, interconnected world and our position within it? This course explores these questions by studying the role of the media in both producing and resisting forms of power, violence and inequality associated with contemporary globalization. In particular, we will examine how the media structures and mediates our relationship to others, and communicates powerful meanings about citizenship, national identity, security, and criminality. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: GLBL.

COMC 2329. INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA INDUSTRIES. (3 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 1011): An overview of the mass media communication industries; examining such issues as the institutional, social and technological histories of the media; the influence of economic factors in shaping content and issues governing regulatory policy.

Attributes: JOUR, SSCI.

COMC 2377. MASS COMMUNICATION AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2610): The class will examine mass communication and society through study of the structure of media, the interaction of individuals with media, the negotiation of culture within mediated contexts, the effects of media, and the interaction of media with institutions and other aspects of society. This course will help students to 1) begin mastering an approach to researching media, 2) build a foundation of knowledge about the ways in which our beliefs, values, and attitudes are shaped by media, and 3) negotiate the complex issues surrounding the collective experience of mass mediated culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, PLUR, SSCI.

COMC 3114. EFFECTIVE SPEAKING. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2501): A study of principles of effective communication with emphasis on the role of public speaking skills in professional life, the importance of critical thinking to communication and its significance in a democratic political system. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP3, JOUR.

COMC 3115. PERFORMANCE FOR BROADCAST MEDIA. (4 Credits)

This course will improve students’ performance skills in broadcast media (as well as give industry insight), whether they are on the path to sports broadcasting, hard news, comedy, the boardroom, or the latest viral web-show or podcast. A different on-air challenge will be presented each week where students will work on—then self-critique—their vocal delivery, body mechanics, and writing style. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMC 3157. MEDIA AND CIVIC ACTION. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the role of communication technologies, media institutions and participatory audiences in mobilizing social change and civic action. It works from a foundational assumption that media is a central component of democracy and civic life, but one with potential for both liberation and constraint. Grounded in theories of media power, communication networks and political discourse, case studies in the course will explore a variety of questions about the past, present and future of media and social mobilization. The course will provide theoretical, methodological and practical insights into the theory and practice of media and civic action. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 3171. ORALITY AND LITERACY. (4 Credits)

An examination of oral and literate modes of communication and their relationship to culture, consciousness and social organization. Topics include the nature of non literate cultures, oral tradition and mnemonics, the historical development of writing systems and their social and psychological impacts, theories and debates on oral and literate cultures, and mindsets. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, JOUR.

COMC 3172. PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3502): A study of advertising strategies and promotional appeals. Professional guidance in the creation of advertising: the planning, designing and writing of campaigns for all media and for multimedia campaigns with special emphasis on copywriting. Juniors and Seniors only. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, JOUR, NMDD.

COMC 3173. MARKETING AND THE MEDIA. (4 Credits)

A survey of marketing/advertising techniques and approaches utilized for print, radio, television, out-of-home and direct marketing. Niche marketing opportunities created by cable, infomercials, syndication and the Internet are also examined. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 3174. PUBLIC RELATIONS. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3501): Provides knowledge of the basic concepts of public relations and instruction in the use of various media in reaching specific publics.Through lectures, writing assignments, and in-class workshops, students will learn the basic concepts of public relations and the methodology of using various media to reach specific audiences. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

Prerequisites: (COMM 1010 or COMC 2121) and (COMM 1011 or COMC 2329).

COMC 3175. ADVERTISING AS COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

One of the most valuable resources in our economy is our attention. Advertising is a form of communication designed to capture that attention. What do advertisers know about how to achieve that goal, and what techniques do they use in today’s global, digital media environment? This course provides a broad overview of the theory, research and practices associated with advertising as a mode of communication. Themes to be covered include: the history of advertising in the US, the organization and evolution of the ad industry, types of advertising, ethical and regulatory issues, the role of market research and the impact of new media forms on the advertising industry. Students will learn the steps to developing and justifying a creative brief and a media plan, as well as to think critically about advertising texts. This course covers both theory and practice, training students to engage with this form of communication from the perspective of advertising planners, consumers and critics. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 3178. HUMOR AS COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

Each day, most people participate in humorous exchanges. We seek out movies, television programs, YouTube videos, memes, books, and, of course, people that make us laugh. Cross-culturally societies appreciate a good sense of humor. Few would argue that humor is not highly valued. This course will focus on theoretical, empirical, and ethical approaches to humor, with a view to understanding it as a communications tool in a variety of contexts, including relationships, organizations, families, medicine, law, education, intercultural relations, entertainment, and politics. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 3186. SPORTS COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3350): A survey of sports communication from analytical and practical perspectives. Written assignments address topics covered, including sports reporting and writing, advertising, and public relations. Pre-Req: COMM 1000 or COMM 1010 or Instructor permission. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, JOUR, ZLB2.

Prerequisites: COMM 1000 or COMM 1010.

COMC 3231. AESTHETICS AND THE MEDIA. (4 Credits)

A study of the development of aesthetic and formal issues in the media: representation, narration, and convention. Critical methodologies. Reading. Film and television viewings. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 3232. CLASS, TASTE, AND MASS CULTURE. (4 Credits)

An examination of cultural hierarchy and conflicting notions regarding the "ideal" form and content of the symbolic environment. Drawing from various critiques of the mass media, this course explores the ways in which debates about cultural and aesthetic standards reflect socio-economic and political concerns. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, PLUR.

COMC 3235. POPULAR MUSIC AS COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

Current issues in popular music studies-mediation, globalization, authenticity, identity, community, etc.- covering a wide range of popular musics in North America. Regular reading and listening assignments. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, COLI, URST.

COMC 3237. GENDER IMAGES AND MEDIA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3111): This course introduces students to ways in which ideas about gender develop over time and within different cultural contexts and the practical implications of those ideas. We bring critical thinking and discussion to readings from scholarly research and popular media to explore narratives around gender, including those at the intersection of race, sexual preference and ethnicity, to deepen awareness of and appreciation for multiple perspectives. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, COLI, JOUR, WGSS.

COMC 3247. RACE, CLASS, AND GENDER IN MEDIA. (4 Credits)

This class analyzes representations of social class, racial and ethnic identity, and gender and sexuality in media. We begin our work with two assumptions. First, that media both shape and are shaped by social conceptions. Second, that these categories—race, class, and gender—are embodied, that is, they describe different physical bodies that inhabit real, lived environments. From there, students learn to identify central themes and problems in representing differences of race/ethnicity, social class, and sexuality in fiction and nonfiction media. The class will use a mixture of hands-on activities with contemporary media (such as blogging, journaling, and online discussion) plus more traditional readings about theories of representation and embodiment. The course is intended as a learning environment where students are able to do more than simply identify stereotypes. Rather, they intervene in these representations, actively critiquing stereotypes and moving past them towards a reflective attitude about the relationship between society as it is lived for people of different racial, sexual, and class groups—and the image of those groups as depicted in media. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, LALS, PLUR, WGSS.

COMC 3260. MEDIA, REGULATION, AND THE PUBLIC INTEREST. (4 Credits)

This course explores the history and grounding of U.S, telecommunications regulation in the precedence of utilities, emphasizing private control while developing a national infrastructure, as opposed to the European model of media as social agency. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMC 3268. MEDIA AND NATIONAL IDENTITY. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3681): An examination of case studies showing how national identity is inferred and organized by mass media. Questions include: How is nationalism produced by media discourse? How are outsiders portrayed? Who draws the boundaries between inside and outside, and how? Texts will include television, radio, print journalism, music and films. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, COLI, GLBL, INST, JOUR, PJST.

COMC 3272. HISTORY AND CULTURE OF ADVERTISING. (4 Credits)

An examination of advertising practices. A review of the social and technological history of American advertising beginning with the print media. Social and interpersonal meanings imbedded within the publicity images of both print and television are examined as well as the continuing penetration of advertising and marketing strategies in media culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, JOUR.

COMC 3310. ETHICS AND POPULAR CULTURE. (4 Credits)

For many people, popular culture -- specifically television and film -- is their first exposure to complex ethical issues and resulting decision-making processes. Yet, despite the fact that pop culture plays a large part in shaping our moral standpoint, it is often overlooked as a source of academic ethical discourse. This course will examine the relationship between ethics and popular culture throughout the past century: from sideshows and Vaudeville to reality shows and social media. It will look at ethical issues in the entertainment industry and media, how we learn about ethics from pop culture, and how to be an ethical consumer of a variety of media. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMC 3330. PEACE, JUSTICE, AND THE MEDIA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3110): This course analyzes the ways in which the media represent the issues of peace and justice. Considering the relevance of peace and justice for democratic practices, the variety of media depictions of such issues will be analyzed. Topics such as environmental and economic justice, poverty and the poor, race and gender, war and peace, and media ethics and values will be covered. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, JOUR, PJST.

COMC 3350. MEDIA LAW. (4 Credits)

This course is designed to introduce the communication and media studies major to the basic issues in the field of media law. Examined here are the Constitutional principles underlying the major Supreme Court cases that have established the parameters governing the use of communication technologies in the country. Special focus will be given to the various legal changes posed by new media. Juniors and Seniors only. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, JOUR, NMDD.

COMC 3370. ETHICAL ISSUES IN MEDIA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3476): Review of some basic ethical principles and examination of media related issues such as freedom of expression, the right to privacy and the public's right to know. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, JOUR, NMDD.

