Music

Note: "Art History and Music" is a single academic department at Fordham, but the academic information for each subject is listed on a separate web page. Information about Art History programs is listed under Art History.

The music major offers students the opportunity to study music historically as a force in the shaping of Western culture and technically as a practical skill, craft, and art. Emphasizing music as a humanistic pursuit integrated into the liberal arts curriculum, it covers a range of courses that include music history, theory, composition, and performance. While the program offers ample opportunities to take private lessons and to participate in campus performance ensembles, it leads to an academic B.A. degree rather than a performance-oriented one. Students are prepared to go on to graduate school, seek careers in music education, and pursue professions that combine music with other fields of study.

No course in which the student earns a grade of D or F may be used toward a departmental major or minor.

Double Majors

The music major can be combined with other courses of study, including a double major. A music major interested in a career in the music industry or in arts management, for example, might consider taking economics or business courses related to the arts. Fordham’s Gabelli School of Business offers a minor in business that can be combined with the music major.

Program Activities

Internships

Music majors can receive credit for a music internship with a recording company or concert agency in New York City during their junior or senior years. With the approval and supervision of the department, majors may receive elective credit for one internship graded on a pass/fail basis.

For more information

Visit the Music department web page.

The Music program offers MUSC 1100 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC HISTORY and MUSC 1101 OPERA: AN INTRODUCTION, both of which also fulfill the Fine Arts Core requirement. These courses are also available as Eloquentia Perfecta 1 Seminars. In addition, the department offers American Pluralism and Global Studies courses each year as well as a variety of EP3, EP4, and ICC courses.

MUSC 1100. INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC HISTORY. (3 Credits)

This course presents a survey of music history, with a focus on developing the skills of thinking and writing critically about music. Students will learn to listen in a focused way and relate what they hear to issues of musical “meaning” and general culture. Students will learn some technical vocabulary that will help them describe or advocate for any music they encounter, and they will apply this vocabulary to examples throughout the semester, for instance a Beethoven Symphony or a Duke Ellington jazz arrangement. Sections may have different focuses in terms of geography or chronology.

Attributes: FACC, FRFA.

MUSC 1101. OPERA: AN INTRODUCTION. (3 Credits)

Through recordings and in live performance, this course studies the changing form of musical theater called opera. It focuses on skills to analyze an opera’s basic elements: the drama, the words, the music, the voices, the staging. It surveys the history of opera from its beginnings around 1600 to the present, emphasizing the works of Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, and Puccini. And it fosters critical thinking in placing the development of opera in its intellectual, social, and cultural contexts.

Attributes: FACC, FRFA.

MUSC 1210. MUSIC FOR DANCERS I. (3 Credits)

This two-course sequence develops general knowledge of the major historical periods, styles and genres of western music, as well as familiarity with world music. It also provides critical tools to understand the basic components of music: melody, harmony, rhythm, texture, tempo, dynamics, instrumentation. To cultivate musicality, class taught, in part, through practical application: singing and rhythm exercises, elementary score reading etc. Open to B.F.A. students only.

MUSC 1211. MUSIC FOR DANCERS II. (3 Credits)

This two-course sequence develops general knowledge of the major historical periods, styles and genres of western music, as well as familiarity with world music. It also provides critical tools to understand the basic components of music: melody, harmony, rhythm, texture, tempo, dynamics, instrumentation. To cultivate musicality, class taught, in part, through practical application: singing and rhythm exercises, elementary score reading etc. Open to B.F.A. students only.

MUSC 1221. FLUTE ENSEMBLE. (1 Credit)

Weekly rehearsals, coaching, and semester-end performance for flute choir, in which the chamber music literature for flute ensemble is explored. Pass/Fail only. Lab fee.

Attribute: ZVC2.

MUSC 1231. CHAMBER MUSIC INSTRUCTION. (1 Credit)

Consists of ten weekly coachings for ensembles of 3-5 musicians (can be instrumental, vocal, or a combination of the two). Interested  students should contact the Dept. of Art History and Music for more information. Groups are formed at the start of the semester and includes an end-of-semester performance. Pass/Fail only. Lab fee.

Attribute: ZVC3.

