PCS Programs

Legal and Policy Studies courses

LGPO 1105. INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL AND POLICY STUDIES. (3 Credits)

LGPO 3000. POLICY AND FEDERAL AGENCIES? WHO MAKES THE RULES YOU LIVE BY?. (4 Credits)

Who makes the rules? An examination of the enormous impact of government agencies on the day-to-day lives of citizens and noncitizens; a comprehensive overview of the myriad government agencies created over the last century to formulate policy and promulgate rules and regulations that implement the laws enacted by Congress; an examination of how these agencies function as an ad hoc fourth branch of government; the intersection of agency rule making with the three branches of government: executive, legislative and judicial, and agency impact on policy development; how the agencies serve as an extension of executive power, generate test cases for judicial review that define the scope of laws and determine whether agency interpretations are within Congressional intent. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LGPO 3010. WRITING AND RATIFICATION CONSTITUTION. (4 Credits)

Written in secrecy and without authority, the US Constitution was nothing more than a mere proposal upon its release to the public in 1787. The Federal Convention (referred to today as the Constitutional Convention) specified that the decision whether or not to establish the new document as the supreme law of the young confederacy was to be in the hands of “We the People” through ratifying conventions – not a unanimous consent the 13 independent state legislatures. This course is an examination of the writing and ratification of the US Constitution, with particular attention to the role of American Revolution ideology, the failures of the Articles of Confederation that led to the Convention, and the monumental political debate that surrounded its ratification. The course includes a substantial online component and an overnight field trip to the National Constitution Center and Independence Mall in Philadelphia. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LGPO 3015. US CONSTITUTIONAL MOMENTS. (4 Credits)

This course is a study of the watershed moments in US Constitutional history. Several times in the history of the United States, the US Constitution has undergone dramatic change, calling into question the meaning and legal definitions of personal rights and liberties. Often, these moments changed the path of civil rights in the country, for example: the passage of the Bill of Rights, the Reconstruction Amendments, and the New Deal era. Students will explore these moments – and the moments change was considered but not accomplished – within the greater historical and legal policy context of the United States. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LGPO 3100. HEALTHCARE IN THE U.S.: A RIGHT OR A PRIVILEGE. (3 Credits)

There is a national debate on health care in the U.S. as the Affordable Care Act with mandated insurance coverage is creating a sea change in the health care industry away from fee-for-service toward performance-based delivery of health care services. This course examines the debate, government's role in providing health care coverage and services, how to formulate policy and who is entitled to coverage.

LGPO 3200. REGULATING BUSINESS: WHO NEEDS IT?. (3 Credits)

With the implementation of provisions of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in the wake of the recent economic downturn, this course will examine the regulatory climate for businesses and corporations in the United States as well as U.S.-based transnational corporations. An analysis of recent trading practices and efforts to regulate previously self-policing financial industry members through pursuit of insider trading investigations by the SEC and other government agencies will be included in the analysis of consumer protection in an assessment of what is the role of government in regulating business.

LGPO 3300. GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. (3 Credits)

An overview of the implementation of government policy with the view to prepare individuals for working in the public service. This course will analyze how the management of public programs and policies is accomplished so that government can function and politics is translated into reality. The course will include examination of government decision making and analysis of the policies themselves, the various interest groups and individuals that give rise to these policies and the creation of alternative policies when necessary.

LGPO 3400. BASIC ECONOMIC POLICYMAKING. (3 Credits)

This course surveys the major economic policies made by the government, political influences on economic policymaking, and the consequences of economic policy on politics. Some concepts covered will include macroeconomic policy and indicators (e.g., GDP, inflation and unemployment), fiscal and monetary policy, taxes, regulation and trade, deficits and debts, structural reform, fiscal stimulus vs. austerity and the influences on economic policymaking by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government as well as interest groups and the public.

LGPO 3500. EFFECTING CHANGE: ACTIVISM, ADVOCACY, LOBBYING, AND PACS. (3 Credits)

The process of effecting policy change may involve a complex interplay of forces at many levels operating both within and outside government, ranging from individual activists, community organizers advocating on behalf of a cause or group, lobbyists employed by private or corporate special interest groups or political action committees organized to aggregate financial resources to support or block a particular agenda. This course examines the variety of mechanisms utilized to implement policy change, the constraints (or lack thereof) under which they operate and the efficacy of their respective approaches.