COMC 3373. MASS OPINION: MEASURE/MEAN. (4 Credits)

A humanistic survey of disciplined viewpoints about the significance of public opinion in political affairs, human cognition, leadership, religious faith, and aesthetic judgments. The complementary and at times conflicting approaches of philosophical history and the sociology of knowledge are principally employed. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMC 3374. MEDIA EFFECTS. (4 Credits)

What are the effects of mass media on society? This question lies at the heart of mass communications. While many people feel that it is “obvious” that the media have a powerful effect on society, social scientists remain divided on the issue. Reviewing both classic and contemporary literature, we will trace the various models that have been offered as possible explanations for the mechanism of media influence. Juniors and seniors only. Pre-requisite either COMM 1010 or COMM 1011. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, JOUR, NMDD.

COMC 3375. CHILDREN AND MEDIA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3309): This course explores the controversy surrounding children's media. Topics such as the role of media in socialization and learning, the effects of media content and communication technologies on children's behavior, thought and emotions are examined. The functions that media perform for children, and the efforts to design media specifically for children are considered. Various forms such as television, popular music, film, video games, fairy tales and children's literature are explored. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, EP3.

Prerequisites: COMM 1000 or COMM 1010.

COMC 3378. MEDIA, MILLENNIALS, AND CIVIC DISCOURSE. (4 Credits)

This political communication course is being taught by the host of "The Open Mind" on public television, and will discuss how media and politics are evolving in the digital era and politicians are trying to reach out to Millennial voters. The course will investigate: (1) the Millennial media consumer/voter (2) the space of public (old and new) media, and (3) the character of our political discourse. The course will also focus on the 2016 presidential campaign for lessons in how politics is playing out in journalism and social media today. This course also counts toward Journalism, as it concerns the social construction of the news media. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMC 3380. INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3106): Comparative study of media systems of different countries. The role of the media in the formation of the concept of nationality. Theories of communication development and the debate around the international flow of information. How the media informs us about other countries and how, through the media, we form our conception of the world. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, GLBL, INST, IPE, JOUR, LALS, NMDD.

COMC 4114. SPEAKING FOR CHANGE. (4 Credits)

This advanced public speaking course trains students in a variety of long-form presentation scenarios in an effort to develop sophisticated techniques of storytelling and persuasion in a contemporary communication landscape. The course will emphasize rehearsal and performance techniques, storytelling structures, visual aids, speaking without notes, and exploration of societal issues and values of great personal importance. Students’ practice will culminate in a 20-minute public speaking engagement for the Fordham community. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMC 3114 or COMM 2501.

COMC 4170. DISSENT AND DISINFORMATION. (4 Credits)

An exploration of the moral and ethical conflict between conscience and convention, principle and group loyalty, received wisdom and freshly perceived evidence, from disparate disciplines which converge on the continuity of ancient religious and political dissent with modern forms of dissent and the social control measures they provoke in modern mass-mediated society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: JOUR, SRVL.

COMC 4177. COMMUNICATION FOR SOCIAL CHANGE. (4 Credits)

This course provides students with a disciplined understanding of the communications industry through the exploration of communications techniques being used today to promote social change. The course blends guest lectures from leaders in their field with practical training in proven communications tactics to prepare students for advanced study or careers in communication. By the end of the course students will come to understand that you can "do well while doing good". Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 4211. MEDIA AND MODERNITY. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

COMC 4222. MEDIA AND THE ENVIRONMENT. (4 Credits)

This course looks at the variety of ways in which media depict the natural world through stories, narratives, and images of nature and the environment in both fiction and non-fiction formats, as well as persuasive forms of communication. In assessing how our relationship with nature is mediated through culture and media, we will look at a broad spectrum of genres from films, documentary, TV, magazines, advertising, environmental journalism and conservation campaigns. We will compare such media images and narratives to key environmental texts on major topics in ecology, fining points of convergence and difference and assessing the consequences. We will examine the ways in which popular formulations of the natural world influence public opinion, human behavior and environmental policy. Using case studies we will examine informational, educational, and persuasive campaigns designed around topics such as transportation, chemical production, food and agricultural practices, and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ENST, ICC, JOUR, PJST, ZLB2.

COMC 4241. COMMUNICATION, POPULAR CULTURE, AND PHILOSOPHY. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 4711): This course will draw from the fields of Communication and Philosophy, exploring the ways in which the two disciplines complement and inform one another, each offering a route to a deeper understanding of issues of concern to both fields. Our terrain of inquiry will be contemporary popular culture, in the forms of mass, digital and social media. Calling upon a diverse range of scholarship from both intellectual traditions, we will examine the ways in which popular forms of mediated communication can help to engage a mass audience in timeless philosophical issues, as well as inviting us to ponder newer kinds of philosophical questions, unique to our time. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, URST.

COMC 4248. MULTICULTURALISM. (4 Credits)

African Americans and their Media: Innovators, Agitations, Audiences and Entrepreneurs. This course will examine mass media, outlets owned and targeting African Americans from historic, economic, social and media studies perspectives. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: JOUR, PLUR.

COMC 4267. MEDIA AND SOCIAL AWARENESS. (4 Credits)

This course examines the relationship between media and social awareness and how different media interact with our social awareness. The course explores the ways we receive and evaluate images, narratives, representations of events, and depictions of peoples and groups. Students investigate the production of media representations across a broad spectrum of outlets, formats, genres, and programming in print, broadcast, and new media. The course also focuses on the roles and functions of media in society and culture, as well as the public's need for information and knowledge in a 21st century environment of globalization, convergence, and technological and economic change. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

COMC 4279. MEDIA AND POPULAR CULTURE. (4 Credits)

An exploration of various forms of contemporary popular culture and their meanings in modern life. Theoretical approaches are discussed and various media texts such as film, television, advertising images, popular icons, music and style are analyzed. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, URST.

COMC 4338. AMERICAN POLITICAL COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 4706): This survey course addresses political communications in the American context. Students will examine the activities of key political actors (elected officials, institutions, organizations, public and the media) and will engage with key works in the field to assess how political actors use mediated public practices to bolster narratives, create consensus, and allocate power and resources. Major topics for consideration include: the public sphere and public opinion; propaganda and public relations; presidential rhetoric; electoral politics and campaigning; journalism, the news, political humor, and public life; research on media and new media effects; meditation of identity politics (age, religion, race, gender, and sexual orientation); and political advocacy, civic engagement, and social movements. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

COMC 4339. COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA IN THE AGE OF TRUMP. (4 Credits)

The unconventional events of the 2016 presidential campaign and the unprecedented practices, pronouncements and nascent policies of President Trump are expected to have profound effects on the presidency, political campaigning and news media practice for years to come. This course will examine questions and issues related to the Trump presidency. The course will cover such topics as the President's use of Twitter, his rhetoric, his attacks on the mainstream media, the rise of "fake news," coverage of Trump, and issues related to celebrity.

COMC 4340. FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION. (4 Credits)

The opposing historical trends of authoritarian centralism and libertarian pluralism are traced through a variety of political orders, philosophies, and communication systems. The interplay of technological forms of communication predominant social values is examined and specific cases are subject to evaluative judgments. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, DTEM, ICC, JOUR, NMDD, PJST.

COMC 4348. RELIGION, THEOLOGY, AND NEW MEDIA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 4411): An interdisciplinary capstone course, this course examines the historical and theoretical significance of the intersection between communication, technologies and religious communities. Drawing on the disciplinary methods and assumptions of both communication and media studies and theology, the course will ask students to critically and theoretically explore the significance of religion as a cultural phenomenon as well as to take seriously the theological significance of media practices as articulated by religious subjects. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COMM, DTEM, ICC, JOUR.

COMC 4360. COMMUNICATION ETHICS AND THE PUBLIC SPHERE. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 4004): This course deals with the policy decisions and ethical issues facing society in the telecommunications age. Of special concern are the ethical issues raised by the melding together of heretofore discrete media into vertically integrated, profit oriented, corporations. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, EP4, JOUR, PJST, VAL.

COMC 4370. ETHICAL CONTROVERSIES IN 21ST CENTURY MEDIA. (4 Credits)

Mass media have long played a significant role not only in the ways society informs and communicates with itself, but also in the manner in which it reproduces its social mores and reality. With the rise of digital and social media, these dynamics are both disrupted and deepened, even as they continue to evolve. Students who plan to pursue careers in the media (professional and academic) will be faced with an unusually challenging array of difficult choices that carry with them potent ethical repercussions. This course explores contemporary ethical debates in media on the levels of theory, institutions, audiences and practices. It strives to equip future media professionals with sensitivity to moral values under challenge as well as the necessary skills in critical thinking and decision-making for navigating their roles and responsibilities in relation to these challenges. For all students, the class also hopes to hone ethical insights as media consumers as well as participating citizens in media-saturated societies.

Attributes: EP4, VAL.

COMC 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

Digital Technology and Emerging Media courses

DTEM 1401. INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES AND EMERGING MEDIA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2500): A comprehensive overview of the possibilities of communication in a digital world. Through a series of readings, lectures and assignments, students will study the history and forms of new media, address issues of media control, convergence and convertibility, and begin to explore the cognitive and cultural implications of living in a digital age. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, NMDD.

Prerequisites: COMM 1000 or COMM 1010.

DTEM 1402. DIGITAL CULTURES. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the interplay between digital environments and the culture(s) they both stem from and shape. It will give special attention to the ways digital and networked spaces relate to lived experiences on- and offline, organize social relationships, shape values and norms, engage individuals in participatory modes of cultural production, and impact culture on an individual, group, and trans-national scale. Students will investigate the culture(s) (social norms, language, practices of inclusion and exclusion, etc.) of individual digital platforms and learn about cultural norms that span the digital world more broadly. We will also critically engage with whether and how those qualities might also impact the offline experience of various communities or groups, such as those based on race, gender, class, abilities, or affiliation with various subcultures or values. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.This course also counts as a Cultural Studies course in the Communication and Culture major. Prerequisites: DTEM 1401 OR COMM 2500 .

