English

The discipline of English is shaped historically by the study of literature and conceptually by the understanding of written texts in all their many forms. Its foundations are the theory and practice of critical reading, literary analysis, and effective writing. The major is designed to build an inclusive knowledge of literature, to develop skills required for the critical interpretation of texts, and to teach the principles of critical and creative writing.

The major emphasizes the historical reach of literary study through its historical distribution requirement. The theory requirement introduces influential concepts and debates underlying the study of language, literature, and their cultural impact. The range of electives and seminars that make up the bulk of the curriculum allows for flexibility in designing individual majors while ensuring a comprehensive grasp of the varieties of literary study.

Premised on the belief that the study of literature and the practice of writing are mutually reinforcing the major with a Creative Writing concentration, emphasizes the interrelations among creative writing, digital media, criticism, and scholarship. As an integrated concentration in the English department with a dual focus on literature and creative work, the Creative Writing concentration combines literature courses, small writing workshops, and practical industry training to prepare students for advanced study or careers in writing, media, and publishing. In addition, our concentrators benefit from the resources provided by New York City, a worldwide center for literary publishing.

Honors Thesis

The department offers an honors thesis option in English for senior English majors with a 3.6 GPA or higher in English who wish to complete an ambitious project under the direction of a faculty member.  

If you are interested, you should discuss this option with the associate chair and then choose a member of the faculty as an advisor for the thesis prior to the semester in which the thesis will be completed. The associate chair will then authorize you to register for ENGL 4998, a four-credit Honors Tutorial. This course does not count for credit toward the English major or the English major with a creative writing concentration, though it does count as an elective toward graduation. The professor sponsoring the project will set up parameters and deadlines at his or her discretion. You will write your thesis over the course of one semester, at the end of which there will be an honors defense with the advisor and one departmental reader. That committee then evaluates whether the thesis defense qualifies you to graduate with departmental honors.

The English Major and the Rose Hill Honors Program:

Students in the Rose Hill Honors Program fulfill the first-level core English requirements (ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000) by taking HPRH 1001. Rose Hill Honors Program students who major in English may count two Honors Program courses toward the major. HPRH 1051 will count as one of the required Historical Distribution courses. HPRH 2051 will count as a regular elective in the major. The Honors Program thesis project does not count as course credit toward the English major. 

The English Major and the Lincoln Center Honors Program:

Students in the Lincoln Center Honors Program fulfill the first-level Core English requirements (ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000) by taking HPLC 1201 and HPLC 1811.  HPLC 4500 THESIS WORKSHOP can, with the approval of the associate chair, count for elective credit in the major. HPLC 4050 HONORS: SENIOR VALUES SEMINAR can also count for the major when it is taught by English or Comparative Literature faculty. 

Early Admission to Master’s Program

Please read the Early Admission to Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Master’s Programs section, which is located under the heading of Special Academic Programs in the chapter on Academic Programs, Policies, and Procedures of this bulletin. The English director of graduate studies, in consultation with the undergraduate program heads, selects second semester juniors who are invited to apply for early admission to the M.A. program. Students must formally indicate their desire to opt for early admission into the M.A. program and submit a two-page statement of purpose by March 15. Applications do not need to include GRE scores unless the student is planning to apply for financial aid after completing their bachelor’s. In order to qualify for invitation, students must have a minimum 3.2 overall grade point average, at least a 3.5 average in their English courses, and the recommendation of two English faculty. 

This policy applies to FCRH, FCLC, and PCS. Three courses count toward the student’s undergraduate and graduate degrees, fulfilling both English major and master’s-level requirements. Graduate courses taken while still at the College must be approved by the director of graduate studies of the department. Seniors take a total of three 5000-level graduate courses during their final two undergraduate semesters. After the B.A., students take three 5000-level or 6000-level graduate courses in the fall and three in the spring. Students also must complete a capstone project and demonstrate reading knowledge of one foreign language to graduate. Applications are made online through the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences website.

For more information

Visit the English department web page.

The English department offers ENGL 1102 COMPOSITION II, which fulfills the core curriculum requirement in composition and rhetoric. Students who do not place in ENGL 1102 upon admission are required to take ENGL 1101 COMPOSITION I, in which they must receive a grade of C or better before they are allowed to advance to ENGL 1102. The department also offers ENGL 2000 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS, which fulfills the core requirement in English literature and counts toward the distributive requirement in Eloquentia Perfecta 2. Unless otherwise specified, nonmajors may take the department’s elective (major) offerings toward the core requirement in Advanced Disciplinary Courses in Literature. In addition, English offers courses that fulfill the following Core requirements: American Pluralism; Global Studies; Eloquentia Perfecta (EP) 3 & 4; Interdisciplinary Capstone (ICC) and Values.  

English courses and Advanced Placement Credits: AP Credits in English Literature and in English Language count toward a student’s total number of credits in the college but not within the major. A score of 4 or 5 in AP English Literature will count towards college elective credits. All students are required to take Composition II and Texts and Contexts/Eloquentia Perfecta 2. 

Our Courses

ENGL 1004. TEXTS AND CONTEXTS: UPWARD MOBILITY AND THE COMMON GOOD. (3 Credits)

This course will explore Anglo-American literary representations of socio-economic self-transformation by focusing on its inherent tension between mobility and community. Has the fabled path from rags to riches threatened or sustained neighborhoods and nations? What happens to virtue, charity, and social cohesion when the desire for wealth acquisition becomes normative? We will address these and other questions through discussions of a wide range of literary texts, from Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography to Patricia Highsmith’s The Talented Mr., Ripley. But we will also consider how the pervasive contemporary rhetoric of the “American Dream” in newspapers, magazines, film, and new media negotiates the ideal of upward mobility in relation to such collective ideals, such as mentoring, cooperation, and self-sacrifice.

Attributes: EP2, MANR, TC.

ENGL 1101. COMPOSITION I. (3 Credits)

Instruction in sentence and paragraph construction, reading comprehension skills and analysis, the basic principles of grammar with an emphasis on diagnosing and solving persistent problems, and principles of argumentation and evidence. Weekly assignments and regular grammar exercises to build confidences and competence in college writing.

ENGL 1102. COMPOSITION II. (3 Credits)

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, with an emphasis on sound logic, correct grammar, and persuasive rhetoric. Introduces research techniques, including use of the library, conventions and principles of documentation, analysis of sources, and ethics of scholarly research. Weekly papers will be written and discussed.

ENGL 1501. IMAGINING NEW YORK CITY IN LITERATURE. (3 Credits)

New York City has been the home of some of the most significant U.S. writers and artists. The literature of the city explores and tests the very notion of an American identity, and what it means to be an American. This introductory EP1 course examines literary representations of New York City, exploring topics that include the environment, economic inequality, capitalism, and the changing roles of women, blacks, and workers.

Attribute: AMST.

ENGL 1800. INTERNSHIP. (1 or 2 Credits)

ENGL 1999. TUTORIAL. (1 to 4 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

ENGL 2000. TEXTS AND CONTEXTS. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the literary analysis of texts and the cultural and historical contexts within which they are produced and read. Significant class time will be devoted to critical writing and to speaking about literature. Each section of Texts and Contexts will have a focus developed by the individual instructor and expressed in its subtitle. This course fulfills the Core requirements for the second Eloquentia Perfecta seminar.

Attributes: EP2, TC.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.

ENGL 2999. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (2 Credits)

ENGL 3000. THEORIES OF COMPARATIVE LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

A review of theories and methods of comparative literary studies, using literary theory and criticism as primary readings in conjunction with primary works of literature, drawing from a range of literary traditions. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COLI.

ENGL 3001. QUEER THEORIES. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the academic discipline of queer theory, focusing on foundational thinkers (e.g., Butler, Foucault, Sedgwick, and others) as well as their philosophical and psychoanalytic precursors and interlocutors. The course will also address selected issues currently under discussion in the discipline. These may include the role of activism, the relationship between queer theory and feminism theory, attention to race, and intersections with postcolonial theory. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AMST, ASHS, ASLT, COLI, DISA, PLUR.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3002. QUEER ICONOCLASTS: SEXUALITY, RELIGION, RACE. (4 Credits)

The aim of this course is to interrogate and challenge an assumption that religious communities and queer communities stand in direct opposition to one another. We will investigate citations and reappropriations of religious iconography in queer art and literature from the 20th and 21st centuries in order both to understand the controversies that surrounded these artistic and literary projects and to reimagine literary and artistic experimentation as the site of religious and sexual exploration. Particular attention will be paid to the intersection of sexuality, religion, and race. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

ENGL 3008. THE 19TH CENTURY NOVEL OF MANNERS. (4 Credits)

Courtship, marriage, extramarital affairs, and conflict between social groups are staple ingredients of the “novel of manners”—the term that, for some, designates a distinct sub-genre and, for others, serves as a synonym for the realist novel. As we examine the generic traits and thematic concerns of the novel of manners in the long nineteenth century, we will focus most particularly on “manners,” the elusive concept that lends the sub/genre its name. Possible writers include: Frances Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Jane Austen, Anthony Trollope, Edith Wharton, and E. M. Forster. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ENGL 3012. NOVEL, SHE WROTE. (4 Credits)

“If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then, “Toni Morrison declares, “you must write it.” The impulse for black female authors to write novels and the diverse manifestations of that impulse will be of primary concern in this course. What compelled black female authors in the second half of the twentieth century to write their first novels? How are themes of sexuality, motherhood, beauty, respectability, and intra-and interracial conflict represented in their texts? In what ways do their novels complement, build upon, and refer back to each other and other works? These are few of the questions we will tackle as we read through the literature. Some of the selected texts will include Paule Marshall’s Brown Girl, Brownstones (1959); Alice Walker’s The Third Life of Grange Copeland (1970); Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye (1970); Gloria Naylor’s The Women of Brewster Place (1982); and Ayana Mathis’s The Twelve Tribes of Hattie. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AFAM, ALC, PLUR, WGSS.

ENGL 3013. FICTION WRITING. (4 Credits)

The workshop in the craft of writing fiction, with relevant readings in the game Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

ENGL 3014. CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING. (4 Credits)

A workshop in the craft of creative non-fiction, with relevant readings in the genre. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000 or HPRH 1001 or ENGL 1004 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3015. POETRY WRITING. (4 Credits)

A workshop in the craft of writing poetry, with relevant readings in the genre. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3016. SCREENWRITING WORKSHOP. (4 Credits)

A workshop in the craft of screenwriting, with relevant readings in the genre. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

ENGL 3017. DIGITAL CREATIVE WRITING. (4 Credits)

Directed as a workshop, this course will focus on students' writing from the perspective of a producer. We will pay special attention to a variety of media -- digital, social, print -- and the ways they translate to an individual's writing practice. Guest lectures, off-site/online events, and weekly reading will be determined by the instructor and student interests.. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: CVW, NMAT, NMDD.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3019. WRITER'S WORKSHOP. (4 Credits)

A creative writing workshop that features peer review of student work and outside literary readings.Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3020. CREATIVE WRITING CAPSTONE. (0 Credits)

This Capstone course is the exit requirement for English Majors concentrating in Creative Writing. Students will work collaboratively to put together a public exhibition of a creative writing project. The principal aim of the Capstone is to introduce our graduating students to the realities of the writer’s life, which necessarily involves not just individual work but also affiliation, cooperation, and community.

Attributes: CVW, ENHD.