MUSC 1241. CONCERT CHOIR-ROSE HILL. (1 Credit)

Rehearsal and performance of selected choral music. Requirements include regular attendance at two weekly rehearsals, dress rehearsals, and regularly scheduled performances. By audition and permission of the instructor. Interested students should contact Campus Ministry for more information. For Rose Hill-based students. Pass/Fail only.

MUSC 1242. CONCERT CHOIR-LINCOLN CENTER. (4 Credits)

Rehearsal and performance of selected choral music. Requirements include regular attendance at two weekly rehearsals, dress rehearsals, and regularly scheduled performances. By audition and permission of the instructor. Interested students should contact Campus Ministry for more information. For Lincoln Center-based students. Pass/Fail only.

MUSC 1260. VOCAL INSTRUCTION: CLASSICAL. (1 Credit)

A sequence of private weekly lessons in classical voice, available for credit to all students. Students’ progress is monitored by the department. Pass/Fail only. Lab fee.

Attribute: ZVCL.

MUSC 1261. VOCAL INSTRUCTION: JAZZ. (1 Credit)

A sequence of private weekly lessons in jazz voice, available for credit to all students. Students’ progress is monitored by the department. Pass/Fail only. Lab fee.

Attribute: ZVCL.

MUSC 1262. INSTRUMENTAL INSTRUCTION: PIANO CLASSICAL. (1 Credit)

A sequence of private weekly lessons in classical piano, available for credit to all students. Students' progress is monitored by the Department. Pass/Fail only. Lab fee.

Attribute: ZVCL.

MUSC 1263. INSTRUMENTAL INSTRUCTION: PIANO JAZZ. (1 Credit)

A sequence of private weekly lessons in jazz piano, available for credit to all students. Students' progress is monitored by the Department. Pass/Fail only. Lab fee.

Attribute: ZVCL.

MUSC 1264. INSTRUMENTAL INSTRUCTION: GUITAR CLASSICAL. (1 Credit)

A sequence of private weekly lessons in classical guitar, available for credit to all students. Students' progress is monitored by the Department. Pass/Fail only. Lab fee.

Attribute: ZVCL.

MUSC 1265. INSTRUMENTAL INSTRUCTION: GUITAR JAZZ. (1 Credit)

A sequence of private weekly lessons in jazz guitar, available for credit to all students. Students' progress is monitored by the Department. Pass/Fail only. Lab fee.

Attribute: ZVCL.

MUSC 1266. INSTRUMENTAL INSTRUCTION: FLUTE. (1 Credit)

A sequence of private weekly lessons in flute, available for credit to all students. Students' progress is monitored by the Department. Pass/Fail only. Lab fee.

Attribute: ZVCL.

MUSC 1267. INSTRUMENTAL INSTRUCTION: CLARINET. (1 Credit)

A sequence of private weekly lessons in clarinet, available for credit to all students. Students' progress is monitored by the Department. Pass/Fail only. Lab fee.

Attribute: ZVCL.

MUSC 1268. INSTRUMENTAL INSTRUCTION: BRASS HORNS/SAXOPHONE. (1 Credit)

A sequence of private weekly lessons in a brass instrument, available for credit to all students. Students' progress is monitored by the Department. Pass/Fail only. Lab fee.

Attribute: ZVCL.

MUSC 1269. INSTRUMENTAL INSTRUCTION: VIOLIN/VIOLA. (1 Credit)

A sequence of private weekly lessons in violin/viola, available for credit to all students. Students' progress is monitored by the Department. Pass/Fail only. Lab fee.

Attribute: ZVCL.

MUSC 1270. INSTRUMENTAL INSTRUCTION: CELLO. (1 Credit)

A sequence of private weekly lessons in cello, available for credit to all students. Students' progress is monitored by the Department. Pass/Fail only. Lab fee.

Attribute: ZVCL.

MUSC 1271. CONCERT BAND INTERNSHIP. (4 Credits)

Rehearsal and performance of selected band music. Requirements include regular attendance at rehearsals and performances. By audition and permission of the instructor. Pass/fail only.

MUSC 1272. CONCERT BAND INTERNSHIP. (4 Credits)

Instrumentalists may earn 4 credits by participating in the band for 4 consecutive semesters. Students register for MUSC 1271 in the first 3 semesters and MUSC 1272 in the 4th semester. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MUSC 1273. INSTRUMENTAL INSTRUCTION: MISC.. (1 Credit)

A sequence of private weekly lessons in an instrument available for credits to all students. Student's progress is monitored by the department. By audition and permission of the instructor. Pass/Fail only. Lab Fee.

