History

The study of history is an important component of a well-rounded liberal arts education. By understanding the origin and development of peoples and nations, their interrelations and interactions, as well as specific areas and movements that have shaped the modern world, the student is better able to comprehend and evaluate contemporary events. A thorough comprehension of history further enables the student to place the study of other disciplines in their historical context. It is, thereby, a valuable asset in the student’s course of study as well as an excellent preparation for many professional careers that require a broad social vision and global awareness.

Program Activities

Honors in History

To graduate with the distinction of Departmental Honors, majors need to maintain a 3.500 G.P.A. Among the 10 courses required for the major, students seeking to graduate with honors will successfully complete a four-credit honors tutorial and thesis (HIST 4999 Tutorial), and a 5000-level graduate course which will be treated as the Department Seminar.

Phi Alpha Theta, the National History Honor Society

The mission of Phi Alpha Theta is to promote the study of history and to create a space for intellectual exchange among students and faculty members. It is one of the few honor and professional historical societies that encourages student participation at all its functions. The Chi Phi Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta at Fordham University sponsors many activities throughout the year, including field trips to museums in the New York area and lectures by notable speakers each semester. Phi Alpha Theta members at Fordham are active in regional and national competitions for scholarly prizes. For information about membership, contact Nicholas Paul, Ph.D., at 718-817-3928.

Accelerated Master’s Program

Please read the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Accelerated Master’s Programs section, which is located under the heading of Special Academic Programs in the chapter on Academic Programs, Policies, and Procedures of this bulletin. Outstanding history students, with grade point averages of 3.2 or better, may apply for early admission to the M.A. program. Students submit their applications in the spring of their junior year and enter the program in the senior year, when they take two graduate courses. These courses count toward the B.A. and are accepted for the M.A. at Fordham.

With credit for the two courses, students are able to complete a history M.A. in two terms of full-time study after completing their bachelor’s. M.A. students may either complete a thesis, normally as part of a research seminar, or take a comprehensive exam after completion of coursework. Students from the FCRH, FCLC, and PCS campuses are eligible to opt for early admission into the M.A. program, although all graduate courses are given at Rose Hill. The Department of History offers the M.A. in medieval, modern European, American, Latin-American and Latino, gender, and global history. There is also the option of an M.A. without a concentration. Applications are made online through the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences website.

For more information

Visit the History department web page.

Understanding Historical Change

Through the introduction to the discipline of history, students will begin to achieve knowledge of the structure of societies, how they function, and how they change. Each section of the course will consider how to assess evidence, identify and evaluate differing and often contradictory explanations and arguments, and appraise the relative scale and importance of particular changes in the past. Students will be able to choose from different sections of the course each with the title Understanding Historical Change, and a descriptive subtitle such as Ancient Greece, American History, etc. Courses currently offered include:

Course Title Credits
HIST 1000Understanding Historical Change: Modern Europe3
HIST 1075Understanding Historical Change: Renaissance to Revolution in Europe3
HIST 1100Understanding Historical Change: American History3
HIST 1103Understanding Historical Change: Fighting for Equal Rights in American History3
HIST 1210Understanding Historical Change: Ancient Greece3
HIST 1220Understanding Historical Change: Ancient Rome3
HIST 1240Understanding Historical Change: The Ancient World3
HIST 1300Understanding Historical Change: Medieval3
HIST 1400Understanding Historical Change: Latin America3
HIST 1450Understanding Historical Change: South Asian History3
HIST 1550Understanding Historical Change: Modern East Asia3
HIST 1551Understanding Historical Change: Representations of China and The West3
HIST 1600Understanding Historical Change: Africa3
HIST 1650Understanding Historical Change: The Black Atlantic3
HIST 1700Understanding Historical Change: Mideast3
HIST 1750Understanding Historical Change: Islamic History and Culture3
HIST 1850Understanding Historical Change: Jews in the Ancient and Medieval World3
HIST 1851Understanding Historical Change: Jews in the Modern World3
HIST 1925Understanding Historical Change: Science and Technology3

Core Requirements

In addition, the department regularly offers courses that fulfill the EP1, EP3, Advanced History Core, American Pluralism, and Global Studies core requirements.

Our Courses

HIST 1000. Understanding Historical Change: Modern Europe. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and the examination of specific topics essential for understanding the evolution of modern institutions, ideologies, and political situations.

Attributes: HC, INST, IPE, IRST, ISEU.

HIST 1075. Understanding Historical Change: Renaissance to Revolution in Europe. (3 Credits)

Understanding Historical Change in early modern Europe involves a modular and comparative approach to events and issues significant to the history of Europe from approximately 1500 to 1800. The course will examine a range of events stretching from Columbus's voyages to the rise of Napoleon, and issues including but not limited to religious change, state formation, intellectual development and revolution. Previous title: UHC Early Modern Europe.

Attributes: HC, IRST.

HIST 1100. Understanding Historical Change: American History. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and examination of specific topics focusing on significant periods in the development of the U.S. and considering them in the light of certain elements shaping that history. Among these elements are the constitutional and political system; and the society's ideals, structure, economic policy, and world outlook.

Attributes: AMST, APPI, ASHS, FRHE, FRHI, HC.

HIST 1103. Understanding Historical Change: Fighting for Equal Rights in American History. (3 Credits)

This course explores American history through the lens of citizenship. We ask how, when, and if Americans have attained equal rights. In the process, we ask hard questions about the meaning of equality in America. Citizenship includes political, civil, and social rights: how well has America done in providing those rights? We study the conflicts that have occurred over both expanding and limiting citizenship since the nation’s founding. As a course fulfilling Fordham’s core pluralism requirement, we examine particularly how race, gender, and ethnicity have shaped these struggles.

Attributes: ADVD, AMST, APPI, ASHS, FRHE, FRHI, HC, MANR, PLUR.

HIST 1200. Understanding Historical Change: Ancient History. (3 Credits)

A topical consideration of key issues in the political, social, and cultural history of the classical Greek and Roman world.

Attributes: CLAS, FRSM, HC.

HIST 1210. Understanding Historical Change: Ancient Greece. (3 Credits)

A political, social, and intellectual history of ancient Greece from its origin to the death of Alexander the Great.

Attributes: CLAS, HC.

HIST 1220. Understanding Historical Change: Ancient Rome. (3 Credits)

Introduction to Roman History focusing on problems and sources.

Attributes: CC, CLAS, HC.

HIST 1240. Understanding Historical Change: The Ancient World. (3 Credits)

Teaches basic skills of historical analysis and familiarizes students with historical change in ancient history from second millennium BC in Asia Minor and the Aegean to the fall of the Western Roman Empire.

Attributes: CLAS, HC.

HIST 1300. Understanding Historical Change: Medieval. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and the examination of specific topics essential for understanding the emergence and development of Europe from the decline of the Roman Empire to the early Renaissance. A topical study of political, social, economic, religious, and cultural issues, ideas, and institutions.

Attributes: FRHI, HC, MVST, OCHS, OCST.

HIST 1400. Understanding Historical Change: Latin America. (3 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and the examination of specific topics essential for understanding the history of Latin America, from the independence movement to the present.

Attributes: AMCS, AMST, ASHS, GLBL, HC, INST, IPE, ISLA, LAIN, LALS, PJRC, PJST.

HIST 1450. Understanding Historical Change: South Asian History. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and familiarizes students with major themes in South Asian history, including imperialism, trade and production, nationalism, social hierarchies and conflict, and decolonization. As an EP seminar, the course will help students develop writing and oral presentation skills.

Attributes: CNST, FRHI, GLBL, HC, INST, IPE, ISAS.

HIST 1500. Introduction to Asian History. (3 Credits)

Emergence and development of East Asian civilization from Antiquity to modern times, focusing on key political, social, and cultural phenomena in China and Japan.

Attributes: GLBL, INST, ISAS.

HIST 1550. Understanding Historical Change: Modern East Asia. (3 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to the basic skills of historical analysis and the examination of change through time in East Asian history, focusing on key political, social, and cultural phenomena in China, Japan, and Korea.

Attributes: CNST, FRHE, FRHI, GLBL, HC, INST, IPE, ISAS, REST.

HIST 1551. Understanding Historical Change: Representations of China and The West. (3 Credits)

By focusing on the representations of China in "the West" and of "the West" in China, this course examines how people identify and understand others, how people establish themselves as authoritative cultural mediators, and what the representations people produce tell us about history. It is focused on creative analysis of a diverse set of sources.

Attributes: FRHI, GLBL, HC, HIGH.

HIST 1600. Understanding Historical Change: Africa. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the political, social, economic and institutional history of Africa.

Attributes: AFAM, GLBL, HC, INST, IPE, ISAF, MEST, PJRC, PJST.

HIST 1650. Understanding Historical Change: The Black Atlantic. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the history of the African diaspora as formed in the Atlantic world as the result of the slave trade and subsequent process of migration and movement. Course covers the 15th century to the 20th century, and focuses on Africa, the Americas, the Caribbean, and Europe. Nature's method of historical studies is also emphasized.

Attributes: GLBL, HC, INST, ISAF, ISAS, ISEU, ISIN, ISLA, ISME.

HIST 1700. Understanding Historical Change: Mideast. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and the examination of specific topics essential for understanding the history of the Middle East and North Africa from the rise of Islam in the mid-7th century AD until the end of the 20th. The region is defined to include all of the Arab world from Morocco in the west to Iraq in the east as well as Iran, Turkey, and Israel. The course provides strong background preparation for more advanced courses in Middle East history.

Attributes: GLBL, HC, INST, IPE, ISME, MEST, OCHS, OCST, PJRC, PJST.

HIST 1750. Understanding Historical Change: Islamic History and Culture. (3 Credits)

This course spans the development of Islamic history and culture from the rise of Islam in the seventh century to the modern times. Through adopting an interdisciplinary approach, the course seeks to familiarize the students with the dynamic and complex historical process in which Islam emerged and developed as a religious and cultural tradition in the Near East, North Africa, Spain, Central Asia , and Southeast Asia. By reading various political, philosophical, theological, legal, mystical and literary writings, the students will not only learn about the major events, facts, concepts, and periods for Islamic history but also gain knowledge of the multifaceted religious, geographic, social, and aesthetic contexts and processes of the pluralistic Islamic world. By developing an informed historical perspective, the course aims to furnish the students with advanced theoretical and analytical skills enabling them to historicize and question modern perceptions of Islam.

