Latin American and Latino Studies

The Latin American and Latino studies program integrates a series of courses in the humanities, social sciences, and the arts designed to acquaint students with Latin America and the experiences and cultural expressions of the Latino communities in the United States. This interdisciplinary approach aims to expose students to the methods, materials, and tools of various disciplines while addressing two of the program’s and the University’s interrelated major goals: to foster understanding of New York’s local immigrant or diasporic Latino communities and to develop effective, international, global citizenship through learning and service. The major prepares students to enter the fields of international relations, business and finance, social and foreign service, humanitarian affairs, teaching, Hispanic media and communications, publishing, business, and finance, and graduate or professional study.

Program Activities

Study Abroad

Study abroad is a rewarding experience in and of itself, but it is especially recommended for LALS majors and minors. Study abroad complements LALS courses while helping students fulfill many of the program’s and the University’s major goals. It helps students achieve the requisite competency in Spanish and gain a better understanding of Latin America and Spain through cultural immersion and service-oriented courses. To this effect the program has established a series of study abroad opportunities for students, ranging from a spring semester or summer abroad in Granada, Spain, and LALSI-approved study-abroad programs throughout Latin America, the Caribbean, and Spain, to LALS-sponsored summer and spring study tours.

Upon return from study in a non-Fordham program abroad, students will be able to count toward the major up to four (4) courses for two semesters of study or three (3) courses for one semester of study abroad; and up to two (2) courses toward the minor. For Fordham study abroad programs, such as our summer or spring semester abroad in Granada, LALS majors and minors will be able to count all relevant courses taken abroad. If the student has already declared a LALS major or minor, these courses should be approved prior to going abroad by a LALS faculty adviser.

For more information on studying abroad, please visit the International and Study Abroad Programs page or e-mail isap@fordham.edu.

LALS Sponsored Programs

Summer and spring semester programs in Granada, Spain Granada, a world heritage site, is one of the most beautiful and historically-rich cities in the world. It was the hometown of the poet Federico García Lorca, a center of flamenco culture, and a place of intersection for European, North African, and Latin American cultures and scholarship. For a summer or a semester, students will have the opportunity to live in this wondrous city, study the works of García Lorca, and Spanish and Latin American cultures and partake in cultural visits and tours of Andalusia (Andalucía), the region where Granada is located. Interested students should contact Dr. Rafael Lamas at lamas@fordham.edu.

Other LALS Sponsored Programs

LALS often sponsors study-tour courses in Latin America which offer in-depth, on-site study of the history, arts, and culture of a Latin American city or country. Past courses have included

  • A spring study tour on the colonial artistic traditions of Mexico in Mexico City with Dr. Barbara Mundy (art history), on peace, reconciliation initiatives, and service to communities of displaced families in Bogotá, Colombia, with Dr. Cruz-Malavé (modern languages and literatures) and Dr. Lenis (dean), and on migration in Puebla, Mexico, with Dr. Lindo-Fuentes (history).
  • A summer course on the development of Cuban culture since the 1959 Revolution in Havana, Cuba, with Dr. Arnaldo Cruz-Malavé (modern languages and literatures), hosted by Casa de las Américas, Cuba’s premier cultural institute.
  • LALS will be offering spring study tours on the politics of memory in Santiago, Chile, with Dr. Carl Fischer (modern languages and literatures), on contemporary culture in Havana, Cuba, with Dr. Cruz-Malavé (modern languages and literatures), and on public health in Cali, Colombia, with Dr. Lenis (dean) and Mr. Renaldo Alba (associate director, CSTEP).