ENGL 3031. MEDIEVAL MONSTERS. (4 Credits)

St. Augustine once wrote that the word "monster" derived from the Latin word "monstro," to show, implying that monstrous beings were meant to reflect divine creativity. Over time, this word for unusual beings has taken on a more sinister flavor, even within the Middle Ages. This course will explore the medieval taste for the exotic, from ferocious giants and dog-headed men to the peace-loving sciapod. In this course we will examine the discourse of monstrosity as a complex critical lens through which premodern writers asked important questions of race, religion, civic virtue, and human morality. In our study, we will read selections from Pliny, Augustine, and others before moving through a range of medieval texts, including the Beowulf manuscript, medieval romance, and Mandeville's account. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3032. PUBLISHING: THEORY AND PRACTICE. (4 Credits)

The aim of the course is to develop a clear understanding of the publishing industry. Genres addressed will include young adult, literary fiction, science fiction, romance, mystery, and graphic novels. Speakers will include authors, publishers, agents, magazine and book editors. Final projects may range from a formal analysis of a novel or group of novels, an investigation of a segment of the publishing industry, or thirty pages of a novel (of any type). Weekly reading of novels ranging throughout the genres is required; there will also be quizzes, a midterm, and a final. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3036. LATIN AMERICAN SHORT STORY. (4 Credits)

Writings by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Julio Cortazar, Carlos Fuentes and Mario Vargas Llosa (to name just a few) are some of the treasures of world literature. This course will focus on the short story and novella forms in order to explore as fully as possible the full range of Latin American and Latino literature. Literary geographies will include Mexico, the Caribbean, Central and South America, with special sections on Cuba, Argentina, Chile and Brazil. All readings will be in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, AMST, COLI, ISLA, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3045. THEORY FOR ENGLISH MAJORS. (4 Credits)

This course introduces the English major to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of the course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices, and language itself. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COLI.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3062. PROSE POETRY/FLASH FICTION. (4 Credits)

A workshop of prose poetry and flash fiction. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

ENGL 3067. CONTEMPORARY WOMEN POETS. (4 Credits)

In this course, students will read poetry written by women poets in the 20th and 21st centuries with a focus on the imaginative representation of women's lived experience. We will read the work of poets who address the themes of feminine embodiment and sexuality, women's roles as mothers and daughters, women's work (both professional and domestic), and the role poetry plays in enabling women to discover a language to contain their experience. Among the (possible) poets we will read are Sylvial Plath, Ann Sexton, Elizabeth Bishop, Lucille Clifton, Anna Swir, Adrienne Rich, Marie Ponsot, Eavan Boland, Louise Erdrich, Kate Daniels, Mary Karr and A.E. Stallings. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, IRST.

ENGL 3068. WRITING LONDON: OUTSIDERS. (4 Credits)

From the London of Charles Dickens, teeming with "Countrymen, butchers, drovers, hawkers, boys, thieves, idlers and vagabonds of every low grade,” to Monica Ali’s Bangladeshi’s living desperate lives behind the “net curtains” of Brick Lane, London has always inspired fiction about outsiders finding their feet in this vast metropolis. This course invites you to discover writers who have used London as a setting or as a controlling metaphor to create stories about immigrants and other outsiders; and to use field trips as an inspiration to write your own stories. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

ENGL 3071. FAMILY MATTERS: MEMOIR. (4 Credits)

We all have stories about family, but how do you shape this charged material into good narrative? Mary Karr, the celebrated author of three memoirs, writes that "The emotional stakes a memoirist bets with could not be higher." In this course, students will have the chance to try their hands at some of the most potent history anyone can tackle -- their own. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

ENGL 3100. MEDIEVAL LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

A survey of medieval literature. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

ENGL 3101. APOCALYPTIC REPRESENTATION BEFORE 1800. (4 Credits)

Today we often think of the end of the world in scientific contexts: climate change, nuclear and other types of environmental catastrophes, alien or machine annihilation. But for most of human history, the end times were thought of in exclusively theological terms. When and how and why did these sometimes competitive, sometime overlapping frameworks for imagining our end develop? This course will look for answers in early modern and 18th-century apocalyptic representations. Among the authors we will consider are, Francis Bacon, John Milton, Margaret Cavendish, Jonathan Swift, Isaac Newton, and Mary Shelley. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or COLI 2000 or CLAS 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3102. MEDIEVAL DRAMA. (4 Credits)

Medieval Drama offers a study into one of the most vibrant forms of the pre-modern period, offering us a vantage point from which to view medieval ideas about war, sex, religion, life and death. As expected, some sources were closely controlled and curated, such as the Christian liturgy itself and the short dramatic tropes, like the Quem quaeritis, which would expand on the scriptural narrative. Yet other, less formal and popularly organized pieces such as the amazing cycle plays of the late medieval period show a remarkable involvement of everyday people, as the trade guilds work to translate the story of creation to the Apocalypse into a relatable experience. Studying this span of history allows us to consider drama’s origins and changing cultural meanings. Using selected highlights, this course will include the medieval morality plays, such as “Mankind” and “Every-man,” along with biblical plays represented in selections from the York, Towneley, and Chester cycles. Having looked at these snapshots of early and late medieval drama, we will complete the course with a glimpse of the Early Modern, where plays such as “The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus” will show us how the plays produced in the age of Shakespeare both reflected and rejected the medievalisms which formed their very origins.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or MLAL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051.

ENGL 3103. EARLY ENGLISH DRAMA. (4 Credits)

English drama from its origin in the Middle Ages to the beginning of Renaissance drama in the early Tudor period. Mystery plays. Moralities (including Everyman) and interludes. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

ENGL 3107. CHAUCER. (4 Credits)

Reading and analysis of The Canterbury Tales and other major poems. This course will examine Chaucer's major work, The Canterbury Tales, as well as his earlier love poems. We will be spending most of the semester on the Canterbury Tales so that we can explore the range of Chaucer's writings-his romances, bawdy stories, moral tales, and saints' lives. There will be two main goals: to pay close attention to Chaucer's poetry (and, therefore, to become familiar with Middle English) and to discuss the larger concerns to which Chaucer returned again and again-the position of women, social disruption, religious belief, the politics of the court, and the challenge of writing. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3109. ARTHURIAN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

Readings will include excerpts from Geoffrey of Monmouth, Wace and Layamon on the origins of the idea of Arthur. Later we will read Chretien De Troyes*Lancelot(The Knight of the Cart)*, part of the *Alliterative Morte Arthure*, and the conclusion to Thomas Malory's *Le Morte Arthur* Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

ENGL 3111. MEDIEVAL ROMANCE. (4 Credits)

A study of romance's durable popular appeal, this course examines texts from the 12th to 15th centuries and compares them with later romance traditions. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

ENGL 3113. INTRODUCTION TO OLD ENGLISH. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the language of Old English and some of the early literary works composed in that language. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

ENGL 3114. THE (MEDIEVAL) WALKING DEAD. (4 Credits)

Ranging from stories of undead armies in "Branwen, Daughter of Llyr" to eternally-damned 'zombie' knights in Perlesvaus, and from genres varying from chronicle to romance, this course explores the cultural significance of medieval 'zombies,' revenants, spirits, and other beings that we would classify as 'undead,' in order to understand how such monsters might relate to medieval concerns about living, death, dying, and the afterlife. How do the living relate to the dead in the Middle Ages? What happens to bodies and souls after death? How do concerns about morality and living affect the person in the afterlife?.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3115. MEDIEVAL WOMEN WRITERS. (4 Credits)

We will begin with the autobiographical account of Perpetua, Roman martyr, then we will look at the plays of Hroswitha, a Saxon nun, the biography of Christina of Markyate, an Englishwoman who rejected marriage for life as a solitary, and the romantic lyrics of the female troubadours, short excerpts from the English mystics Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe, Christine de Pizan's Treasure of the City of Ladies, and finally the daily letters of the women of the Paston family (xvth century). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, ENHD, MVLI, MVST, WGSS.

ENGL 3121. THE PEARL POET AND HIS BOOK. (4 Credits)

In this course, we will study intensively some of the greatest poems written in Middle English, all by the anonymous 14th century poet known as the Pearl or Gawain Poet, all contained in a single manuscript, Cotton Neo A.x. We will learn about the art of medieval bookmarking and illustration through hands-on work with the manuscript's digital facsimile, weigh in on intense scholarly debates surrounding the book's four poems (Pearl, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Patience, and Cleanness, the crown jewels of the Alliterative Revival), and read other works possibly attributed to this author (St. Erkenwald) to ask critical questions about the formation, and expansion, of literary canons. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

ENGL 3125. BEOWULF IN OLD ENGLISH. (4 Credits)

This course will involve close reading of Beowulf and related texts in the original, as well as discussion of critical approaches to the poem from romanticism to the present. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

ENGL 3127. DREAMS IN MIDDLE AGES. (4 Credits)

"Dreams in the Middle Ages": Much medieval literature presents itself as dream-vision, and this course examines the imaginative possibilities the vision-form presents, and which medieval authors exploit for profit and delight. In making sense of medieval dream worlds. We shall look at both medieval and modern theories of dreams and dreaming. We shall begin by reading, in translation, the Romance of Rose, one of the most influential dream visions of the Middle Ages, and as we read it, and works by Chaucer, Langland, the Pearl-poet, and Julian of Norwich, texts that investigate secular and spiritual love and loss, allegory, psychology, and the human struggle for existence, we shall come to appreciate the diversity, literary and philosophical complexity, and beauty of the medieval dream vision. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

ENGL 3131. MEDIEVAL TOLERANCE AND INTOLERANCE. (4 Credits)

Studies medieval literary texts for their representations of various peoples, ethnicities, beliefs, relationships, models of justice etc. Taught in the original (for some medieval English texts)and in translation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

ENGL 3134. LOVE IN THE MIDDLE AGES. (4 Credits)

This course will treat the rules for love written by the 12th century author Andreas Capellanus, together with the work of his Roman predecessor Ovid. Then we will examine the way love was experienced in Marie de France’s short stories (lais), will read the real life letters of Abelard and his beloved Heloise, and will discuss same-sex friendship/love. The course will conclude with Arthurian narratives by Chretien de Troyes, Sir Thomas Malory and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ENHD, MVLI, MVST, WGSS.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3135. IRISH AND BRITISH MEDIEVAL LITERATURE:CONNECTIONS AND COMPARISONS. (4 Credits)

This course covers the literature of the period 1000 to1330 in England, Wales, Ireland, and Northern France in the context of spiritual reform, artistic innovation, political consolidation, and cultural exchange. Readings will include selections from all the major genres of high medieval literature: Arthurian romance and other courtly fictions, history and saga, the outrageous lives and afterlives of the saints, and lyric poetry in English and translated from Latin, Welsh, Irish, and French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

ENGL 3136. MEDIEVAL MYSTICS. (4 Credits)

During a Middle Ages where Catholic Christianity informed virtually all aspects of public and private life, the claim to genuine mystical experience—that is, the claim to direct, unmediated experience of God—could not have carried higher stakes. Starting with foundational texts, we will read the synaesthetic ecstasies of maverick hermit Richard Rolle, the regimented monastic instruction of Walter Hilton, and the complex language games of The Cloud of Unknowing; we will unravel one of the great, gem-like masterpieces of the Alliterative Revival, the anonymous Pearl, probe the intersections of gender, text, and faith in the writings of Julian of Norwich (the first female writer in English) and Margery Kempe (the first autobiographer in English), and examine mysticism’s secular dimension in Malory’s telling of the Quest for the Holy Grail. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, MVLI, MVST, REST.

ENGL 3137. WORLD CINEMA MASTERPIECES. (4 Credits)

World Cinema Masterpieces provides a close analysis of style, narrative structure and visual texture in selected masterworks of major European, Asian and American directors. Directors under consideration include: Renoir, Carne, Lang, Welles, Ophuls, Hitchcock, Bresson, Kurosawa, Ray, Bergman, Rossellini, Fellini, Truffaut, Tarkovsky, Kieslowski, Fassbinder and Altman. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, INST, ISEU, ISIN.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3138. LATE MODERNISM. (4 Credits)

Sandwiched between high modernism of the 1910’s and 20’s and the postmodern turn, texts produced between the 1930’s and 60’s often fall out of accounts of twentieth century literature. In this class, we will interrogate critical assumptions surrounding ideas about “late modernism,” and how re-invention and disenchantment can complicate and enrich our understanding of literary modernism. Our readings will include late works by writers who contributed to the first wave of modernist writing, as well as those by individuals whose careers began in its aftermath. Possible authors include: Jean Rhys, H.D. , Samuel Beckett, Carson McCullers, Djuna Barnes, Paul Celan, W.H. Auden, Gertrude Stein, James Joyce David Jones, T.S. Eliot, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and George Oppen. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or HPLC 1201 or COLI 2000 or CLAS 2000 or MLAL 2000 or ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004.

