Classical Languages and Civilization

The classics department at Fordham teaches courses in the Latin and Greek languages as well as courses pertaining to the culture of ancient Greece and Rome. Two areas of major or minor concentration are offered: classical languages and classical civilization. Classical languages involve the study of Latin, Greek, or both languages and literatures. A concentration in classical civilization requires no study of Latin or Greek, although it may be included; rather it consists of courses in Greek and Roman literature, history, mythology, art, philosophy, religion and other areas, all taught in English translation. Acquaintance with, and appreciation of, classical languages and literatures and the classical tradition is essential to Fordham’s identity as a university in the Catholic tradition.

Program Activities

Students who are academically qualified are invited to become members of Eta Sigma Phi, the National Honors Society for Classics. Chapters are operative on both campuses. The department encourages and supports the activities of an undergraduate classics club. All undergraduates are invited to the lectures sponsored by the department, including the annual Robert Carrubba Memorial Lecture.

Students are also encouraged to take advantage of the many opportunities for study abroad available through Fordham both during the summer months and the academic year.

Fellowship monies are available for qualified students majoring in classics during their junior and senior years.

Courses outside the department

The following courses offered outside the department have the CLAS attribute and count toward the Classics majors and minors:

CourseTitleCredits
ANTH 1300INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY3
ANTH 3110ANCIENT CULTURES OF THE BIBLE4
ARHI 2305GREEK ART4
ARHI 2311ATHENS AND ANCIENT GREECE: ATHENS AND PERICLES IN THE FIFTH CENTURY BC “GOLDEN AGE”4
ARHI 2312HELLENISTIC ART4
ARHI 2315ROMAN ART4
ARHI 2320THE FALL OF ANCIENT ROME: A MATERIAL CULTURE INVESTIGATION4
ARHI 3200MUSEUM STUDIES IN ANCIENT ART4
ARHI 3315THE CITY OF ROME4
ARHI 3316ART AND ARCHITECTURE OF ROME4
ENGL 3219SHAKESPEARE AND THE ANCIENTS4
HIST 1200UNDERSTANDING HISTORICAL CHANGE: ANCIENT HISTORY3
HIST 1210UNDERSTANDING HISTORICAL CHANGE: ANCIENT GREECE3
HIST 1220UNDERSTANDING HISTORICAL CHANGE: ANCIENT ROME3
HIST 1240UNDERSTANDING HISTORICAL CHANGE: THE ANCIENT WORLD3
HPRH 1001ANCIENT LITERATURE3
HPRH 1002ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY3
HPRH 1003ANCIENT HISTORY AND ART3
HPRH 1004HONORS: MATHEMATICS3
HUMA 1920PLATO AND ARISTOTLE2
LING 1100INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS3
MLAL 1100INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS3
MVST 5050WORLD OF LATE ANTIQUITY: INTRO TO HISTORY, ART AND CULTURE4
PHIL 3501ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY4
PHIL 3502PRE-SOCRATIC PHILOSOPHY4
PHIL 3504STOICS AND SKEPTICS4
PHIL 3520PHILOSOPHY OF ARISTOTLE4
PHIL 3525PHILOSOPHY OF PLATO4
PHIL 3526PLATO: THE UNREAD DIALOGUES4
PHIL 3557CONFESSIONS OF AUGUSTINE4
PHIL 4410LOVE AND EMPIRE4
PHIL 4412CLASSICAL VALUES: ART OF LIVING4
PHIL 5001INTRODUCTION TO PLATO3-4
POSC 3411CLASSICAL POLITICAL THOUGHT4
THEA 2000THEATRE HISTORY I: THE GREEKS4
THEO 3200INTRODUCTION TO NEW TESTAMENT3
THEO 3212GOSPEL OF JOHN3
THEO 3301CHRISTIAN TEXTS IN CONTEXT3
THEO 3310EARLY CHRISTIAN WRITINGS3
THEO 3314ST. AUGUSTINE OF HIPPO3

For more information

Visit the Classical Languages and Civilizations department web page.

The department participates actively in the Common Core Curriculum.

Classes in Latin or Greek fulfill the foreign language requirement. The B.A. requirement may be fulfilled by completing GREK 2001 GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE or LATN 2001 LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE or one advanced course. The prerequisite for GREK 2001 GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE or LATN 2001 LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE, the exit- level course, is GREK 1501 INTERMEDIATE GREEK I or LATN 1501 INTERMEDIATE LATIN I. Students with sufficient previous language training may be placed directly into the intermediate (GREK 1501 INTERMEDIATE GREEK I or LATN 1501 INTERMEDIATE LATIN I), literature (exit) (GREK 2001 GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE or LATN 2001 LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE), or advanced reading level in Greek or Latin (GREK or LATN 3000s).