Institute Resources

In addition to offering a major, minor, and graduate certificate, the Latin American and Latino studies program sponsors an institute that provides an intellectual home for students and faculty who are interested in Latin America and the Latino immigrant or diasporic communities in the United States: LALSI acts as a clearinghouse for information for faculty and students, invites speakers, organizes conferences and film series, and maintains video and journal collections for the use of its faculty and students. In addition, it sponsors visiting scholars, networks of scholarly exchange between Latin America and the United States, especially on issues pertaining to the relationship between Latin America and its diasporas, and fosters understanding of and service in Latin America through its study abroad programs and study tours of Latin America. Its newsletter, Boletín, which is published twice a year, documents the program’s multiple academic events as well as the research, educational, and service activities of its faculty and students. All Boletín issues are available online at www.fordham.edu/lalsi.

Prestigious Fellowship Opportunities

LALS students have won many prestigious fellowships, including Fulbright Awards, which allow students to pursue their own research abroad. Students need to plan early (preferably in their sophomore year) if they wish to compete for a prestigious fellowship. See the director or associate director for more information.

Courses outside the institute

The following courses offered outside the institute have the LALS attribute and count toward the Latin American and Latino Studies major and minor:

CourseTitleCredits
AFAM 2647THIRD WORLD AND THE CITY4
AFAM 3037BEING AND BECOMING BLACK IN THE ATLANTIC WORLD4
AFAM 3130RACIAL AND ETHNIC CONFLICT4
AFAM 3150CARIBBEAN PEOPLES AND CULTURE4
AFAM 3663MINORITIES IN THE MEDIA4
AFAM 3667CARIBBEAN LITERATURE4
AFAM 4000AFFIRMATIVE ACTION AND THE AMERICAN DREAM4
AFAM 4650SOCIAL WELFARE AND SOCIETY4
ANTH 1100INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY3
ANTH 3111NEW WORLD ARCHAEOLOGY4
ANTH 3339IRISH AND MEXICAN MIGRATION: NEW YORK FOCUS4
ANTH 3340ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES ON RACE AND ETHNICITY4
ANTH 3341RACE, SEX, AND SCIENCE4
ANTH 3351COMPARATIVE CULTURES4
ANTH 3470PEOPLE AND CULTURES OF LATIN AMERICA4
ANTH 3481AFRO-BRAZILIAN CULTURE, POLITICS, AND IDENTITY4
ANTH 4114ANTHROPOLOGY OF HEALTH HEALING AND SOCIAL JUSTICE4
ARHI 2250PRE-COLOMBIAN ART4
ARHI 2256RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE IN LATIN AMERICAN ART4
ARHI 4250AZTEC ART4
CEED 6290HEALTH DSPARITIES &SOCIAL INEQ3
COLI 3250REPRESENT SP CIVIL WAR4
COLI 3434THE AVANT-GARDES: EUROPE AND LATIN AMERICA4
COLI 3668CARIBBEAN IDENTITIES4
COLI 3840LATIN AMERICAN CULTURE THROUGH FILM4
COLI 3910US LATINO FILM MAKING4
COLI 3912LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAS4
COMC 3247RACE, CLASS, AND GENDER IN MEDIA4
COMC 3380INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION4