Attributes: GLBL, HC, INST, IPE, ISME, MEST, MVST, OCHS, OCST, PJRC, PJST.

HIST 1850. Understanding Historical Change: Jews in the Ancient and Medieval World. (3 Credits)

The course will explore the history and culture of Jews from biblical times to the eve of modernity, the transformations from "biblical Israelites" to "Jews." It will explore the changes in religious and social culture as biblical Israelites became diaspora Jews. The course will present Jewish history in the broader context of the environment in which Jews lived. The readings will consist mostly of historical sources on Jewish culture, politics, economic activities, social and legal status, and the Jews' relations with non-Jews, Chrisitans, and Muslims.

Attributes: FRHI, GLBL, HC, HIMH, JSHI, JSPM, JWST, MVST, PJRJ.

HIST 1851. Understanding Historical Change: Jews in the Modern World. (3 Credits)

This course will provide an introduction to the history of the Jewish people as it encountered the modern world from the 18th century through the twentieth. It will explore the social, cultural, religious, and political aspects of this encounter, primarily in Eastern and Western Europe, the United States, and the middle East. The course will touch on such issues and events as emancipation and the breakdown of traditional identities and communcal structures; Jewish religious movements from Hasidism to Reform; the invention of modern secular culture in Yiddish and Hebrew; political movements including Socialism, Zionism and Communism; migrations and the creation of American Jewry; anti-Semitism and the Holocaust; and the rise of the State of Israel.

Attributes: ADVD, AMST, ASHS, GLBL, HC, INST, IPE, ISEU, ISIN, ISME, JSHI, JWST.

HIST 1925. Understanding Historical Change: Science and Technology. (3 Credits)

The course covers basic themes, concerns, and methods to understand the critical role of science, technology and medicine in the world history. The course will aim to foster both a set of skills and a body of knowledge about how science technology, and medicine have shaped important social changes, with a concomitant understanding of how social and cultural factors have shaped the nature of scientific, technological and medical knowledge.

Attributes: FRHI, HC, INST, ISIN.

HIST 1999. Tutorial. (1 Credit)

Tutorial.

Attribute: HIUL.

HIST 2070. Honors Research Skills Review. (1 Credit)

This course is open to members of the History Department's Mannion Society. It is intended to develop specific disciplinary skills in researc h, grant-writing, and writi ng. Students w ill be expected to undertake significant indepedent research projects resulting in substantial research papers. Requires permission of Instructor.

HIST 2999. Tutorial. (0 to 3 Credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

HIST 3001. African American History I. (4 Credits)

An examination of the black experience in the U.S. from colonial times through Reconstruction. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, HIAH, HIUL, PJRC, PJST, PLUR, URST.

HIST 3002. African American History II. (4 Credits)

An examination of the black experience in the U.S. from Reconstruction to the present. Subjects covered will be the origins of segregation, the Civil Rights movement, African American nationalism, and African American contributions to American literature, music, sports, and scholarship. Special attention will be given to the role of economic forces in shaping African American life, and the importance of gender issues in the African American experience. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, HIAH, HIUL, PJRC, PJST, PLUR, URST.

HIST 3012. Medieval France. (4 Credits)

Covers the distinctive characteristics of medieval French society and culture from the ascent of Hugh Capet to the trial of Joan of Arc, including feudalism, kingship, law, chivalry, and courtly love. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3014. Medieval Feud, Ordeal, and Law. (4 Credits)

This course is designed to explore the great transformation in European legal habits that occurred in the medieval period, from private, family-directed systems of vengeance to royal or state-sponsored systems of vengeance. It will raise many ethical and substantive issues that are very relevant to an understanding of the function of law and justice in the modern world. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH.

HIST 3018. Medieval Nobility: Love, War, and Devotion. (4 Credits)

Europe's warrior aristocracy was responsible for many of the most popular and enduring features of medieval civilization, including the literature of courtly love, great stone castles, and richly endowed monastic foundations. These artifacts point to just a few of the wide variety of roles that these men and women had to play within medieval society. In this course, we will trace the rise of the princely nobility as judicial arbiters, military commanders, advocates not only of religious institutions but of reform and dissent, and as patrons, consumers, and creators of art and literature. Among the issues that we will discuss are the origins and meaning of nobility, the place of women within noble society, the performance of courtliness, and the relationship between the nobility and the other social "orders". Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3050. Christians, Muslims, and Jews in Medieval Iberia. (4 Credits)

This course examines intercultural and cross-religious engagement in the kingdoms of medieval Iberia from c. 700 to 1500. Readings and discussions will focus on the religious, cultural, and economic interactions of members of the three main religious cultures of medieval Iberia—Christians, Muslims and Jews—and on the legal position and lives of religious minorities (Jewish, Christian, and Muslim) in both Islamic and Christian Iberian lands. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, JWST, MVST.

HIST 3051. The Black Death, 1348-1450. (4 Credits)

The Black Death had a profound effect on society in the Middle Ages. Wiping out nearly one half of the population in a relatively short period of time, the disease has been identified as the catalyst for a long period of instability and change. This course will examine the conditions preceeding the disease in Europe, and trace the social and economic changes wrought by the plague's arrival and aftermath. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3070. Honors Research Seminar. (3 Credits)

This course is open to members of the History Department's Mannion Society. It is intended to develop specific disciplinary skills in research,grant-writing, and writi ng. Students will be expected to undertake significant indepedent research projects resulting in substantial research papers. Requires permission of instructor.

HIST 3071. Honors Research Seminar I. (0 Credits)

This course is open to members of the History Department's Mannion Society. It is intended to develop specific disciplinary skills in research, analysis, and writing. The instructor will guide students to carry out independent research projects that result in quality academic papers. Requires permission of instructor. Students must also complete HIST 3072.

Attribute: HIUL.

HIST 3072. Honors Research Seminar II. (4 Credits)

As a continuation of History 3071, this course is open to members of the History Department's Mannion Society. It is intended to develop specific disciplinary skills in research, analysis, and writing. The instructor will guide students to carry out independent research projects that result in quality academic papers. Requires permission of instructor.

Attribute: HIUL.

Prerequisite: HIST 3071.

HIST 3100. History of the Arts at Lincoln Center: Urban Renewal and the Arts. (4 Credits)

This course considers the history of the arts in NYC with special emphasis on urban renewal and the changing politics and economics surrounding Lincoln Center in midtown Manhattan. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

HIST 3110. History of Gay and Lesbian New York City. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the relationship between key LGBT historical and cultural events in New York City, including lesbian and gay public and private life, changing laws and prohibition, transformative theories of sexual attraction and affiliation, and medical histories of LGBT bodies. Students will compare New York City lesbian and gay histories with those of other major urban centers of the world. The course will also include a survey of the role of the arts in creating LGBT culture, with a particular focus on Walt Whitman's New York.

Attributes: AHC, WGSS.

HIST 3139. Buffalo Soldiers: Race and War. (4 Credits)

Buffalo Soldiers examines the intersection of race and military service in the United States, from the American Revolution to the Cold War. The focus of the course is on the role African Americans played in the major military conflicts of this country's history. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AFAM, AHC, AMST, ASHS, ASSC, PLUR.

HIST 3145. Medieval Barbarians. (4 Credits)

This course will discuss the different groups that contemporaries and modern historians have called "barbarians." Topics to be considered include the role of barbarians in the fall of the Roman Empire, barbarian identity and the creation of barbarian states, and later barbarian groups such as the Vikings. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3192. The United States, Africa, and the Cold War. (4 Credits)

This course seeks to understand, analyze, and review the United States' foreign policy toward Africa during the Cold War. Specifically, the course explores how the Cold War rationales that viewed the Horn of Africa as a means for solving non-African problems integrated into the determinants of U.S. policy toward Africa from Truman to Bush. The goal of this course is to assess critically the significance of U.S. preoccupation with anticommunism and the rise of Africa’s anti-colonialism nationalism in defining and advancing U.S. national interest in Africa. The first part of the course debates the origins or causes of the Cold War, and the determinants of U.S. policy towards Africa. Then, in the second part of the course, we will critically evaluate and discuss U.S. foreign policy toward selected countries in the Horn of Africa, particularly Somalia and Ethiopia, between 1945 and 1990. We will conclude by discussing possible new directions in U.S. Africa policy in the post-Cold War period. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AFAM, AHC, EP3, HIGH, HIUL, INST, ISAF, ISIN, PJST, PJWT.

HIST 3203. Medieval Family Life. (4 Credits)

Our modern notion of “family” did not exist in the Western Middle Ages (circa 500 to 1500). Expressions, like the Latin word “familia,” denoted instead wider networks of people that were characterized, not only by blood relations, but also by bonds of submission, friendship, and solidarity. For medieval contemporaries, today’s common understanding of family—consisting of a “nuclear” domestic unit with two intimate partners and their children—would have been “marriage.” The course, based on readings and discussion, will address both notions of family, medieval and modern, by focusing on issues such as childhood, partnership roles, forms of cohabitation, and parental authority. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3204. Sex & Celibacy in the Middle Ages. (4 Credits)

The canonical obligation for priests and bishops to abstain from marriage is an invention of the Western Middle Ages (circa 500 to 1500). Sex outside of marriage was condemned as sinful, so that, in theory, churchmen were expected to abstain from intercourse completely and throughout their lives. How did the prohibition fare in medieval practice? In the Mediterranean, for example, members of the holy orders had access to legal alternatives in the form of notarized partnerships. Elsewhere, concubinage and sex were branded as sin, although with consequences of varying severity. The course will examine the original sources and modern historiography for answers to the question of how medieval culture sought to accommodate the conflicting commands of sexuality and celibacy. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST, MVTH.

HIST 3205. Medieval Medicine. (4 Credits)

The course explores the history of disease in the west from 500 to 1500, including sudden epidemics like the Black Death, endemic illnesses such as leporsy, and the rise of uterate university medicine. Particular attention is paid to issues highlighting the close nexus between medical and social practices. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST, REST.