HIST 1210 UNDERSTANDING HISTORICAL CHANGE: ANCIENT GREECE and HIST 1220 UNDERSTANDING HISTORICAL CHANGE: ANCIENT ROME are core area history courses. Core area courses are taken by all students during freshman and sophomore years and must be completed by the end of sophomore year.

The department offers three Texts and Contexts courses (CLAS 2000 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS): Myth in Greco-Roman Literature, Gender in Greco-Roman Literature, Tragedy and Comedy. All are level-two Eloquentia Perfecta courses.

CLAS 3030 ATHENIAN DEMOCRACY, CLAS 3050 PAGANS AND CHRISTIANS, CLAS 3141 LOVE, FATE, AND DEATH IN THE ANCIENT NOVEL, CLAS 4020 THE CLASSICAL TRADITION IN CONTEMPORARY FICTION AND FILM are level-three Eloquentia Perfecta courses.

Courses taken in the ancient world to fulfill core requirements may also be used for a major or minor in classics.

Classics courses

CLAS 1210. UNDERSTANDING HISTORICAL CHANGE: ANCIENT GREECE. (3 Credits)

A political, social, and intellectual history of ancient Greece from its origin to the death of Alexander the Great.

Attribute: HC.

CLAS 1220. UNDERSTANDING HISTORICAL CHANGE: ANCIENT ROME. (3 Credits)

Introduction to Roman History focusing on problems and sources.

Attribute: HC.

CLAS 2000. TEXTS AND CONTEXTS. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the literary analysis of texts and the cultural and historical contexts within which they are produced and read. Significant class time will be devoted to critical writing and to speaking about literature. Each section of Texts and Contexts will have a focus developed by the individual instructor and expressed in its subtitle. This course fulfills the Core requirements for the second Eloquentia Perfecta seminar.

Attributes: EP2, TC.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.

CLAS 2800. INTERNSHIP. (2 Credits)

CLAS 3030. ATHENIAN DEMOCRACY. (4 Credits)

A historical overview and morphological description of democracy as it was practiced in Athens from 508 BCE until 322 BCE. In addition to survey how Athenian democracy evolved and an overview of its most salient features, we will also investigate how classical Athenian democracy was imagined and criticized by leading thinkers contemporary with it. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, EP3, PJST.

CLAS 3031. THE SPARTAN MIRAGE. (4 Credits)

Beginning with a survey of the Ancient Sparta imagined by modern historians who strive to depict Sparta “wie es eigentlich gewesen” (“as it actually was”), we will examine select representations (both Ancient and Modern) of what the French historian, Francois Ollier famously termed “le mirage Spartiate.” From its influence on Plato’s political idealism to how Ancient Romans, French Revolutionaries, German Nationalists and modern mass media have each imagined Sparta we will review and critique these visions as exercises in cultural construction and appropriation in order to better understand the importance of what and how people choose to remember and forget -- and why. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, EP3.

CLAS 3040. LAW AND SOCIETY IN GREECE AND ROME (ADVANCED LITERATURE CORE). (4 Credits)

A survey of the systems of law in ancient Greece and Rome, focusing on the relation of the law to social values and to politics. The course ranges from law in Homer to the changing legal position of early Christianity in Roman society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, EP3, FCRH.

CLAS 3050. PAGANS AND CHRISTIANS. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, EP3.

CLAS 3141. LOVE, FATE, AND DEATH IN THE ANCIENT NOVEL. (4 Credits)

This course will provide an intensive introduction to the Ancient Novel Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: EP3.

CLAS 4020. THE CLASSICAL TRADITION IN CONTEMPORARY FICTION AND FILM. (4 Credits)

This course provides a survey of classical works from ancient Greece and Rome and their reception in contemporary literature and film. The objective is threefold: first, to learn about patterns of narrative intrinsic to the representation of myth and history in classical literature; then to observe how these patterns function both in works of the classical period and also in contemporary fiction and film; and finally, to consider why classical antiquity has proved an enduring source of inspiration for writers and film-makers of today. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, EP3, ICC.

CLAS 4040. THE BIRTH OF LEARNING: CLASSICAL EDUCATION THEN, NOW, AND IN NEW YORK CITY. (4 Credits)

This course offers a survey of classical education from antiquity through its reception in late antiquity among early Christian writers and into the present day. It is also an integrated service-learning seminar that requires on-site investigation into current approaches to teaching the Classics in several schools in NYC. We will use the traditional entry into the liberal arts-Trivium-to structure our readings and focus our inquiry into the purpose and value of an education in the humanities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP4, VAL.