LGPO 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Organizational Leadership courses

ORGL 2000. THEORIES OF LEADERSHIP. (4 Credits)

1esigned to provide a context for the beginning student in the Organizational Leadership major, this course presents a range of theoretical perspectives and a common vocabulary for discussing leadership. It includes an analysis of historical concepts and contemporary theories, focusing on the idea of leadership and the contributions of several disciplines to our understanding of it. Designed to provide a context for the beginning student in the Organizational Leadership major, this course presents a range of theoretical perspectives and a common vocabulary for discussing leadership. It includes an analysis of historical concepts and contemporary theories, focusing on the idea of leadership and the contributions of several disciplines to our understanding of it. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 2300. ISSUES IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT. (4 Credits)

An overview of current issues in human resource management in organizations. Topics include: career development, recruitment, retention, training, interviewing, performance appraisal and improvement, employee relation, technology, legal issues, compensation, motivation, ethics, work-life balance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 2500. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR, CHANGE, AND LEADERSHIP. (4 Credits)

This couse will explore individual and group behavior in organizations. Scholarly persepectives, theoretical framework, practitioner methods, measurement instruments within the field of organizational behavior and change management will be presented. Course academic content and skills exercises emphasize the social, psychological, and cultural dynamics and practices influencing individual and group behavior. Key focus areas of the course include theories of organizational behavior, cultural change models, and the leader's role in assessing, facilitating and achieving change. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 2600. MEDIATION, NEGOTIATION, ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION. (4 Credits)

A review of the history principles and practices of ADR (Alternative Dispute Resolution)--including mediation, negotiation, arbitration, conflict resolution--increasingly used in all areas of society (Law, Business, Family). Combines lectures and exercises. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 2700. ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 2800. U.N. AND POLITICAL LEADERSHIP. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: PJST.

ORGL 2900. ENTREPRENEURSHIP. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 3100. LEADING WITH EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE. (4 Credits)

Leading with emotional intelligence is the capacity for effectively recognizing and managing our own emotions and those of others. It is self-awareness and self-management, social awareness, and social management and other items. The course relates IQ to organizational effectiveness and personal success. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 4000. LEADERSHIP CONCEPTS AND CASES. (4 Credits)

This course combines historical examples with vision into the future of organizational development to identify the qualities and responsibilities that will dramatically redefine and improve leadership performance in today's rapidly changing world of work. This course, through case study analysis, will help students identify and understand fundamental shifts in leadership development shifts that are essential if organizations are to grow and prosper. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 4800. INTERNSHIP. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ORGL 4999. LEADERSHIP TUTORIAL. (1-5 Credits)

Professional Studies/New Media courses

PSNM 2000. PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIONS IN NEW MEDIA. (3 Credits)

A comprehensive overview of the history and forms of the new media and the possibilities they offer for participation and interaction. Explorations of the cognitive and cultural implications and issues surrounding computers and computer-mediated communication, digital technologies, gaming, the internet, the web, social media, and online communication.

PSNM 2001. BUSINESS AND PRACTICE OF NEW MEDIA. (3 Credits)

An introduction to new media industries covering matters of economics, technology and regulation; convergence in media and entertainment industries as well as social and cultural consequences.

PSNM 2350. PROGRAMMING FOR THE WEB. (4 Credits)

Using a process of incremental development, students will learn the latest technologies used in developing dynamic, database-driven websites. Principle of good web design will be covered, as well as techniques and languages for layout and scripting. The course is open to all students. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

PSNM 3307. SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS. (4 Credits)

An exploration of computer-mediated communication, electronic networking, online internet communication and emerging interactive social contexts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

PSNM 4000. NEW MEDIA INTERNSHIP. (1 Credit)

Weekly intern duty and regular meetings with a faculty adviser, during which time students extend classroom experience into the real world. Written projects and readings relating to the internship are assigned. Can be repeated for credit.

PSNM 4001. SPECIAL PROJECT IN DIGITAL DESIGN. (1-4 Credits)

Independent project supervised on a tutorial basis. Can be repeated for credit.

PSNM 4002. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN NEW MEDIA. (1-4 Credits)

Independent study supervised on a tutorial basis. Can be repeated for credit.

PSNM 4010. SPECIAL TOPICS IN NEW MEDIA. (4 Credits)

An examination of current issues, practices, or trends in new media. Specific topics to be covered vary by semester. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Interdisiplinary Study (IDIS) courses

IDIS 1005. COLLEGE SKILLS DEVELOPMENT-1. (3 Credits)

IDIS 1006. COLLEGE SKILLS DEVELOPMENT. (4 Credits)

For pre freshmen students accepted through HEOP. This is a developmental course to enhance student skills related to college composition, critical reading, mathematical analysis, science and economics. It is offered as part of the mandatory HEOP Summer Program for new freshmen. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 1007. COLLEGE SKILLS DEVELOPMENT-2. (3 Credits)

IDIS 1010. CRITICAL READING - DISCIPLINES. (3 Credits)

IDIS 1100. ADULT LEARNER: IDENTITY, CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT. (3 Credits)

This seminar has been designed to encourage each student to study his or her own unique identity development in adulthood. Each adult learner will be assisted in examining their skills, values, goals, experience, educational background, learning style and personality. Students can use this information for both short and long term career, educational and life planning. This new self-discovery will be developed through assessment testing, occupational research, informational interviewing and consultations with career development and educational specialists. The course utilizes a combination of readings, lecture, class discussions, presentations, exercises, guest speakers and video material.