HIST 3207. Late Medieval Religion and Society. (4 Credits)

Topics in the history of later medieval religion and society. From the eleventh century, the growth of trade and urbanization in the West deeply affected religious sensibilities. The institutional Church began to monitor Christian behavior ever more closely, and the faithful responded to the rapid diversification of lifestyles with varied forms of spiritual expression. Cistercians 'sanctified' colonization, military orders Western expansion, and mendicants the needs of the urban poor. Some of the new movements did not find a place within the orthodox framework, having to endure heresy charges and- eventually- the Inquisition. The course, based on lectures and original source material, will survey the most important manifestations of piety and their struggle for social recognition. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3208. The Medieval Other. (4 Credits)

Western people in the Middle Ages shared many assumptions reinforcing their sense of social identity and unity. The recognition of common views and aspirations simultaneously implied that 'others' who challenged accepted lifestyles and beliefs suffered exclusion. Collective rejection varied in degree, from ridicule and physical separation to judicial prosecution, expulsion and indiscriminate slaughter. The course will examine various types of the medieval 'other', including Jews, lepers, heretics, prostitutes, and beggars. It will also focus on their respective treatment by the public, which became more rigid, if not outright hostile, as time went on. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST, OCST.

HIST 3209. The Origins of Christianity from the Apostles to the 4th Century. (4 Credits)

This upper-division course surveys the sources for the development of ancient Christianity, from the ministry of Jesus Christ to the conversion of the emperor Constantine in the early fourth century. Through lectures and a close reading of primary source materials in translation, students will examine the social activities, theological inquiries, and doctrinal conflicts of early Christians in their Roman and Jewish context, with special attention to the plurality of understanding about the significance of Jesus Christ, the development of the church as an institution, and the formulation of orthodoxy and heresy, particularly with regard to the creation of a “canon” of authoritative texts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3210. King, Court, Crusade: Writing Knightly Life in the High Middle Ages. (4 Credits)

This course will view the medieval world through a lens provided by the life and writings of one man, John of Joinville (d. 1317). John was a knight, a crusader, and a close friend of King Louis IX of France (canonized as Saint Louis). He wrote a Life of Saint Louis that is rich with information about his own life, as well as the saintly king's. We will use the Life to open an examination of key themes in the knightly experience in the high middle ages, including: power, faith, the crusades, noble culture, family and social relations. It will also consider the usefulness of biography/autobiography in understanding the past.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3211. Medieval Sin, Sinners, and Outcasts. (4 Credits)

During the medieval period, the notions and practice of sin and redemption underwent constant changes. In surveying their development, the course will place particular emphasis on the growing inclination to treat those banned from the community of the faithful simultaneously as outcasts, to be excluded from lay society as well. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3212. The History of Medieval Christianity. (4 Credits)

The History of Medieval Christianity explores the history, organization, and beliefs of Christian communities and institutions from the time of the apostles to the sixteenth century. The history of the Church is treated as the history of the variety of possibilities that human culture has created to define "church," and the history of the choices Christians have made in the face of those possibilities. Through lectures and discussions of primary source texts in English translation and the work of modern historians of Christianity, this course examines the spread of the Christian movement in its ancient, medieval, and early modern contexts. Our intellectual goal is to achieve a detailed knowledge and firm understanding of this development. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3213. Monsters, Magic, and the Undead in Medieval Europe. (4 Credits)

This course explores the shadowy margins of the human imagination in the European Middle Ages (ca. 400 to 1400) through an investigation of the representation and understanding of monsters, supernatural creatures, and the restless dead in medieval Christian writings. Through a close reading of saints’ lives, sermons, books of wonders, and magical treatises, we will discover some of the “stranger things” about the medieval world. Weekly topics of inquiry include dragons, fairies, demons, werewolves, dog-headed people (cynocephali), subterranean races, necromancy, weather magic, ghosts, zombies, and vampires, among others. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3214. Plagues and Peoples: Health and Disease in Medieval Europe. (4 Credits)

In recent years the study of health in the premodern world has flourished, and new approaches like viral genome sequencing and osteoarchaeology have led to a reconsideration of the longstanding narrative of the Middle Ages as a time of hardship and disease. This course uses these new approaches, together with primary-source material, to examine how medieval people understood and experienced health and disease, including their approaches to diet, occupations, and plagues, among other issues. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3215. Middle Ages and West. (4 Credits)

At very nearly the same moment, empires at opposite ends of Eurasia imploded. In the centuries that followed, both absorbed nomadic populations, incorporated new religions, expanded into heretofore peripheral areas, revived trade, urban life and classical intellectual traditions. Each exported high civilization (and accompanying technologies) to island archipelagos off their coast. They emerged from this process having restructured themselves politically and socially. This course will explore the parallels even as it seeks to bring forces generating significant contrasts into sharper focus. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3216. Rich and Poor in the Middle Ages. (4 Credits)

The theme of this class is wealth inequality in late medieval European society. Using a variety of primary and secondary source readings, we will explore subjects such as the lives of the rich (nobles and kings), the lives of the poor (peasants and beggars), the lives of those in the middle (artisans and merchants), income inequality, social mobility, common means of making money, charity, and prevailing religious attitudes towards poverty and profit in Europe during the later Middle Ages. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, EP3, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3217. Islamic History, 1000–1600. (4 Credits)

This course surveys the history of Islam between 1000 CE and 1600 CE, with a particular emphasis on the political, cultural, and intellectual developments that shaped the lives of Muslim peoples inhabiting the geography stretching from Iran to the Mediterranean. The period formed a link between the medieval and modern periods in Islam and witnessed many significant transformations, including the rise of political dominance of Central Asian nomadic people and cultures over the core lands of Islam, the destruction of the historical caliphate, the arrival of the Crusades, the emergence of the new Christian threat in the Indian Ocean and the Red Sea following the discovery of new sea routes to the east, the emergence of new forms of political legitimacy based on messianic Shi’ism, the formation of the Ottoman and Safavid Empires, and the return of Islamic military expansion into the Mediterranean under the Ottomans. Through the deployment of a wide variety of primary sources, students in the course aim to understand this formative period of Islam in conjunction with the broader developments of European history and crosscultural interactions with the West. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, HIUL, MVST.

HIST 3220. Medieval Hollywood. (4 Credits)

This course examines popular depictions of the Middle Ages on screen by using lectures, discussion,and selected films. Topics include the cinematic representations of King Arthur, female mystics,warfare, monks, knighthood, and kings and queens, among others. This course fosters a deeper understanding of the relationship between historical evidence and fiction, as well as how modern sensibilities shape popular representations of the medieval past. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3260. Medieval Ireland to 1691. (4 Credits)

A history of Ireland from early Middle Ages through the Tudor-Stuart era. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMCS, HIMH, IRST, MVST.

HIST 3270. The Crusades. (4 Credits)

The idea of a crusade; the European background; conditions in the Moslem world; the Latin Kingdoms of the East; crusades of the late Middle Ages; effects of Crusades on the Mediterranean world. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, JSPM, JWST, MVST, OCHS, OCST, REST, RSHR.

HIST 3301. Medieval Women's Lives. (4 Credits)

This course will discuss women in medieval society: the noblewoman who influenced major political developments, the peasant woman who performed agricultural and manorial tasks, the townswoman who served as merchant and producer and the wife and mother who provided the basis of family life. The course will also cover attitudes toward women revealed in legal, religious and secular literature of the period. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, HIUL, MVST, PJGS, PJST, WGSS.

HIST 3305. Medieval Warfare. (4 Credits)

This course examines the social, economic, and political history of warfare from the fall of the Roman Empire to the fifteenth century. Several themes are emphasized: 1) the impact of technological developments in weaponry, fortifications, and armor on the conduct of war and society; 2)the influence of the Christian Church on warfare; 3) the relationship between social stratification and the conduct of war; and 4) the social consequences and economic costs of warfare. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST, PJST, PJWT.

HIST 3310. Medieval England: From Viking Invasions to Henry VIII. (4 Credits)

This course covers the politics and society of medieval England from the Viking invasions in the eighth century through the reign of Henry VIII. In addition to learning about the drama of the kings and nobles, students will investigate the everyday lives of people in England including how their society was inexorably altered by the Black Death plague in the fourteenth century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, HIUL, MVST.

HIST 3322. The Reformation Era. (4 Credits)

A detailed analysis of the religious upheavals of the 16th century with attention to the social, political and economic aspects of the theological movements. (Alternate years) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, HIMH, RSHR.

HIST 3356. Confessionalization and Conflict in Early Modern Europe, 1453-8885. (4 Credits)

Through lectures and discussions of primary and secondary source material, the course will examine the Ottoman threat, confessional purity, the Peasants’ Revolt, Luther and the German nobility, cuius region eius religio, the French Wars of Religion, English “wars of religion,” the Thirty Years’ War, the way forward: religious tolerance, or King Louis XIV’s absolutism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

HIST 3362. Crime and Punishment in Europe. (4 Credits)

The history of defining, prosecuting, and punishing transgressions, both religious and secular, in Europe, especially from 1500-1800. The course will focus on the development of so-called modern beliefs about crime and law. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, IPE.

HIST 3363. Europe and Early Modern World. (4 Credits)

From 1450-1700, the European cosmos expanded intellectually to reach an infinite universe and materially to grasp the entire earth. This course will examine the transformation of understanding and power that made Europe the center of global empire and intellectual and cultural change. The reciprocal influence of the world upon European life, culture, and art is another important theme of this survey. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, EP3, HIUL.

HIST 3364. Environmental History of the Atlantic World, 1250-1650. (4 Credits)

Contemporary climate change has driven home the capacity of human societies to shape and be shaped by our environments. We are not, however, the first people to rely on fragile relationships with an ever-changing natural world. From the sequence of floods, famines, and human and animal diseases that struck Europe in the 14th century, linked to a minor fluctuation in global temperature, to the catastrophic transformation of American ecologies and societies with the arrival of Old World species, such relationships have defined our past. This course will explore the interactions between humans and their environment around the Atlantic basin, from the first faltering of the Medieval Warm Period in the 13th century, through the establishment of permanent European colonies on the North American mainland, exploring how societies were affected by changing environmental conditions, and how they tried to understand, adapt to, and shape those conditions in turn. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, ENST, ESEL, ESHC, HIEH, MVST.