CLAS 4050. ANCIENT ROMAN CITIES. (4 Credits)

This course offers a survey of ancient Roman cities in context. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, ICC.

CLAS 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

Greek Courses

GREK 1001. INTRODUCTION TO GREEK I. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the vocabulary and structure of ancient Greek, with emphasis on reading continuous passages. Attention to Greek history and civilization.

Attribute: ZLB1.

GREK 1002. INTRODUCTION TO GREEK II. (3 Credits)

This course will enhance the reading, writing, speaking and listening skills acquired by students in Introduction to Greek I or from prior study. It will further promote a deeper understanding of Greek and its literary and cultural traditions.

Attribute: ZLB1.

Prerequisite: GREK 1001.

GREK 1004. INTENSIVE ANCIENT GREEK. (4 Credits)

An accelerated introduction to the vocabulary and structure of the ancient Greek language. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

GREK 1501. INTERMEDIATE GREEK I. (3 Credits)

A continuation of GREK 1002 or 1006 with an introduction to the reading of various prose authors.

Attribute: ZLB1.

GREK 2001. GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. (3 Credits)

Advanced reading in classical Greek authors.

GREK 3034. READINGS IN HOMER (ADVANCED LITERATURE CORE / TAUGHT IN GREEK). (4 Credits)

Select readings in the Greek texts of Homer. Discussions of the literary, mythological and historical background of the Homeric texts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

GREK 3200. READINGS IN GREEK. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: GREK 2001.

GREK 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Advanced-level courses will be taken either as tutorials in selected Greek texts or on the Rose Hill campus where students may select from among the offerings of the classics department there.

Latin Courses

LATN 1001. INTRODUCTION TO LATIN I. (3 Credits)

An introduction to Latin grammar with selected readings.

Attribute: MVST.

LATN 1002. INTRODUCTION TO LATIN II. (3 Credits)

This course will enhance the skills acquired by students in Introduction to Latin I or from prior study. It will further promote a deeper understanding of Latin and its literary and cultural traditions.

Attributes: MVST, ZLB1.

Prerequisite: LATN 1001.

LATN 1004. INTENSIVE LATIN. (4 Credits)

LATN 1501. INTERMEDIATE LATIN I. (3 Credits)

A continuation of LATN 1002 with an introduction to the reading of texts.

Attribute: MVST.

LATN 2001. LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. (3 Credits)

An appreciation of the language, literature, and culture of antiquity through original readings in classical Latin authors.

Attribute: MVST.

Prerequisite: LATN 1501.

LATN 3000. LATIN POETRY. (4 Credits)

To introduce advanced students of Latin to the lyric poetry of Catullus and Horace through translation, stylistic and metrical analysis and discussion of the poets' literary tradition. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COLI.

LATN 3009. HORACE: ODES. (4 Credits)

Readings in and literary analysis of the Odes of Horace. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

LATN 3021. ROMAN LOVE POETRY. (4 Credits)

Readings from the works of Catullus, Ovid, Propertius and Tibullus. Study of Metrics and Poetic Forms. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LATN 3041. OVID. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

LATN 3043. DRAMA IN ANCIENT ROME. (4 Credits)

Close reading of selections from Plautus, Terence and Seneca. The cultural history of Roman drama. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LATN 3050. CICERO'S ORATIONS. (4 Credits)

Reading in the speeches of Cicero. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LATN 3060. READINGS IN VERGIL. (4 Credits)

Readings from Eclogues, Georgics, and Aeneid. Taught in Latin. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

Prerequisite: LATN 2001.

LATN 3061. CHRISTIAN LATIN. (4 Credits)

A study of the language and literature of the late classical and early Christian eras. Taught in Latin. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, AMCS, COLI, MVST, REST.

LATN 3300. ADVANCED LATIN. (4 Credits)

A reading of selections from Ovid's Amores and his Ars Amatoria, with cultural and literary analysis. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

LATN 3332. SENECA'S LETTERS. (4 Credits)

A select survey of Seneca's Moral Epistles in Latin. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: LATN 2001.

LATN 3456. IMPERIAL LATIN BIOGRAPHY. (4 Credits)

A reading of selections from the imperial lives of the "Historia Augusta," with literary and historical analysis. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

LATN 3466. LATE LATIN POETRY. (4 Credits)

A survey of late-antique Latin poetry, in particular Claudian, Aussonius, Rutilius, and the Centones. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: LATN 2001.

LATN 3999. TUTORIAL. (3 Credits)

LATN 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Classical Civilization.