Attributes: AMST, NMDD.

Prerequisites: COMM 2500 or DTEM 1401.

DTEM 2411. DIGITAL RESEARCH METHODS. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 4710): Digital technologies affect every area of social life, from personal identity, to interaction with others, to broad social and political arenas. Digital technologies have also deeply impacted scholarship and research in the humanities and the social sciences. How can we investigate the impacts of digital technologies accurately? How do academics and industry professionals use social media, “big data,” and the like to answer puzzling questions? This course provides an overview of and hands-on approach to contemporary digital research methods, including ethnography, interviews, focus groups, metrics and analytics, and polling and surveys. Students will become familiar with basic research methods used in both academic and professional contexts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

DTEM 2412. DIGITAL ETHNOGRAPHY. (4 Credits)

Ethnography, or the systematic description of human culture, has expanded beyond its anthropological origins and is widely used by researchers and industry professionals alike to understand online interaction. This class explores how ethnographic methods, such as participatory observation, field notes, and interviews, can be used to examine and analyze popular internet culture, self-expression, relationships, social practices, and emerging technological forms. Students will learn the basics of digital ethnography, and be able to competently leverage cultural analysis to understand digital artifacts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

DTEM 2413. PARTICIPATORY METHODS. (4 Credits)

This course spans both the use of participatory methods to research digital technology, as well as the use of digital technology to facilitate participatory research. Participatory, collaborative, and community-based research models aim to engage traditional research subjects as active participants in the production of knowledge. Drawing from these models, students will critically explore how emerging civic and social media produces knowledge and how to utilize such media for social research. Collaborative workshops and projects are designed to engage students in negotiating the power dynamics of various research relationships. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

DTEM 2414. MEDIA ECOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Analysis of the impact of innovations on communication, culture, and consciousness. As the study of media as environments, media ecology is concerned with the nature and effects of our codes and modes of communication, and the technologies and techniques we employ. Through an understanding of the role that media play in historical patterns of change, we can assess the influence of the contemporary media environment on individuals and society, and better plan and prepare for the future. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COMC.

DTEM 2417. DATA VISUALIZATION. (4 Credits)

Obtaining, interpreting, visualizing and displaying data are essential skills for communication professionals in the 21st Century. This hands-on introductory course in data visualization will help students learn to use data to tell visual stories. Topics discussed will range from where to find data and how to evaluate sources to how to organize data to create visually appealing graphics that tell stories that can be grasped in an instant. Students will critique published visualizations to identify common pitfalls, as they create a data-based story to add to their portfolio. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: JOUR, NMDD.

DTEM 2421. DIGITAL PRODUCTION FOR NEW MEDIA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2523): Analysis and practice of visual design concepts as they apply to a wide range of digital software programs. The course generally covers photo editing, audio editing, video editing, desktop publishing and basic website design. Classes are structured around individual production assignments with a focus on project management, composition and layout. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: JOUR, NMDD, ZLB2.

DTEM 2425. DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION I. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2222) This introductory workshop class will teach the fundamentals of digital video production and cinematic storytelling. Students will learn concepts, techniques, and technologies pertaining to digital video and sound through hands-on production and post-production assignments. We will explore the aesthetics and the communicative potential of the medium through screenings, critiques, and exercises.Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: FITV, JOUR, NMDD.

DTEM 2427. DIGITAL AUDIO PRODUCTION. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2303): A comprehensive introduction to the principles and techniques of audio production. Instructions in the use of portable audio equipment as well as in production and post-production skills. A hands- on approach augmented with readings and listening to audio material. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

DTEM 2431. TOPICS IN DIGITAL PRODUCTION. (4 Credits)

An examination of radio and television from cultural, aesthetic and historical perspectives. Topics covered include the development of broadcast programming, the sources of radio/television forms in other media and the impact of electronic media on the arts today. The course considers how broadcasting has affected contemporary culture and emerged as the most prominent maker of popular images. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

DTEM 2443. FASHION AND DIGITAL MEDIA. (4 Credits)

This course examines what happens when one of the oldest forms of communication, fashion, meets up with the newest, digital media. Digital media has reconfigured the fashion industry: bloggers sit alongside famous magazine editors at Fashion Shows, the retail industry collapses as online shopping takes off, platforms such as Instagram reconfigure social status and power. While digital media creates new jobs, communities, celebrities, status and power in the fashion world, it also maintains and creates new social inequalities. We will examine the relationship between fashion and digital media from three vantage points: globally, locally, and personally. Our global focus considers the ways digital media creates new networks of production/labor/people; the local unit considers new jobs and identities (such as “influencers”) in the fashion industry, with special focus on New York City; and our focus on the personal Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: FASH.

DTEM 2450. COPYRIGHT AND DIGITAL MEDIA. (4 Credits)

This course will provide a general overview of copyright law specific to its impact on media and entertainment institutions, online platforms and distribution channels. The course will examine copyright subject matter, ownership, duration, rights, licensing, infringement and fair uses with a focus, in particular, on issue-identification and other analytical skills for professionals in practice. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: NMDD.

DTEM 2452. VIDEO GAME DESIGN. (4 Credits)

Games are everywhere and over 155 million Americans play them regularly on tabletops and electronic devices across the county. Their prevalence has prompted the medium as a space for expression, art, and meaning-making. Moving beyond the notion of simple entertainment games are creating provocative experiences to promote change or understanding. This course emphasizes exploration and critical thinking as we discover how games are designed to address issues such as social justice, gender representation, behavioral change, and education. Through analyzing game artifacts and engaging in creative exercises, students will be able to think critically about games and how they are designed. Students will apply this literacy into their own game projects. This course is open to anyone who is interested in games and their possibilities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: NMDD.

DTEM 2459. SOCIAL HISTORY OF COMMUNICATION AND TECHNOLOGY. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2010): Explores theoretical and critical perspectives on technology, with special emphasis on the impact of technology on communication, culture and consciousness; the symbolic component of technology; the ecology of media; the process of technological innovation and the diffusion of innovations; the role of media and culture in the creation of a technical society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COMC, SSCI.

DTEM 2471. WRITING FOR ONLINE MEDIA. (4 Credits)

From Web sites to Web logs, wikis to social media, the Internet continues to evolve and offer opportunities for communicators in various fields. Students will create their own blog; learn about cyber-journalism; apply their writing skills toward business, politics, art, or personal expression; and explore how marketing, public relations, Web design, and other factors impact writing style in New Media. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: JOUR, NMDD, ZLB2.

DTEM 3423. PROJECTS IN DIGITAL VIDEO. (4 Credits)

Students will explore the possibilities of digital video and evolve both conceptually and technically through critiques, tutorials, readings, discussion and practice. Students will be challenged to discover and shape concepts of interest, experiment, explore narratives, plan and execute, while developing strategies for effective communication through moving image and sound. Resulting work can be delivered as video for the screen, installation or performance. Students are challenged to find appropriate outlets for their works (such as festival, public space, broadcast, screening, gallery, etc.) This course is at the intermediate level. Students should enter with working knowledge of Final Cut Pro X or another similar video editing software garnered through COMM 2083 Introduction to Journalism with Lab, COMM 2222 Digital Video Production, COMM 2522 Multimedia Production, COMM 2523 Digital Design for New Media, a Visual Arts course in digital video or permission of instructor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2222 or FITV 2621.

DTEM 3425. DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION II. (4 Credits)

Students will devote the semester to developing a narrative or documentary project of their choosing from concept to post-production. This workshop will allow students to evolve technically and conceptually through screenings, critiques, tutorials, readings, and practice. This is an intermediate class, and students must have taken some sort of introductory film/video production class prior to enrolling, and have some basic familiarity with DV cameras and editing software. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: FITV.

Prerequisites: DTEM 2425 or FITV 2425 or FITV 3512 or VART 1265 or VART 3261 or VART 3262 or COMM 3525.

DTEM 3463. CIVIC MEDIA. (4 Credits)

Participating in local life can be difficult. Information is hard to obtain and validate, local meetings are difficult to attend, networks are challenging to build. Increasingly, governments, advocacy groups, community organizers, and individual citizens are looking to digital tools to increase and improve the conditions in which we live and enhance our opportunities to engage. We will look at academic research surrounding citizenship and engagement in a digital era and cover research into many genres of civic media, from citizen journalism to hackathons, tech for development, activist art hacker culture, and games for good. This class will not only explore the various goals campaigns are using digital tools to meet, but will also focus on what type of citizen these tools are enabling and encouraging people to become. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: JOUR, NMDD.

DTEM 3475. DIGITAL MEDIA AND ADVOCACY. (4 Credits)

This course will teach students the history of using digital media for advocacy, its contemporary implications for political participation and social movements. It is grounded in theories of technology for development, social movement theory, and participatory citizenship. It also involves a practical element, and teaches students and puts those to use in practically applied lessons concerning how to use digital media to impact political participation (in terms of protesting, donating, civic engagement, voting, and more. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

DTEM 3476. SOCIAL MEDIA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3307): This class critically examines popular computer-mediated communication technologies such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Students will critically analyze, use, and encountera broad range of social technologies. Students will also learn basic social media skills, “best practices,” and create and propagate content. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, JOUR, NMDD, ZLB2.

Mutually Exclusive: JOUR 3776.

