Honors Program

Since its founding in 1950, the Fordham College at Rose Hill Honors Program has provided students of exceptional academic talent and intellectual curiosity with the opportunity to pursue their core studies in greater depth, breadth, and intensity. Drawn from every major, honors students routinely go on to attend the most respected graduate and professional schools and to excel in their chosen fields. What unites the members of the program is their active approach to learning and their desire to go beyond compartmentalized knowledge to an understanding of the whole.

The heart of the program is a sequence of courses taken during the freshman and sophomore years. These courses work together to provide a comprehensive overview of the intellectual and social forces that have shaped the modern world. Each semester in this sequence is devoted to an integrated study of the art, history, literature, music, philosophy and religion of a particular period. In addition, special courses in mathematics and the sciences for nonscience majors help to bring out these disciplines’ important role in contemporary society. This sequence is followed by two courses in the junior year that focus on different social and ethical problems of the modern world.

The capstone of the honors curriculum is the senior thesis, an extended research project prepared under the individual guidance of a faculty mentor in one’s major field. Graduate and professional schools, as well as prospective employers, recognize the thesis as a clear indication of a student’s ability to do independent work at an advanced level. Recent theses have examined topics as diverse as the roles of women in modern film, the constitutional implications of total quality management, and the effects of cellular aging on human chromosomes.

The honors curriculum takes the place of the regular Fordham College at Rose Hill Core Curriculum, with the exception of the language requirement. Credit is granted for advanced placement courses taken in high school and for college courses taken elsewhere. Most students enter the program at the beginning of their first year, though it is possible for a certain number of students with strong academic records to join in the middle of that year and at the beginning of their sophomore year.

Because honors courses usually take the form of small seminars of no more than 14 students, enrollment in the program is necessarily limited to around 35 students each year. Members of the program are normally expected to maintain a grade average of 3.5. Successful completion of the program entitles the student to the designation in cursu honorum on the diploma and the transcript.

Policies and Procedures

Meeting the Core Requirements

Honors students are not required to take any of the other Fordham College Core Curriculum requirements. However, they are still required to fulfill the general Fordham College language requirement. AP placement may exempt students from this requirement.

Completing a Major

The honors program is not a major. It is an alternative core curriculum. Honors students must fulfill their major requirements as outlined by the respective academic department.

Advanced Placement Credit

AP credit is often used to place out of honors mathematics and honors science I and/or II. Students must have earned a 4 or 5 on the AP exams in question.

Study Abroad

Honors students may study abroad for all or part of junior year. To fulfill one or both of the junior honors course requirements, there are two possibilities: (a) the student takes a comparable course while abroad, approved by the honors director, or (b) the student takes the junior year honors courses upon return in senior year.

For more information

Visit the Rose Hill Honors Program web page.

Plan of Study Grid
First YearCredits
Fall
Ancient Period  
HPRH 1001 ANCIENT LITERATURE 3
HPRH 1002 ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY 3
HPRH 1003 ANCIENT HISTORY AND ART 3
HPRH 1004 HONORS: MATHEMATICS 3
 Credits12
Spring
Medieval Period  
HPRH 1051 MEDIEVAL LITERATURE AND ART 3
HPRH 1052 MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY AND THEOLOGY 3
HPRH 1053 MEDIEVAL HISTORY 3
 Credits9
Second Year
Fall
Early Modern Period  
HPRH 2001 EARLY MODERN LITERATURE/ART 3
HPRH 2002 EARLY MODERN PHILOPHY AND THEOLOGY 3
HPRH 2003 EARLY MODERN HISTORY/MUSIC 3
HPRH 2004 HONORS: SCIENCE I 3
 Credits12
Spring
Contemporary Period  
HPRH 2051 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE AND MUSIC 3
HPRH 2052 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT 3
HPRH 2053 CONTEMPORARY HISTORY AND ART 3
HPRH 2005 HONORS: SCIENCE II 3
 Credits12
Third Year
Fall
HPRH 3001 RELIGION IN THE MODERN WORLD 4
 Credits4
Spring
HPRH 3051 ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS 4
 Credits4
Fourth Year
Fall or Spring  
HPRH 4001 SENIOR THESIS 4
 Credits4
 Total Credits57

GPA Requirement

Honors students receive the special designation in cursu honorum (“in the course of honors”) on their diplomas. This is in addition to any other honors earned, such as cum laude, magna cum laude, and summa cum laude. In order to graduate in cursu honorum, a student must have a GPA of 3.5 at the end of senior year.