HIST 3411. Tudor and Stuart England. (4 Credits)

Religious and political changes under Henry VIII and Elizabeth; the Stuart regime, civil war and Cromwell, the Restoration and revolution of 1688. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH.

HIST 3412. The Tudors. (4 Credits)

This course tells the fascinating story of the Tudor dynasty (1485-1603), but it will also explore the history of the Tudor state which in addition to England included Wales, Ireland and parts of France. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, IRST.

HIST 3413. Reformation England. (4 Credits)

This course studies political and religious change in England in the 16th century, from Henry VIII to Elizabeth I. It will examine Roman Catholicism before the schism, the Divine issue, Thomas Cromwell and Thomas Cranmer's influence in the English Church; and the development of Puritanism in England. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH.

HIST 3414. Cabbages and Kings. (4 Credits)

This class will explore various styles of kingship and monarchy in Europe from the end of the Middle Ages to the First World War. We will compare and contrast monarchial forms of government with the ideal of the republic, and especially with new standards created by the Enlightenment. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH.

HIST 3415. European Women: 1500-1800. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the role of women in northern European society from the 16th to the end of the 18th centuries. It will examine issues of gender, and contemporary attitudes concerning women. Among the subjects that this course will address are women's work, education, marriage and childbirth. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, WGSS.

HIST 3416. European Women: 1800-Present. (4 Credits)

This course will be an exciting exploration of the changing status, roles, and achievements of women in western Europe from the French Revolution at the dawn of industrialization to the present day. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, HIUL, INST, IPE, ISEU, WGSS.

HIST 3417. Civil Wars and Revolution in the British Isles. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the concepts of revolution in 17th-century Britain under the Stuart dynasty and Oliver Cromwell. It will examine the failures of King Charles I to tame Parliament and why he was overthrown. This course will also explore how Cromwell overcame Parliament to create a brief military dictatorship in Britain, as well as when new political groups developed and experiments with socialism occurred. We will explore why the monarchy was restored in 1660. This course will also discuss the Glorious Revolution of 1688, when Parliament triumphed over the monarchy forever. This course is important because it stresses how revolutions happen, what the participants hope for, and how often their expectations are disappointed. We will see why the outcomes of any revolution can be wholly surprising. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIEH.

HIST 3420. The English Renaissance. (4 Credits)

Studies in intellectual life in England from the late 15th through 16th centuries. This course will pay special attention to humanism and its development by examining the works of Bishop John Fisher, Sir Thomas More, Juan Luis Vives, and others. Emphasis will be placed upon the education of women; and also Renaissance art, including Holbein. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH.

HIST 3425. Henry VIII's England. (4 Credits)

Henry VIII is the most famous king England ever had. His brutality, his six marriages, his tyranny, his ego, even his physiognomy, is the stuff of legend. Often lost in all of this, however, is the fact that King Henry presided over a revolution in church-state relations and important changes in English government and society. His reign also witnessed a redefinition of England’s relationship with its near neighbors Ireland, Wales, and Scotland, which was part of a broader repositioning of England in Reformation Europe. At the center of all of these developments was Henry VIII; understanding of England in what, in hindsight, was one of the most pivotal periods in the kingdom’s long history is impossible without understanding the king. To do so this course will explore Henry VIII’s England by looking at four interrelated themes: politics and society; the Reformation, England's relationship with Europe and with Ireland. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, IRST.

HIST 3430. The World of Queen Elizabeth I. (4 Credits)

This course explores the world of Queen Elizabeth, the last Tudor sovereign, by looking at four overlapping themes which together shaped the Elizabethan period: state and society in the kingdom of England; overseas discovery; European diplomacy; and the kingdom of Ireland. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, IRST.

HIST 3455. 20th Century Ireland. (4 Credits)

This course examines Northern Ireland and the Southern Republic with special attention to their internal development, their relations with each other, and their relationship to Great Britain. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, INST, IPE, IRST, ISEU.

HIST 3456. Britain: 1688-1867. (4 Credits)

Aristocratic hegemony, popular culture and protest, the industrial revolution and its associated class conflict, radical and reform movements, and the transforming effect of new social forces and ideologies. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, IRST.

HIST 3457. Britain: 1867-Present. (4 Credits)

Gradual democratization, imperial expansion, the rise of the Labour Party, economic decline, the impact of the two world wars, and the Thatcher Revolution. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, INST, IPE, ISEU.

HIST 3458. Ireland: 1688-1923. (4 Credits)

Revolution, nationalism, and constitutionalism in Ireland, focusing on the United Irishmen, Daniel O'Connell's reform movements, young Ireland, the Fenians, the land war, Home Rule, cultural revival, and the quest for independence in the early 20th century. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, INST, IRST, ISEU.

HIST 3459. Transgender History. (4 Credits)

This course examines the making of transgender life in the modern world. We will begin in late 19th-century Europe with the emergence of sexology, contextualizing early sexological writings in relation to contemporaneous cultures of sexual and gender nonconformity, to literary and historiographical works in which gender-variant figures appear, and to the gender dynamics of high imperialism. In this way, we will sketch out the historical matrix that gave birth to the modern invert. We will treat transgender people not only as objects of historical narratives but also as creators of historical representations. We will engage with late 20th- and early 21st-century histories of transgender life in various places, including Europe, the United States, and other areas of the world. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, INST, ISIN, PJGS, PJST, WGSS.

HIST 3460. Diversity and Globalization at the Irish-Atlantic Crossroads. (4 Credits)

Exploring the fateful diversity and globalization links among Irish emigration, African slavery and Indian removal in Ireland, England and America at the fateful 19th century Irish-Atlantic crossroads. A vivid mix of period and present-day people, texts, photos and films. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

HIST 3465. The Modern Atlantic World, 1780–1980: Literature and History. (4 Credits)

In this course, we will ask how literary works can help illuminate histories of the modern Atlantic world, and more generally how literature and history are related. We will begin by examining the transatlantic slave trade, reading "The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano" (1789), trial records of the Zong massacre (1781), and M. NourbeSe Philip’s poetic reworking of these records in "Zong!" (2008). From here, we will consider the literary underpinnings of 19th-century nationalist movements, focusing in particular on playwright Adam Mickiewicz’s contributions to Polish nationalism, and on poet José Martí’s involvement in Cuban nationalism. The course will then approach the problem of how to represent modern experiences of war and mass violence, considering writings by David Jones, Aimé Césaire, Walter Benjamin, and Charlotte Delbo. Finally, our attention will turn to postwar Britain, with an examination of literary and historical materials on the Windrush generation, the Troubles in Northern Ireland, and feminist and queer movements. Here, we will read works by George Lamming, Anna Burns, Shelagh Delaney, and Carolyn Steedman, among others. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, ENGL.

HIST 3474. The Arab Israeli Conflict: Cultural Perspectives. (4 Credits)

The Arab-Israeli conflict is one of the longest and most controversial conflicts in the world. Through careful analysis of Israeli literature and film, this course provides a nuanced cultural and political history of Arab-Israeli relations. Our texts emphasize the dialectic relationship between art and politics, representation and history, as well as aesthetic and ethics. The course thus explores the effect of art on politics, and the effect of politics on art. Specifically, we examine how art is instrumental in producing 1) "imagined communities" with stable national identities and 2) political resistance that disrupts these hegemonic metanarratives. We also consider the internal dynamics of Israeli society as represented in literature and film, especially tensions between the Jewish-Arab, Ashkenazi-Mizrahi, and religious-secular communities. By analyzing canonical and more contemporary stories, poems, and films (including those by S. Yizhar, Amos Oz, Said Kashua, Mahmoud Darwish, among others) we explore the dialectic between art and politics in Israeli society since 1948.

Attributes: AHC, ALC, COLI, HIGH, HUST, INST, ISME, JWST, MEST, MLL.

HIST 3480. Judaism and Islam. (4 Credits)

HIST 3503. Modern France: 1900 to Present. (4 Credits)

We will follow the tumultuous course of French history from the turn of the twentieth century to suburban riots, recent presidential elections through three republics, two world wars (and a cold one), the painful loss of a colonial empire, the difficult emancipation of women, fast-paced urbanization and modernization, massive student and worker riots, the transition to the European Union, its troubled relationship with the United States, and the market economy and globalization. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, INST, IPE, ISEU.

HIST 3505. The History and Politics of Cartoons and Caricature from the Middle Ages to the Present. (4 Credits)

In this course, students will examine the development of the mass media of political cartoons, caricatures, and graphic satire from the end of the Middle Ages to the present, principally in the historical context of modern Europe and the Americas, but also adopting various broader thematic and geographical approaches to caricature and cartooning within the given chronology. Topics of study include but are not limited to pictorial marginalia in illuminated manuscripts; the beginnings of caricature and sequential graphic art in Renaissance and Reformation Europe; graphic art and the conquest and colonization of the Americas; the graphic satires of William Hogarth; the development of political cartoons in the Atlantic world and Europe in the Age of Revolutions; political cartoons in the Age of Industrialization and mass culture; the birth of the comic strip; cartoons, animation, and the advent of cinema; caricature and empire; caricature, cartoons, and wartime propaganda; cartoons and television; manga and anime; cartoons and politics in the 21st century. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, COMC, COMM, HIAH, HIEH, HIUL.

HIST 3512. The French Revolution. (4 Credits)

This course examines the French Revolution, including the origins of the revolt, social conditions, ideological and political motivations, the overthrow of the monarchy, the waves of terror, and the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH.

Mutually Exclusive: HIST 3513.

HIST 3513. Old Regime and French Revolution. (4 Credits)

A history of France between 1642 and 1815—from Louis XIV through the French Revolution and Napoleon. The themes we will analyze resonate well beyond French history: the rise of the state and the formation of social classes, Enlightenment thought and the diffusion of new ideas, early globalization and the culture of consumption, the first popular democratic revolution—its shining accomplishments and its descent into Terror and eventually dictatorship. We will read texts from the period ranging from novels to memoirs of Versailles courtiers or diaries of obscure people, and from political treatises and constitutions to newspapers and pamphlets. To get a fuller picture, we will also use music, songs, paintings, prints and cartoons, as well as films, along with the work of historians whose interpretations of this tumultuous, fascinating era have shaped our conceptions of modernity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH.