MUSC 1280. INSTRUMENTAL INSTRUCTION: MISCELLANEOUS. (1 Credit)

MUSC 1291. JAZZ ENSEMBLE. (1 Credit)

The Jazz Ensembles are hosted in collaboration with Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC) and meet weekly in the Irene Diamond Education Center at JALC (20 West 60th St). The ensembles are taught by Fordham University instructors and focus on a wide range of jazz styles and levels for each ensemble. Students will have the opportunity to work with Fordham University instrumental instructors, JALC teaching artists, and other special guests throughout the semester. All Chamber Jazz Ensembles perform a concert at the end of the term. Credit toward the music major/minor ensemble performance requirement is offered.

Attribute: Z207.

MUSC 1300. CHAMBER ORCHESTRA. (1 Credit)

The Chamber Orchestra is a Lincoln Center-based musical ensemble open to all students, University wide. The group will hold weekly rehearsals culminating in one or more performances each semester. The Chamber Orchestra invites all orchestral instruments to join, including string, woodwind, brass, and percussion players. Pass/Fail only. Lab fee.

MUSC 1301. JAZZ ORCHESTRA. (1 Credit)

The Fordham Jazz Orchestra is open to students interested in learning about and performing music by great jazz composers and arrangers, including Duke Ellington, Benny Carter, Thad Jones, Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie, Mary Lou Williams, Charles Mingus, John Clayton, and Wynton Marsalis, among others. The Jazz Orchestra will provide ensemble, sectional, and solo experience in a big band jazz format. Improvisation is encouraged, but not required for participation. The Jazz Orchestra is hosted by Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC) and meets weekly in the Irene Diamond Education Center at Jazz at Lincoln Center (20 West 60th St). Members will have the opportunity to work with Fordham University instrumental instructors, JALC Teaching Artists, and other special guest artists. The Jazz Orchestra will perform a concert at the end of the term. Credit toward the music major/minor ensemble performance requirement is offered.

Attribute: ZCGO.

MUSC 2014. JAZZ: A HISTORY IN SOUND. (4 Credits)

This course studies jazz historically from the turn of the 20th century to the present, through both the shifting relations between white and black cultures in America, and the changes in musical tastes and practices over time. It considers the development of New Orleans, Swing, bebop, modal, fusion, and contemporary jazz styles, with special attention to the contributions of Armstrong, Ellington, Parker, Davis and Coltrane. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, PLUR, URST.

MUSC 2022. BROADWAY MUSICALS. (4 Credits)

This course studies Broadway’s musical theater in its ever-changing forms. It surveys the history of musicals from the 19th century to the present, drawing on the work of influential figures such as the Gershwin brothers, Rodgers & Hammerstein, and Stephen Sondheim. It focuses on skills to analyze how books, lyrics, and music work in a musical. And it fosters critical thought in probing how musicals reflect and engage the political, economic, and social concerns at given moments in American culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

MUSC 2025. AMERICAN POPULAR MUSIC. (4 Credits)

Music not only reflects the history and cultures of the US, it shapes them. This course takes a tour of American musical styles, from those of indigenous groups before the arrival of Europeans, to the present in NYC. We will analyze musical styles and consider broader issues including: African-American experience, commerce and mass media, "high" vs. "low" culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: OSS.

MUSC 2031. ROCK AND POP MUSIC SINCE WORLD WAR II. (4 Credits)

Rock and pop music have played key roles in Western culture for over half a century. This course considers the roots and musical features of rock and related styles, their changing status within "mainstream" culture, and the musical and ethical issues they raise. From the R&B music of the early 1950's to the British Invasion, punk, disco, rap, alternative and the spread of electronica, pop musicians have moved billions of people, while raising questions about race, gender, generation gaps, commercialism, and globalization. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

MUSC 2048. WORLD MUSIC AND DANCE. (4 Credits)

This course will take an approach based on the premise that to study music is to study people, community, history, religion, politics and dance, as well as to study musical styles, forms and instruments. This approach provides the student with an appreciation of the sound, power and meaning of music as it exists within culture. Previously titled Worlds Of Music. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: GLBL.