ENGL 3140. MYTH OF THE HERO: MEDIEVAL MEMORY. (4 Credits)

Scholar Umberto Eco once compared the Greek gods to the superheroes of our present day. Yet our own cultural understanding of what a hero is varies, ranging from Zeus to Catwoman and everything in between. This course will explore the development of the concept of the hero, beginning in the pre-modern era with Beowulf. We focus on the works of the eleventh through sixteenth centuries as time periods wherein the concept of the hero changed most dramatically, and the resulting ideas continue to drive what many twenty-first-century societies still consider “heroic” today. In the spirit of theEloquentia Perfecta seminar, of which this course is a part, our studies will involve many speaking and writing opportunities. To help you create this content and generate ideas, we will study the cultural contexts of the hero, as well as those shared characteristics that seem to set the hero apart: otherworldly backgrounds, bodies & minds. This will be an interactive class, arrive prepared to discuss/debate issues of interest. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or HPLC 1201 or ENGL 1004 or COLI 2000 or CLAS 2000 or MLAL 2000 and ENGL 1102.

ENGL 3143. WORLD CINEMA MASTERPIECES 1960-1980. (4 Credits)

World Cinema Masterpieces, 1960-1980 explores major works of the French New Wave, expressionism, surrealism, epic, and New German cinema--all produced during a twenty year period of extraordinary diversity and experiment. Among the European, North American and Asian directors we will consider are: Truffaut, Rohmer, Tarkovsky, Bunuel, Antonioni, Teshigahara, Bergman, Kubrick, Fassbinder and Malik.\ Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3144. OTHER WORLDS. (4 Credits)

This course will explore different kinds of “Other Worlds” in medieval literature, from visions of heaven and to voyages into supernatural worlds. We will analyze how these texts use spatial distance and difference to explore social relations, identities, and even to subvert established ideas. The syllabus will include selections from the Lays of Marie de France; and the Middle English Sir Orfeo and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. We will finish the semester by looking at how the medieval is re-imagined as an “otherworld” in the present, through modern fantasy literature. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000.

ENGL 3151. METAPHYSICAL POETS: RADICALS AND THE POETIC TRADITION. (4 Credits)

This course deals with Donne and his followers and their radical divergence from the standard use of metaphor in the Renaissance and early 17th Century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or HPLC 1201 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or ENGL 1004 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3206. SHAKESPEARE. (4 Credits)

Poetry and plays studied in relation to Renaissance and 21th-century concerns and ideologies. Emphasis on Shakespeare and his works read and constructed in regard to power, class, gender, and literary aesthetics. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ENHD.

ENGL 3207. MILTON. (4 Credits)

A survey of the major poetry and prose of John Milton with strong emphasis on Paradise Lost. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, REST.

ENGL 3221. SHAKESPEARE'S HISTORY PLAYS. (4 Credits)

Shakespeare’s first great hit was a series of history plays about the kings who ruled, and the wars they waged, a century and more before his birth. The eight plays produced (Harry Potter-style) over the course of eight years, gave London audiences then-and will give us now-a chance to watch Shakespeare becoming Shakespeare: to see him learn how to pack plays with a pleasure, impact, and amazement, a scene by scene and line by line, with a density and intensity no playwright before or since has ever managed to match. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ENHD.

ENGL 3222. SHAKESPEARE AND POPULAR CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on theories of popular culture in tandem with items of popular culture related in some way to Shakespeare's work. We will be reading cultural theory every week. Please keep this double focus in mind: we want to figure out why and how Shakespeare's work is employed, not merely in what manifold ways he appears. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, ENHD.

ENGL 3226. STAGE VENGEANCE. (4 Credits)

For reasons intriguing to think about, playwrights and playgoers have been obsessed with acts of vengeance from Ancient Greece through New York yesterday. We’ll mull the reasons as we track the acts through three epochs: Ancient Greece, Elizabethan London, and present-day New York. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, FCLC.

ENGL 3230. EARLY RENAISSANCE POETRY. (4 Credits)

Renaissance poetry is marked by an extraordinary generic versatility, topical daring, and rhetorical dexterity; it raises many fascinating questions regarding language, aesthetics, nationalism, gender relations, sexual and romantic desire, status and rank, and religious and political turmoil. This course will trace such questions by focusing on genres such as the sonnet, the epyllion, the eclogue, and others. Although we will engage the historical and cultural context of Renaissance England where appropriate, this is not a history course; our primary energies will be devoted to close, careful readings of the language, form, and style of the poems themselves. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3234. A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM. (4 Credits)

This course gives students the opportunity to spend an entire semester focusing intensively on one of Shakespeare's most enduring, and endearing plays: A Midsummer Night's Dream. We will begin with a slow reading of the play itself, then move both backward (to sources in Ovid and Chaucer) and forward (to important critical studies as well as various musical, theatrical cinematic, and novelistic adaptations, including Shakespeare's own revisiting of the material, late in his career, in The Two Noble Kinsmen). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or HPLC 1201 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or MLAL 2000 and ENGL 1102.

ENGL 3239. THE RISE OF THE NOVEL. (4 Credits)

Following a century of civil wars, something very curious happens in England: Novels appear. People write them, publish them, read them and, most of all debate furiously about what novels are. In this course we will look at the rise of the novel in England, asking: Where did novels come from? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or HPLC 1201 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3306. JONATHAN SWIFT AND THE ART OF SATIRE. (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the art and nature of satire using the works of Jonathan Swift as the prime material for study. In addition to Swift’s A Tale of a Tub, Gulliver’s Travels, and A Modest Proposal, we will consider select works from the long satiric tradition as well as works by his contemporaries, including Alexander Pope, Mary Wortley Montagu, John Gay, and Jane Collier. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, IRST.

ENGL 3311. OPENING HEADS: WRITING ABOUT MINDS AND BRAINS BEFORE 1800. (4 Credits)

This course reads literary representations of minds and brains within the context of early-modern neurology and some major concepts in current cognitive theory. The literary authors considered may include Milton, Marvell, Swift, Finch, Addison, Pope, Sterne, Austen, and the Scriblerians. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or COLI 2000 or CLAS 2000 or MLAL 2000 or MVST 2000.

ENGL 3315. LAUGH. CRV. HUM. QUAKE. (4 Credits)

Over the course of two centuries. British playwrights and players hit upon a huge new panoply of ways to trigger in their audiences the responses tagged above; many of their methods are still at work in the entertainments we seek and savor now. By close readings of the plays and their contexts (cultural, theatrical, social, political) we’ll track the development of those techniques, seeking to make sense of how they worked and why they matter. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ENHD.

ENGL 3318. EARLY WOMEN NOVELISTS. (4 Credits)

A study of the rise of female authors in the early modern period. We will address problems of gender and rigorously analyze the basic literary and historical dimensions of each text. Authors will include Behn, Burney, Wollstonecraft, Radcliffe, Austen, Emily and Charlotte Bronte. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, WGSS.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3319. PLAYS AND PLAYERS: 1600-1700. (4 Credits)

Beginning in the 1660's, the stage mirrored the world in ways unprecedented: new performers (actresses trod the boards for the first time ever); new protagonists (middle-class as well as aristocratic); new shapes of comedy and lighting; new styles of acting; and new audiences keen to absorb, assess, and gossip about whatever transpired on stage, in the stalls, and behind the scenes. We'll investigate all this innovation, through play texts, performances (live and recorded), and all the modes of writing (diaries, letters, autobiographies, reviews)by which spectators sought to preserve the evanescent but often spellbinding experience of going to a play. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD.

ENGL 3329. PLAYS AND PLAYERS, 1700-1800. (4 Credits)

During the 1700s, the London world of entertainment changed in directions that now look, from our vantage, both long familiar and rather strange. The century ushered in the first feel-good comedies, calculated to make their audience cry and laugh by turn; the first exaltation of Shakespeare as more divinity than mere playwright; the first docudramas; the first attempts to record performances for posterity; the first theatrical superstars; and all the elaborate apparatus that sustained the stars' centrality in the public eye: gossip columns, celebrity magazines, souveniers, and tell-all memoirs. We'll track all the change and stragness by reading some of the century's greatest theatrical hits alongside all the many modes of documenation in which they came swathed for their first audiences. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or COLI 2000 or CLAS 2000 or MLAL 2000 or MVST 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001.

ENGL 3333. CAPTIVES, CANNIBALS AND REBELS: (ADVANCED LITERATURE CORE). (4 Credits)

Captives, cannibals, and rebels are everywhere in early English writing about the Americas and the British Empire. In this course, we will think wbout why these figures fascinated authors and readers so much and waht they can tell us about anxieties regarding colonization. We will read travel and captivity narratives, novels, plays, and poetry from the 17th and 18th centuries; authors may include Mary Rowaldson, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Unca Eliza Winkfield, George Colman, John Stedman, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Earle. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT, COLI, ENHD, HCWL.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3334. EARLY MODERN POETRY AND DRAMA 1579-1625. (4 Credits)

A survey of major writers during the reigns of Elizabeth and James I. Poetry and drama by Shakespeare, Donne, Spenser, Sidney, Johson and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ENHD.

ENGL 3338. KEATS AND THE ROMANTIC CITY. (4 Credits)

This course takes Keats as our guide to London in the Romantic period. We will focus on a range of poets and prose writers who take the city as their subject and define their art by it. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ENGL 3359. ASIAN DIASPORIC LITERATURES. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to some key works of Asian diasporic literature, as well as to some crucial debates in Asian American studies. Some matters we may consider include the origins of the Asian American movement; the transnationalism debates; the intersections of race, gender, sexuality; and the emergence of an Asian American avante garde. Authors may include Maxine Hong Kingston, Chang-rae Lee, Li-Young Lee, Ha Jin, Young-Jean Lee, Jon Hau, Tan Lin, and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, ALC, AMST, ASLT, COLI, ISAS, ISIN, PLUR.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or COLI 2000 or CLAS 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3361. THE FEMALE BILDUNGSROMAN. (4 Credits)

At its inception, the term "bildungsroman" referred to novels concerned with the maturation, education, and coming of age of white, male protagonists. This class explores how the bildungsroman transforms when it focuses on protagonists of different gender identities, sexualities, and races in a variety of literary forms that might include novels by the likes of Charlotte Bronte or Maxine Hong Kingston, autobiographies by Simone De Beauvoir or Audre Lorde, poetry by Emily Dickinson, or even super hero comics like Marvel's Uncanny X-Men. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: ENGL 2000 (may be taken concurrently).

ENGL 3363. CRIME AND PUNISHMENT (Advanced Literature Core). (4 Credits)

What makes crime a crime, and what constitutes just punishment? This course will explore ideas about criminality and correction as reflected in literary texts. We will also read crime narratives as taking up other concerns--such as social conformity, religious redemption and political unrest. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

ENGL 3364. NOVELS OF IDEAS: 19TH CENTURY. (4 Credits)

An intensive study of four major novels from the second half of the 19th-century: Melville's Moby Dick, Tolstoy's Ann Karenina, Dostoyevski's The Brothers Karamazov, and Hardy's Jude the Obscure. In exploring the ideological texture of these works, the course will consider the influences of such seminal thinkers as Schopenhauer, Marx, Darwin, Nietzsche, Zola and Frazer. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or ENGL 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or HPLC 1201 or MLAL 2000 or MLAL 1010.

Mutually Exclusive: COLI 3364.

ENGL 3365. NOVELS OF IDEAS: HIGH MODERNISM. (4 Credits)

Drawing on works of philosophy, psychology, aesthetics and literary theory, the course will develop close, contextualized readings of five Modernist masterpieces, all published with a twenty year span: Proust’s Swann’s Way (1913), Lawrence’s Women in Love (1920), Svevo’s Confessions of Zeno (1923), Mann’s The Magic Mountain (1924), and Faulkner’s Light In August (1932). The class will require approximately 2,700 pages of reading—about 200 pages per week. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ISEU.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3400. AGE OF ROMANTICISM. (4 Credits)

This course covers the broad sweep of British Romanticism, from the 1780s through the 1830s. In any given semester, specific themes may organize the readings, but they are designed to encompass a wide range of poetry, prose, and drama. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, ENHD.

ENGL 3402. VICTORIAN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

English literature from 1832 to the latter part of the 19th century. Poets and prose writers. The reflection of contemporary ideas in the literature of the period. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COLI.

