PCS Programs

Interdisciplinary Study (IDIS) courses

IDIS 1001. Quantitative Skills Review Workshop for Social Studies. (0 Credits)

This workshop is the perfect opportunity to get a refresher or review of quantitative skills for those pursuing studies in the Sciences. While the workshop is designed for students in the Post-baccalureate /Pre-Medical/Pre-Health program, it is open to all students who need or would like instruction or a refresher in the listed subject areas. The workshop will provide students with the necessary foundation for Chemistry, Physics, Calculus, Psychology, and other courses needed to prepare for advanced science studies. The 5-session workshop, conducted in a relaxed setting, will cover essential topics that will help prepare you for a rigorous science curriculum. Topics will include a review of basic algebra, refresher on exponents and radicals, functions and graphs, logs and exponents, polynomial and rational equations, calculator use and exponential and logarithmic expressions. An optional trigonometry overview is available. In person lessons, video links and resources will be provided and in-class problem sessions will assist to increase your math skills and confidence.

IDIS 1002. MCAT Problem Solving: A Unique Approach for ESL. (0 Credits)

The purpose of this two-part workshop is to help students effectively handle the reading passages on the MCAT. General preparation strategies for the MCAT will be presented with a focus on the CARS portion of the exam, emphasizing careful and efficient reading of questions, and applying these techniques to the science sections of the test. While this material is designed specifically for pre-med students for whom English is not the first language, the workshop is for anyone who is struggling to handle the large amount of written material on the MCAT. The sessions discuss the structure of the MCAT while helping students identify and address the skills that are being tested. The workshop will provide techniques and strategies that can be adapted for dealing with the verbal aspects of the MCAT.

IDIS 1003. Health Professions Development Seminar. (0 Credits)

The CHP Development Workshop sets the preparatory framework for post-baccalaureate/pre-medical/pre-health students who have been selected to participate in the Committee on Health Professions process. The workshop, intended only for students who are in the Committee on Health Professions program, covers the requisite areas for their aspirant school application cycle, which includes strategies and techniques for MCAT test preparation and test taking, preparing narratives, interviewing skills, and the CHP portfolio process, which will lead to the CHP letter to support school applications. Prior approval from the program director is required.

IDIS 1005. College Skills Development-1. (3 Credits)

IDIS 1006. College Skills Development. (4 Credits)

This course, open to entering first-year students accepted through HEOP, is designed to enhance student skills related to college composition, critical reading, mathematical analysis, science, and economics. It is offered as part of the mandatory HEOP Summer Program for new entering first-year students. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 1007. College Skills Development-2. (3 Credits)

IDIS 1010. Critical Reading in the Disciplines. (3 Credits)

This course will provide students with the critical skills necessary to read successfully and use reference materials at the college level. Selections from disciplines such as literature, psychology, history, and natural sciences will be analyzed for information, main and subordinate ideas, logical structure, inference, tone, and irony. Written exercises and reports will measure students’ comprehension.

IDIS 1100. The Adult Learner: Identity, Change, and Development. (3 Credits)

This seminar has been designed to encourage each student to study his or her own unique identity development in adulthood. Each adult learner will be assisted in examining their skills, values, goals, experience, educational background, learning style and personality. Students can use this information for both short and long term career, educational and life planning. This new self-discovery will be developed through assessment testing, occupational research, informational interviewing and consultations with career development and educational specialists. The course utilizes a combination of readings, lecture, class discussions, presentations, exercises, guest speakers and video material.

IDIS 1200. Seminar: Career Transition Leaders. (1 Credit)

Designed to enhance students’ personal/professional understanding of career development and life management skills to transition to a professional/corporate career. The course will assist students to obtain internships in a structured, interactive, open form. It will also offer access and networking with employers.

IDIS 1250. Foundations of Community and Public Health. (3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to community and public health. We will study the foundations of community and public health using readings and class discussions, and will examine prevailing community and health problems and new developments. There will be an emphasis on developing the knowledge base and skills necessary for a career in health education and health promotion. Topics will include definitions of health, community health, public health, and mental health, epidemiology, communicable and noncommunicable diseases, environmental health, health disparities in various population demographics, and racial and ethnic populations. Practitioners and experts in the field will be invited to give presentations to the class. Students will get opportunities to explore the various health issues and discuss prevalence of various diseases, with a focus on COVID-19, diabetes, asthma, and other diseases, as well as opportunities to participate in a volunteer experience in a clinical/hospital setting.