ECON 3210ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT4
ECON 3235ECONOMY OF LATIN AMERICA4
ECON 3240WORLD POVERTY4
ECON 3242GLOBAL ECONOMIC ISSUES4
ECON 3244INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC POLICY4
ECON 3346INTERNATIONAL TRADE4
ECON 3563LABOR ECONOMICS4
ECON 3580ECONOMICS OF DIVERSITY4
ENGL 3036LATIN AMERICAN SHORT STORY4
FITV 3647GENDER, RACE, CLASS, AND TELEVISION4
HIST 1400UNDERSTANDING HISTORICAL CHANGE: LATIN AMERICA3
HIST 3806U.S. IMMIGRATION/ETHNICITY4
HIST 3950LATINO HISTORY4
HIST 3960RELIGION AND POLITICS LATIN AMERICA4
HIST 3961REBELLION AND REVOLUTION IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE ATLANTIC WORLD4
HIST 3965COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA4
HIST 3968MEXICO4
HIST 3969LATIN AMERICA AND THE U.S.4
HIST 3972REVOLUTION IN CENTRAL AMERICA4
HIST 3973EDU AND STATE IN LATIN AMERICA4
HIST 3974SPANIARDS AND INCAS4
HIST 3975THE CARIBBEAN4
HIST 3977LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH FILM4
HIST 4347LATINOS: FACT AND FICTION4
HIST 4760SEMINAR: IMMIGRATION TO THE U.S.4
HIST 4853SEMINAR: US CIVILIZING EFFORTS IN LATIN AMERICA4
HIST 4954SEMINAR: LAW AND EMPIRE IBERIAN ATLANTIC4
HIST 4998STUDY TOUR: MEDIEVAL SPAIN4
HIST 5913GOLDEN AGE SPAIN & AMER4
HPRH 2051CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE AND MUSIC3
INST 3859POST-1945: A GLOBAL HISTORY4
JOUR 3724FIRST PERSON JOURNALISM4
LING 3007SPANISH LINGUISTICS4
MLAL 1010SPANISH COLONIALISM THROUGH FILM3
MLAL 3000GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES4
MLAL 3607TOPICS IN MULTILINGUALISM4
MLAL 4347LATINOS: FACT AND FICTION4
MVST 4998STUDY TOUR: MEDIEVAL SPAIN4
PHIL 3653LATIN AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY4
PJST 3322PAN-AMERICAN POETIC REBELLION4
PJST 4970COMMUNITY SERVICE/SOCIAL ACTION4
POSC 2610INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS4
POSC 3310RACIAL AND ETHNIC POLITICS4
POSC 3324POLITICS OF IMMIGRATION4
POSC 3610POLITICAL ECONOMY OF DEVELOPMENT4
POSC 3611THIRD WORLD POLITICS4
POSC 3616POLITICAL ECONOMY OF POVERTY4
POSC 3641LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS4
POSC 3642CARIBBEAN POLITICS4
POSC 3645POLITICS OF IMMIGRATION4
POSC 3915INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY4
PSYC 3600MULTICULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY4
SOCI 2410INEQUALITY: CLASS, RACE, AND ETHNICITY4
SOCI 2420SOCIAL PROBLEMS OF RACE AND ETHNICITY4
SOCI 3000LATINO IMAGES IN MEDIA4
SOCI 3017INEQUALITY IN AMERICA4
SOCI 3140OLD AND NEW MINORITIES IN THE U.S.4
SOCI 3148POPULATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ISSUES4
SOCI 3149ECONOMIC SOCIOLOGY4
SOCI 3300"RACE" AND "MIXED RACE"4
SOCI 3405GENDER, RACE, AND CLASS4
SOCI 3418CONTEMPORARY IMMIGRATION IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE4
SOCI 3427HISPANICS/LATINOS IN THE USA4
SOCI 3471UNDOCUMENTED MIGRATION4
SOCI 3506DIVERSITY IN AMERICAN FAMILIES4
SOCI 3601URBAN POVERTY4
SOCI 3670HISPANIC WOMEN4
SOCI 4408DIVERSITY IN AMERICAN SOCIETY4
SOCI 4970COMMUNITY SERVICE/SOCIAL ACTION4