ENGL 3410. JANE AUSTEN IN CONTEXT. (4 Credits)

An intensive study of Jane Austen's novels and times. An intensive study of Jane Austen's novels and time. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, WGSS.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3417. EARLY VICTORIAN NOVELS. (4 Credits)

A study of the novels of the early Victorian period. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3420. POEMS OF SHAKESPEARE AND OTHERS. (4 Credits)

Although Shakespeare is best known as a playwright, he also composed many extraordinary poems, especially love sonnets. We will read them together with poetry by about five of his contemporaries. According to an old joke, sex, religion, and politics are the three subjects one should not discuss at dinner parties-- and these are precisely the subjects that recur most intriguingly and intensively in the poetry we'll be exploring together. A sampling of the issues we'll discuss: how does the poetry of the period reflect-- or conceal-- the political tensions that culminated in the English Revolution? why do so many poets of this era write sonnets? how do these texts treat desire and gender? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD.

ENGL 3424. ROMANTICS AND THEIR WORLD. (4 Credits)

British Romantic literary culture flourished in a period of dramatic global change that included the American and French revolutions; war and peace with France; campaigns for abolishing slavery and reforming parliament; and urbanization, industrialization, and an early environmentalism. We will read a wide range of writers who participate in these dynamic events in poems, plays, essays and novels. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENST, ESHC.

ENGL 3425. NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the writing, life, and social world of Nathaniel Hawthorne. Paying particular attention to questions of literary form, history, national, trans-national, racial, and gender politics, we will read The Scarlet Letter, The House of the Seven Gables, The Blithedale Romance, The Marble Faun, and a selection of his tales. We will also consider Hawthorne's shifting role in the history of American literary criticism.

Attributes: ALC, AMST.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or COLI 2000 or CLAS 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3430. REGENCY ROMANTICISM. (4 Credits)

This course takes the Regency (1811-20) as an historical frame to focus our attention on the latter part of the Romantic period. Officially, this era begins with George III's declared lapse into madness and ends with his son's ascent to the throne upon the king's death. But the Regency has come to be defined more generally as an era characterized by two extremes: the decadence exemplified by the Prince Regent's court and the popular protest movements that would lead to the first Reform Act. We will read a wide swath of the period's poetry and prose within this context. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ENGL 3434. 19TH CENTURY BRITISH WOMEN'S TALES (ADVANCED LITERATURE CORE). (4 Credits)

This course will explore the development of the national tale, a feminist genre of the first two decades of the 19thC whose symbolic cross-regional marriages celebrate the British union. We will examine how women writers used the national tale's defining tropes for their own political, national, and feminist purposes throughout the century. Writers we will read include Sydney Owenson, Maria Edgeworth, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell, and George Eliot. Reading will include some literary criticism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, WGSS.

ENGL 3436. AMERICAN DREAM IN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

In this course we will explore the changing conceptions of success and business in American literature in genres including sermon, autobiography, short story novel, drama and through literary periods including Puritanism, Transcendentalism, Realism, and Naturalism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT.

ENGL 3437. VICTORIAN NOVEL. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to major authors of the Victorian novel, including such figures as Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, George Eliot, Henry James, Emily Bronte and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

ENGL 3438. AMERICAN MODERNISM. (4 Credits)

This course introduces forms of literary experimentation associated with the modernist movement, including authors such as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Gertrude Stein, Nella Larsen, Jean Toomer and others. We’ll examine such contexts as Harlem Renaissance, American writers in Paris, southern agrarianism, and others, as a way of grasping modernism’s fascination with difficulty. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT, COLI.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3439. ODDITY AND CREATIVITY. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on rule-breaking and rule-making literary genres, from the 19th century's innovative dramatic monologue and limerick to the 21st century's abecedarian, erasure poem, prose poem and flash fiction. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or HPLC 1201 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3441. AMERICAN MODERNISM. (4 Credits)

A study of the responses by American poets and novelists to the radical social, cultural, and technological changes of the first half of the twentieth century. Authors include William Carlos Williams, Wallace Stevens, Elizabeth Bishop, Hart Crane, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, and Jean Toomer. Some attention will also go to film, music, and literary criticism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ENGL 3462. ROMANTICISM AND PRIVATE LIFE. (4 Credits)

In an expanding celebrity age, Romantic writers developed a new appreciation for solitude, family, and friendship. Our texts explore the pleasures, benefits, and risks of private life in a growing media culture. Writers include Lord Byron, Mary Robinson, Felicia Hemans, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats, John Clare. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

ENGL 3467. DISOBEDIENCE IN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

"Of man's first disobedience" -- so begins John Milton's epic poem, PARADISE LOST. Milton was not alone in his having interest sparked: the concept of disobedience, in its various permutations (literary, social, political, psychological, religious) has energized a wide variety of literary works. One might say that without some form of disobedience there could be no storytelling. Some of the questions that will shape our explorations in this course include: when is disobedience heroic, and when is it destructive or regrettable? What is the difference between disobeying your family and disobeying the law? Can an obedient character be interesting? How are the different modes of authority (religious, juridical, familial) played off against one another in order to license behavior? Using disobedience as our master rubric, we will follow important continuities and innovative changes in literary history across the past three centuries. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT.

ENGL 3504. VIRGINIA WOOLF. (4 Credits)

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) was one of the great writers of the 20th century. In this course, we will read three of her novels and "A Room of One's Own", her influential feminist essay. Never formally educated, she was also one of the great readers and critics of her time. Brilliant, funny, and hugely curious about her world, she wrote about virtually everything that might interest a person in her time: war, sex, friendship, reading, food, money, art, inspiration, jealousy, fashion, walking, and marriage to name some. As we read her work, we will look at how she transformed the tradition she read into revolutionary art. Then, after spring break, we will read four novels by writers who claim Woolf as an influence, major or minor, direct or indirect. Each of these writers, from England, Colombia, the United States, and Egypt, finds a different Virginia Woolf. With your final project, you will have the opportunity to write about the Woolf you discover through reading her words and discussing them in class. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: WGSS.

ENGL 3529. THEATER AND THE AVANT-GARDE. (4 Credits)

"Avant-garde" was originally a French military term for the first line of battle, but in the late nineteenth century, it came to signify the radical new art movements cropping up with abundance throughout Europe and, later, the United States. Rejecting social and aesthetic norms, these movements called for artistic (and often political) revolution, and many seized on theater as the perfect place to make a scandal of their ideas. After the Second World War, the center of gravity for the avant-garde shifted from Europe to New York, where a new generation built on earlier innovations and sought to reflect new realities. But throughout the long twentieth century, avant-garde artists put forth wildly different views of theater and its role in society, and some rejected live performance all together. In this course, we will consider the twentieth-century avant-garde's complicated relationship to theater and its potential configurations of politics, text and spectacle, and analyze theatrical experiments in the context of other art forms. We will read manifestos, plays and performance and anti-performance texts of all stripes, and attend several live art events. Assignments will include one practical theatrical project. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ENGL 3535. MODERN POETRY. (4 Credits)

Modernist Poetry offers an intensive survey of major thematic currents and formal experiments in British, Irish and American verse from the late 19th century through World War II. Beginning with Gerard Manley Hopkins and Thomas Hardy, the course will devote central attention to the poetic development of W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, and Wallace Stevens, while also exploring works by such major figures as Ezra Pound, H.D., Robert Frost, Wilfred Owen, William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, W.H. Auden and Langston Hughes. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT, COLI.

ENGL 3537. SATIRE, SEX, STYLE: THE AGE OF THOMAS NASHE. (4 Credits)

Considered for a long time to be a "minor" Elizabethan writer with "nothing to say," Thomas Nashe managed to produce a varied and astonishing, if ultimately costly and futile, body of work during the last decade of the sixteenth century, spanning erotica, picaresque fiction, and fierce invective, satire, and polemic. This course will offer a close look at Nashe's unique rhetorical style in relation to the vivid literary culture of his times, focusing on how Nashe's work pushes to the extreme various impulses in Elizabethan literature that tend to get overlooked in conventional accounts of the period. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or HPLC 1201 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3542. MODERN IRISH LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This course examines major modern Irish authors such as Yeats, Joyce, Synge, O'Casey and Beckett in terms of contemporary development in Irish culture. The Irish revival and the move to modernism and post modernism will be shown through the poets, playwrights and prose writers of the era. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, IRST, ISEU.

ENGL 3603. AMERICAN RENAISSANCE. (4 Credits)

Examination of US literature 1830-1860, with emphasis on individualism and social relations, national expansion, popular print culture, slavery, and the emergence of women's writing in relation to changing ideas of public and private. Authors may include: Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Hawthorne, Whitman, Poe, Fuller, Stowe, Child, Douglass, Longfellow, Fern, Jacobs, Wells Brown. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT.

ENGL 3604. AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1870. (4 Credits)

We will look at the lively and surprisingly varied body of texts from the 17th century to 1870 as art, as social record and as representations of a mode of aspiration and experience that may well be uniquely American. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT, ENHD.

ENGL 3609. FEMINISM AND AMERICAN POETRY. (4 Credits)

This course addresses contemporary American womens' poetry and its relationship to recent feminist thought, specifically during and since "second-wave" feminism (roughly 1968 to the present). What role has poetry played in the arena of feminist politics? How do women writers construct varying identities through poetic language, exploring differences of race, ethnicity, physical disability, and sexual orientation? How might we apply recent feminist theories of language and identity to recent women poets? In response to such questions, we will read feminist theory in relation to poetry, and poetry in dialogue with feminist theory. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AMST, ASLT, COLI, PLUR, WGSS.

ENGL 3611. MODERN AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY. (4 Credits)

After an acknowledgment of earlier memoirists such as Twain, Fitzgerald, Orwell and Baldwin, this course focuses on contemporary practitioners such as Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, Gerald Early, Kathryn Harrison, Mary Karr, Kate Simon, Alice Walker, Geoffrey Wolff, Tobias Wolff. Considerations include shifting notions of public and private, the construction of persona, and the impact of TV and radio on print, especially in regard to "voice", self-disclosure, and pathology. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT.

ENGL 3613. MODERN AMERICAN NOVELS. (4 Credits)

Modern American Novels will deal with the works of some of the major writers who rose to prominence in the period between 1920 and 1970. Novelists to be considered may include Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Nathanael West, Henry Miller, Steinbeck, Hurston, Bellow, Nabokov, Ishmael Reed, Kerouac, Joan Didion, Philip Roth, and Thomas Pynchon. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT.

ENGL 3617. AMERICAN SHORT STORY. (4 Credits)

Covers the development of the short story in America as it evolved through classicism, romanticism, realism, naturalism, and existentialism; with emphasis on recurring cultural issues: images of women, the Puritan heritage, the American Dream, American materialism, and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AMST, ASLT.

ENGL 3620. ORDINARINESS. (4 Credits)

The “ordinary”: what is usual, customary, habitual, indistinct. In life, the ordinary blends into the background, unseen or unnoticed until something brings it to crisis. In fiction, however, where there is no background other than what description conjures, the ordinary is a carefully manufactured aspect or narration. The purpose of this course is to pay attention to some of the ways that realism, as a particular narrative subgenre conjures ordinariness. We’ll consider the ways that realist fictions construct ordinary details (commodities, objects, settings, weather), ordinary actions (laboring, walking, falling in love), ordinary time (work days, boring dinners, long afternoons), and ordinary feelings (frustration, ennui, affection, resentment). Novelists will include Henry James, Theodore Dreiser, Frank Norris, and Stephen Crane; and we’ll also read some theoretical work by Rolan Barthes, Frederic Jameson, Lauren Berlant, and Kathleen Stewart. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AMST, ASLT.

ENGL 3624. MELVILLE. (4 Credits)

A seminar devoted to Herman Melville's writings, from the early travel narratives to the late poetry, including a careful reading of Moby-Dick. We will discuss Melville's views on race, sexuality, war, politics and art. This course is an excellent opportunity for students to refine their close reading skills. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT.

ENGL 3625. EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This course will examine texts written in and about early America from early narratives of exploration to nineteenth-century gothic novels. Special attention will be given to topics like relations between Europeans and Native Americans, the circulation of ideas between the Americas and Britain, the American Revolution, the tensions between religion and commerce, and controversies over class, gender, sexuality, race, and slavery. As we read a wide variety of authors ranging from John Smith and Benjamin Franklin to Olaudah Equiano and Harriet Beecher Stowe, we will investigate how literature both reflected and shaped the colonization and development of the Americas and the United States. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT, ENHD.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2000 or HPRH 2051 or ENGL 1004 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3630. BLACK AMERICAN ICONS. (4 Credits)

This course provides a focused exploration on the formation of Black American icons from the nineteenth century to the contemporary period, and it examines how race, gender, sexuality, and religion inform their work. Authors may include Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. Du Bois, Malcolm X, Angela Davis, Toni Morrison, and Barack Obama, among others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, ALC, AMST, ASLT, FCLC.