IDIS 3015. Culture and Community. (4 Credits)

A study of culture and community in contemporary American society and lifestyles. The course will study the entire way of life that is faced by various groups in American life. An interdisciplinary consideration of the concepts of culture and community will be studied. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3020. War and New York City. (4 Credits)

This course is an explanation of the impact of war on the political, social, economic, and cultural development of New York City. The course will examine wars and times of conflict from several periods in American history, including, but not limited to: the American Revolution, the Civil War, WWII, and September 11th. An integral element of this course will be using the City itself as our classroom. We will be making several field trips to various locations of historical events, museums, etc.0 Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3025. Social Problems in America. (4 Credits)

This course will examine and study major issues and problems in contemporary American society in the context of individuals and community in a complex society. Research and writing will use an interdisciplinary approach. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3035. The Helping Professions: Theory and Practice. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the helping professions and the issues related to becoming a well-trained professional, including ethics, burnout, motivation, dual relationships, and boundaries. The class will also examine the major theories and the techniques used by psychoanalysis, cognitive behavioral therapy, group therapy, and others.

IDIS 3040. Gettysburg: A Study Tour. (4 Credits)

Three days and 51,000 casualties ¿ the Battle of Gettysburg was the turning point of the Civil War and a seminal moment in the history of the United States. So striking was the battle, President Abraham Lincoln vowed that the men who died there did not do so in vain ¿ in fact their sacrifice gave ¿a new birth of freedom¿ to the idea of democracy for the world. Robert E. Lee, deeply depressed at his failure, fearing he cost his nation the possibility of independence and peace, offered his resignation to Confederate President Jefferson Davis. This course will examine Gettysburg from several perspectives, including military and political strategy, Lincoln¿s Gettysburg Address, Davis¿ and Lee¿s reactions, and the battle¿s long-lasting impact on American society and mythology. The course includes an overnight field trip to the Gettysburg Battlefield. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3045. Presentation Strategies for Professional Impact. (4 Credits)

Competent and compelling presentations are important in all professional settings. In this class, students develop their public presentation and performance skills by exploring physical and vocal communication techniques. Taught in a workshop format, students explore verbal and nonverbal communication, use of visual aids, organization, and delivery through weekly action-oriented exercises. Students learn strategies to enhance their public persona and gain confidence through instructor and peer feedback, developing the ability to create presentations that have professional impact. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3050. A Bloody Lane and Forever Free: Antietam, a Study Tour. (4 Credits)

Antietam – September 17, 1862 was the single bloodiest day in American military history. The 23,000 casualties on that single day were four times the number of casualties at Normandy. The number of men who died in combat that day was twice the number who died in combat during the War of 1812, the Mexican War, and the Spanish-American War combined. Antietam ended the British and French momentum for recognition of the Confederacy and gave President Abraham Lincoln the opportunity to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. This course will examine Antietam from several perspectives, including military and political strategy, Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, Davis’ and Lee’s reactions, and the battle’s long-lasting impact on American society. The course includes a two night field trip to the Antietam Battlefield. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3060. Civil War in Popular Memory. (4 Credits)

The Civil War has been the topic of over 50,000 books, thousands of websites, and hundreds of multimedia sources – ranging from films to television shows to comic books to video games. Americans have long been fascinated by the Civil War, which cost more Americans their lives than WW I, WWII, the Korean War, and Vietnam War combined. Much of what Americans know about the Civil War did not come from textbooks or scholarly sources or the classroom, but rather from popular culture. This course will explore how the Civil War is portrayed in popular culture and examine how Americans’ perception and memory of the Civil War has changed over time – change that often had more to do with American society at the time than the “facts” of the War itself Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3070. Baseball - the New York Game. (4 Credits)

Interdisciplinary course that will trace the relationship between baseball and New York society and culture. The course will study the early history of the game and historical developments as the emergence of the New York City professional teams in connection with government, culture and issues of society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3071. Baseball: The American Game. (4 Credits)

Baseball: The American Game is an interdisciplinary course that will trace the relationship between baseball and American society and culture. The course will study the early history of the game and historical developments during the emergence of the American professional teams in connection with government, culture, and issues of society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: HIST.