SOCI 4990CONFLICT RESOLUTION AND JUSTICE CREATION4
SPAN 2001SPANISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE3
SPAN 2301ADVANCED FOR SPANISH SPEAKERS3
SPAN 2305SPANISH CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION4
SPAN 2500APPROACHES TO LITERATURE4
SPAN 2610ADVANCED READING AND WRITING4
SPAN 2620SPANISH PHONETICS4
SPAN 2640SPANISH AND NEW YORK CITY4
SPAN 2650BUSINESS SPANISH4
SPAN 2700HISPANIC LEGENDS4
SPAN 3001SPAIN: LITERATURE AND CULTURE SURVEY4
SPAN 3002LATIN AMERICA: LITERATURE AND CULTURE SURVEY4
SPAN 3005THEMES IN LATINA/O AND LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES4
SPAN 3007SPANISH LINGUISTICS4
SPAN 3052SURVEY OF SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE4
SPAN 3070THE LATIN-AMERICAN URBAN CHRONICLE4
SPAN 3072GEOGRAPHIES OF POWER/INJUSTICE4
SPAN 3075Crime Fiction in Hispanic Literature4
SPAN 3180POETRY IN CONTEXT4
SPAN 3200MULTICULTURAL SPAIN4
SPAN 3210TRANSATLANTIC PICARESQUE4
SPAN 3250GOD, GOLD, AND GLORY4
SPAN 3275HYBRID FUTURES: A PANORAMA OF MEXICAN SHORT FICTION4
SPAN 3300MODERN LATIN AMERICAN VISUAL CULTURE4
SPAN 3301FEDERICO GARCIA LORCA AND HIS WORLD4
SPAN 3398GENERATION OF 18984
SPAN 3401MODERN SPANISH FICTION4
SPAN 3425MODERN SPANISH THEATER4
SPAN 3426MODERN HISPANIC THEATER4
SPAN 3500LITERATURE OF DISCOVERY4
SPAN 3510SPAIN AT WAR4
SPAN 3530EXCESS IN SPANISH LIT4
SPAN 3540SPAIN AND ISLAM4
SPAN 3550EXPRESSING THE COLONIES4
SPAN 3561REPRESENTING THE GYPSY4
SPAN 3570STORIES OF A NEW WORLD4
SPAN 3575PAINTING THE EMPIRE: UNDERSTANDING THE SPANISH EMPIRE THROUGH ART AND LITERATURE4
SPAN 3582NEW YORK IN LATINO LITERATURE AND FILM4
SPAN 3583NEW YORK CITY LATINO THEATRE AND PERFORMANCE4
SPAN 3610CHILDREN'S GAZE IN LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE4
SPAN 3625SPANISH-AMERICAN SHORT FICTION4
SPAN 3630CULTURAL JOURNEY THROUGH MEXICO CITY4
SPAN 3642SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE AND POPULAR MUSIC4
SPAN 3685MEDIA AND LITERATURE IN SPANISH AMERICA4
SPAN 3701SPANISH-AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS4
SPAN 3710CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN FICTION4
SPAN 3712LITERATURES OF THE LATIN AMERICAN BOOM AND POST-BOOM4
SPAN 3715LATIN AMERICAN CYBERLITERATURE4
SPAN 3727Writing Disease in Latin American Literature4
SPAN 3728Popular Culture in Latin America4
SPAN 3730WRITING VIOLENCE: PERU, 1980-20004
SPAN 3751ADAPTING SPANISH DRAMA4
SPAN 3755SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE AND GLOBALIZATION4
SPAN 3820CARIBBEAN LITERATURE4
SPAN 3826LATIN AMERICAN AND WORLD LITERATURE4
SPAN 3850NARRATING THE CITY4
SPAN 3908FRANCOIST SPAIN4
SPAN 3950THE FANTASTIC IN SPANISH LITERATURE AND FILM4
SPAN 4001CERVANTES AND DON QUIXOTE4
SPAN 4020NOVELS OF PEREZ GALDOS4
SPAN 4100SPEAKING FOR/AS THE OTHER4
SPAN 4347LATINOS: FACT AND FICTION4
SPAN 4520SPAIN IN CONTEXT4
SPAN 4900SEMINAR: HISPANIC LITERATURE4
THEO 3610CHRIST IN WORLD CULTURES3
THEO 3847LATINO/A THEOLOGY4
WGSS 3000GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES4
WGSS 3341RACE, SEX, AND SCIENCE4