ENGL 3631. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FICTION. (4 Credits)

Novelists of our own time: Roth, Pynchon, Vonnegut, DeLillo, Morrison, and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AMST, ASLT.

ENGL 3633. THE ENLIGHTENED EARTH: AMERICAN LIT & CULTURE AFTER 1945. (4 Credits)

Since the Second World War, Americans have prepared for catastrophe. The Enlightenment's dream of the mastery of nature is threatened by forces such as atomic warfare, industrial pollution, and climate change. In this course, we will trace the responses to these threats in literature, film, and new media, organized into four broad categories: the Long 1960s, Postmodernism, Neo-Thoreauvian nature writing, and "cli-fi" (climate fiction). We will investigate how altered environments reshape ideas of the American project through major works by Gary Synder, Alice Walker, Mark Z. Danielewski, Octavia Butler, and Louise Erdrich, among others. The literature will be accompanied by transmedia storytelling that carries literary ideas to global audiences, beginning with environmental horror, adventure, Noir, anime, and documentary film. Digital art, a graphic novel, television, and video games will cap this course as we discover the genres of the enlightened earth today. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, AMST, ASLT, ENST, ESHC.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or MVST 2000 or MLAL 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001.

ENGL 3636. INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This course will survey African American Literature from the 18th century to the present. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AFAM, ALC, AMST, ASLT.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or COLI 2000 or CLAS 2000 or MLAL 2000 or MVST 2000.

ENGL 3646. BLACK DISABILITY STUDIES. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the intersections of blackness and disability in African American literature and culture from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. We will consider how disablement as experience and as discourse has shaped racial subjecthood for African Americans, influencing notions of racial health and citizenship in the United States. In addition, we will explore how Black writers, thinkers, and activists acknowledge the ways disability intersects with blackness to understand more fully the complexities of racial injury and subjection. We will tackle these matters by examining the work of Henry Box Brown, William and Ellen Craft, James Weldon Johnson, Octavia Butler, Toni Morrison, Pearl Cleage, and Mamie Till-Mobley, among others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AFAM, ALC, AMST, ASLT, COLI, DISA.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or COLI 2000 or CLAS 2000 or MVST 2000 or MLAL 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001.

ENGL 3650. STAYIN' ALIVE: PERFORMING BLACKNESS AND WHITENESS IN 1970's US FILM AND LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

Using film—Hollywood and independent—as the primary texts, this course will introduce students to many of the debates surrounding the political and social climate of the US in the 1970s marked by the increasing influence of identity politics, the Ethnic Revival, and black power. Using texts ranging from Sounder (1972) to Saturday Night Fever (1977), this interdisciplinary class will use film, media and performance studies to consider the ways in which intersecting modes of identity develop and change across US historical eras, particularly through the dissemination of media images. Ancillary reading will draw from autobiographies, journalism, history and the popular criticism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AFAM, ALC, AMST, ASAM, ASLT, PLUR.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or COLI 2000 or MLAL 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001.

ENGL 3652. NEW WAVE IMMIGRANT LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

If the immigrant of the late 1800s and early 1900s valued assimilation, the post-1965 newcomer to America has forged a new cultural identity. This course will look at the attempts to situate oneself in America while maintaining a tie to one’s family’s country of origin in works by authors such as Amy Tan, Bharati Mukherjee, Gish Jen, Jamaica Kincaid, Edwidge Danticat, Cristina Garcia and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, ALC, AMST, ASLT, COLI, LALS, PLUR, URST.

ENGL 3653. MAJOR AMERICAN AUTHORS: (Advanced Literature Core). (4 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to major American authors. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT.

ENGL 3673. POSTMODERN LITERATURE AND CULTURE. (4 Credits)

Postmodernism marks the time and space after WW II; the globe has become the global market, producing wide ranging cultural and political effects. These effects are explored in various experimental novels by American writers including Philip K Dick, Pynchon, De Lillo, William S. Burroughs, and David Foster Wallace. The course will concentrate on a selection of novels that attempt to make sense of a world dominated by commodities and images in a time of endless war. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT, COLI.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000.

ENGL 3677. LATINO/A US LITERATURES. (4 Credits)

An introduction to Latino-American literature. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ASLT, LALS.

ENGL 3691. BLACK ATLANTIC LITERATURE: IMAGINING FREEDOM. (4 Credits)

The foucs of this course is contemporary black literature across the African Diaspora. We will read literature written in the 21st century, and we will investigate the manner in which authors in various locales around the world creatively explore the meaning of black identity and freedom. Authors include: M. NourbeSe Philip, Zadie Smith, ChimamandaAdichie, Mat Johnson, and Helen Oyeyemi. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AFAM, ALC, AMST, ASLT.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or COLI 2000 or CLAS 2000 or MLAL 2000 or MVST 2000.

ENGL 3701. AMERICAN WRITERS IN PARIS. (4 Credits)

As a capital of modern Western culture, Paris has long been attractive to experimental artists from other countries, a home in exile to find supportive audiences, publishers, and collaborators. For American writers in the 20th century, this activity took place in roughly two movements: after WWI , the "Lost Generation" of Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Stein, and others, and after WWII a circle of African American authors including Wright, Baldwin, and Himes. Through a selection of their works, as well as the art and music of the period, this course will explore the creative aims and cultural contexts of these two innovative groups. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, ALC, AMST, ASLT, COLI, ISEU, ISIN.

ENGL 3702. AMERICAN NATURALISM. (4 Credits)

American Naturalism surveys some of the most uncompromising literature that U.S. writers have ever produced. Naturalism, an offshoot from the post 1865 turn toward realism in U.S. literature and art, has a generally harsher outlook characterized by deterministic surroundings and influenced by new developments in science, especially Darwinian evolution. Many naturalist writers were denounced in their own time as sordid and immoral, charges that we will explore and assess. Though mainly associated with the 1890-1910 period during which it flourished, American naturalism is not restricted to work produced between those dates. Naturalism continued to thrive after that era-this course ends with Wright’s Native Son, a book that was published in 1940. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or HPLC 1201 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3802. LITERATURE AND IMPERIALISM. (4 Credits)

This course explores key debates in the study of literature and in the history of imperialism. Attention will be paid to the importance of literary form and historical representation as well as the relation between the two. A major concern of the course will be to examine the problems posed for any study of culture by legacies of imperialism. Readings will likely include Joseph Conrad, Mahasweta Devi, Naruddin Farah, Rudyard Kipling, Salman Rushdie, Tayeb Salih, Olive Schreiner, and Pramoedya Ananta Toer. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, GLBL, INST, ISIN, PJST.

ENGL 3834. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. (4 Credits)

The subject of this course will be the history of English from the Old English period to the present day, and the range of varieties that are found throughout the world. We will study the visual forms English has taken from early runic engravings through medieval manuscripts to recent texts; the radical changes that have taken place in the structure of English over the centuries; the position of English as an "international" language; variation in English grammar and pronunciation; how individual speakers vary their use of the language; and how far it is possible to speak of "good" and "bad" English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, MVLA, MVST.

ENGL 3836. FICTION INTO FILM. (4 Credits)

Cinematic adaptation of novels and short stories. Problems of narrative, genre, film language, imitation, etc., will be studied in the works of film makers such as Bresson, Merchant/Ivory, Antonioni, Wyler, Renoir, Lean, Bunuel, etc. Lab fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COLI.

ENGL 3840. THE CLASSIC MYSTERY. (4 Credits)

Literary and social evolution of the mystery genre from its 19th century origin in Poe, Collins and Doyle, to the 20th century development of "locked room" and "hard-boiled" forms, and more recently, the rise of the woman detective. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ENGL 3841. CONTEMPORARY FICTION. (4 Credits)

What makes comtemporary fiction "contemporary"? How does it differ from pre-World War II fiction or so-called "modernist" writing? This course explores the fundamental transformation of the way contemporaries see the world, dealing with writers as diverse as Kundera, Nabokov, Philip Roth, Pynchon, Ishmael Reed, Joan Didion, Marquez, Mishma, Robbe-Grillet, Patrick Suskind, Calvino and Vonnegut. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT, LAHA, LALS.

ENGL 3842. THE SHORT STORY. (4 Credits)

A fun and rigorous romp through great short stories, such as those by Poe, Hemingway, Atwood, and O'Connor. We will read and discuss a range of fabulous short fiction to find out how such narratives work and how they challenge our expectations about ourselves and the world around us. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

ENGL 3851. Horror and Madness in Fiction and Film. (4 Credits)

How and why do we respond to horror, madness and rage in film and literature? What are our reactions and responsibilities? Starting with the Alien series, the course moves to works by Stanley Kubrick, Steven Spielberg, Toni Morrison, Virginia Woolf, Sigmund Freud and Emmanuel Levinas, among others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COLI.

ENGL 3916. ANIMALS IN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

An investigation of 19th-century writings on the "animal mind" as a context for understanding such literary endeavors as Melville's "Moby Dick" and Jack London's "Call of the Wild". Topics to be addressed include animal rights, animal/human relations, domestication, and animal language. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AMST, ASLT, ENST, ESEJ, ESHC.

ENGL 3922. INTERNSHIP SEMINAR: CAREERS IN ENGLISH. (4 Credits)

Fordham's English majors in New York City enjoy numerous opportunities for Internships in fields like publishing, magazines, and TV and on-line media. Inernships provide students with the chance to explore different avanues of potential professional development through hands on experience. Previous English majors have pursued internships ranging from daily newpapers and television networks, to theater and arts organizations and public service and non-profits. The internship seminar allows students to gain a full elective's worth of credit for their internship work. The internship seminar meets once a week to discuss readings relating to on-site work in the field. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ENGL 3930. INTRODUCTION TO GAY AND LESBIAN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This course will read texts by a diverse range of Anglophone authors, emphasizing the cultural history of same-sex indentity and desire, heteronormativity and oppression, and queer civil protest. It will also consider the problems of defining a queer literary canon, introduce the principles of queer theory, and interrogate the discursive boundaries between the political and personal. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AMST, ASLT, COLI.

ENGL 3943. SOCIOLINGUISTICS. (4 Credits)

The course will introduce students to sociolinguistics, the study of languages as they are used by ordinary human beings to communicate with one another and to develop and maintain social relationships. Topics will include language variation and change, codes, speech communities, ethnography and gender. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3964. HOMELESSNESS. (4 Credits)

This service learning course explores the literary representation--and lived experience--of homelessness. For the academic portion of the course, we will read a variety of books, including some (but not necessarily all) of the following: King Lear, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, The Wrongs of Woman, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Grapes of Wrath, When the Emperor Was Divine, and Voyage of the Sable Venus, as well as various essays and memoirs by and about homeless people. The service portion of the course will include meetings and discussions with homeless and formerly homeless people and at least 30 hours of volunteer work with a relevant service organization. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, ASLT, COLI, PJST, PLUR.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 3965. WRITER'S WORKSHOP 2. (4 Credits)

An intermediate workshop class for creative writing. For more information, go to the Fordham Intermediate/Advanced Creative Writing Workshops webpage. Pre-req: ENGL 3013 or ENGL 3014 or ENGL 3015 or ENGL 3016 or ENGL 3017 or ENGL 3018 or ENGL 3019 or by writing sample submission. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

Prerequisites: ENGL 3013 or ENGL 3014 or ENGL 3015 or ENGL 3016 or ENGL 3017 or ENGL 3018 or ENGL 3019.

ENGL 3966. FICTION WRITING 2. (4 Credits)

An intermediate workshop class for fiction writing. For more information, go to the Fordham Intermediate/Advanced Creative Writing Workshops webpage. Pre-req: ENGL 3013. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

Prerequisite: ENGL 3013.

ENGL 3967. CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING 2. (4 Credits)

An intermediate workshop class for creative nonfiction writing. For more information, go to the Fordham Intermediate/Advanced Creative Writing Workshops webpage. Pre-req: ENGL 3014 or by writing sample submission. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

Prerequisite: ENGL 3014.