DTEM 4440. PRIVACY AND SURVEILLANCE. (4 Credits)

New technologies, from closed-circuit television cameras to large databases, have shifted the information landscape in ways that call into question cultural assumptions and social norms about sharing, visibility, and the very essence of privacy. Can we have privacy in the digital age? Is mass surveillance justified? Whose interests are being served, and who is at risk? This course is designed to promote student awareness of and sensitivity to the ethics, values, and latest developments in global privacy and surveillance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

DTEM 4442. HACKER CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This course will investigate the histories of hacking, and the practices, values, and politics of hacking over time, and how they impact contemporary life. This will involve the study of its roots in pranksterism, governmentality, activism, and DIY/maker communities, and how these roots impact a variety of contemporary digital spaces. This course will take special consideration of the institutionalized political implications of hacking, including free speech and censorship, privacy and surveillance, intellectual property, net neutrality, as well as the more anarchistic forms of activism such as leaking (embodied by WikiLeaks) and hacktivism (embodied by Anonymous). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

DTEM 4451. THE TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRIES. (4 Credits)

From 2-person startups to multinational corporations, technology companies exert an enormous influence on contemporary society, industry, and politics. This course critically examines various aspects of the technology industries, such as engineering culture, entrepreneurship, the history and culture of Silicon Valley, and the influence of technology companies on policymaking and localism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

DTEM 4477. NETWORKS AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

From social media to WIFI to the global internet, “networks” have emerged as a dominant metaphor for how culture, communication, and technology are organized in the Information Age. This course introduces students to the social and material shifts entailed in the rise of communication networks at local and global scales. Readings and lectures will consider the ways network infrastructures reconfigure contemporary understandings of the self, the public, the economy, and civic engagement. Papers, class discussions, and assigned projects are designed to encourage students to connect their lived experiences with relevant research, theory, and current events. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

DTEM 4480. DIGITAL MEDIA AND PUBLIC RESPONSIBILITY. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 4005): An examination of the choices and responsibilities which shape personal identity and common humanity for those who regularly employ the tools of digital media and computer technology. Regular use of digital media enables individuals to separate from their physical selves and from the community spaces in which they have traditionally lived. This course focuses on the resulting ethical tensions. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, EP4, JOUR, NMDD, VAL.

DTEM 4488. POLITICAL COMMUNICATION IN THE DIGITAL ERA. (4 Credits)

This course will focus upon the construction of campaign communication through the lens of two fundamental messaging phases: (1) the development of campaign messages through initial research, polling and strategy; and (2) the dissemination, circulation, and sometimes adjustments of those messages through use of paid and earned media. In doing so, we will focus on both digital and traditional/mass media channels, and on messaging within a variety of contexts, including crisis communication, going negative, get out the vote (GOTV), and more. In doing so we will seek answers to a variety of questions: What exactly is effective political communication, particularly in the context of campaigns? How do campaigns create messages that not only persuade citizens of a candidate’s worth, but move citizens to vote or not? How do these messages find their way into various channels of communication? How can the use of many disparate channels – of different technologies, tactics and skills – best reflect a coherent campaign strategy? And how do all of these efforts comport with our traditional notions of democracy, and/or point to new ideals? To get at these questions, research concerning the efficacy of messages, the process of their construction, and democratic values implied by their content will be the focus of this course. These empirical measurements of the state of campaign messaging and its theoretical implications will be supplemented by periodic advice from practitioners of political communication about the practical application of such research from professionals in the field. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

DTEM 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

Film and Television courses

FITV 1501. UNDERSTANDING FILM. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2471): Examination of the aesthetics of film, its formal language and structure. Screening and analysis of representative films. Study of film theory and criticism. Strongly recommended as a prerequisite to other film courses. Lab fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, ZLB2.

Prerequisites: COMM 1000 or COMM 1010.

FITV 1601. UNDERSTANDING TELEVISION. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3332): Critical Analysis of television as a storytelling medium. Study of current approaches to television narrative and style. Screenings and discussion of TV series and news programming. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, JOUR.

Prerequisites: COMM 1000 or COMM 1010.

FITV 2425. DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION I. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2222) This introductory workshop class will teach the fundamentals of digital video production and cinematic storytelling. Students will learn concepts, techniques, and technologies pertaining to digital video and sound through hands-on production and post-production assignments. We will explore the aesthetics and the communicative potential of the medium through screenings, critiques, and exercises.Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: DTEM, NMDD.

FITV 2501. HISTORY OF FILM, 1895-1950. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3422): A survey of film history from 1890 to 1950, looking at industrial practices and stylistic developments. The contribution of major national cinemas is also explored. Lab fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction. Pre-req: FITV 1501 or COMM 2471 OR BY PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR.

Prerequisites: FITV 1501 or COMM 2471.

FITV 2511. SCREENWRITING I. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3405): Analyzing and writing screenplays for theatrical motion pictures. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENGL, ZLB2.

FITV 2531. SERIALS, SERIES, AND FRANCHISE FILMS. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FITV 2533. FASHION COSTUMING IN FILM. (4 Credits)

Clothing design and its ancillary functions play a central role in film meaning, audience response, and the economics of film industries. With this primary assertion at its center, the course explores the myriad ways fashion operates in film. Students will engage issues of film aesthetics, marketing, fan culture, and stardom within historical and contemporary contexts. In addition to formal analysis and theorization of films, analytic approaches include how the effects of film are felt in larger patterns of consumer behaviors and how film reinforces the branding of fashion houses, designers, and designs. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: FASH.

FITV 2547. FILM AND GENDER. (4 Credits)

This course explores the interrelated nature of gender and film in aesthetics, production, marketing, and reception. To do so, the course focuses on film theory and criticism about representations of femininity and masculinity, which include attendant issues of sexuality, embodiment, race, class and nationality. This approach will be augmented by considerations of historical and cultural contexts, developments within film industries, key figures in film production, and audiences. Films will include mainstream commercial films and filmmakers as well as feminist, avant-garde, and counter-cinemas. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COLI.

FITV 2601. HISTORY OF TELEVISION. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3320) This course surveys the aesthetic, technological, and industrial developments of American television. Starting with the foundations of television in radio and in the global developments of television technologies, the course moves through the development of the network era up to the transitional stages between network and post-network eras. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction. Prerequisite: COMM 3222 OR FITV 1601 OR BY PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR.

Attribute: AMST.

Prerequisites: FITV 1601 or COMM 3332 or COMM 2330.

FITV 2611. TELEVISION PRODUCTION I. (4 Credits)

Practical studio management and creative employment of technical facilities for videotaping and studio production of a variety television programming formats. Software and hardware are covered. Lab fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ZLB2.

FITV 2612. WRITING PRODUCING WEB SERIES. (4 Credits)

A unique narrative form exploding in popularity, the web series provides young artists a chance to produce their own stories and see their work go viral. In this production workshop class, students will study what goes into creating a successful web series—including techniques for building emotionally engaging stories, three- dimensional characters and a series arc—and then write, shoot, edit and produce the first episode of their own original series. An essential experience for writers, directors, actors or anyone in the creative arts. Prerequisite: FITV 2511 Screenwriting I or DTEM 2425 Digital Video Production. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: FITV 2511 or COMM 3405 or DTEM 2425 or COMM 2222.

FITV 2659. THE BROADCAST INDUSTRY. (4 Credits)

The examination of the American broadcasting industry from a variety of perspectives, such as regulation, advertising, programming, technology, institutional structure and audience research. Lessons from broadcast history are used to shed light on contemporary concerns. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

FITV 2670. TELEVISION AND SOCIAL CHANGE. (4 Credits)

This course explores television's complex relationship to social change. While television's commercialism and focus on entertainment may seem antithetical to activist politics, activists used the medium to gain visibility for their causes, demand equitable representation and employment practices, and create programming that spoke back to mainstream TV's reductive and controlling representations. The course engages with scholarly and activist literature on theories of television, representation, and social change as well as case studies of public and commercial television in various national and historical contexts. It also considers the possibilities and limitations for activism via television brought about by transformations in media technology and culture, particularly those related to online distribution, digital media, and globalization. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FITV 2674. TEEN TELEVISION. (4 Credits)

In this course, we consider global television that represents teens and programs that hailed teen audiences. The concept of the teenager is a relatively recent development in U.S. culture, emerging in the 1920s. From that moment, media has played an important role in the creation, maintenance, and revision of discourses of the teenager. Thus, one goal will be to assess the ways that teenagers have been represented and targeted at different points in time and in different genres of television. Secondly, we will consider whether teen television has developed as its own genre in the last 30 years and how that corresponds to theories about global youth cultures and media. Lastly, we will discuss the ways in which these television representations correspond to teens’ lived experiences and become the vessel for adults’ hopes, anxieties, and nostalgia. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FITV 3425. DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION II. (4 Credits)

Students will devote the semester to developing a narrative or documentary project of their choosing from concept to post-production. This workshop will allow students to evolve technically and conceptually through screenings, critiques, tutorials, readings, and practice. This is an intermediate class, and students must have taken some sort of introductory film/video production class prior to enrolling, and have some basic familiarity with DV cameras and editing software. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: DTEM, JOUR.

Prerequisites: DTEM 2425 or FITV 2425 or FITV 3512 or VART 1265 or VART 3261 or VART 3262 or COMM 3525.

FITV 3501. FILM THEORY AND CRITICISM. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3470) This course is a survey of classical and contemporary film theory. Readings focus on psychological, semiotic, psychoanalytic, feminist, post-colonial and transmedia approaches to the study of film. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction. Pre-req: FITV 1501 or COMM 2471 OR BY PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR.

Attribute: COLI.

Prerequisites: FITV 1501 or COMM 2471.

FITV 3505. TOPICS IN FILM STUDIES. (4 Credits)

Students will learn about dramatic structure, scene construction, characterization, dialogue, and cinematic storytelling techniques through the analysis of classic and contemporary feature-film screenplays. The focus will be on traditional dramatic narrative, but alternative approaches will also be considered. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COLI.

FITV 3511. SCREENWRITING II. (4 Credits)

Analyzing feature screenplays and working towards production of a feature length screenplay. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: FITV 2511 or COMM 3405.