IDIS 1200. SEMINAR: CAREER TRANSITION LEADERS. (1 Credit)

Designed to enhance students’ personal/professional understanding of career development and life management skills to transition to a professional/corporate career. The course will assist students to obtain internships in a structured, interactive, open form. It will also offer access and networking with employers.

IDIS 3015. CULTURE AND COMMUNITY. (4 Credits)

A study of culture and community in contemporary American society and lifestyles. The course will study the entire way of life that is faced by various groups in American life. An interdisciplinary consideration of the concepts of culture and community will be studied. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3020. WAR AND NEW YORK CITY. (4 Credits)

This course is an explanation of the impact of war on the political, social, economic, and cultural development of New York City. The course will examine wars and times of conflict from several periods in American history, including, but not limited to: the American Revolution, the Civil War, WWII, and September 11th. An integral element of this course will be using the City itself as our classroom. We will be making several field trips to various locations of historical events, museums, etc.0 Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3025. SOCIAL PROBLEMS IN AMERICA. (4 Credits)

This course will examine and study major issues and problems in contemporary American society in the context of individuals and community in a complex society. Research and writing will use an interdisciplinary approach. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3040. GETTYSBURG: A STUDY TOUR. (4 Credits)

Three days and 51,000 casualties ¿ the Battle of Gettysburg was the turning point of the Civil War and a seminal moment in the history of the United States. So striking was the battle, President Abraham Lincoln vowed that the men who died there did not do so in vain ¿ in fact their sacrifice gave ¿a new birth of freedom¿ to the idea of democracy for the world. Robert E. Lee, deeply depressed at his failure, fearing he cost his nation the possibility of independence and peace, offered his resignation to Confederate President Jefferson Davis. This course will examine Gettysburg from several perspectives, including military and political strategy, Lincoln¿s Gettysburg Address, Davis¿ and Lee¿s reactions, and the battle¿s long-lasting impact on American society and mythology. The course includes an overnight field trip to the Gettysburg Battlefield. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3050. A BLOODY LANE AND FOREVER FREE: ANTIETAM, A STUDY TOUR. (4 Credits)

Antietam – September 17, 1862 was the single bloodiest day in American military history. The 23,000 casualties on that single day were four times the number of casualties at Normandy. The number of men who died in combat that day was twice the number who died in combat during the War of 1812, the Mexican War, and the Spanish-American War combined. Antietam ended the British and French momentum for recognition of the Confederacy and gave President Abraham Lincoln the opportunity to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. This course will examine Antietam from several perspectives, including military and political strategy, Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, Davis’ and Lee’s reactions, and the battle’s long-lasting impact on American society. The course includes a two night field trip to the Antietam Battlefield. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3060. CIVIL WAR IN POPULAR MEMORY. (4 Credits)

The Civil War has been the topic of over 50,000 books, thousands of websites, and hundreds of multimedia sources – ranging from films to television shows to comic books to video games. Americans have long been fascinated by the Civil War, which cost more Americans their lives than WW I, WWII, the Korean War, and Vietnam War combined. Much of what Americans know about the Civil War did not come from textbooks or scholarly sources or the classroom, but rather from popular culture. This course will explore how the Civil War is portrayed in popular culture and examine how Americans’ perception and memory of the Civil War has changed over time – change that often had more to do with American society at the time than the “facts” of the War itself Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3070. BASEBALL - THE NEW YORK GAME. (4 Credits)

Interdisciplinary course that will trace the relationship between baseball and New York society and culture. The course will study the early history of the game and historical developments as the emergence of the New York City professional teams in connection with government, culture and issues of society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3080. WINNERS AND LOSERS IN LITERATURE AND FILM. (4 Credits)

Literature and film are filled with so-called “winners” and so-called “losers.” Who can claim these titles and why? Who decides and how? In analyzing these topics, we’ll explore what can be learned about the human condition in the individual and in society. Works discussed will include, Snow White; Goldilocks and the Three Bears; Death of a Salesman; Charlie Chaplin’s Little Tramp; Glengarry Glen Ross; My Left Foot, and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3090. DEMORACY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE: A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

Through a multi-disciplinary analysis, this course will explore global definitions of freedom, solidarity and the self within a social context. Readings will lead to discussions on resistance models influencing World Order and the criterion of an underclass, that must organize for transformative change for the sake of survival. Analysis of texts and classroom discourse will explore the development of a nation state, its emphasis on economic globalization, cultural difference and liberationist criticism, in conjunction with an analysis of social ethics and morality Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

IDIS 3800. INTERNSHIP. (3 Credits)

IDIS 3999. TUTORIAL. (3 Credits)

IDIS 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)