ENGL 3968. POETRY WRITING 2. (4 Credits)

An intermediate workshop class for poetry writing. For more information, go to the Fordham Intermediate/Advanced Creative Writing Workshops webpage. Pre-req: ENGL 3015 or by writing sample submission. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

Prerequisite: ENGL 3015.

ENGL 3999. TUTORIAL. (3 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

ENGL 4005. THE MEDIEVAL TRAVELER. (4 Credits)

This course follows the routes of pilgrims, crusaders, merchants, nobles and peasants as they charted a course for lands of promise and hoped-for prosperity. In Medieval Traveler, we will read selections from the diaries, chronicles, and historical literature written by and about travelers in the Middle Ages. We will begin and end with travelers who sought miracles, marvels, and new trading routes on the cusp of the known world. We will focus in particular on the practicalities of medieval travel, and well as the reasons for traveling: the sacred, the profane, and everything in between. This will be an interactive class, be prepared to discuss and debate issues of interest. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, GLBL, HIST, ICC, MVLI, MVST, OCST, REST.

ENGL 4006. WRITING FOR PUBLICATION. (4 Credits)

See your name up in lights! Try your hand at getting published! Most publications rely on genres such as profiles, Q&As, reviews, personal essays, and service pieces supplied by both staffers and freelancers, working in print or multimedia. In this course, you will learn how to assess publications and find those that might publish you; write persuasive "pitch" letters (also known as queries) in which you propose article ideas; write and revise articles in a variety of genres; and learn how to use social media to promote your published work. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ENGL 4010. AMERICAN CRIME STORIES. (4 Credits)

Crime narrative has long been a staple of American literature and culture, traversing both high, so-called literary, fiction and lowbrow popular efforts which were sometimes named for how much they cost (dime novels) or for the cheap, course paper they were printed on (pulp fiction). We’ll be reading a selection of crime stories ranging from the antebellum era to contemporary times, but the main focus will fall on the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, the period when the distinctively American hard-boiled style evolved in print and the film noir became an identifiable American movie idiom. Authors include Dashiell Hammett, James Cain, Raymond Chandler and Patricia Highsmith. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT.

ENGL 4015. LONDON MODERNISMS: 1915-1925; PARALLELS AND PROSPECTS. (4 Credits)

British literary modernism is associated with London and the post-war period of 1915-1925, and particularly with the "annus mirabilis" of 1922, when many new literary works appeared in what was perceived as a new, "modern" literary style. This course will focus on the nature of literary modernism in London the early 20th century and connect it to modernism in the early 21st century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4018. THE POET'S CHOICE. (4 Credits)

"The Poet's Choice" offers a broad and occasionally irreverent survey of English poetry from canonical greats such as Shakespeare and Whitman to well-known contemporaries such as Seamus Heaney, Robert Hayden, Adrienne Rich and emerging young talents, such as Monica Youn, Terrance Hayes, and Brenda Shaughnessy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

ENGL 4032. SEMINAR: JOYCE'S ULYSSES. (4 Credits)

This seminar undertakes an intensive, chapter by chapter reading of Joyce's serio-comic epic, Ulysses, in the context of literary modernism and in relation to several theoretical frameworks: psychoanalytic, reader-response, gender studies, deconstructive, and post-colonial. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ENGL 4033. SOUND IN U.S. CULTURE, HISTORY, AND LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

While people have long been interested in studying the sensory experiences of everyday life, music popular and otherwise, and the technologies that produce and reproduce sound, only recently has “sound studies” become a self-defined interdisciplinary field that has drawn in scholars from art history, film studies, history, literary studies, music history, and other fields. Over the course of the semester we will explore different ways in which such scholars have approached the study of sound, assess the value of various keywords they have used to interpret sound in the United States, and assemble an archive of primary sources—texts, sites, events, figures, and objects—that help us ask new questions about U.S. culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or HPLC 1201 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4096. HOBBITS/HEROES/HUBRIS. (4 Credits)

Culminating with Tolkien’s The Hobbit, this course will examine the male hero, with all his cultural, philosophical, and individual limitations. We will take a close look at the epic journeys of Gilgamesh, Jeremiah, Ahab, Beowulf, and the Hobbit. Pride and Prejudice will provide a domestic counterpoint and alternative view of male heroism. The course emphasizes writing and oral presentation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP4, SRVL, VAL.

ENGL 4106. SEMINAR: THE GREAT DEPRESSION: LITERATURE AND CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This course studies one of the deepest economic. social, and cultural crises in American history, from the 1929 stock market crash through 1941. We will be reading major American writers of fiction, poetry, and drama (to include, among others, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Stevens, Odets, Hurston, Langston Hughes, and Richard Wright). But we will also attend to popular culture--newspapers, magazines, film, and radio. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, ALC, AMST, ASLT.

ENGL 4113. SEMINAR: WRITING WHITENESS. (4 Credits)

"As long as you think you are white, there's no hope for you" (James Baldwin). What could Baldwin have meant by such a provocative statement? This course will address the question by tracing the process by which some Americans have come to think of themselves as "white," a category defined both against their own ethnic and national origins and against racial "others." Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AMST, ASLT.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4118. DICKINSON, WHITMAN, AND COMPANY. (4 Credits)

This course examines the poetry of Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and their contemporaries. As we study the writings of Dickinson and Whitman across a variety of areas- love poems, poems about loss, poems about nature and art, historical and comic poems and religious poems- we will also link them to less familiar non-canonical poems from a variety of traditions. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

ENGL 4119. SEMINAR: GOD AND MONEY IN EARLY AMERICA. (4 Credits)

In Matthew, Jesus said “Ye cannot serve God and mammon,” that is, religion and wealth, at the same time. So how did American colonist reconcile their desires for salvation and prosperity? Did piety and profits always “jump together”? Reading both British and American literary text and recent scholarship in early American studies, this seminar will explore the language of spiritual and material wealth in colonial New England, the South, the West Indies, and the Mid-Atlantic. We will examine writing concerned with theology, morality, ethics, social class, economics, and economic self-making over the course of nearly two centuries – both on their own terms and in terms of how religion and economics shaped one another. Authors will include William Bradford, Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, Jonathan Edwards, Benjamin Franklin, Phillis Wheatley, and Olaudah Equiano. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AMST, APPI, ASLT, ENHD.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4120. SEMINAR: MILTON. (4 Credits)

“Knowledge of good and evil, as two twins cleaving together, leaped forth into the world,” John Milton claims in Areopagitica, an essay advocating against censorship. How do we tell one from the other? This course follows Milton’s attempt to do the sorting through his major poetry and his political, social, and theological advocacy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, REST.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or MLAL 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001.

ENGL 4121. NEW YORK CITY IN FICTION. (4 Credits)

This course will explore both short stories and novels written in and about New York City during the 20th century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AMST, ASLT, URST.

ENGL 4126. TEN SHORT FILMS ABOUT MORALITY. (4 Credits)

This seminar will focus on a close analysis of acclaimed Polish director Krzysztof Kieslowski’s cinematic masterpiece, The Decalogue (1988-89). The ten one-hour films of the series each examine the ambiguities of the Ten Commandments in the modern setting of late twentieth-century Poland. The films will be paired with substantial essays examining the “ten words” of the commandments from various religious, philosophical, and theoretical perspectives, as well as some key texts in critical and film theory. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, EP4, VAL.

ENGL 4127. SEMINAR: NOVELS BY WOMEN: JANE AUSTEN TO TONI MORRISON. (4 Credits)

An intensive study of novels by Jane Austen, George Elliot, Virginia Woolf, Zora Neale Hurston, and Toni Morrison. Our reading will be supplemented by literary criticism and historical contextual material. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, WGSS.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000.

ENGL 4128. LOVE AND SEX IN EARLY MODERN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

An exploration of ideas about love, the erotic and human sexuality from 1500 to 1700. Writers to be studied include Petrarch, Aretino, Shakespeare, Sidney, Wroth and Wilmot. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, WGSS.

ENGL 4135. BIBLE IN ENGLISH POETRY. (4 Credits)

This course studies some of the books of the Bible which have been most influential on English literature, together with English poetry and critical texts, from the Middle Ages to the present, which have been influenced by these biblical books. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMCS, ENHD, EP4, SRVL, VAL.

ENGL 4137. HYSTERIA/SEXUALITY/UNCONSCIOUS. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary seminar is sponsored by the Department of English and the Department of History. The seminar explores issues raised by hysteria, sexuality and the unconscious in turn of the twentieth-century western culture-topics that cross disciplinary boundaries. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: BEHR, BIOE, COLI, HIST, ICC, WGSS.

ENGL 4141. DEATH IN THE MIDDLE AGES. (4 Credits)

This course will examine death culture, including rituals of death, the instructions for a good death, visual depictions of death, and the great theme of the afterlife. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, EP4, MVLI, MVST, VAL.

ENGL 4143. SHAKESPEARE: TEXT AND PERFORMANCE. (4 Credits)

This course will study Shakespeare’s plays first as texts and then as performance, focusing on the literary/historical aspect of a play, and then the same play as a theatrical script for realization in a performance setting. Through close readings from these widely disparate points of view, we will try to grasp how the theater acts to engage audiences and create meanings, and how time and culture are expressed in both text and performance. We’ll investigate questions about adaptation, authorship, the status of “classic” texts and their variant forms, the transition from manuscript, book and stage to film and digitally inflected forms of media. Assignments will include readings, memorization, essays, and presentations. The final project can be an essay, the student’s short video of a Shakespeare excerpt, or a brief performance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, ICC.

ENGL 4144. HAMLET: TEXT & PERFORMANCE. (4 Credits)

We will study Shakespeare's _Hamlet_ as a historical/literary text and as a theatrical script. Through close readings from disparate points of view, we will encounter how the theatre acts to create meanings, and how time and culture are expressed in text and performance. Areas of study will include set design, costumes, film adaptations, literary rewritings, pop culture renditions, and references in music and advertising. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, ICC, THEA.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or COLI 2000 or CLAS 2000 or MVST 2000 or MLAL 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001.

ENGL 4145. DRAMATURGY. (4 Credits)

The word dramaturgy, "the art or technique of dramatic composition or theatrical representation," according to the Encyclopedia Britannica definition describes a series of practice that include aspects of playwriting, directing, and theatrical scholarship, This interdisciplinary seminar takes a capacious view of the practice of dramaturgy, approaching it as both a creative and a scholarly practice. As dramaturge, we will be literary and performance scholars, researching theater history, dramatic theory, and the broader cultural and historical contexts of our theatrical projects; we will also work as practitioners, collaborating with our peers to translate diverse texts into theatrical events. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, THEA.

ENGL 4146. THE BODY IN COMP WOMEN LITERATURE AND ART. (4 Credits)

How do we understand relationships among identity, gender, race, and the human body? How do recent women writers and artists explore this question? This course will examine visual art and writing since the 1980s that depicts--and seeks to understand--human embodiment, challenging the idea of a physical norm in order to expand how bodies (especially women's) are represented and known. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ENGL 4147. FOOD AND GLOBALIZATION. (4 Credits)

THIS COURSE WILL EXAMINE SCHOLARSHIP ON FOOD AND GLOBALIZATION FROM A RANGE OF DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES, INCLUDING ANTHROPOLOGICAL, SOCIOLOGICAL, HISTORICAL, AND LITERARY. IT WILL ALSO EXAMINE THE INTERDISCIPLINARY FIELDS OF FOOD STUDIES AND GLOBALIZATION STUDIES TO DISCUSS THE DEVELOPMENT OF GLOBAL EXCHANGE NETWORKS AND THEIR IMPACT ON CONSUMER CULTURES AND NOTIONS OF IDENTITY IN THE UNITED STATES AND BEYOND. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, ENST, ESHC, ICC, INST, ISIN.

ENGL 4148. MEDIEVAL DRAMA IN PERFORMANCE. (4 Credits)

Divine mysteries and scurrilous scatology, Everyman's workaday struggles and a king's political quandaries, lavish one-night courtly entertainments and massive Biblical plays performed by an entire community: the drama of the English late Middle Ages (roughly 1350-1500) was resourceful, local, non-professional, and endlessly inventive. In this course, we study medieval English drama along three axes: as literary texts full of humor, pathos, and meaning; as evidence for historical performance practice and theater history; and as scripts brimming with possibility for performance. Combining intensive reading of medieval play texts with key works by important theater practitioners, we examine medieval drama on its own terms and ask what it means to read and perform these works in the 21st century. To help answer this question, students collaboratively design, direct, and stage a medieval dramatic work of their choosing as a final project. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, ICC, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4149. MODERN DRAMA AS MORAL CRUCIBLE. (4 Credits)

The creators of modem drama made theater an arena for moral struggle and personal commitment. Plays by Buchner, Ibsen, Chekov and Shaw; relevant reading in history and philosophy. Senior values seminar. Literary Studies elective. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, EP4, IRST, ISEU, VAL, WGSS.