FITV 3512. FILM/TELEVISION: NARRATIVE BASICS. (4 Credits)

This class will focus on teaching students the basics of cinematic storytelling: how to conceptualize, direct, shoot and edit a dramatic narrative. Students will receive training on camera and sound equipment and editing software, and will then direct a series of exercises, scenes, and short narratives, while also crewing on their classmates' projects. Student work will be critiqued in group sessions as well as one-on-one meetings with the professor. In addition, scenes from classic and contemporary film will be analyzed and discussed in class. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FITV 3532. LANDMARKS, LOCATIONS, AND ADAPTION. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FITV 3534. FASHION IN BRITISH FILM AND TELEVISION. (4 Credits)

This course considers the historical and contemporary co-constitution of British fashion, cinema, and television. As a city that generates and is defined by formative industries, cultural institutions, and socio-political movements associated with fashion and media, London plays a crucial role in our explorations. We will analyze historically specific and culturally significant moments when fashion coincided with television and/or film to express the anxieties, pleasures, and investments of British culture(s) on a regional, national, and international scale. To do this, we will study film and television texts that utilize fashion; consider issues of identity politics that include class, sexuality, race, and gender; and explore the industrial and cultural contexts that gave rise to fashion-driven films and television programs. Significant course themes include: war, the monarchy, countercultural movements, empire and imperialism, and the city. Film and television texts are both historical and contemporary and include a wide range of genres and styles. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FITV 3535. FILM ADAPTATION. (4 Credits)

This course seeks to examine the complex relationship between a cinematic adaptation and the source material from which it is derived. Select essays, novels, plays, comic books and short stories will be studied with regard to the works they inspire, and how narrative changes when works are presented in a new medium. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COMM, ZLB2.

FITV 3537. PLAYS AND SCREENPLAYS. (4 Credits)

The purpose of the five week project is to write a one-act play and a short screen play, and to explore the relation between the two forms. Elements of craft will be introduced to provide a vocabulary and a scaffolding. Contemporary plays and screenplays will be used as models. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FITV 3543. FICTION INTO FILM. (4 Credits)

Cinematic adaptation of novels and short stories. Problems of narrative, genre, film language, imitation, etc., will be studied in the works of Film makers such as Bresson, Renoir, Lean, Bunuel, Antonioni, Merchant/Ivory, Wyler, etc. Lab fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FITV 3544. THE FILM DIRECTOR. (4 Credits)

An examination of the tools and techniques of film directing. How do the great directors make full use of the medium’s creative potential? How are stories told and meaning communicated to viewers? What does it mean when we speak of a director’s style or voice? This course will combine close study of classic and contemporary films, lectures and discussions, in-class demonstrations, and individual and group research projects. Topics covered will include the transition from script to screen, camerawork (framing, blocking, movement), lighting, working with actors, editing, sound and music, and more. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ZLB2.

Prerequisites: COMM 2471 or FITV 1501.

FITV 3545. FILM AND TELEVISION OF HITCHCOCK. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3451): A critical examination of Hitchcock's cinema. Students explore Hitchcock's major films, including Rear Window, Vertigo and Psycho from a variety of perspectives, including psychoanalytic, narrative and feminist theory. Emphasis on Hitchcock's role in the British and American studio systeand his mastery of cinematic technique and language. Lab fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, COLI, ZLB2.

FITV 3551. FILM HISTORY 1950-PRESENT. (4 Credits)

A survey of film history from 1950 to the present, looking at industrial practices, stylistic developments and the impact of new technologies of the film image. The contribution of the major national cinemas will also be explored. Lab fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, INST.

FITV 3553. HOLLYWOOD GENRES. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3401): Cultural, psychological, socioeconomic analyses of theme, plot, characterization, and iconography of popular formula films. Lab fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, ZLB3.

FITV 3555. THE CITY IN FILM AND TELEVISION. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3438): In what way is the "mythical city" of the movies a reflection of the real city in which we live? Indeed, how are issues such as ethnicity and class depicted throughout the mass media? The course will offer an investigation of key films from various genres and eras, including silent films, science fiction films, musicals and documentaries, in order to investigate how environment shapes character in a narrative film. Course offering for Communication & Media Studies, History and American Civilization students Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ZLB2.

FITV 3558. ITALIAN FILM. (4 Credits)

This course traces the development of Italian film from the silent era through the telefono bianco (white telephone) films of the Mussolini era and the post-World War II Neo-realist films of Rossellini, De Sica and Fellini. It also examines the films of Antonioni, Olmi, Pasolini, Wertmuller and the Taviani brothers. Lab fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: INST.

FITV 3565. THE DOCUMENTARY IDEA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3408): The history of documentary and the analysis of contemporary works. An examination of the variety of documentary language formats and visual styles and their meaning and impact. Lab fee. Credit will not be given for both this course and FITV 3566. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP3, JOUR, ZLB2.

Mutually Exclusive: FITV 3566.

FITV 3566. DOCUMENTARY FILM. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the art of documentary film with a focus on the genre by such important figures as Flaherty, Vertov, Grierson, Lorentz, Leacock and Wiseman. The impact of technology, cultural and social forces, and the vision of individual Film makers in shaping the documentary form. Lectures by guest Film makers. Lab fee. Note: Credit will not be given for both this course and FITV 3565. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: JOUR, ZLB2.

Mutually Exclusive: FITV 3565.

FITV 3571. SCIENCE FICTION IN FILM AND TELEVISION. (4 Credits)

Sociological, cultural, and psychoanalytic analysis and criticism of the science fiction genre in cinema, television, radio, print and other media. Lab fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, DTEM, ZLB2.

FITV 3578. AMERICAN FILM COMEDY. (4 Credits)

The course takes both a theoretical and historical approach to Hollywood film comedy from the silent classics of Sennett, Chaplin, and Keaton to the best of contemporary work in the genre. Lab Fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, ZLB2.

FITV 3579. MOVIES AND AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3108): A study of the American character as portrayed in American feature films from the early 20th century to the present. Lab fee Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, PLUR, ZLB2.

FITV 3585. TRANSNATIONAL ASIAN CINEMA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3414): This course explores classic and contemporary films from a variety of Asian countries. We will survey a broad range of directors, styles, and genres, considering films as individual works of art but also examining them within their historical, national, and cultural contexts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, INST.

FITV 3587. UNITED KINGDOM AND IRISH FILM. (4 Credits)

This course examines classic English film from the early Hitchcock period through the post-war literary adaptations of David Lean and Laurence Olivier, the Ealing comedies and the social realist films of Tony Richardson and Jack Clayton. Contemporary British film is represented in the work of Mike Leigh and Terrence Davies. Irish film is explored through the work of directors such as Neil Jordan, Jim Sheridan, Pat O'Connor, and others. Lab fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: INST.

FITV 3588. GLOBAL CINEMA. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3410): A comparative study of films produced by various nationalities and cultures. Analysis of differing cultural, political and economic factors affecting filmmakers as they deal with basic human concerns such as individual self worth, relationships, freedom and conformity and values and moral choice. Lab fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COMC, GLBL, INST, ZLB2.

FITV 3601. TELEVISION THEORY AND CRITICISM. (4 Credits)

This course is a survey of classical and contemporary television theory. It explores multiple theories of television production, consumption, and exhibition as well as the development of television studies as a field. The course considers television as a historical technology situated in social and economic structures and as a multiplicity of technologies in an age of media convergence. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction. Prerequisite: COMM 3222 OR FITV 1601 OR BY PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR.

Prerequisites: FITV 1601 or COMM 3332.

FITV 3605. TOPICS IN TELEVISION AND RADIO. (4 Credits)

This course takes advantage of the presence in New York of visiting scholars and practitioners. Courses may have a television or radio combined emphasis, with production and/or academic focus, and each will concentrate on a particular field that is under-represented in regular course offerings. (Course may be repeated.) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

FITV 3624. WRITING TELEVISION DRAMAS. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3305): This course applies traditional principles of dramatic writing to the television genre, including soap operas, pilots, mini-series and docudramas. Students will analyze outstanding examples of the genre and are required to produce professional-level scripts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FITV 3626. WRITING THE ORIGINAL TELEVISION PILOT. (4 Credits)

An immersive writing workshop that covers core concepts on the craft and business of writing for television. Students will create their own original TV series (half-hour comedy or one-hour drama) and write both a complete pilot script and a show bible. This course is a good follow-up or prelude to FITV 3624 Writing the TV Drama, in which students write a spec episode of an existing series. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FITV 3629. AMERICAN TELEVISION HISTORY: FIRST 60 YEARS. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the history of American television, from its early experimental years until the current era. Topics will include the “Golden Age of Television”, the rise of TV broadcast journalism, the influence of television on American politics, the development of the socially conscious sitcom such as the comedies of Norman Lear, Mary Tyler Moore and M*A*S*H. The beginnings and current state of PBS (with emphasis on its children’s programming and quality dramas) and the current fragmentation of the audience as a result of the growth of cable television and how the new technologies such as streaming and DVRs have influenced programming, the audience and advertising. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JOUR.

FITV 3637. QUEER STUDIES IN FILM AND TELEVISION. (4 Credits)

This course examines “queer” independent and mainstream film and television. We will delve into classic Hollywood cinema, “New Queer Cinema,” European cinema, global and “transnational” cinema, as well as U.S. and Canadian TV series. We will apply queer, feminist, film, and television theories to the media in order to more profoundly understand our objects of study—the films and TV series themselves—while simultaneously using our objects to better understand the theories and histories. As we unpack assumptions about sexed bodies, sexual desires, gender identities, and sexual identities, we will examine the ways in which films and TV series uphold and subvert the status quo in regards to gender and sexual norms. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: JOUR, WGSS.