MUSC 2060. SACRED SOUNDS: MUSIC AND RELIGION IN CULTURE AND TIME. (4 Credits)

Music gives voice to our deepest hopes and fears, beliefs and uncertainties; it is therefore central to many religions. In this course we will deepen our musical knowledge through an exploration of music and spirituality. We will examine musical practices spanning many centuries and several religious traditions: Judaism, Christianity (Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant), Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MUSC 2120. INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC THEORY. (4 Credits)

Intro to Music Theory is a course designed for the student who wants to learn the basics of reading music notation (music written on the staff using treble and bass clefs), as well as the fundamentals of music theory such as scales, keys and key signatures, and intervals. This course assumes little to no formal musical training, and students need not be able to read music before taking this class. Students who do read music already, but lack some knowledge in theory fundamentals, are also encouraged to take this course. This class is a pre-requisite to Music Theory I (MUSC 2145) for those with no formal music theory training.

MUSC 2121. EAR TRAINING. (4 Credits)

Ear Training is an aural skills class designed to enhance the student musician’s ability to hear music in context as well as increase fluency in sight-reading and performance. Students will learn to both recognize by ear, and sing on command, the diatonic intervals, as well as training in rhythm and solfège. While there is no course pre-requisite, students must be fluent in reading music and have some knowledge of music theory fundamentals, such as the topics covered in Introduction to Music Theory (MUSC 2120).

MUSC 2140. BASIC KEYBOARD. (3 Credits)

An intensive hands-on course in the basic skills necessary for the expression of musicianship at the keyboard. First, we learn to read, write, and interpret the fundamental elements of music theory: pitch, clef, and interval; rhythm and meter; scales and key signatures. Then, we apply these tools to the analysis and realization of triads and seventh chords, using both Roman numerals and jazz lead-sheet notation. No prior background assumed.

Corequisite: MUSC 2141.

MUSC 2141. KEYBOARD LAB. (1 Credit)

Offered in conjunction with MUSC 2140. This practical lab focuses on applying music-theoretical skills at the keyboard: playing diatonic scales and chord progressions; mastering specific compositions from the classical repertoire; developing a reliable sense of rhythm and meter; acquiring basic improvisational strategies and the technique of realizing jazz and popular styles from lead sheets.

Corequisite: MUSC 2140.

MUSC 2145. MUSIC THEORY I. (4 Credits)

Music Theory I is the first in a series of three required semester-long courses designed to offer a comprehensive overview of the theory of tonal music, especially of classical music during the Common Practice era, but also relating to the other genres, such as jazz and popular music. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MUSC 2146. MUSIC THEORY II. (4 Credits)

Music Theory II is a continuation of the required three-course music theory sequence. The class will deal primarily with the principles of diatonic harmony as found in classical music of the Common Practice era, as well as through more contemporary and popular styles. Students will learn about chord construction and progressions, and continue in the study of voice-leading principles (as exemplified by four-part writing) begun in Music Theory I. This course is required for all Music majors. Music Theory I (MUSC 2145) is a pre-requisite to this course, though some students with past music theory experience could be admitted upon instructor approval. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: MUSC 2145.

MUSC 2147. MUSIC THEORY III. (4 Credits)

This course is the last in the required three-course music theory sequence. It extends the principles of harmony and voice leading learned in MUSC 2146 (Music Theory II) and covers chromatic harmony, especially as practiced in the 19th century and in popular styles, as well as advanced musical forms. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: MUSC 2146.

MUSC 2148. MUSIC THEORY IV. (4 Credits)

This final music theory course focuses on further exploration of counterpoint, musical forms, and advanced analytical approaches. Students will study imitative counterpoint, such as fugal writing, the Sonata Principle in the 19th and 20th centuries, and will learn to write about music using technical language. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: MUSC 2147.

MUSC 2222. MUSIC COMPOSITION. (4 Credits)

This class will engage in the study of instrumental music composition covering a wide range of stylistic approaches and historical genres. Students will compose several short musical works over the course of the semester culminating in a final project that will be performed in a workshop setting by professional musicians Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: MUSC 2145 and MUSC 2146.