Mutually Exclusive: HIST 3512.

HIST 3515. Media History: 1400 to Present. (4 Credits)

This EP seminar will examine the evolution of media and the revolutions brought by new modes of communication, from the printing press in the 15th century to radio, television and the internet most recently. The book and audiovisual media have been major forces in history; we will examine the profound impact they have on culture, ideas, politics, society, and economy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, CCUS, CMST, COLI, COMC, HIAH, HIEH, HIUL, INST, ISIN, JOUR.

HIST 3517. The Belle Époque. (4 Credits)

The course will explore Europe in the three decades before the first World War. It will explore the development of a global industrial economy, imperialism, modernism, militarism, and racial reform movements in an especially dynamic period. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH.

HIST 3538. The Good Earth?. (4 Credits)

An examination of the past experiences and current problems, posed by man's relations with nature in China and Japan. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, CNST, ENST, ESEL, ESHC, GLBL, HIGH, HIUL, INST, ISAS.

HIST 3541. Modern Italy. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the history of Italy from the late 18th century to the present. Drawing on a variety of sources besides historical analyses (novels, films and music), the course will pay special attention to issues of nation building and national identity and to the specificity of Italian modernity. Topics include the culture and politics of the Risorgimento, the role of the Church, gender relations, the crisis of the liberal state and the emergence of Fascism, anti-Fascism and the making of the Republic, the "economic miracle" the difficult post-1989 political transition. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, HIUL, INST, IPE, ISEU, ITAL.

HIST 3543. The Connecting Sea: The Mediterranean Since 1800. (4 Credits)

The Mediterranean is a space of exchanges, confrontations, and connections among the peoples of three continents (Europe, Africa, and Asia). By drawing in multidisciplinary fashion on a variety of different sources, the course will focus on the changing relations among the polities and peoples inhabiting this multicultural region in the modern era. Topics will include Barbary corsairs and ethnic clashes, the circulation of political ideas, the relationships forged during the colonial and postcolonial periods, the legacies of anti-colonialism, beach tourism and climate change, contemporary migration and the formation of new relationships and communities in the age of globalization. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, GLBL, HIEH, HIGH, INST, ISEU, ISIN, ISME.

HIST 3545. Race and Nation in Modern Europe. (4 Credits)

An exploration of the constructions of race and nation since the Enlightenment. Topics will include the relationship between nationalism and racism; ¿scientific¿ discourses and ideas of race and nation; the institutionalization of racist practices in colonial states; the rise of modern anti-Semitism; fascist racisms; immigration, national identities, and racism in contemporary Europe. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, HIUL, INST, IRST, ISEU.

HIST 3549. Global Italy. (4 Credits)

Throughout the ages Italians have had intense exchanges with the world outside the peninsula, both in the Mediterranean and beyond. Italy has had many diasporas and continues to have significant numbers of emigrants, even though in the past couple of decades it has become primarily a migrant-receiving nation. This course will examine the relationship between the inhabitants of the peninsula and the world at large and how they have shaped their identities. Focus will be on political exiles, emigration, foreign policies, and colonialism, and the recent wave of African and Asian migration to the peninsula. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, INST, IPE, ISEU, ISIN, ITAL.

HIST 3550. Fascism from Mussolini to the Present. (4 Credits)

Fascism has been described as the “major political innovation of the 20th century” and, unfortunately, its fortunes do not seem to be spent. This course will examine what distinguished fascism from other types of nationalist and authoritarian movements and regimes and what characterized its peculiar ideological makeup and “style” of rule. The course will focus on fascist Italy and Nazi Germany, but it will also cover many other countries. Topics will include the ideological origins of fascism, the movement phase and the establishment of the regime, the use of violence, the manufacturing of consent, the cult of the leader, gender politics, racism and the Holocaust, collaboration and resistance, legacies and memories, neo-fascism, and the appeal of right-wing populism and authoritarianism in the crisis of contemporary democracies. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, HIUL, ITAL.

HIST 3555. Hitler's Germany. (4 Credits)

Study of the problem of how Nazism arose in German society, the ways in which it triumphed, and its significance for Germany and modern world history. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, INST, IPE, ISEU.

HIST 3558. Europe: 1900-1945: Total War. (4 Credits)

The course will focus on the two world wars, the rise of fascism and communism, and the Spanish Civil War, and the impact of these events on Europe and the world. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, INST, ISEU.

HIST 3559. Europe Since 1945. (4 Credits)

In this second half of a two-semester sequence, whose parts may be taken separately, we will explore how Europe constructed a new civilization from the ruins of the second World War. Topics include the treatment of war criminals, the "glorious thirty years" of unprecedented economic growth which produced the consumer society, the loss of empires, the cultural revolution of the 1960's and the Thatcher years. Special attention will be paid to the construction of the Soviet empire in Europe and to the collapse of Communism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, INST, ISEU.

HIST 3562. Memory, Myth, and History in Post-1945 Europe. (4 Credits)

In the aftermath of World War II, European political leaders and ordinary people constructed false or incomplete versions of their nations’ wartime actions and experiences. These narratives, which often served to deny acts of collaboration with Nazi Germany or instances of violent anti-Semitism, entered history when they were reinforced by professional historians and by educational and cultural institutions. Subsequent transformative events, such as the Cold War, decolonization, and the social movements of the 1960s, produced similar tensions between official versions of the past and the often traumatic memories of those who experienced them. In the era of fake news and “alternative facts,” thinking about how and why people understand or misunderstand the past has never been more urgent. In this course, we will draw from texts by scholars, wartime survivors, and witnesses who used memory as a principal object of study and from groups who lobbied for justice. We will explore the conflict over “sites of memories,” the monuments, museums, and other representations that came to symbolize how people struggled to face the past as a way to explore European politics, culture, and society since 1945. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, HIUL.

HIST 3563. New York City History in Film. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the ways in which films have shaped historical understandings of American cities, with a special focus on New York City. Films offer the magic of projected imagination, and can also present constructed versions of historical memory. Considering select films as cultural texts, this class will explore themes in urban history—including suburbanization, deindustrialization, the carceral state, and gentrification, among others—as they have been portrayed on screen. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIAH, HIUL.

HIST 3564. Environmental History of New York City: A Research Seminar. (4 Credits)

Students will undertake an intensive course of reading and writing related at the formation and ecology of New York City, from Lenape settlement and subsistence patterns to present concerns about climate change. We will visit, as a class, the New York Historical Society eight times during the semester. There students will meet and work with an archivist who will aid them in finding sources for three essays on three different periods in the city's history. Students will become members of the NYHS and use it throughout the semester. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, ENST, ESEL, ESHC.

HIST 3565. History of New York. (4 Credits)

The development of the City and the region from the Dutch to the deficit. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, ASHS, HIAH, URST.

HIST 3566. War and Imperialism. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the strains placed on the old Concert of Europe and its eventual collapse into two world wars. Themes of nationalism, and imperialism will be stressed as well as domestic and international sources of conflict. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, HIEH, INST, IPE, IRST, ISHI, ISIN, PJST, PJWT.

HIST 3570. Genocide. (4 Credits)

We will investigate the major instances of modern genocide, including the Armenian, Rwandan, and Cambodian cases; the Ukrainian famine; and the Holocaust. There is a comparative dimension to the course. What triggers genocide? How do modern cases compare to earlier ones? Why is rescue usually not forthcoming? How did the concept arise? How effective is the punishment of perpetrators? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HHPA, HIUL, HUST, INST, ISIN, JWST, PJST, PJWT.

HIST 3575. Torture, Terror, and the Body in the Modern World. (4 Credits)

Prohibited in Europe from the 18th century and since the nearly universally condemned throughout the world as ineffective and immoral, the practice of torture nevertheless continues today in authoritarian, democratic, and theocratic states alike. This course will examine the history of torture from its abolition, stubborn endurance, and subsequent return as a pervasive state practice. Though Europe and the United States remain the particular area of study, the course will examine torture worldwide through its intended and actual effect on the human body and on the lives of men and women regardless of nationality or creed. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, MEST.

HIST 3580. War, Gender, and Violence in Modern Europe. (4 Credits)

This course will explore themes related to war, gender and violence in modern European history. In particular it will focus on gender and violence during conflicts, its intersections with race and nation identity, and its effects on societies. It will also consider the aftermath and outcomes of wartime violence by looking at post-bellum trials and the politics of reparations. This course will interrogate questions such as: How is violence gendered in warfare and what are its meanings? How do citizens and combatants narrate and remember experiences of warfare and violence? How does wartime violence reverberate in cultural sources such as in films, novels and art? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, INST, ISEU.

HIST 3614. Revolutionary and Soviet Russia. (4 Credits)

This course explores key themes in the history of 20th Century Russia, including the decline of autocracy; the outbreak of World War I and the 1917 Revolutions; transformation of the state, society, and culture under the Soviet regime; state-sponsored terror, World War II and the Cold War; as well as socialist/Marxist theories as interpreted by key Russian/Soviet leaders and intellectuals. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, INST, IPE, ISEU, OCHS, OCST, PJST.

HIST 3619. World's Fair. (4 Credits)

Upper division course examining the world's fairs as a representation of modern culture. Topics include architecture and urbanism, leisure and amusement, tourism, and the conception of mass culture. Fairs in both Europe and America will be covered from the nineteenth century to the present. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: HIAH, HIEH, URST.

HIST 3620. 20th Century Europe. (4 Credits)

World War I and peace settlement; postwar problems; communism, fascism, nazism; totalitarian aggression and World War II; international cooperation and reconstruction; the cold war and the collapse of communism. (Alternate years) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, INST, IPE, IRST, ISEU, ISHI.

HIST 3622. Great Trials. (4 Credits)

The course investigates a series of famous trials in order to pinpoint the conflicts and issues that characterized the times and places of these trials. Among the cases studied will be: Oscar Wilde, Alfred Dreyfus, The Moscow Show trials, the Nuremberg War Crimes Tribunal and the Scopes Trial. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, JWST.