FITV 3638. BRITISH CINEMA AND TELEVISION. (4 Credits)

British Heritage Cinema, arguably the most identifiable and lucrative form of British national cinema, emerged in the 1980s and continues to define “Britishness” through its nostalgic and individualized view of the past. In looking at costume dramas, literary adaptations, and biographical films, this course explores Heritage Cinema through its key themes and aesthetics, the cultural context in which it gained and retains popularity, and its material and ideological consequences. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FITV 3639. QUALITY TELEVISION/CULT TV. (4 Credits)

This class examines two key categories for grouping television shows—“quality television” and “cult TV”—and considers the history behind these terms, the technological changes in the industry that brought them about, and the ways in which the two terms have increasingly intersected. These two approaches to TV shows also map out an industrybased approach (the long-standing marketing strategy of “quality television”) and an audience-based approach (the intense fandom that generates a cult TV show), allowing the class to study texts by considering and combining both industrial histories of television and reception theories of television. Bringing the material into the present day, the class also ultimately brings the two terms together, “quality” and “cult,” as new technologies and their attendant media strategies and audience practices have increasingly blurred their distinction—and cult audiences become the arbiters, and marketers, of quality TV. FITV 1601 Understanding Television is recommended as a pre-req Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

FITV 3647. GENDER, RACE, CLASS, AND TELEVISION. (4 Credits)

This course explores gender, race, and class as intersectional identities that inform and are informed by the aesthetics, production, marketing, and reception of television. To do so, the course focuses on theory and criticism about representations of femininity and masculinity, race and ethnicity, and economics and involves attendant issues of sexuality, embodiment, desire, and identification. This approach will be augmented by considerations of historical and cultural contexts for television texts, developments within television industries, key figures in television production, and audiences. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, COMC, JOUR, LALS, PJST.

FITV 3648. TELEVISION, RACE, AND CIVIL RIGHTS. (4 Credits)

“The Revolution Will Not Be Televised.” This was the rallying cry of Black radicals during times of national unrest, especially associated with the Black Power Movement. This course introduces students to the intersection of television, race, and civil rights broadly. How does U.S. TV engage with racial injustice and the fight for civil rights? How does the mass medium articulate pressing issues concerning the historical struggle for equality for African Americans? Students will engage with concepts in television studies as they connect to representations of racial Blackness on the small screen, paying special attention to TV texts, audiences, and industries. Topics discussed include mediations of protest, violence, and criminality in news media as well as social and political commentary in fictional programming. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AFAM, AMST.

Prerequisites: COMM 1000 or COMM 1010.

FITV 3658. ITALIAN AMERICANS ON SCREEN. (4 Credits)

What can explain the shocking popularity of Jersey Shore? Where did the controversial images of Italian Americans that the show displays originate? This course proposes an examination of Italian Americans as represented in mainstream and independent American cinema (and later television) from the silent era to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the traditional stereotypes associated with these representations (how they arose and why they continue to exist), two specific genres--the gangster film and the boxing film--and how Italian-American filmmakers respond to and re-vision them. The class will also include field trips to Arthur Avenue and Little Italy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: PLUR.

FITV 3672. RADIO NEWS TECHNIQUES. (4 Credits)

This course deals with the fundamentals of radio news reporting. Emphasis is placed on sound gathering, writing and interview techniques. The course will cover spot news reporting, but will also give close attention to NPR style stories; longer form narrative, in-depth audio-rich stories. Emphasis will also be placed on journalism ethics. Students will get practical experience through in-class exercises and field assignments. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2083 or JOUR 1702 or COMM 3010 or JOUR 3715.

FITV 3678. TELEVISION COMEDY AND AMERICAN VALUES. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3310): An examination of the major genres of American television comedy and their relationship to American culture. The influence of social, artistic and commercial factors on comic patterns and techniques are considered. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, COMC.

FITV 3688. GLOBAL TELEVISION. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to theories of global television studies, including the reception of US TV abroad as well as the circulation of television in a post-network and multi-platform global context. Do you watch Korean TV on Drama Fever? Have you ever wondered what it would be like to watch The Fresh Prince of Bel Air in South Africa? Or are you also enchanted by The Great British Bake Off on PBS? We will explore questions and case studies like these in detail to consider how they impact our understanding of the television industry across cultures and language as well as television’s potential to unite and/or divide communities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FITV 4570. FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 4001): The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. Lab fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, COLI, EP4, PJST, REST, VAL.

FITV 4625. WRITING TELEVISION SITCOMS. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 4708): Sitcoms are shot by multiple cameras which limit the action to one or two sets. This practically eliminates all action lines in a sitcom screenplay, leaving behind mostly dialogue. This class teaches that behind that wall of sitcom dialogue , sophisticated writers have meticulously developed an invisible scaffolding of comedic tension which requires as much or even more effort than coming up with clever one-liners. This course teaches students to integrate “comedic tension” into all levels of work- from episode premise, to sequence, to scene. TV sitcom writing is performed in teams. Therefore students will write episodes together, and learn skills required to be a comedy staff writer- including originality, creativity, humor and supporting classmates with their scripts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FITV 4676. TELEVISION AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

A problem-based and issue-oriented analysis of the medium as it affects basic social institutions and values. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: PJST, SOCI.

FITV 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

Journalism courses

JOUR 1701. INTRODUCTION TO MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISM WITH LAB. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2083): A course designed to introduce the student to various fundamentals of journalism today, including writing leads; finding and interviewing sources; document, database and digital research; and story development and packaging. The course also discusses the intersection of journalism with broader social contexts and questions, exploring the changing nature of news, the shifting social role of the press and the evolving ethical and legal issues affecting the field. The course requires a once weekly tools lab, which introduces essential photo, audio, and video editing software for digital and multimedia work. Note: Credit will not be given for both this course and COMM 2082/JOUR 1702. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: EP1.

JOUR 1702. INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

A course designed to introduce the student to various elements of reporting- including writing leads and articles and finding and interviewing sources- as well as the nature of news, the social role of the press, and the ethical and legal issues that face it. Students are encouraged to submit work to the college newspaper for possible publication. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 1761. THE POWER OF NEWS. (3 Credits)

This course studies the interaction between the American mass media, politics and public policymaking. We will examine some of the most important interactions between the press and politicians to answer questions about the role of media in American society. The point of the course is to demonstrate the power of news by examining in depth some of the most important interactions of media and American government. After all, the media is no longer just an institution that covers the news- the media now actually help shape the political process as an important political institution in their own right.

Attributes: EP1, FRSS, MANR, SSCI.

JOUR 2711. INTERMEDIATE MULTIMEDIA REPORTING. (4 Credits)

This course further develops the skills learned in Introduction to Journalism focusing on how to utilize medium effectively across platforms. Students will gain hands-on experience in multimedia reporting, taking into account the unique strengths of each medium. Students will focus on narrative technique and reporting while learning the technical skills required of each platform. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702 or COMM 2082 or COMM 2083.

JOUR 2712. INTERMEDIATE PRINT REPORTING. (4 Credits)

This is an intermediate reporting course which focuses on developing investigative skills through the use of human sources and computer-assisted reporting. Students will develop beat reporting skills, source-building and journalism ethics. Students will gather and report on actual news events in New York City. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 2714. RADIO AND AUDIO REPORTING. (4 Credits)

A survey of the historical styles, formats and genres that have been used for radio, comparing these to contemporary formats used for commercial and noncommercial stations, analyzing the effects that technological, social and regulatory changes have had on the medium. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 2722. INTERMEDIATE FEATURE WRITING. (4 Credits)

Developing necessary skills for writing soft news and human-interest feature stories for various news media. Creation of strong ideas, leads, narratives, quotations and interviews, as well as the blending of interesting material and personal writing style, are emphasized. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 2725. WRITING WORKSHOP. (4 Credits)

The writing workshop is about writing in all of its forms- press releases, op-eds, movie reviews, short stories, more. There is one writing assignment per week. The emphasis is on writing professionally, for either online or print publications. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 2735. VIDEO JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

Today, Video Journalists are offered a vast array of outlets and possibilities. From “basic” broadcast, to thousands of cable channels, satellite TV, and the internet. From transmedia to social media, twitters and texts, iThis and iThat, all the way to IMAX! What use3d to be called “simply” Television News, today covers a media cornucopia.From the most mundane, to extraordinary facts, fictions, ideas, sounds, pictures, and effects, the sky seems to be the limit. This class will help students bring that down to earth, to give birth to their ideas and imaginations, desires and dreams, in very concrete form. Together, we will explore the vision, the art, and the craft of Video Journalism, and create pieces that will (hopefully!) make people sit up, watch, and listen. Stories that will challenge them, make them think, and ideally inspire them to make their lives and the world a better place. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 2786. SPORTS WRITING AND REPORTING. (4 Credits)

In this course, students will read from the canon of great sportswriting, from print to broadcast to digital. To gain practice in this craft, students will also complete original reporting assignments in a range of forms, such as game story, column, feature profile, broadcast script, and live tweeting. The evolution of the sports genre will also be connected to essential social movements, such as civil rights, women’s liberation, and the consequence of big money following the birth of TV. For perspective, specific attention will be paid to the treatment of iconic modern American sports figures, including such seminal athletes as Babe Ruth, Muhammad Ali, Lance Armstrong and Serena Williams. Pre-Req: Introduction to Journalism (Jour 1701 or COMM 2082 or COMM 2083) or permission of instructor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: JOUR 1701 or COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 2787. FASHION JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

Fashion Journalism combines beat reporting with an emphasis on the cultural, artistic, social, historical and business aspects of fashion. An in-depth review of the history of fashion journalism sets the stage for students to learn and understand the digital revolution in fashion journalism and marketing​, ​ including ​social media, blogs and ​websites. Topics to be covered include: Catwalk and trend reporting, ​f​ashion criticism, feature and fashion writing. Course will enable students combine the love of writing with the interest in fashion and acquire the skills to become a fashion journalist using different media formats. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701.