IDIS 3080. Winners and Losers in Literature and Film. (4 Credits)

Literature and film are filled with so-called “winners” and so-called “losers.” Who can claim these titles and why? Who decides and how? In analyzing these topics, we’ll explore what can be learned about the human condition in the individual and in society. Works discussed will include, Snow White; Goldilocks and the Three Bears; Death of a Salesman; Charlie Chaplin’s Little Tramp; Glengarry Glen Ross; My Left Foot, and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3090. Demoracy and Social Justice: A Global Perspective. (4 Credits)

Through a multi-disciplinary analysis, this course will explore global definitions of freedom, solidarity and the self within a social context. Readings will lead to discussions on resistance models influencing World Order and the criterion of an underclass, that must organize for transformative change for the sake of survival. Analysis of texts and classroom discourse will explore the development of a nation state, its emphasis on economic globalization, cultural difference and liberationist criticism, in conjunction with an analysis of social ethics and morality Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3800. Internship. (3 Credits)

Internship.

IDIS 3999. Tutorial. (3 Credits)

IDIS 4999. Tutorial. (1 to 4 Credits)

Organizational Leadership (ORGL) courses

ORGL 2000. Theories of Leadership, Context and Change. (4 Credits)

Designed to provide a context for the beginning student in the Organizational Leadership major, this course presents a range of theoretical perspectives and a common vocabulary for discussing leadership. It includes an analysis of historical concepts and contemporary theories, focusing on the idea of leadership and the contributions of several disciplines to our understanding of it. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 2100. Information Systems and Technology for Leadership. (3 Credits)

This course introduces computer terminology, hardware, and software related to the organizational environment. The focus of this course is on organizational leadership business productivity software applications and professional behavior in computing, as well as the use of software to support decision-making and to enhance efficiency. The course will emphasize the importance of the ethical use of technology and how technology can both advance and hinder organizational growth.

ORGL 2200. Transforming Managers into Inspired Leaders. (4 Credits)

This course will take an integrative view of the organization’s transformation, detailing which capabilities are most critical to success while providing key references to what defines the roles of leaders and how managers can acquire and develop leadership skills. There will be a focus on how managers are able to creatively innovate, inspire, and engage people to adapt to fast-paced transformation and minimize the risk of failure. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 2210. Ethical Decision Making for Leadership. (3 Credits)

Focuses on basic ethical viewpoints as a foundation and examines specific characteristics of business life through cases and examples. The fact that there is not one universal set of behaviors one considers ethical and no guidelines to follow to determine ethical behavior poses unique challenges to contemporary leaders. Yet, leaders are faced with situations where individual values may conflict with those of teams or organizations. Topics include professional responsibility and loyalty, conflict of interest, and employee rights, personal integrity and critical thinking in decision making.

ORGL 2300. Issues in Human Resource Management. (4 Credits)

An overview of current issues in human resource management in organizations. Topics include: career development, recruitment, retention, training, interviewing, performance appraisal and improvement, employee relation, technology, legal issues, compensation, motivation, ethics, work-life balance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 2400. The Legal Environment. (3 Credits)

The course provides the student with foundational information about the U.S. legal system and dispute resolution, and their impact on organizational practices. The major content areas will include general principles of law, the relationship of organizations and the U.S. Constitution, state and federal legal systems, the relationship between law and ethics, contracts, sales, torts, agency law, intellectual property, and corporate law in the global context. Emphasis will be placed on how law impacts decision-making and leadership strategies.

ORGL 2500. Change Management and Organizational Culture. (4 Credits)

This course will explore individual and group behavior in organizations. Scholarly perspectives, theoretical frameworks, practitioner methods, and measurement instruments within the field of organizational behavior and change management will be presented. Academic content and skills exercises emphasize the social, psychological, and cultural dynamics and practices influencing individual and group behavior. Key focus areas of the course include theories of organizational behavior, cultural change models, and the leader's role in assessing, facilitating, and achieving change. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 2600. Mediation, Negotiation, Alternative Dispute Resolution. (4 Credits)

A review of the history principles and practices of ADR (Alternative Dispute Resolution)--including mediation, negotiation, arbitration, conflict resolution--increasingly used in all areas of society (Law, Business, Family). Combines lectures and exercises. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: PJCP, PJCR, PJST.