ENGL 4150. RACE AND HOLLYWOOD FILM. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary capstone course examines how contemporary US culture represents its racial others. Drawing on theories and methods from sociology, political science, philosophy, and literary theory, we will develop a provisional model of interdisciplinary cultural analysis that will enable us to examine how racial representations work, why they matter, and how they can be most fruitfully interpreted. We will then conduct a series of case studies in racial representation. Each case will be organized around a recent Hollywood film, and each film will be examined from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, with particular emphasis on how the various disciplines both illuminate and obscure various aspects of the racial representation at hand. The course will culminate in a series of group presentations, with each group presenting an interdisciplinary analysis of a recent racial representation of its own choosing. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, ICC, PLUR.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 2051 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or ENGL 1004 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4151. PERFORMING MEDIEVAL DRAMA. (4 Credits)

In the English late Middle Ages (roughly 1350-1500), theater was a thoroughly local affair. Performances spanned from one-night-only entertainments, acted by lavishly costumed noblemen for their peers, to massive cycles of city-specific religious plays, performed annually over a period of days by an entire community. Scurrilous scatology stood alongside the most divine of mysteries; the humble, menial struggles of Everyman had their place on stage just as much as the social and political quandaries of a king. In this course, we will study medieval English drama both as a body of literature and as a repository for medieval performance rhetorics we can experiment with in the present day. A series of assignments over the course of the semester will help us understand late medieval plays and their unique theatricality. The semester culminates with a collaboratively staged and publicly performed medieval drama of the student's choosing. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or AFAM 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or MVST 2000 or MLAL 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001.

ENGL 4172. DIVERSE BIOLOGY/SHARED HUMANITY. (4 Credits)

This course draws on readings and approaches from biology and literary studies to gain understanding of the diversity of human experience. Students will study the biological (genetic, metabolic, developmental, and neuronal) factors contributing to differences in human behavior, cognition, ability/disability, and appearance. Through the study of first-person narratives, poems, and other texts (including film), students will gain insight into the lived experiences of people they might not otherwise have come to know, even as they deepen their appreciation of the interdependence of self and other. Through reflection on readings in literature and science, students will come to recognize more fully what these disciplinary approaches offer to understanding our place in the world and our responsibilities to one another. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: DISA, ICC, PLUR.

Prerequisites: (ENGL 2000 or COLI 2000 or CLAS 2000 or MVST 2000 or MLAL 2000 or HPRH 1001 or HPLC 1201) and (NSCI 1030 or NSCI 1080 or NSCI 1051).

ENGL 4184. POSTWAR AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-cultural movements of the post-WWII war era as represented in American literature and history. Topics include the Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of history, identity, and responsibility. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ICC, LAHA, LALS.

ENGL 4185. CARIBBEAN ISLANDS AND OCEANS. (4 Credits)

Islands and oceans: these geographic features have defined both the history of the Caribbean and imaginative writing about it. Drawing on work by cultural geographers, historians, anthropologists, literary scholars, and others, this course will examine novels, poetry, travel narratives, essays and films about the Caribbean from 1492 to the present. As we read, we will think about how authors have used themetaphors of island and ocean not only to portray the Caribbean as a paradise but also to critique the devastation of its peoples and ecologies by the forces of empire and colonialism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENHD, ICC, INST, ISLA.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or HPLC 1201 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4206. COMPARATIVE STUDIES IN REVOLUTION. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary capstone seminar engages students in a series of literary and historical studies of revolutionary (and counter – revolutionary) movements (e.g. the Haitian revolution of 1791, the Indian Rebellion of 1857, and the events of 1965 in Indonesia). Examining historical documents, works of fiction, literary theory and historiography, the seminar will investigate how the disciplines of history, literary criticism, and cultural studies more generally, seek to explain revolutionary historical change. Particular attention will be paid to the authority of textual evidence placed within interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and multi-media contexts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, ICC, PJST.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4207. COMPARATIVE STUDIES IN EMPIRE. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary capstone seminar will study the interrelation between different imperial formations (e.g. Roman, Ottoman, Mongol, British, Chinese, and American) and the various linguistic, literary, and cultural traditions that give them imaginative and historical shape. Attention will be paid to the importance of literary form and historical representation. Juxtaposing historical and fictional texts from different cultural and historical moments, the seminar will explore how these texts foreground problems of historical documentation and textual authority. The seminar will also study how these foundational problems, shared by the disciplines of history and literary criticism, are embodied in other media, notably music and film. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, IRST.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4209. LITERATURE OF PEACE AND WAR. (4 Credits)

The decision to wage war is one of the most consequential moral choices we make. The struggle to achieve and maintain peace is one of the most challenging and abstract human goals. For all the ways that war and peace are tied up with politics, we can come to a better understanding of human experience of peace and war through art. This senior values seminar explores literary and cinematic representations of peace and war from Classical times to the present day. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP4, PJST, VAL.

ENGL 4227. BLACK LITERATURE AND FILM. (4 Credits)

From Malcolm X and Alex Haley’s The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1965) to Sapphire’s Push (1996), African American literature has certainly inspired several film adaptations throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries (like Spike Lee’s Malcolm X [1992] and Lee Daniels’s Precious [2009]). Indeed, the number of cinematic adaptations of African American literature suggests that there is not only a particular fascination with transforming literary works into films but also an abiding interest in seeing how a text will translate onto the big screen. This class will analyze selected texts (such as Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun [1959], Alice Walker’s The Color Purple [1982], and Terry McMillan’s Waiting to Exhale [1992]) alongside their cinematic counterparts (such as Daniel Petrie's A Raisin in the Sun [1961], Steven Spielberg’s The Color Purple [1985], and Forest Whitaker’s Waiting to Exhale [1995]) to discuss how literary and filmic texts measure up on their own worth as well as to examine how these texts mutually inform one another, particularly in the ways that they become remembered in the American cultural imagination. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AFAM, AMST, ICC, PJST, PLUR.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or COLI 2000 or MLAL 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001.

ENGL 4236. SEMINAR: LATIN AMERICAN SHORT STORY. (4 Credits)

Writings by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Julio Cortazar, Carlos Fuentes and Mario Vargas Llosa (to name just a few) are some of the treasures of world literature. This course will focus on the short story and novella forms in order to explore as fully as possible the full range of Latin American and Latino literature. Literary geographies will include Mexico, the Caribbean, Central & South America, with special sections on Cuba, Argentina, Chile and Brazil. All readings will be in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, AMST, ASLT, COLI, LALS.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or MLAL 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 1010.

ENGL 4246. MEDIA, DISABILITY, FUTURITY. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary capstone course explores the theme of futurity through the lenses of media studies, disability studies, and narrative studies. Futurity is not just the stuff of science fiction, but is rather an integrated part of the rhetoric we use when imagining the kind of world we want to build. Media and other digital technologies are often a part of this narrative imagining, and with those tools we often imagine which bodies we might repair, represent, or rebuild. Using a variety of interpretive and analytical methods, students will ask what futures are available to which bodies and why; how bodies are figured as legibly human, and how dominant narratives enable or foreclose the full expression of a range of embodiments. The object of analysis is simultaneously representative, linguistic, narrative or historical: this course argues that any critical examination of embodiment necessarily touches upon not only key cultural studies categories such as race, class, gender and sexuality, but also upon the question of technology’s relationship to the body and its narrative figuring of health and flourishing. Students will finish the course with a nuanced understanding of how contemporary texts both visual and linguistic determine a shared cultural imagining of a better world, and how we might work to craft that image in a more inclusive and socially just way. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, COMC, DISA, ICC.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4318. SEMINAR: EARLY WOMEN NOVELISTS. (4 Credits)

A study of the rise of female authors in eighteenth-century England. We will address problems of gender, race and class, as well as the basic literary and historical dimensions of each text we read. Authors will likely include Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Frances Burney, Mary Wollstonecraft, Ann Radcliffe, Jane Austen, and Charlotte or Emily Brontë. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ENHD, WGSS.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4370. DISGUST IN LITERATURE AND PSYCHOLOGY. (4 Credits)

This course will analyze disgust in literature (and related disciplines) and in psychology as primary emotion that exists in every culture. We will study fiction, poetry, and film--and also psychological research, as we explore what it means to be disgusted, and why we are motivated to read and view things that provoke disgust. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ASLT, ICC.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or MLAL 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051.

ENGL 4401. THE BRONTES IN CONTEXT. (4 Credits)

The study of the novels by the three Bronte sisters- Charlotte, Emily, and Anne- in the context of the social and cultural developments in 19th century England. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

ENGL 4403. EXTRAORDINARY BODIES. (4 Credits)

From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with non-normative bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bones from a variety of personal and social perspectives. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, COLI, DISA, EP4, VAL, WGSS.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or HPLC 1201 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4420. ETHICS AND INTELLIGENCE. (4 Credits)

This seminar will engage students in an intensive examination of the history, literature, and ethics of secret intelligence. Tracing the historical emergence of contemporary intelligence agencies from the early modern period up to the present, and with special attention to literary works from contrasting cultural traditions, the seminar will focus on three areas of expertise that have historically shaped he articulation and administration of both clandestine and public intelligence and information: the work of translators, the work of missionaries, and the work of government agencies.

Attributes: EP4, VAL.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4421. DISABILITY, LITERATURE, CULTURE: NEUROLOGICAL, MENTAL, AND COGNITIVE DIFFERENCE IN CULTURE & CONTEXT. (4 Credits)

Disability studies, the central focus of this course, is an inherently interdisciplinary field. Drawing particularly on two of its constituent disciplines, literature and sociology, this course will explore the questions and problems raised by neurological, mental and cognitive disabilities, as they relate to identity, community, and belonging. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, COLI, DISA, ICC.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4425. Seminar: Nathaniel Hawthorne. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the writing, life, and social world of Nathaniel Hawthorne. Paying particular attention to questions of literary form, history, national, trans-national, racial, and gender politics, we will read The Scarlet Letter, The House of the Seven Gables, The Blithedale Romance, The Marble Faun, and a selection of his tales. We will also consider Hawthorne's shifting role in the history of American literary criticism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ALC, ASLT.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000 or MLAL 1010.

ENGL 4490. BRITISH LITERATURE, HISTORY, AND CULTURE OF THE GREAT WAR. (4 Credits)

Focusing upon poetry, fiction, drama and memoir written between 1910 and 1925, this interdisciplinary course explores the historical, cultural and aesthetic impact of World War I. Literary works are paired with historical readings, early silent film, popular music and medical discourses. Using London and Great Britain as texts, the course features field trips to several important archives, including the The Imperial War Museum in London and Craiglockhart War Hospital near Edinburgh. Major modernist writers treated in the course include Thomas Hardy, G.B. Shaw, W.B Yeats, Rudyard Kipling, Wilfred Owen, T.S. Eliot, D.H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, Robert Graves, Ford Madox Ford and Rebecca West. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, IRST.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2000 or ENGL 1004 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or COLI 2000 or CLAS 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4603. ASIANS IN THE AMERICAS. (4 Credits)

This capstone course examines the histories, cultures, and politics of Asians in the Americas. Drawing on theories and methods from history, sociology, psychology, literary studies, and other scholarly disciplines, we will examine some major touchstones in the interdisciplinary field of Asian American Studies. Topics may include the global context of Asian migration to the west, Asians as coolie laborers in the US and the Caribbean, anti-Asian legislation, Japanese American internment during World War II, the geopolitical context of model minority discourse, gender and sexuality in Asian America, media representations of Asians and Asian Americans, and methodological debates in the field of Asian American Studies.

Attributes: AMST, COLI, ICC, ISAS, PLUR.