HIST 3623. Screening Europe's Past. (4 Credits)

This course investigates a series of historical periods and issues through historical readings and documents and their depiction in films. Focus on Europe from medieval era to the modern period. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

HIST 3624. European Cities. (4 Credits)

Topical study of the evolution of Europe's cities with emphasis on urban culture, society and the built environment. Considers the nature of urban transformation in key urban places such as Paris, London, Berlin, Rome and Moscow. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, COLI, HIEH, INST, ISEU, URST.

HIST 3626. Social History of Architecture. (4 Credits)

Studies the historical relationship between architecture, space and urban culture and the ways in which architectural innovations acts as both a reflection of and a catalyst for social and cultural transformation. Considers architecutre and cultural theory as well as the evolution of building technologies. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIAH, HIEH, URST, VART.

HIST 3627. History of LGBT Movements. (4 Credits)

 Survey of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender histories across the globe. Particular focus on the American movement since Stonewall, including the AIDS crisis. As well, the course considers philosophic traditions, and varying histories of LGBT artistic expression. Students will also study Ancient Greek same-gendered partnerings as a way to understand modern forms of sexuality. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, INST, ISIN.

HIST 3633. The Cold War Space Race. (4 Credits)

In this course, we will consider the entire history of space exploration with a particular focus on the Cold War era. The course will begin with the first dreaming about space travel during the 16th century and end with the rise of new space powers such as China and India. Using a combination of primary and secondary sources, we will consider the political, military, technological, social, and cultural dimensions of space exploration. Among many issues, we will engage in speculations on why humans were drawn to the cosmos in the first place, discuss the weaponization of space, examine the geopolitical rationales for space travel, explore the popular culture of Star Trek and Star Wars, deconstruct the myth of the hero astronaut, uncover the secret Soviet space program, revisit the extraordinary Apollo missions to the Moon, and evaluate the International Space Station of the 21st century. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, EP3, INST, ISIN.

HIST 3634. Modern South Asian History. (4 Credits)

This course will survey the recent history of the nations that are part of the Indian subcontinent, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and Myanmar (Burma). The nations of South Asia are rapidly assuming a central role in global geopolitics and the economics of globalization. In this course, we will survey a period spanning nearly four centuries beginning in 1600, from the fragmented kingdoms within the Indian subcontinent to the rise of discrete nation states by the mid-twentieth century to the geopolitical and cultural prominence of South Asia on the global state in the early twenty-first century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, GLBL, HIGH, INST, IPE, ISAS.

HIST 3635. Science in Popular Culture. (4 Credits)

This course will be a historical survey of the intersection between science and popular culture. How do ideas about science and technology appear in our everyday lives? What kinds of perceptions do lay people have about science and scientists? What shapes these perceptions? Where do we get our ideas about technology from? How are our expectations of the future shaped by perceptions (and often misperceptions) of scientific knowledge? These are some of the questions we will address during the semester. The course will be firmly grounded in history, tracing the evolution of popular science through important transformations in the modern Era, including the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, Colonialism, and the traumas of the 20th century. Through the semester, we will study a variety of popular scientific forms, such as science fiction, magazines, comics, graphic novels, sci-fi movies, and TV shows. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, HIEH, INST, ISEU, ISIN.

HIST 3636. Social History of Technology. (4 Credits)

This course will survey the history of technology from antiquity to the present with a particular focus on the ways in which common people experienced technologies in their daily lives. During the course, we will explore how technology enabled important social changes in Europe, Asia, and North America, while at the same time turning our attention to how social needs shaped the nature and direction of technological evolution. The first portion of the course will focus on ancient and medieval technologies. As we approach the modern era, we will pay particular attention to the history, impact, and nature of such technologies as the telegraph, the atomic bomb, the jet plane, the birth control pill, the record player, and the internet. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIAH, HIEH, INST, ISIN.

HIST 3637. Stalinism: Making the Soviet State. (4 Credits)

This EP course will explore the enormous transformation in life in the Soviet Union under the rule of Stalin, one of the most brutal dictators of the 20th century and the architect of massive social transformation that turned Russia from a predominantly agrarian nation to a powerful industrial state. During this period, Soviet society was engulfed in massive traumas including a civil war, industrialization, famine, the rise of a police state, the establishment of the Gulag, and World War II. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, EP3, OCHS, OCST.

HIST 3638. Technology From Antiquity to Middle Ages. (4 Credits)

This EP course will survey the history of technology from antiquity to the Middle Ages with a particular focus on the ways in which common people experienced technologies in their daily lives. We will pay particular attention to the history, impact, and nature of technological changes in agriculture, architecture, warfare, transportation, clothing, household objects, and medicine. Our goal is to reconsider antiquity and the Middle Ages through the lens of knowledge, technology, and material culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIGH, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3653. Gender in Early America. (4 Credits)

Consideration of the roles of women and men from the 17th century into the 1840s, and the attitudes that shaped those roles in American society. The course will explore transatlantic influences and the interchange of European, Native American, and African American values. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH, WGSS.

HIST 3656. The American Revolution. (4 Credits)

History of the Revolution and formation of the Constitution. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, ASHS, EP3, HIAH.

HIST 3657. American Constitution. (4 Credits)

The U.S. Constitution is one of the extraordinary codes of law in history, the culmination of the development of liberty within a self-governing republic, and the model for modern democratic government. Yet the course of its interpretation has been contentious and often divisive, revealing schisms between liberalism and conservatism, between citizenship and partisanship, in the quest for American identity. This course will focus on the principles of American constitutionalism--its evolution from the historical roots, the adoption of the Constitution, and its development in relation to legal, political and social changes in American history. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, ASRP, HIAH, HIUL.

HIST 3670. The Modern Middle East. (4 Credits)

The chief concern of this course will be to develop a sensitivity to and awareness of the issues and problems of the modern Middle East since the late 18th century and the introduction of Western ideas/technology into the Ottoman Empire. The course will be both a survey of Middle Eastern/Islamic history and an attempt to understand and re-evaluate our own perceptions of a non-Western civilization in the 20th century. (Alternate years) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, COLI, GLBL, HHPA, HIGH, HUST, INST, IPE, ISME, MEST, PJRC, PJST.

HIST 3675. History of Modern Israel. (4 Credits)

The history of Israel from the rise of Zionism in 19th. Century Europe to the present. Topics include: the Zionist experiment, the history of the Israeli-Arab conflict, the U.S. and Israel's "special relationship," and socio-cultural trends. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, HHPA, HIGH, HUST, INST, IPE, ISME, JWST, MEST.

HIST 3682. The United States in the 1950s and the Illusion of Happiness. (4 Credits)

After World War II, the United States experienced an economic boom that allowed the country to prosper as never before. However, while the 1950s were presented by the media as one of happy domestic conformity, that image of contentment and abundance was far from accurate. This course will examine that packaged illusion of happiness, delving into how fear fueled the decade’s rich fabric of music, film, and art—itself symbolic of an underlying rebellion among the nation’s youth; the nation’s growing embrace of religion; and the rise of figures attempting to enhance the sense of conservatism that symbolized the decade. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AHC, AMST, ASHS, HIAH, HIUL.

HIST 3700. Sickness and Health in Early Ma. (4 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to the systems of learned medicine of western Europe from Late Antiquity to the High Middle Ages. Using a wide range of sources, including medical texts, hagiography, liturgy, and modern scientific studies, we will explore the distinctions between medical theory and practice, the relationship of secular and ecclesiastical authorities to the compilation of medical knowledge and the fundamental question of what constitutes medicine and what does not. In addition, we will consider the changing definition of illness and health through an investigation of medieval responses to the cataclysm of the Black Death. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 3745. Colonial America 1492-1765. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, ASHS, HIAH.

HIST 3747. Slavery and Freedom in Greater New York City. (4 Credits)

This course makes the case that slavery and Black people’s quotidian struggles against it are central rather than peripheral to the history of greater New York City and examines Black struggles for freedom therein over a 300-year period. It begins in the 17th century in New Amsterdam and ends in New York City in the 1860s. Black people’s survival and freedom in New York was never a historical inevitability. It was instead something that had to be fought for, repeatedly. To that end, this course explores the experience of slavery in New York during different periods and under different empires, the formation and fate of free Black communities, and tracks how members of the African diaspora shaped the major social, political, and cultural developments of the region and the United States. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, EP3, HIAH, PJRC, PJST, PLUR.

HIST 3752. Coming of the Civil War. (4 Credits)

A history of the sectional crisis in America, focusing on the questions: Why did the South secede? Why did the North decide to fight rather than allow it? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH.

HIST 3753. Civil War Era: 1861-1877. (4 Credits)

A history of the war years and America's racial and sectional readjustment after the war. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH.

HIST 3758. America at War. (4 Credits)

Exploration of the interaction of American society and war throughout U.S. history, focusing especially on how American society influences how the country fights war and how war influences the development of American society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, HIAH.

HIST 3759. African American Women's Activism, 1815–1915. (4 Credits)

This course will focus on women’s relationships to and roles in the diverse communities that developed in the U.S., assessing how the strategies used by women to improve their positions in U.S. society have changed over time. Our exploration will include: access to educational, legal, political, and economic opportunities; women’s ability to recognize and use their creative, sexual, physical, and intellectual selves; and the consequences of living within or outside of images created for women. We will pay particular attention to, among other factors, how race, ethnicity, class, citizenship, and home region defined a woman’s ability to maneuver in society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AFAM, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH, WGSS.

HIST 3773. American Capitalism. (4 Credits)

Focusing primarily on modern United Sates, this course explores the history and everyday workings of ideas and institutions that often seem to us to be timeless: property, markets, profits, and developments. Throughout the course, we emphasize how ideas about race, class, and gender have affected the workings of our economic world. Our examination draws on and analyzes the history of ideas about economic life, from the works of Karl Marx to Milton Friedman. Topics range from the rise of plantation slavery to the growth of our fossil fuel economy to the feminization of labor in the 1970S. The course assumes no knowledge of economics, but only an interest in American social and economic history. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, HIAH.