JOUR 2789. SPORTS BROADCASTING. (4 Credits)

This class will provide a detailed study in all aspects of the sports broadcasting industry. Students will be introduced to a wide array of techniques and philosophies for sports broadcasting, from fundamentals and essentials to advanced learning methods. The course will consist of discussions, critiques, learning exercises, take home assignments and hands-on practice and participation. The course assumes no prior experience in sports broadcasting.

JOUR 3711. ADVANCED MULTIMEDIA REPORTING. (4 Credits)

Advanced Internet Reporting picks up where Introduction to Journalism leaves off, offering students a way to continue their study of multimedia journalism in a converged setting. The class will be project-based, with students completing both breaking news and features assignments. Each story for the course will need to be done in both print and video form. Students will also have the option of producing audio or photo slideshow versions of their reports. Completed projects, with the student’s permission, will be posted on Fordham news sites like that of The Ram and WFUV News. This course differs from COMM 3083, Advanced Television Production (Bronxnet) in that it will also cover print, audio and photo. It differs from JOUR 3717/COMM 3978, Online Journalism, in that it will not focus on blogging or social media. PREREQUISITE: Intro to Journalism with Lab (JOUR1701/COMM 2083), Advanced Television Reporting (BronxNet) (COMM 3083), Intermediate Television Production (JOUR 3716), or permission of instructor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: DTEM.

Prerequisites: COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701 or COMM 3083 or JOUR 3716.

JOUR 3715. WRITING FOR BROADCAST NEWS. (4 Credits)

An overview of the skills required for the writing of news stories for radio and television including hard news and features. This course is designed to strengthen the student’s ability to write clearly, concisely and accurately for broadcast emphasizing critical thinking skills. Storytelling techniques are explored, as well as writing to film/videotape. Students will eventually write to deadline under simulated newsroom conditions. Four credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction. Outside of class, students will be required to screen specific news programming and submit critical essays evaluating content. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.Pre-Req: COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701 or Instructor permission.

Prerequisites: COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 3716. INTERMEDIATE TELEVISION PRODUCTION. (4 Credits)

A practical, intensive course in all aspects of television news production. Early in the semester, the course will focus on teaching students the basic skills needed to create high-quality television news, including how to write for broadcast, shoot video, edit video digitally, and create taped pieces for air. The course will also cover on-camera skills. Later in the semester, students will put their television skills into action by producing entire newscasts, where they will anchor, direct, and produce all the content. In addition, the course will also cover key journalism concepts including interviewing, story research and using online media resources. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.on.

Attribute: ZLB4.

JOUR 3717. ONLINE JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3978): Recent shifts in media technologies, corporate structure, and the organization of public life have combined to change the role and the practice of journalism. Exploring these changes as a context, this course will introduce conceptual and practical techniques of reporting, writing, and packaging news for the on-line environment today. Students will learn about and actively participate in doing journalism on-line. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: DTEM, NMDD, ZLB2.

Prerequisites: COMM 2083 or COMM 2082 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 3718. ON-AIR REPORTING. (4 Credits)

In this class, students will learn how to craft and present stories for air. The course will include lessons on how to build a news package, how to present for broadcast (both on television and for podcasts), and will include assignments with in-class deadlines. Class will feature visits from working journalists/news personalities in New York City. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3719. DATA JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

Obtaining, interpreting, visualizing, and displaying data are essential skills for journalists in the 21st century. This hands-on introductory course in data visualization will help students learn to use data to tell visual stories. Topics discussed will range from where to find data and how to evaluate sources to how to organize data to create visually appealing graphics that tell stories that can be grasped in an instant. Students will critique published visualizations to identify common pitfalls, as they create a data-based story to add to their portfolio. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: NMDD.

JOUR 3723. INTERVIEWS AND PROFILES. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3081): This course includes intensive work in developing and writing profiles accompanied by readings from Boswell to Mailer. This course will help students develop a personal interview style which complements their individual strengths. Students will examine various interview strategies and learn how to compile their notes into a cohesive and compelling narrative. In-depth critiques of profiles will be provided. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ENGL.

Prerequisites: COMM 2083 or COMM 2082 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 3724. FIRST PERSON JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

First person journalism is nothing new. As part of the New Journalism movement, reporters like Tom Wolfe and Joan Didion have been infusing their storytelling with subjectivity for decades. Still, the digital shift in journalism and explosion of social media has brought a new wave of first person journalism to the web. This course will explore the history of first person journalism and help students use first person perspective to bring reported pieces to life. Students will look critically at the form to consider the limitations of personal narrative in journalism. On that note, this course will not be limited to personal narratives. Students will also work on reported stories in which their experiences as journalists and citizens impacts their storytelling structure. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: LALS.

JOUR 3725. PROFILE AND BIOGRAPHY. (4 Credits)

Analysis and practice in applying the principles of biographical writing with the emphasis on contemporary forms in books and magazines. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3727. WRITING FOR MAGAZINES. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3084): Intensive practice in developing ideas into non-fiction pieces intended for general interest or specialized publications. Inquiries, field and library research, interviews, presentation of technical subjects to non-specialists. Students may wish to concentrate on areas in which they have particular interest or expertise. Note: Credit will not be given for both this course and COMM 4201/ JOUR 4727. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENGL, EP3.

Prerequisites: COMM 2083 or COMM 2082 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 3728. SPECIAL REPORTING: IN-DEPTH REPORTING. (4 Credits)

An in-depth reporting class focused on the production of a newspaper Special Report on a given topic each year. The class will use a team-based approach to develop a multi-element story package, in print format from conceptualization, through research, reporting, writing, editing, production and publication. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3729. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING. (4 Credits)

All great reporting is investigative reporting. There is some truth to that claim. But investigative journalism is not about breaking news, or what happened yesterday. It's an explanation of the complex machineries of big systems: policies, business, foreign policy, economics. It involved systematic, in-depth and original reporting, and it takes weeks, months, sometimes years, using multiple media tools: interviews, documents, data. It shows people how power works, and, at its best, it breaks through layers of deception and obfuscation. This is a hands-on course that will require students to study and analyze investigative journalism, major cases and techniques, and undertake investigative projects requiring on the ground reporting and writing. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: JOUR 1701.

JOUR 3741. JOURNALISM WORKSHOP: REPORTING. (2 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2211): A practical workshop course in writing news, features, commentary, reviews, and sports articles, or doing graphics, photography, multimedia and layout. The Rose Hill section is centered on giving students opportunities to write for The Ram, but students can also use the course to improve work being done for the paper, the Fordham Undergraduate Research Journal, Flash, Mode, and other student media at Rose Hill. Students not currently working for student media are also welcome in the Rose Hill section, where they will be taught basics of journalism and given the opportunity to publish articles in The Ram. At Lincoln Center there are four separate sections of the course. Each section has its own focus but all are related to involvement with THE OBSERVER. The sections are: Journalism Workshop/reporting, Journalism Workshop/photography, Journalism Workshop/layout and Journalism Workshop/multimedia.

Attributes: ENGL, NMDD.

JOUR 3742. JOURNALISM WORKSHOP: FNN. (2 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2212): A practical workshop for students working on Fordham Nightly News. The instructor will help students improve all aspects of broadcast journalism, including scriptwriting, shooting, editing and anchoring. All students in this course must volunteer to work on Fordham Nightly News, and will be producing the day's show as part of the workshop. NOTE: This is a 2-point class. Students who want a full 4-points of Journalism Workshop to equal a full course toward the major in Communication and Media Studies should also sign up for COMM 2211 concurrently, which focuses on basic journalism reporting skills and print writing. Journalism Workshop will NOT be offered at Rose Hill after Spring 2016.

JOUR 3743. JOURNALISM WORKSHOP: MULTIMEDIA. (2 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2213): A practical workshop course in writing news, feature, commentary or sports articles, or doing graphics and layout for The Observer. Students will work as writers or on the layout staff.

JOUR 3744. JOURNALISM WORKSHOP: PHOTOGRAPHY. (2 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 2214): A practical course in public media journalism held at WFUV-FM. WFUV is a National Public Radio affiliate station based in Keating Hall on the Rose Hill campus. This workshop covers everything from broadcast writing and interviewing techniques to field reporting and journalism ethics and standards. Students will also spend time behind the microphone learning how to deliver news copy in a clear, conversational manner. The professor, George Bodarky, has extensive experience in commercial and public radio journalism, and has won multiple awards for his work. George is president of Public Radio News Directors Inc. and past president of the New York State Associated Press Board of Directors.

JOUR 3760. THE JOURNALIST AND THE LAW. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 3205): An investigation of the legal concerns of the working journalist: prior restraint, shield law, libel, invasion of privacy, the Freedom of Information Act. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

Prerequisites: COMM 1000 or COMM 1010.

JOUR 3763. THE MURROW YEARS: 1938-65. (4 Credits)

This course traces the career and contributions to broadcast journalism of Edward R. Murrow, one of America's foremost reporters, from his remarkable accounts of London under German bombing attacks to his documentary work on the "See It Now" and "CBS Reports" series. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3764. TELEVISION NEWS AND TODAY’S WORLD. (4 Credits)

This course examines and analyzes the approaches of the three commercial networks and the Public Broadcasting Service to the major news stories of the day. Each class screens one of the network's evening news broadcasts and assesses its content, comparing story selection and presentation with the day's newspaper coverage. Emphasis is placed on students' comprehension of the week's salient news developments. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COMC.