MUSC 2231. INTRODUCTION TO JAZZ IMPROVISATION. (4 Credits)

Introduction to the practice of jazz improvisation including scales, chords, transcription, stylistic analysis and performance. Students will play through exercises in class and transcribe solos for their own instruments. Open to all students regardless of background and experience. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MUSC 2233. JAZZ ARRANGING AND ORCHESTRATION. (4 Credits)

This class covers basic tools and skills for learning about the sounds of different instruments and voices used in a jazz ensemble. We will learn how these elements can be combined to create various styles and effects specific to jazz music. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MUSC 2300. ELETCRONIC MUSIC AND MUSIC PRODUCTION. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the creation, editing, and sequencing of electronic and recorded music using MIDI, computer software, sampling, and audio recordings. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MUSC 3110. MUSIC BEFORE 1600. (4 Credits)

This course spans 2000 years: from Pythagoras and Ancient Greek musical culture, to the birth of a commercial music industry in Renaissance Italy. We will examine carefully a number of musical worlds in order to extend our abilities as listeners, writers, analysts, and musicians. We will combine a study of musical style and technique with discussions of mysticism, gender and sexuality morality, science, economics (class, commerce, and colonialism), and art and architecture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: MVST, REST.

MUSC 3121. BAROQUE MUSIC: MUSIC BETWEEN ANCIENTS AND MODERNS. (4 Credits)

Musicians of the Baroque era (c. 1600-1750) distinguished themselves through the creation of distinctively modern sounds even as they found inspiration in the past: Monteverdi, Vivaldi, Handel, Bach (and their contemporaries) created music that continues to be performed. To understand what music meant during the Baroque, and what Baroque music might mean to us today, we will combine a study of musical style and technique with discussions of: sexuality, science and the occult, drama, morality, religion, class, colonialism, and the cultural upheavals of the Enlightenment. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MUSC 3122. MUSIC, ENLIGHTENMENT, AND REVOLUTION. (4 Credits)

From the 1750's to Beethoven's music in the early nineteenth century, this course examines the cultural issues of this crucial period in music history and their reflection in the compositions of such composers as Pergolesi, Gluck, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. It considers how changing ideas about nature, government, social class, improvisation, dance, and language--as well as national rivalries, war, and technological advances--shaped the music that has come to represent the "classical" era in European art music. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MUSC 3123. MUSIC IN THE ROMANTIC CENTURY. (4 Credits)

Most of our current behaviors and beliefs with respect to Western music were first shaped in the cultural discourse of the 19th century. This course examines these as part of the interactions of 19th-century music composition, performance, and criticism with the major social, intellectual and cultural movements of the age, focusing on the work of Beethoven, Rossini, Berlioz, Wagner, Verdi, Brahms and Mussorgsky. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COLI.

MUSC 3124. MUSIC IN THE 20TH CENTURY. (4 Credits)

Beginning with the innovations of Mahler, Debussy, Schoenberg, and Stravinsky, this course traces the main developments in the history of the 20th century Western music to the present. It examines both the music and its engagement with such social and cultural issues as the challenge of modernism; the technological revolution, high vs mass culture, art in democratic and totalitarian societies; and the impact of jazz, popular and world music. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MUSC 4000. MUSIC AND NATIONALISM. (4 Credits)

Since modern nationalism first emerged in the eighteenth century, music has been used in many ways by nationalists to shape and to stand for their cultural and political claims. This interdisciplinary course will examine how music helped motivate the earliest interest in "folklore," and how "classical" and even recently "popular" musics have drawn on these foundations. We will examine how historians, musicologists, folklorists, composers, sociologists and others have treated music in this context. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP3, ICC.

MUSC 4951. INTERNSHIP. (1 Credit)

An internship at an off site sponsoring institution from 6 to 12 hours a week, occasional meetings with a Fordham professor and a journal or paper varying from 5 to 10 pages.

MUSC 4952. INTERNSHIP. (2 Credits)

An internship at an off site sponsoring institution from 6 to 12 hours a week, occasional meetings with a Fordham professor and a journal or paper varying from 5 to 10 pages.

MUSC 4953. INTERNSHIP. (3 Credits)

An internship at an off site sponsoring institution from 6 to 12 hours a week, occasional meetings with a Fordham professor and a journal or paper varying from 5 to 10 pages.

MUSC 4954. INTERNSHIP. (4 Credits)

An internship at an off site sponsoring institution from 6 to 12 hours a week, occasional meetings with a Fordham professor and a journal or paper varying from 5 to 10 pages.

MUSC 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.