HIST 3774. History of Capitalism in the U.S.. (4 Credits)

Focusing primarily on the modern United States, this course explores the history and everyday workings of ideas and institutions that often seem to us to be timeless: property, markets, profits, and development. Throughout the course, we emphasize the connections between political and economic life in the U.S. and elsewhere in the world. Topics range from the rise of plantation slavery to the growth of our fossil fuel economy to the 2008 financial crisis. Students should emerge from the course with greater insights onto how the U.S. transformed from a peripheral country that drew wealth from slave-based agriculture into the world’s political and economic superpower. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST.

HIST 3775. The Early Republic. (4 Credits)

The course studies the birth of American democracy and capitalism from the course studies to the birth of American democracy and capitalism from the revolution to the age of Jackson. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH.

HIST 3780. The Era of the Civil War. (4 Credits)

Slavery and other contributory factors leading to the war for southern independence; the war; reconstruction of the southern states; 1865-1877. (Alternate years) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH, HIUL.

HIST 3785. Robber Barons and Reformers: The Gilded Age and Progressive Era in the U.S.. (4 Credits)

No other era resonates within our own more powerfully than the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era. Industrial and technological advances spread across the nation; Americans experienced displacement as they attempted to adapt to the shifting economy; greed seeped into government; and people from all around searched for a better life. The Spanish-American War of 1898 announced the United States had arrived as an international power, and the nation continued to identify itself with expansion. However, from 1900 until World War I, the country struggled to fulfill its vision of becoming “a more perfect Union,” as debates over social and political reform, as well economic, gender, and racial equality, took center stage. Amid the change—both domestic and international—Americans turned to amusement; authors from Edith Wharton and Henry James to Mark Twain and Joseph Conrad populated the nation’s bookstores, and radio and film captured the public’s attention. This course will examine how the events and memorable personalities who dominated the period made these years some of the most exciting and innovative in the nation’s history. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH, HIUL.

HIST 3789. Modern South Africa Stories. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, PJRC, PJST.

HIST 3795. U.S. Between Wars: 1919-1941. (4 Credits)

America between the wars was a nation in transition, and in contradiction. In a continuing quest for identity, American siciety faced the tensions between internationalism and isolationism, prosperity and economic collapse, progressivism and conservatism. From the anvil of the Progressive Movement, the Jazz Age, the Depressionand the New Deal were forged the foundations of the "American Century." Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH.

HIST 3799. Race and American Popular Music. (4 Credits)

This course examines the historical significance of popular music in the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will learn to analyze musical sound as "text." More crucially, we will focus on the cultural, social, political, and economic dimensions (the "context") of genres including gospel, blues, jazz, rhythm and blues, rock, country, salsa, punk, hip hop, and techno. While the course will discuss the stylistic evolution of American popular music, the focus will be on reading, or listening to, music as a historical text as a key to understanding major themes in American history, with a particular focus on race. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASAM, ASHS, HIAH, HIUL.

HIST 3806. U.S. Immigration/Ethnicity. (4 Credits)

A survey of immigration and ethnicity in American life. Themes include the motives for migration; America's reception of immigrants; the formation of immigrant communities; the intersection of ethnicity with race, gender, religion, politics, and class; the personal meanings of ethnic identity; and the relationship of ethnicity to American national identity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH, IRST, JWST, LALS, LAUH, PJRC, PJST, PLUR, URST.

HIST 3807. The U.S in the 1920s and 1930s: From the Jazz Age to Hard Times. (4 Credits)

Topics covered in this course include Prohibition; the New Morality fundamentalism; the KKK and immigration restriction; African American migration and culture; causes and social effects of the Depression; FDR and the New Deal; popular culture; radical challenges; and the coming of World War II. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AHC, AMST, ASHS, HIAH, URST.

HIST 3808. New York City Politics. (4 Credits)

An exploration of New York City since consolidation in 1898. Topics include consolidation, the role of Tammany Hall and municipal corruption, reform and radical politics, important mayoral campaigns and administrations (including Walker, LaGuardia, Lindsay, Koch, Dinkins, Giuliani), the civil rights movement in the city, the rold or ethnic groups, the 1970s fiscal crisis, and Septmeber 11th. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH, LALS, LAUH, URST.

HIST 3809. Jews in the Modern World. (4 Credits)

This course will provide an introduction to the history of the Jewish people as it encountered the modern world from the 18th century through the twentieth. It will explore the social, cultural, religious, and political aspects of this encounter, primarily in Eastern and Western Europe, the United States, and the Middle East. The course will touch on such issues and events as emancipation and the breakdown of traditional identities and communal structures: Jewish religious movements from Hasidism to Reform; the invention of modern secular culture in Yiddish and Hebrew; political movements including Socialism, Zionism and Communism; migrations and the creation of American Jewry; anti-Semitism and the Holocaust ; and the rise of the State of Israel. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, GLBL, HIGH, JWST.

HIST 3810. Jews in America. (4 Credits)

Jews have been present in North America since the 17th century, but it was in the course of the 19th and early 20th centuries that the Jewish community in the United States rose to significance both within the Jewish world and as a visible presence in American life. Never more than 4% of the population, this small minority has had a prominent role in defining American pluralism. This course traces the history of the Jews in the United States from the colonial period to the 21st century. Among the topics it will cover are the waves of immigration that formed the community: American Jewish religious movements; secular approached to Jewish identity; class conflict and mobility; Jewish participation in politics; American Jewish relations with communities abroad; and America and the Holocaust. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, JSHI, JWST, PLUR.

HIST 3815. East European Jewish History. (4 Credits)

Some 80% of Jews in the world trace their roots to eastern Europe, which was home to the largest Jewish population until WWII. From the 16th century, the impact of east European Jews on Jewish culture and society has been tremendous, in shaping the interpretation of Jewish law, the ideology of the Zionist movement at the turn of the 20th, or modern Hebrew, and American literature and popular culture. Yet, the history of this important Jewish community has been vastly misunderstood, largely due to the devastating legacy of the Holocaust and the persistence of imagery of the impoverished “shtetl" in Yiddish fiction, and later popularized through plays and films such as "Fiddler on the Roof." This course takes us beyond legends and stereotypes, and into a complex, more textured world of Jews living among Christians from the beginnings of Jewish settlement in the 13th century to contemporary Poland's small Jewish community, trying to reinvent Jewish life in the aftermath of the Holocaust and the 1968 forced migrations. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, HIEH, INST, ISEU, JSHI, JWST.

HIST 3817. The Papacy in the Modern Worlsd. (3 Credits)

Is the papacy a bulwark against change, or a model of adaptation? This course considers the complex evolution of the papacy in the last 500 years, from the pope as an Italian Renaissance prince and patron to a universal pastor. We'll dive into how the papacy has responded under pressure from various religious, cultural, and political forces, how the papacy was nearly destroyed in the age of Napoleon, how "modern" technologies (e.g., rail and air travel, radio, internet) have altered the functioning of the papacy, and what difference Pope Francis, the first Jesuit and first Latin American pope, has or has not made.

Attribute: THHC.

HIST 3822. U.S. Cultural History. (4 Credits)

The focus of this course is on ideas, assumptions, and values in American life from colonial times to the present, from ministers' sermons to blues performances, from philosophical essays to Hollywood films. It examines the symbolic forms and social context of conflicting as well as shared beliefs and considers the character of American cultural expression on various levels, in ways in which different groups have influenced American cultural life, and the meaning of recent mass culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AHC, AMST, ASHS, HIAH.

HIST 3824. U.S. Social Movements Since 1900: Struggles for Social Justice. (4 Credits)

This course examines social movements of the 20th century U.S. and how they connect to contemporary struggles for social justice. Topics include populism, the New Deal, civil rights, feminism and women's rights, LGBTQ rights, and poor people's movements. The focus is on how movements create change. Students will get out of the classroom and into the community by working, for example, with organizations serving low-income communities, immigrants, or ones dealing with gender/LGBTQ or race discrimination. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AMST, APPI, ASHS, SL.

HIST 3826. Modern US Women's History. (4 Credits)

The history of American women from the first women's rights convention in 1848 to the present. We will study women's everyday lives (including at home and work), major events like the campaign for suffrage, World War II, and the women's liberation movement, and representations of women in popular culture (magazines, movies, and T.V.). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH, HIUL, PJGS, PJST, PLUR, WGSS.

HIST 3827. Wealth & Poverty in the US: Capitalism, Social Welfare & Inequality. (4 Credits)

Americans have long debated the meaning of wealth and poverty, questioning whether such conditions are natural (and acceptable) or the product of exploitative practices, corruption, or biased governmental policy (and potentially alterable). Over time, they have questioned the relationships among economic inequality, markets, democracy, and thriving families and communities. We will explore these and other questions surrounding the meaning of wealth and poverty in supposedly “middle-class” America, focusing mostly on the post-Civil War period. The class takes an intersectional perspective that brings questions of race and gender, as well as social class, to bear on the topics in order to better understand how various inequalities impact individuals and communities. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, HIAH, HIUL, PLUR.

HIST 3830. History of American Women and Gender. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to some of the key people, events, and movements in United States women’s history from the American Revolution to the recent past. Students in this class will explore changes over time in women’s social experiences and gender ideologies by asking: How is gender constructed? What differences do ethnicity, race, and class make in women’s experiences? What is the relationship between sex, gender, and sexuality? What has distinguished women’s and men’s experiences, and what are areas of meaningful convergence? How does gender function in family life, the workforce, and political institutions? To investigate these questions, students will consider primary sources drawn from women’s private lives and social movements, as well as from public records and popular culture. They will evaluate these sources in the context of experiential learning assignments, gender theory, academic writing, and class lecture. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH, HIUL, WGSS.

HIST 3833. Screening America's Past. (4 Credits)

An examination of American history as depicted in 20th century American films. We will assess their relative accuracy, cultural context, and contributions to the (mis)shaping of the nation's collective memory. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AHC, AMST, ASAM, ASHS, HIAH.

HIST 3834. Gender, Race, and American Mass Media. (4 Credits)

How have different forms of media been created, consumed, and mobilized by different groups in American society over time? This course will explore the development of mass media in the United States, and the roles gender and race played in this process. Through a study of newspapers, radio, television, film, and websites, we will examine how representations of gender and race changed over time, how the producers of mass media segmented their audience based on these categories or tried to speak to audiences across them, and how different consumers interacted with different forms of mass media. The course will also explore the relationship of the media to the economy, politics, religion, and globalization. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIAH, JSHI, JWST.