For more information

Visit the Latin American and Latino Studies Institute web page. 

LALS 1003. BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE FOR SPANISH-SPEAKERS AND LEARNERS. (3 Credits)

An accelerated introductory course for students with knowledge of Spanish, this course concentrates on aspects of the Portuguese language that are most difficult for Spanish-speakers or learners, such as pronunciation, vocabulary, idioms, grammatical structures that are different from Spanish and particular to Portuguese, and introduces students to Brazilian media and culture.

LALS 1100. AFRO-LATIN AMERICA. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the central themes in the study of people of African descent in Latin America. In considering race and blackness in L. America we will pay attention to the flexibility of racial categories, the importance of gender and class, and the role of visual images in the making of racial identities.

Attribute: GLBL.

LALS 1503. BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE FOR SPANISH-SPEAKERS AND LEARNERS II. (3 Credits)

An intermediate course for students with knowledge of Spanish, this course focuses on Portuguese language as it contrasts with Spanish. Development of speaking, reading, and listening skills. Special practice in areas of grammar, linguistic structure, pronunciation and idioms that differ from Spanish. Emphasis on Brazilian media and culture. Fulfills the language requirement of the Latin American and Latino Studies major and minor. An elective of the LALS and the Spanish Studies minor.

LALS 2000. CULTURE AND IDENTITY IN FRENCH CARIBBEAN LITERATURE: FROM CHAOS-MONDE TO TOUT-MONDE. (3 Credits)

In this course we will read contemporary francophone literature from Martinique, Guadeloupe and Haiti, translated to English, in an effort to familiarize ourselves with the colonial and post-colonial history of the region, its cultural richness and its literary modes.

LALS 2005. AMERICAN PLURALISM. (4 Credits)

Contemporary and historical studies in the racial and ethnic diversity of American (U.S.) society with a special emphasis on the issues of race relations, migration and immigration and their relation to either (1) the distribution of economic or political power or (2) their cultural manifestations in literature, the arts and/or religion. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, PLUR.

LALS 3005. LATIN AMERICAN THEMES. (4 Credits)

This course allows students to explore ways to synthesize key topics in Latin American and Latina/o Studies (LALS) as an interdisciplinary field of study. It will compare the distinct approaches to these topics of the different disciplines represented by the LALS faculty (including History, Literature, Film Studies, Theology, Art History, Sociology, and Anthropology). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, COMC, COMM.

LALS 3007. SPANISH LINGUISTICS. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the linguistic study of the Spanish language. The course discusses the formal domains of language structure - including speech sounds and their mental representations, sentence structure and semantic meaning, as well as social realities of language use and language change across different varieties of Spanish in the world. The course is taught in Spanish.

Attribute: ASSC.

LALS 3275. HYBRID FUTURES: A PANORAMA OF MEXICAN SHORT FICTION. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the main themes of Mexican science fiction, from the late nineteenth century to today, using a panoramic approach that encompasses different forms of cultural production and media (literature, film, comics, street art, etc.). Through the science fiction lenses we will examine Mexico’s relation to technology and the processes of modernization, as well as the imagined future of labor, gender, and immigration, among other issues. We will frame Mexican science fiction as part of a larger Latin American tradition, while also discussing the connections to more mainstream (i.e. American and English) visions of the genre. All materials will be available online.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

LALS 3343. CRIME AND MINORITY RIGHTS. (4 Credits)

This course is designed to present an overview of the problems for decision in the promulgation, invocation, and administration of a law of crimes. Topics include theories of crime, the purpose of punishment, and specific types of crimes. The rights of minorities will be discussed within the context of a viable criminal law. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: URST.

LALS 3344. CRIME, LITERATURE, AND LATINOS. (4 Credits)

This course examines the relationship between criminal law and literature. We will study how writers use stories about the law to express ideas of humanity. We will also examine the interplay between law and morality and discuss how authors have viewed the criminal justice system, with particular emphasis on the experience of Latinos. The reading list will include criminal law and criminal procedure law, as well as works by Latino fiction writers such as Bodega Dreams, Carlito's Way, and House of the Spirits, and by non-Latino writers such as Billy Budd and The Trial. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COLI.