HPRH 1001. ANCIENT LITERATURE. (3 Credits)

An examination of the Greek, Roman, and biblical texts which have played a central role in the definition of the Western tradition.

Attribute: CLAS.

HPRH 1002. ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY. (3 Credits)

An examination of the Greek and Roman texts which have served as the foundation for subsequent Western philosophical thought.

Attribute: CLAS.

HPRH 1003. ANCIENT HISTORY AND ART. (3 Credits)

An overview of the history and art of the ancient world, with particular emphasis on the classical world of Greece and Rome.

Attribute: CLAS.

HPRH 1004. HONORS: MATHEMATICS. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the dynamics of mathematical thought for non-science majors. Attention will be paid to both the historical development of central mathematical concepts and the implications of these concepts for contemporary life.

Attribute: CLAS.

HPRH 1051. MEDIEVAL LITERATURE AND ART. (3 Credits)

An examination of the literature and art of the medieval world.

Attribute: MVST.

HPRH 1052. MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY AND THEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

An examination of major medieval thinkers, including Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas.

Attribute: MVST.

HPRH 1053. MEDIEVAL HISTORY. (3 Credits)

An overview of the history of the medieval world, including an examination of the rise and spread of Islam.

Attribute: MVST.

HPRH 2001. EARLY MODERN LITERATURE/ART. (3 Credits)

An examination of the literature and art of the period from the Renaissance to the mid-19th century.

HPRH 2002. EARLY MODERN PHILOPHY AND THEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

An examination of the major thinkers from the Renaissance to the mid-19th century, with particular emphasis on the figures of the Enlightenment.

HPRH 2003. EARLY MODERN HISTORY/MUSIC. (3 Credits)

An overview of the history and music of the period from the Renaissance to the mid-19th century.

HPRH 2004. HONORS: SCIENCE I. (3 Credits)

A hands-on examination of a question which is the focus of contemporary scientific inquiry. The particular question considered will vary from semester to semester and will usually be addressed from the perspective of more than one scientific discipline. Typical courses examine mind/body questions from the perspective of biology and psychology and environmental issues from the perspective of chemistry and physics.

HPRH 2005. HONORS: SCIENCE II. (3 Credits)

A hands-on examination of a question which is the focus of contemporary scientific inquiry. The particular question considered will vary from semester to semester and will usually be addressed from the perspective of more than one scientific discipline. Typical courses examine mind/body questions from the perspective of biology and psychology and environmental issues from the perspective of chemistry and physics.

HPRH 2051. CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE AND MUSIC. (3 Credits)

An examination of the literature and music of the contemporary period, with attention to both European/American texts and texts from world literature.

Attribute: LALS.

HPRH 2052. CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT. (3 Credits)

An examination of the major works of social and political thought which have helped to define the modern world.

Attribute: AMST.

HPRH 2053. CONTEMPORARY HISTORY AND ART. (3 Credits)

An overview of the history and art of the contemporary period.

HPRH 2999. SERVICE LEARNING-2000 LEVEL. (1 Credit)

In this student-initiated program, the student may earn one additional credit by connecting a service experience to a course with the approval of the professor and the service-learning director.

HPRH 3001. RELIGION IN THE MODERN WORLD. (4 Credits)

An examination of the way that the world's major religious traditions have come to terms with the philosophical and practical challenges of modernity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: IPE.

HPRH 3051. ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS. (4 Credits)

An examination of a particular modern problem from the perspective of both social and ethical analysis. The problem to be considered will vary, although it will generally be either international in scope or able to be viewed from a number of different traditions. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HPRH 3075. IGNATIAN EDUCATION SEMINAR. (1 Credit)

This seminar will examine the distinctive nature of a liberal arts education in the Ignatian tradition. Intended for those who have completed at least half of their work at Fordham, the seminar will allow such students an opportunity to reflect on their own education in conversation with a small group of their peers and a memeber of the faculty or administration. This one credit course will meet four times during the semester and will be graded on a pass/fail basis.

HPRH 4001. SENIOR THESIS. (4 Credits)

An extended original research project in one's major field, prepared under the guidance of a faculty mentor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HPRH 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.