JOUR 3765. TELEVISION NEWS. (4 Credits)

An examination of the growth and impact of television journalism. Technological and historical changes, techniques and influences of television news. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3769. HISTORY OF TELEVISION AND RADIO NEWS. (4 Credits)

Traces the history of electronic journalism, from its infancy in the 1930's to the present day; emphasis on the work of the most prominent broadcast journalists of these decades. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3772. NEWSMAKING. (4 Credits)

A critical study of news gathering and dissemination processes in the contemporary world with emphasis on their cultural, political, and economic effects in modern society. Factors that determine the worthiness of current events and journalistic interpretations reaching national audiences are considered. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3776. SOCIAL MEDIA FOR JOURNALISTS. (4 Credits)

This is a research and practice-based course on social media, aimed at journalists who will need to understand and use social media. Students will research historical and contemporary innovation relating to social media, and will then develop strategies for creating impact throughout the course of the semester with their own journalistic projects using social media. Readings, discussions, project critiques, and hands-on work will all be used methodologically to allow students to delve into the possibilities of social media. Students will come to understand the power and limitations of social media as both a reporting tools and a tool to aid in the marketing of powerful journalism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Mutually Exclusive: DTEM 3476.

JOUR 3781. ARTS AND CULTURE REPORTING. (4 Credits)

In this course, students will have the opportunity to apply their journalistic skills to the area of art and cultural reporting and criticism, including popular culture (television, movies, pop music, books, etc.) and the fine arts (theater, classical music, dance, and the visual arts, etc.). They will develop an ability to identify, describe, and evaluate for readers/viewers the full range of our culture’s creative output, including live shows and events. This includes recognizing the importance of the historical, social, and political context of what they are reporting on and reviewing. As budding arts and culture journalists, students will learn how to balance being both a reporter and cultural critic, and develop a strong, reliable voice. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3782. SCIENCE JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

At a time when science and technology permeate debates on everything from climate change to stem cell research, to nuclear power to genetically modified foods many Americans lack sufficient understanding of these basic science and health concepts. This course will explore fundamentals in science and medicine reporting emphasizing the essential research and story development skills needed bring complex medical, science and health issues to the general public. It will explore the scientific process, how to evaluate scientific and health information, ethical controversies, and what makes science and medical news. Students will learn how to break, report, translate, and illuminate scientific information, forging journalism that helps build scientific literacy equal to contemporary challenges. (Prerequisite- COMM 2082 or instructor's permission) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2082 (may be taken concurrently) or JOUR 1702 (may be taken concurrently).

JOUR 3783. THEATER JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

JOUR 3785. WRITING FOR THE MEDIA. (4 Credits)

Analysis and practice of writing for a variety of print, broadcast, and online media. Exploring different media contexts such as news, entertainment, public relations, and advertising, the approach in this course assumes that media writers tell stories, that they write for multiple formats, and that they engage in ethical activities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 3788. INTERNATIONAL REPORTING. (4 Credits)

For decades an aura has surrounded international correspondents, the corps of reporters who cover foreign governments, war fronts and conflict zones to bring the news out of some of the world’s most dangerous, complex and influential places. They risk lives and freedom in the struggle to dig out the truth behind government propaganda and military secrecy, whether in battlefields or presidential palaces or besieged regions. This course will define and explore the underpinnings of international reporting and its evolution from the mid-20th century to the digital age. Students will study and practice reporting, writing and video skills. We will examine the importance of understanding foreign cultures, histories and languages, discuss the work and lives of major foreign correspondents, and examine where the art of foreign correspondence stands today. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: JOUR 1701.

JOUR 4713. AUDIO REPORTING AND PODCASTING. (4 Credits)

This class will teach students how to create professional level audio reports and podcasts. Students will learn the major theories and practices of audio journalism. They will also develop practical skills on how to choose stories for audio journalism, write for broadcast, gather and use sound, interview for audio, edit audio journalism, and promote their work. Students will work on both short- and long-form projects. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 4727. ADVANCED MAGAZINE ARTICLE WRITING. (4 Credits)

Planning, researching, and writing magazine articles. Emphasis is placed on preparing manuscripts of professional caliber. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 4733. PHOTOJOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

American photojournalism emerged in the late 1920s and has an increasing role to play in bith news and feature reporting in today’s digital world. As online journalism and its audiences take shape, visual storytelling is finding new modes and roles. This course will introduce students to the contemporary practices and production of photojournalism. It will be conducted in a manner similar to the real working world of professional journalism while also touching on the aesthetic, technical, cultural, and historical forces that have shaped its evolution into the present day. Students will be responsible for taking pictures with their own cameras and producing their own digital images, photo slideshows and visual reporting. While the emphasis of the course will be on picture taking and visual storytelling, students will also learn how to edit their own photographs and hot to prepare selected images in Adobe Photoshop. (Pre-requisite COMM 2082 or JOUR 1702 or instructor's permission) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 4741. PRACTICUM – OBSERVER. (4 Credits)

A practical workshop course in writing news, features, commentary, reviews and sports articles for The Observer, the student newspaper at Lincoln Center.  Student will take assignments for The Observer to gain writing experience and clips. In class, students will workshop articles to improve them before publication. We will also address basic journalism skills, including interviewing, researching, and using online-media resources. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

JOUR 4742. PRACTICUM – CAMPUS TELEVISION NEWS. (4 Credits)

This course teaches provides a way for students to gain practical experience in journalism by working on Fordham’s student news broadcast, Fordham Nightly News, under the supervision of a professor. Students will learn to generate stories, research, report, write, shoot, edit and present news on television, using Fordham Nightly News as a learning laboratory. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 4743. PRACTICUM – RAM. (4 Credits)

This course teaches provides a way for students to gain practical experience in journalism by working on Fordham’s student newspaper, The Fordham Ram, under the supervision of a professor. Students will learn to research, report, write, shoot, edit and design, using The Ram as a learning laboratory. Because The Ram is not just a print newspaper but also exists in digital form, students will have the opportunity to tell stories across multiple platforms. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 4744. PRACTICUM – WFUV. (4 Credits)

This course teaches provides a way for students to gain practical experience in journalism by working in the news department of WFUV, Fordham’s public media station, under the supervision of a professor. Students will learn to generate stories, research, report, write, gather and present news on radio and possibly on video and in print, using WFUV as a learning laboratory. Students taking this course should already be involved in the WFUV News Department. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2082 or COMM 2083 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 4745. CAMPUS JOURNALISM PRACTICUM. (4 Credits)

This course teaches provides a way for students to gain practical experience in journalism by working on a student media outlet at Fordham under the supervision of a professor. Students will learn to research, report, write, shoot, edit and/or design, using one of the campus publications as a learning laboratory. prereq: OUR 1701 or COMM 2083 or permission of instructor Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: COMM 2083 or COMM 2082 or JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702.

JOUR 4750. VALUES IN THE NEWS. (4 Credits)

Values in the News examines the ethical and moral codes and standards observed, or violated, by the news media in the United States. These standards are under scrutiny in this challenging transition from traditional or legacy media to digital journalism and the advent of various platforms including citizen journalism and social media. Students will analyze contemporary and historical examples of ethical violations and ethical questions in print, television, cable and digital news. The class will research, interpret, analyze and write about these cases and will explore the obstacles journalists face trying to adhere to a set of ethical rules. This seminar is writing intensive and requires class debate. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, EP4, VAL.

JOUR 4766. TELEVISION NEWS INNOVATORS. (4 Credits)

(Formerly COMM 4111): This Interdisciplinary Capstone Course bridges the disciplines of Media Studies and History. It surveys the most prominent figures in the history of electronic journalism--producers, executives, anchors, correspondents--and explains how their work shaped the course of American history. Innovators whose work is studied include Edward R. Murrow, Walter Cronkite, Ted Koppel, Barbara Walters, Mike Wallace, Ed Bardley, Roone Arledge, Ted Turner and Roger Ailes. We discuss the historical episodes covered by these innovators including World War II, McCarthyism, the Civil Rights movement, the Vietnam War, the Iran Hostage Crisis and the 1991 Gulf War before investigating how the coverage of these events in and of itself affected their outcomes. Sections R01 and R02 meet concurrently. Open only to Rose HIll students. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, FITV, ICC.

JOUR 4767. HISTORY OF WOMEN'S MAGAZINES. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the history and mission of women's magazines from the 19th century to the 21st century with special emphasis on magazines such as Godey's Lady's Book, Lady's Home Journal, and Cosmopolitan. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, WGSS.

JOUR 4770. MEDIA LAW AND JOURNALISM ETHICS. (4 Credits)

Media Law and Journalism Ethics will introduce students to the legal and ethical issues confronting the media on a daily basis. Journalists, in particular, face complicated decisions as technology changes the way news is produced. With communication tools increasing the speed at which news is gathered and disseminated, media industries are growing more powerful. As the journalism industry shifts from traditional newspapers and broadcasting to social media, podcasts and blogs, the rules and limitations also change. This course will explore ethical principles that govern journalism, such as freedom of expression, the right to privacy and the public's right to know. Students will develop an understanding of the ethical and legal issues that are unique to journalism in a Democracy, and become more critical consumers of news media.

JOUR 4773. PUBLIC MEDIA. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COMC.

JOUR 4784. BUSINESS JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

If money makes the world go round, as the famous saying goes, then following the money is a creative way to discover gripping stories that can make you stand out as a journalist. But how do you find the money angle? This course will teach you to understand business and economics, and also how to tell financial stories creatively. Over the course of the semester, students will learn ways in which they can "follow the money" in order to tell great multimedia stories about people and institutions. Students will also learn about financial concepts and markets including stocks, bonds, and balance sheets. The course assumes no background in economics or finance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: JOUR 1701 or JOUR 1702 or COMM 2082 or COMM 2083.

JOUR 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.