LALS 3346. LATINOS AND THE MEDIA. (4 Credits)

A seminar and workshop on the impact and influence of the news media on Latin Americans and U.S. Latinos and their image by acclaimed journalist and memoirist, Luisita Lopez Torregrosa, former national editor at The New York Times and author of the critically acclaimed memoires, Before the Rain: A Memoir of Love and Revolution and The Noise of Infinite Longing. This course will discuss and analyze the impact of negative labels and cultural and social typecasting on news written about Latin Americans and U.S. Latinos. It will also examine sources, such as films, memoires, and scholarly books, as alternative ways to transform and reinvent these images of Latin Americans and Latinos in the news. Students will learn to analyze the presentation of Latin American and Latino subjects in the news and compose news reports and essays that present more expansive and knowledgeable views of the lives and cultures of Latin Americans and U.S. Latinos. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: FCLC.

LALS 3352. POL ISSUES AND PROCEDURE IN CRIMINAL LAW. (4 Credits)

Utilizing the casebook and problem-solving approaches, this course will study the manner in which criminal laws are created and the effect on minority communities throughout the country. The course will examine such issues as the scope and nature of criminal liability, the insane defense and other defenses to crimes, as well as the purpose and effectiveness of traditional sentencing. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LALS 3359. CRIME: A CASE STUDY. (4 Credits)

An exploration of trial advocacy through an examination of a case from its inception to its conclusion. Examines each stage of the criminal justice process, issues related to the rights of minorities, the role race and the police play in the system. Course will culminate in a mock trial after analyzing issues arising from the substantive study of criminal law and procedure. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LALS 3400. SOCIAL REALITY: BOGOTA. (1 Credit)

This one week course in the capital of Colombia, Bogota, will explore contemporary social reality in one of Latin America's most representative and vibrant cities, with special emphasis on the way this nation's armed conflict has impacted its population and its modernization process and on current conflict resolution and civic participation through social service-learning projects.

LALS 3401. LATIN AMERICAN SOCIAL REALITY: PUEBLO. (1 Credit)

One-week study tour to Puebla, Mexico. The course will explore the socioeconomic reality of Puebla, Mexico. The city is the main source of Mexican immigrants to New York and has sites important for every major period of Mexican history. The tour will include lectures on history and contemporary issues as well as visits to sites important to the history and culture of Mexico.

LALS 3421. LATIN AMERICAN FICTION. (4 Credits)

A study of Latin American narrative forms. Selected readings from major Latin American writers. Topics such as unity, diversity, magic realism, the search for a national identity, literature and underdevelopment, etc. will be examined in their social and literary context. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: GLBL.

LALS 3435. BRAZILIAN LITERATURE AND FILM. (3 Credits)

This course examines some of Brazil's best known cinematic and literary classics in translation. We start with Jose` de Alencar's "Iracema" continuing through to works that treat the military dictatorships in Brazil during the 1960's and 1970's. Taught in English.

LALS 3437. AFRO-BRAZILIAN FILM, LITERATURE, AND CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This course examines central themes in Afro-Brazilian film, literature, and culture. We will study the depiction of slavery the depiction of slavery during the construction of syncretic religions such as Candomble and Macumba, the experience of Afro-Brazilian women, the image of favelas or shantytowns and conclude with Afro-Brazilian woman, the music and performance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, GLBL.

LALS 3575. PAINTING THE EMPIRE: UNDERSTANDING THE SPANISH EMPIRE THROUGH ART AND LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

The Golden Age of Spanish art and literature (known as “el Siglo de Oro”) coincided with the configuration of Spain as a global empire after the rise of the Habsburg dynasty to the Spanish throne (from around 1550 to around 1650). This course proposes a study of the main social, political and cultural conflicts that conformed that empire from a multidisciplinary perspective that combines the works of the empire’s most famous painters (El Greco, Diego Velázquez, José de Ribera, among others) with the works of its most representative writers (Lope de Vega, Miguel de Cervantes, María de Zayas, among others); topics such as the symbolic construction and shaping of space, gender, national identity or social and religious relationships will be approached through a combination of visual and textual representations. The course will also take great advantage of the important collections of Spanish Renaissance and Baroque painting held at several New York institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art of the Hispanic Society of America, including visits to those institutions and field work. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