ORGL 2610. Applied Organizational Behavior and Leadership. (4 Credits)

This course is designed for students to understand and apply major theories and research in industrial psychology for use in organizational settings. The course provides an overview of individual, group, and organizational issues related to relationships and performance. The purpose of the course is for students to discover how behavioral and psychological concepts can be applied in business and careers. The course prepares students for leadership positions in business and nonprofit organizations. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 2700. Organizational Communication. (4 Credits)

A hands-on review of communication theory and practice in organizations, including writing, oral presentations, and up-down/across communications. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 2701. Business Communications in Leadership. (3 Credits)

Business Communication is designed to facilitate students’ understanding of crucial communication principles and to develop effective writing skills. This course provides opportunities to analyze complex issues, organize thought logically, and communicate these complex ideas concisely. The core purpose of this course is to develop expertise in the theories and practices that will enable you to become an effective communicator in professional settings.

ORGL 2702. Interpersonal Communication. (4 Credits)

This course is designed to explore the field of ideas relating to human modes of communication and personal relationships in the shaping of our social environment and in formulating leadership styles. This course focuses not on developing a particular set of “skills” (communication competence), but to explore the overarching structures that influence interpersonal interaction and investigate research on some of the major topics of interpersonal communication. Students will explore such topics as the development of the self-concept, perception, language, nonverbal communication, and conflict management.

ORGL 2703. Digital and Social Media Marketing Communication in Leadership. (4 Credits)

Social media represents a new class of communication platforms that have become quickly interwoven into society. The course will examine various applications and strategies for communicating through social media, including managing personal and professional social media messages, social media content development and dissemination, and the importance of social media to business. The intention is to broaden perspectives, and to approach SMM from a communication strategist’s standpoint. Students will begin to appreciate the true value of digital and social media to consumers, to managers, and to other corporate stakeholders.

ORGL 2704. Interpersonal Behavior within Organizations. (4 Credits)

This course in interpersonal behavior is designed to give you exposure to essential concepts for analyzing, understanding, and managing human behavior in organizations and the behavioral influences which affect productivity, organizational effectiveness, and efficiency. The course will tie concrete organizational situations to effective management practices. The course will investigate: individual behavior in organizations, including personality, decision-making, and ethics and the impact on the organization; interpersonal behavior, including teamwork, conflict, leadership, social networks, and power and influence; and organizational factors affecting behavior, including reward systems, culture, and organizational design. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 2800. U.N. and Political Leadership. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, ISIN, PJCR, PJST.

ORGL 2900. Entrepreneurship. (4 Credits)

A hands-on overview of entrepreneurship today—its history, role in society, theory, and practice. Topics include developing a business plan, market analysis, value position, exit strategy, entrepreneurs, and managing creativity in organizations. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 3100. Leading with Emotional Intelligence. (4 Credits)

Leading with emotional intelligence is the capacity for effectively recognizing and managing our own emotions and those of others. It is self-awareness and self-management, social awareness, and social management and other items. The course relates IQ to organizational effectiveness and personal success. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 3110. Strategic Leadership, Development & Diversity. (4 Credits)

The course will focus on developing the cross‐cultural competence you need to lead effectively in the modern collaboration‐powered global marketplace – one that is more diverse than ever before on multiple dimensions. This course is designed to provide leaders with evidence‐based insights, as well as proven individual, interpersonal, enterprise‐level strategies to successfully harness the power of diversity and inclusion in teams, organizations, markets, and societies.

ORGL 3120. Leading Innovation: Strategies for Growth. (4 Credits)

In this course, students will gain a deeper understanding of why companies need exceptional leaders who can manage both exploiting established businesses and exploring innovative products and services. Through concrete examples, students will learn how to bring products to the right markets in a timely and efficient manner. They will be able to reflect on their own personal development and leadership skills. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: ORGL 2000.