ENGL 4604. JAZZ AGE, LITERATURE, AND CULTURE. (4 Credits)

The glamour and glitz of the 1920s era known as "The Jazz Age" are the subject of this course, which examines changes in the literature and culture of the period between World War 1 and the end of Prohibition in 1933. The class examines popular culture, politics, and economic change in these years, through the lens of writers like Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Faulkner, as well as the writers of the Harlem Renaissance and the first wave of women's liberation. Sample topics include the Great Migration, World War I, the New Negro, the rise of the Ku Klux Klan, urban transformations, consumerism, homosexuality, and the influence of jazz and blues music. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

ENGL 4701. WRITER'S WORKSHOP 3. (4 Credits)

An advanced workshop class for creative writing. Admission by writing sample submission only. For more information, go to the Fordham Intermediate/Advanced Creative Writing Workshops webpage. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

ENGL 4702. FICTION WRITING 3. (4 Credits)

An advanced workshop class for fiction writing. Admission by writing sample submission only. For more information, go to the Fordham Intermediate/Advanced Creative Writing Workshops webpage. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4703. CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING 3. (4 Credits)

An advanced workshop class for creative nonfiction writing. Admission by writing sample submission only. For more information, go to the Fordham Intermediate/Advanced Creative Writing Workshops webpage. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

ENGL 4704. POETRY WRITING 3. (4 Credits)

An advanced workshop class for poetry writing. Admission by writing sample submission only. For more information, go to the Fordham Intermediate/Advanced Creative Writing Workshops webpage. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

ENGL 4705. CREATIVE WRITING CAPSTONE. (4 Credits)

This Capstone course is the exit requirement for English Majors concentrating in Creative Writing. Students will work on comprehensive creative and scholarly portfolios and a collaborative creative writing public exhibition project. The principal aim of the Capstone is to introduce our graduating students to the realities of the writer’s life, which necessarily involves not just individual work but also affiliation, cooperation, and community. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CVW.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 1002 or ENGL 1004 or ENGL 2000 or CLAS 2000 or COLI 2000 or HPLC 1201 or HPRH 1001 or HPRH 1051 or HPRH 2001 or HPRH 2051 or MLAL 2000.

ENGL 4998. ENGLISH HONORS THESIS TUTORIAL. (4 Credits)

Seniors with a 3.6 GPA or higher in English who wish to complete an ambitious project under the individual direction of a faculty member should register for this course. Discuss this option with the Associate Chair in the term prior to the semester in which the thesis will be completed, and then choose a member of the faculty as an advisor for the thesis. The professor advising the project will set up parameters and deadlines at his/her discretion. At the end of the semester, there will be an honors defense with the advisor and one departmental reader.

ENGL 4999. TUTORIAL. (4 Credits)

Supervised individual study projects.

Historical Distribution courses

The following courses have the ENHD attribute and count toward the historical distribution requirement for the historical distribution requirement of the English major and the English major with a Creative Writing concentration.

Course Title Credits
ENGL 3020CREATIVE WRITING CAPSTONE0
ENGL 3031MEDIEVAL MONSTERS4
ENGL 3100MEDIEVAL LITERATURE4
ENGL 3101APOCALYPTIC REPRESENTATION BEFORE 18004
ENGL 3102MEDIEVAL DRAMA4
ENGL 3103EARLY ENGLISH DRAMA4
ENGL 3107CHAUCER4
ENGL 3109ARTHURIAN LITERATURE4
ENGL 3111MEDIEVAL ROMANCE4
ENGL 3113INTRODUCTION TO OLD ENGLISH4
ENGL 3114THE (MEDIEVAL) WALKING DEAD4
ENGL 3115MEDIEVAL WOMEN WRITERS4
ENGL 3121THE PEARL POET AND HIS BOOK4
ENGL 3125BEOWULF IN OLD ENGLISH4
ENGL 3127DREAMS IN MIDDLE AGES4
ENGL 3131MEDIEVAL TOLERANCE AND INTOLERANCE4
ENGL 3134LOVE IN THE MIDDLE AGES4
ENGL 3135IRISH AND BRITISH MEDIEVAL LITERATURE:CONNECTIONS AND COMPARISONS4
ENGL 3136MEDIEVAL MYSTICS4
ENGL 3140MYTH OF THE HERO: MEDIEVAL MEMORY4
ENGL 3144OTHER WORLDS4
ENGL 3151METAPHYSICAL POETS: RADICALS AND THE POETIC TRADITION4
ENGL 3206SHAKESPEARE4
ENGL 3207MILTON4
ENGL 3221SHAKESPEARE'S HISTORY PLAYS4
ENGL 3222SHAKESPEARE AND POPULAR CULTURE4
ENGL 3226STAGE VENGEANCE4
ENGL 3230EARLY RENAISSANCE POETRY4
ENGL 3234A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM4
ENGL 3239THE RISE OF THE NOVEL4
ENGL 3306JONATHAN SWIFT AND THE ART OF SATIRE4
ENGL 3311OPENING HEADS: WRITING ABOUT MINDS AND BRAINS BEFORE 18004
ENGL 3315LAUGH. CRV. HUM. QUAKE4
ENGL 3318EARLY WOMEN NOVELISTS4
ENGL 3319PLAYS AND PLAYERS: 1600-17004
ENGL 3329PLAYS AND PLAYERS, 1700-18004
ENGL 3333CAPTIVES, CANNIBALS AND REBELS: (ADVANCED LITERATURE CORE)4
ENGL 3334EARLY MODERN POETRY AND DRAMA 1579-16254
ENGL 3400AGE OF ROMANTICISM4
ENGL 3410JANE AUSTEN IN CONTEXT4
ENGL 3420POEMS OF SHAKESPEARE AND OTHERS4
ENGL 3537SATIRE, SEX, STYLE: THE AGE OF THOMAS NASHE4
ENGL 3604AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 18704
ENGL 3625EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE4
ENGL 3834HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE4
ENGL 4005THE MEDIEVAL TRAVELER4
ENGL 4119SEMINAR: GOD AND MONEY IN EARLY AMERICA4
ENGL 4120SEMINAR: MILTON4
ENGL 4127SEMINAR: NOVELS BY WOMEN: JANE AUSTEN TO TONI MORRISON4
ENGL 4128LOVE AND SEX IN EARLY MODERN LITERATURE4
ENGL 4135BIBLE IN ENGLISH POETRY4
ENGL 4141DEATH IN THE MIDDLE AGES4
ENGL 4143SHAKESPEARE: TEXT AND PERFORMANCE4
ENGL 4144HAMLET: TEXT & PERFORMANCE4
ENGL 4147FOOD AND GLOBALIZATION4
ENGL 4148MEDIEVAL DRAMA IN PERFORMANCE4
ENGL 4151PERFORMING MEDIEVAL DRAMA4
ENGL 4185CARIBBEAN ISLANDS AND OCEANS4
ENGL 4318SEMINAR: EARLY WOMEN NOVELISTS4
HPRH 1051MEDIEVAL LITERATURE AND ART3
HPRH 2001EARLY MODERN LITERATURE/ART3
THEA 4143SHAKESPEARE: TEXT AND PERFORMANCE4
THEA 4144HAMLET: TEXT AND PERFORMANCE4
THEA 4151PERFORMING MEDIEVAL DRAMA4

Creative Writing courses

The following courses (either in English or outside the department) have the CVW attribute and count toward the English major's creative writing requirement, the English major with a Creative Writing concentration, or the creative writing minor.

Course Title Credits
ENGL 3013FICTION WRITING4
ENGL 3014CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING4
ENGL 3015POETRY WRITING4
ENGL 3016SCREENWRITING WORKSHOP4
ENGL 3017DIGITAL CREATIVE WRITING4
ENGL 3019WRITER'S WORKSHOP4
ENGL 3020CREATIVE WRITING CAPSTONE0
ENGL 3062PROSE POETRY/FLASH FICTION4
ENGL 3068WRITING LONDON: OUTSIDERS4
ENGL 3071FAMILY MATTERS: MEMOIR4
ENGL 3965WRITER'S WORKSHOP 24
ENGL 3966FICTION WRITING 24
ENGL 3967CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING 24
ENGL 3968POETRY WRITING 24
ENGL 4701WRITER'S WORKSHOP 34
ENGL 4702FICTION WRITING 34
ENGL 4703CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING 34
ENGL 4704POETRY WRITING 34
ENGL 4705CREATIVE WRITING CAPSTONE4
ENGL 5151MASTER CLASS: WRITING3-4
ENGL 5177MASTER CLASS:WRITERS AS SHAPERS:THE SHORT STORY3-4
ENGL 5193MASTER CLASS:STUFF OF FICTION3
ENGL 5791POETRY OF WITNESS: MASTERCLASS3
FITV 2511SCREENWRITING I4
JOUR 3723INTERVIEWS AND PROFILES4
JOUR 3727WRITING FOR MAGAZINES4
JOUR 3783THEATER JOURNALISM4
NMDD 3020EXPLORATIONS IN DIGITAL STORYTELLING4
THEA 3700PLAYWRITING4

Courses in Other Areas

The following courses offered outside the department have the ENGL attribute and count toward the English majors and minors:

Course Title Credits
AFAM 3632HARLEM RENAISSANCE4
AFAM 3637BLACK FEMINISM: THEORY AND EXPRESSION4
AFAM 3667CARIBBEAN LITERATURE4
AFAM 3688AFRICAN LITERATURE I4
AFAM 3689AFRICAN LITERATURE II4
AFAM 3693CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN LITERATURES4
COLI 2000TEXTS AND CONTEXTS3
COLI 3000THEORY OF COMPARATIVE LITERATURE4
COLI 3137WORLD CINEMA MASTERPIECES4
COLI 3364NOVELS OF IDEAS: 19TH CENTURY4
COLI 3400MODERN JEWISH WRITING4
COLI 3450THE CITY IN LITERATURE AND ART4
COLI 3471LUIGI PIRANDELLO IN CONTEXT: THE SUBJECT AND ITS MASKS4
COLI 3500ADVANCED LITERARY THEORY4
COLI 3522STRANGE MEMORIES, STRANGE DESIRES4
COLI 3664POST COLONIAL LITERATURES4
COLI 3910US LATINO FILM MAKING4
COLI 4011NARRATING CHILDHOOD4
COLI 4014JEAN RHYS: REWRITING ENGLISH4
COLI 4020LITERATURE, FILM AND DEVELOPMENT4
COLI 4124SEMINAR: KIESLOWSKI'S DECALOGUE4
COLI 4125KIESLOWSKI IN THEORY AND HISTORY4
COLI 4126TEN SHORT FILMS ABOUT MORALITY4
COLI 4206COMPARATIVE STUDIES IN REVOLUTION4
COLI 4207COMPARATIVE STUDIES IN EMPIRE4
COLI 4320READING THE INDIAN OCEAN WORLD4
COLI 4420ETHICS AND INTELLIGENCE4
COMC 4246MEDIA, DISABILITY, FUTURITY4
FITV 2511SCREENWRITING I4
HIST 4137HYSTERIA, SEXUALITY, AND THE UNCONSCIOUS4
JOUR 3723INTERVIEWS AND PROFILES4
JOUR 3727WRITING FOR MAGAZINES4
JOUR 3741JOURNALISM WORKSHOP: REPORTING2
JOUR 3783THEATER JOURNALISM4
LALS 3344CRIME, LITERATURE, AND LATINOS4
LALS 4005QUEER THEORY AND THE AMERICAS4
LING 1100INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS3
MLAL 1100INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS3
MLAL 3070RUSSIAN VISIONS: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN RUSSIAN LITERATURE AND ART IN MID-19TH/EARLY 20TH CENTURY4
MVST 4005THE MEDIEVAL TRAVELER4
MVST 5077EDITING MEDIEVAL TEXTS4
PSYC 4370DISGUST IN LITERATURE AND PSYCHOLOGY4
THEA 3700PLAYWRITING4
THEA 4143SHAKESPEARE: TEXT AND PERFORMANCE4
THEA 4144HAMLET: TEXT AND PERFORMANCE4
THEA 4148MEDIEVAL DRAMA4
THEA 5700PLAYWRITING WORKSHOP4
WGSS 3001QUEER THEORIES4
WGSS 3318EARLY WOMEN NOVELISTS4
WGSS 4005QUEER THEORY AND THE AMERICAS4
WGSS 4127SEMINAR: NOVELS BY WOMEN: JANE AUSTEN TO TONI MORRISON4