LALS 3600. LATIN AMERICA: CURRENT TRENDS. (4 Credits)

The objective of this course is to help students develop the basic tools for political analysis in the context of an overview of the current political environment and economic circumstances of Latin America¿s main players. The course will provide information and guidelines for understanding the present situation within each of the main influential countries in the region and the interrelationship among these countries. The relationship with the United States and other extraregional players with increasingly important roles in the region, as well as the influence of the Organization of American States will also be explored. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, PJST.

LALS 3601. LATIN AMERICAN ARCHEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Latin America is one of the great culture areas of the ancient and modern worlds. The peoples of the region developed unique civilizations long before the arrival of Europeans. This course considers the religion, hieroglyphic writing systems, architecture, political economy, myth, and history of Pre-columbian cultures of Mesoamerica, South America and the Caribbean. We examine the latest archaeological research and primary ethnohistoric documents to study the Maya, Zapotec, Aztec, Moche, Inca, and Taino culture. A broad historical and geographical sweep allows us a deeper understanding of how the Latin American past continues to shape the present. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: GLBL.

LALS 3602. CROSSING BORDERS: MIGRATIONS, GENDER, SEXUALITY. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LALS 3840. LATIN AMERICA THROUGH FILM. (4 Credits)

Major topics of Latin American cultural criticism through an examination of Latin American and Latino film production, with a special emphasis on the documentary as an alternative to mainstream cinema and television. Latin American media theories and cultural criticism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: FITV, INST.

LALS 3930. CONTEMPORARY CUBAN CULTURE STUDY TOUR. (1 Credit)

This one-week, one-credit, spring study-tour course will explore renewed importance of Havana as both a local and global purveyor of culture since the fall of Soviet-style socialism in the 1990’s. It will focus on the city’s vibrant contemporary cultural scene in music, art, dance, literature and film as exhibited in museums, galleries, workshops, concert halls, and community centers and will give students a lived sense of the issues, topics and concerns addressed by contemporary Cuban artists in new innovate forms that respond to local conditions of economic transitions and to a globalized world market.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2001.

LALS 4005. QUEER THEORY AND THE AMERICAS. (4 Credits)

Drawing from the often divergent traditions of Anglo and Hispanic America, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to queer methodologies for cultural and literary studies. Students will encounter foundational queer theoretical texts (both historical and contemporary) as well as novels, plays, and films, and will explore, for themselves, what queerness means and does. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ENGL, ICC.

LALS 4100. SPEAKING FOR/AS THE OTHER. (4 Credits)

What are the implications of giving voice to those who are "voiceless"? This course explores the role of writing and speaking during the encounter of black, Indian, mestizo and Hispanic cultures in Latin America and Latina/o United States. By examining these cultural encounters, the course examines the political and ethical implications of speaking for and as the other Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, EP4, VAL.

LALS 4200. PRAGMATISM AND IDEOLOGY: LATIN AMERICA. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: GLBL.

LALS 4347. LATINOS: FACT AND FICTION. (4 Credits)

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine the experiences of Latin Americans and Latinos. It employs literature and history to introduce students to the benefits of using multiple ways of acquiring knowledge. It then relies on other academic areas such as art and sociology to reinforce its interdisciplinary. As a capstone course, it allows students to incorporate disciplines from their own academic foundation. It covers topics such as politics, social justice, race, gender, and identity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, ICC.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

LALS 4900. TOPICS IN LATIN AND LATINO STUDIES. (4 Credits)

Advanced study of a Latin American or Latino topic. Must be approved by Chair/Associate Chair. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

LALS 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-4 Credits)