ORGL 3200. Special Topics Seminar. (4 Credits)

This course will comprise distinct content models that relate to leadership and/or organizational behavior. The selected topics will address contemporary issues in organizational leadership. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 4000. Leadership Concepts and Cases. (4 Credits)

This course combines historical examples with vision into the future of organizational development to identify the qualities and responsibilities that will dramatically redefine and improve leadership performance in today's rapidly changing world of work. This course, through case study analysis, will help students identify and understand fundamental shifts in leadership development shifts that are essential if organizations are to grow and prosper. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 4800. Internship. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 4999. Leadership Tutorial. (1 to 5 Credits)

Real Estate (REAL) courses

REAL 1002. Fundamentals of Real Estate Law. (3 Credits)

This course introduces the legal concepts, laws, regulations, and risks involved in the acquisition, development, financing, leasing, and sale of real property. It discusses forms of ownership and co-ownership, the real estate transaction process from contract to closing, private property rights, and governmental restrictions on private property. The effect of mortgages, liens, and other encumbrances on the quality of title are also weighed. Students are introduced to estates and interests, deeds, easements, covenants, transferable development rights, eminent domain, zoning ordinances, environmental laws, and the legal aspects of a variety of commonly used real estate contracts including listing agreements, letters of intent, options, purchase and sale agreements, mortgages, insurance, construction contracts, and leases. Negotiation strategies, ethical issues, and fiduciary duties are addressed throughout the course.

Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and ECON 1200 and ECON 2140.

REAL 1004. Principles of Real Estate Economics. (3 Credits)

This course discusses the economic reasons for the growth and decline of real estate markets, along with the economic basis for location decisions by residential and commercial owners and tenants. The course includes a comprehensive overview of real estate market analysis, from the macroeconomic perspective to sector-specific drivers and considerations. Building upon a discussion of the basic principles of urban economics, the course explores the correlations of real estate valuations to regional and national economies, as well as the impact on specific property types resulting from macroeconomic business and growth cycles, key policy decisions, and changing monetary conditions. The course also examines the economic structure of major metropolitan areas, the influence of local governments on urban economic growth, the impact of urban economic growth on supply and demand for specific property types, and the factors that cause certain regions to thrive while others decline. The course identifies key indicators for tracking economic and real estate performance, as well as useful data sources and techniques for analyzing and forecasting real estate demand and supply for specific property types in specific markets. Class discussions will include current economic and real estate events and their potential impacts on real estate markets.

Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and ECON 1200 and ECON 2140.

REAL 1006. Real Estate Accounting Essentials. (3 Credits)

This class introduces general financial accounting principles, concepts, and rules, as established by U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). The fundamentals of financial statement development and analysis, including balance sheets, income statements, cash flow statements, and statements of owners' equity are covered, in addition to cash versus accrual accounting and accrual accounting rules that are specific to real-estate entities, including property owners, developers, and managers. The tax implications of business entity selection are introduced, along with tax accounting for the development, operation, and sale of cash flow producing properties including like-kind tax-free exchanges. Key topics to be covered are lease abstracts, rent rolls, security deposits, vacancy and collection loss, miscellaneous income, effective gross income (EGI) annual reports, fixed and variable operating expense (OE), net operating income (NOI), variance analysis, financial audits, operating budgets, capital budgets, replacement reserves, depreciation, property taxes, and before-tax cash flow (BTCF) and after-tax cash flow (ATCF).

Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and ECON 1200 and ECON 2140.

REAL 1008. Principles of Real Estate Finance. (3 Credits)

This course offers students a comprehensive orientation to how residential and commercial properties are financed and analyzed. It covers the investment property income statement, income and expense analysis, time value of money concepts, discounted cash flow analysis, capitalization theory, forms of debt and equity finance, mortgage concepts and terminology, mortgage instruments, equity concepts, and investment analysis. The course also introduces students to the broader real estate capital markets, securitization, the sources and uses of real estate funds, components of a capital structure, and the role of government in real estate finance.

Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and ECON 1200 and ECON 2142.

REAL 1010. Principles of Real Estate Valuation and Feasibility. (4 Credits)

This course introduces the theory, principles, and techniques for conducting valuation and feasibility studies of real property. The course emphasizes the importance of market analysis in the valuation and development process. The course covers real property concepts and characteristics, influences on real estate values, types of value, economic principles, market area analysis, and highest and best use. Students learn the three approaches to value--the income capitalization, cost, and sales comparison approaches--to reach an opinion of value. After examining income capitalization methods and formulas, students learn how rates and multipliers are derived. The cost approach is explored, showing how the cost of constructing a reproduction of, or replacement for, an existing structure is estimated. Land and site valuation are also covered. Finally, the sales comparison approach is covered, including researching the market, verifying information, selecting units of comparison, conducting a comparative analysis, and adjusting findings. Students learn basic concepts and terminology of market analysis and marketability studies and how marketability studies provide vital information for the highest and best use decision.

Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and ECON 1200 and ECON 2140 and REAL 1002 and REAL 1004 and REAL 1006 and REAL 1008.

REAL 1020. Real Estate Development Principles and Practices. (4 Credits)

This course presents a step-by-step examination of the real estate development process from idea conception to project completion. Students are introduced to the phases, procedures, and complexities of developing and redeveloping various property types, including multifamily, office, and mixed-use real estate. Students study the principal stages of development, including preliminary planning and market analysis, feasibility studies, site selection and acquisition, deal structure, financing, permitting, entitlements, design, construction, marketing, and asset management. This course also examines trends including mixed-use projects, public and private partnerships, and transit-oriented development.

Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and ECON 1200 and ECON 2140 and REAL 1002 and REAL 1004 and REAL 1006 and REAL 1008.

REAL 1999. Tutorial. (1 Credit)

Tutorial.

REAL 2002. Real Estate Financial Modeling. (4 Credits)

This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of the essential Time Value of Money (TVM) concepts and calculations employed in common real estate financial models and investment analyses. Beginning with an introduction to the property income statement, the pro forma and essential Excel software keystrokes, the course progresses to financial modeling best practices and more sophisticated Excel software techniques. Students will learn to develop a practical financial model from a set of project assumptions and merge appropriate TVM principles with Excel functions, tools, formulas, and shortcuts to arrive at investment decisions. Students will prepare basic income and expense models and amortization schedules while progressing forward to direct capitalization and discounted cash flow (DCF) analyses.

Attribute: REE.

Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and ECON 1200 and ECON 2140 and REAL 1002 and REAL 1004 and REAL 1006 and REAL 1008.

REAL 2004. Real Estate Management. (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to the core competencies and specialized skills needed to professionally plan and manage residential multifamily buildings, commercial office buildings, and corporate workspace for real estate owners, businesses, and third-party management companies. Through the study of established management practices with real-world applications, this course introduces students to the world of property management, corporate real estate, and facility management. Students study the Management Plan, the Management Agreement, management organizational structures, ownership obligations, management responsibilities, management fees, operating procedures, repositioning for value creation, staffing, training, supervision, risk management and insurance, leadership, communication, and ethics.

Attribute: REE.

Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and ECON 1200 and ECON 2140 and REAL 1002 and REAL 1004 and REAL 1006 and REAL 1008.

REAL 2006. Global Real Estate Markets. (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to real estate markets and investment activity beyond the U.S. border. It develops a due diligence framework to undertake comparative analyses of international real estate transactions, investments, and development projects across borders and within specific markets. The course focuses on the macro-economy, financial and real estate capital markets, currency concerns, taxation, legal issues, land use policy, political activity, regulations and statutory requirements, and cross-cultural negotiations of various key markets. Current global topics will be used to anchor learning and be the basis for class discussions in this comparative analysis.

Attribute: REE.

Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and ECON 1200 and ECON 2140 and REAL 1002 and REAL 1004 and REAL 1006 and REAL 1008.

REAL 2008. Building Design and Construction. (4 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the design and construction process for residential and commercial real estate assets. Students gain an understanding of the construction project life cycle; the roles of the owner, architect, engineer, contractor, and project management representative; and the most commonly used construction methods and materials. Topics of study include project delivery methods, the phases of design, project teams and organizations, types of contracts, cost estimating, construction planning and scheduling, construction budgets, field supervision, community and public agency relations, risk management, insurance, safety, and sustainable building practices.

Attribute: REE.

Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and ECON 1200 and ECON 2140 and REAL 1002 and REAL 1004 and REAL 1006 and REAL 1008.

REAL 2010. Special Topics in Real Estate. (4 Credits)

These courses, which will be offered periodically, are designed to enhance the student’s educational experience by supplementing the standard array of courses with topics that are very highly specialized. Areas of study will include real estate finance, investment, and development. In most cases, they will be of interest to those students who desire a more intense exposure to a particular aspect of real estate.

Attribute: REE.

Prerequisites: ECON 1100 and ECON 1200 and ECON 2140 and REAL 1002 and REAL 1004 and REAL 1006 and REAL 1008.

REAL 3999. Independent Study. (3 Credits)

Independent Study.

REAL 4999. Tutorial. (4 Credits)

Tutorial.