HIST 3838. History of U.S. Sexuality. (4 Credits)

This course offers a historical introduction to sexual behaviors and attitudes in the United States from the colonial period to the present, examining race, the state, sociocultural changes, and sexual norms and behavior. Particular attention is paid to sexuality ordered racial hierarchies and sanctioned violence against discriminated groups. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH, PJGS, PJST, PLUR, WGSS.

HIST 3842. The Vietnam Wars. (4 Credits)

The United States became involved in French-Indo-China in 1950 and left Vietnam in 1975. This course asks basic questions about the Vietnam Wars. Why did the United States make such a vast commitment in an area of so little importance? What did it attempt to do during the quarter century of it involvement there? Why, despite the expenditure of more than $150 billion dollars and the loss of more than 58,000 lives did the world's most powerful nation fail to achieve it objectives? What have been the consequences for Americans, Vietnamese, and others of the long and divisive war? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH, INST, ISAS, ISIN.

HIST 3844. U.S. Foreign Relations in the 19th Century. (4 Credits)

This course examines U.S. foreign relations in domestic and international contexts from 1776 to 1898. Through the examination of primary and secondary sources, students will learn about the ideological, religious, political, economic, and cultural origins, as well as the debates and outcomes of U.S. expansion, territorial and non-territorial as well as formal and informal. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH.

HIST 3845. The History of U.S. Foreign Relations, 1898 to the Present. (4 Credits)

This course examines the foreign relations of the United States from 1898 to the present, tracking the nation's trajectory from minor international power to sole superpower. Through that history, it addresses traditional diplomatic questions of international wealth and power, the link between domestic politics and foreign policy, and programs of military intervention, cultural expansion, and economic development. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, INST, ISIN.

HIST 3846. The History of U.S. Foreign Relations, 1974 to Present. (4 Credits)

This course examines the foreign relations of the United States from the end of the Vietnam War to the present. It charts the course of recent U.S. history through the lens of its foreign relations, including major events like the energy crisis, the Iraq Hostage crisis, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the Iran-Contra crisis, the end of the Cold War, and others. It addresses traditional diplomatic questions of international wealth and power, this history of contemporary globalization, the link between domestic politics and foreign policy, and programs of military intervention, cultural interchange and economic development. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, INST, ISIN, PJST, PJWT.

HIST 3852. The American Radical Tradition. (4 Credits)

In this course, students explore the radical left and right of American politics and culture. Lectures, discussions, and assignments critically assess topics including the history of populism, socialism, the Klan, communism, Black Power, radical feminism, and the religious right. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH, PJSJ, PJST.

HIST 3857. America Since 1945. (4 Credits)

Integrating economic, political and social history, this course will explore the development of the American economy, paying particular attention to transformations in the nature of work and labor relations. (Alternate years) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH.

HIST 3858. The Global Cold War. (4 Credits)

An analysis of the global Cold War. Particular attention to the international forces of decolonization, revolution, and development in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, GLBL, HIGH, INST, IPE, ISIN.

HIST 3860. The "Long" 1990s in United States History (1989-2008). (4 Credits)

This course examines the 1990s as a "long decade" in United States history, spanning from the end of the Cold War to the 2008 financial crisis. Students will explore how alternating historical frames of abundance and anxiety may help explain this unsettled period of the recent past. This course foregrounds the historical question of change versus continuity in recent United States history. Among other topics, students will investigate the relationship between the First Gulf War and the Global War on Terror; the changing social and political significance of "terrorism" before and after the September 11 attacks; the rise of the internet and digital cultures; developments in popular media such as music, television, and video games; the rise of popular awareness and activism regarding anthropogenic climate change; and alternating economic visions of abundance and austerity. This course is rooted in a cultural and social approach to history but includes significant discussion of high politics and foreign policy. In addition to a wide range of discussions, readings, and written assignments, students will collaboratively construct a “primary source reader” for the American 1990s based on subtopics of their own interests. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH, HIUL.

HIST 3862. History of New York City. (4 Credits)

The political, social and cultural development of the city from trading post to metropolis. The emphasis is on leading personalities and the relationship between New York's growth and major American trends over the last century. (Alternate years) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, HIAH, JWST, LALS, LAUH, URST.

HIST 3864. New Frontiers-1960's America. (4 Credits)

Americans remember the 1960s as a decade of great social change, an era of “new frontiers,” as the young presidential contender John F. Kennedy proclaimed during the election of 1960: “The world is changing,” Kennedy asserted, “the old era is ending, the old ways will not do.” In its most excessive phases, the period became linked with overwhelming changes, as music, hippies, drugs, and protest marches filled the scenery of American social and cultural spaces. But to what extent did the 1960s truly expand the nation’s frontiers? This course will investigate how 1960s America adopted and resisted social change, examining the period from cultural, political, economic, and diplomatic perspectives. Course themes will include, among others: social activism, including the civil rights, women's, antiwar, and student movements; politics, like changes in presidential politics and the American party system; and pivotal moments in the Cold War. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, HIAH.

Mutually Exclusive: HIST 3869.

HIST 3865. Ethics and Capitalism. (4 Credits)

Since its foundations, the modern ideas and institutions we call capitalism have posed a range of ethical and political questions: What is the point of work? How should humans think about and value nature? How do capitalist institutions affect racial, class, and gender inequalities? This course explores these questions through the writings of theorists such as J.S. Mill, Karl Marx, W.E.B. DuBois, Nancy Fraser, and Milton Friedman. We think through philosophical texts alongside the writings of historians and historical actors. Possible topics include slavery, consumerism, the meat industry, and the growth of government. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

HIST 3866. History of Comics and Superheroes. (4 Credits)

This course explores the emergence and evolution of the superhero archetype in modern comics through a deep engagement with social, cultural,and political currents in American and European history in the 20th century. We will track the creation of the first superheroes in the 1930's amid anxieties about the rise of fascism, and then trace their evolution through World War II and postwar prosperity in the U.S. The bulk of the course will explore the relationship between Cold War culture and comics, particularly the ways in which new maverick companies such as Marvel Comics reflected Cold War anxieties about advances in science and technology, nuclear annihilation, communism, consumerism, etc. The course will also look at many other superhero genres (including the recent spate of superhero movies), locating them in larger movements and episodes of the past half-century, such as the Civil Rights movement, the rise of second wave feminism, anti-war movements, the AIDS epidemic, and the War on Terror. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, HIAH.

HIST 3867. United States History Through Television. (4 Credits)

This course is designed to explore the intersection of American history and the medium of television. A combined thematic and chronological approach will explore television and its historical consequences from the post-war dominance of three major networks, to the more diverse and fragmented cable era of the late 20th century. Various genres will be examined, including: news, scripted programming, advertising, and political campaigns. Through curated readings and video analysis, the course will explore several themes and questions, such as: how television programming has shaped the course of historical events and social/cultural/political movements; how scripted historically themed programming (series and made-for-TV films) can affect viewers’ knowledge and opinions of historical figures and events; and how TV programming can be used in the study of American history. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AHC, AMST, ASAM, ASHS, HIAH.

HIST 3868. Culture and Capitalism in the United States. (4 Credits)

Focusing primarily on the United States, this course analyzes the history of capitalism in an anthropological light. We trace its underlying premises and its effects on habits of life and mind. At the same time, we consider the ways in which changing cultural concepts—such as religious beliefs, racial hierarchies, and gender norms—have shaped the workings of economic life over time. Possible topics range from formation of private property in colonial America to the ethos of the 20th-century corporation. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH.

HIST 3869. 1960s America: Gender, Race and Youth. (4 Credits)

This course will investigate 1960s social change and its resistance, examining the long 1960s from a social, cultural, political, economic, and intellectual perspective. Course themes will devote particular attention to social movement activity, including the civil rights, women’s, antiwar, environmental, and student movements. A pluralist perspective--relying on gender, race, class, and similar categories of historical analysis--will guide readings and discussions of related course topics, including the rise of the New Left and its discontents, changes in presidential politics and the American party system, American economic trends, and pivotal moments in the Cold War.  Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH, HIUL, PLUR.

Mutually Exclusive: HIST 3864.

HIST 3880. History of the Cold War. (4 Credits)

The course will examine the Cold War as a political, economic, ideological, and military contest on a global scale. It will give special attention to the American role and experience in the origins of the conflict and its historical significance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, INST, ISIN.

HIST 3911. U.S. and East Asia. (4 Credits)

From its earliest days, the United States has been involved with East Asia. In this course we will examine key moments in the interaction of these radically different cultures: the opening of Japan; Asian immigration (and exclusion); the United States as a colonial power in the Philippines; the Open Door Policy; the road to Pearl Harbor; the Pacific War: Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the American occupation of Japan; the "loss" of China; Korea and containment; Vietnam; the opening to the PRC; the growth of Asian America; and the emergence of the Pacific Rim. We conclude by placing current issues (economic tension, strategic concerns, human rights) in their historical content. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, HHPA, HUST, INST, ISAS, ISIN.

HIST 3915. Contemporary China. (4 Credits)

Chinese history since 1895, focusing on the scramble for concessions, the Hundred Days, the Boxer Movement, the 1911 Revolution, the emergence and rise to power of the Communist Party, the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, Deng's four modernizations and the rising demand for a fifth democracy. (Alternate years) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, CNST, GLBL, HIGH, INST, IPE, ISAS, PJRC, PJST.

HIST 3918. Cultural Revolution: China in Context. (4 Credits)

Given the rise of contemporary China, the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) might seem like an anomaly driven by Mao Zedong's cult of personality. This course will challenge this idea by exploring the broader trajectory of radical change in Modern China, the global contexts of popular activism and anti-imperialism, and the ongoing impact of the Cultural Revolution in China and beyond. Topics will include the role of ideology, and the workings of everyday life, the reimagination of the "peasant". revolutionary mobilization of gender, ethnicity, science and environment, and the art and literature of memory. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIGH, INST, ISAS.

HIST 3919. Christianity in China. (4 Credits)

This course explores the history of Christianity in China from the seventh century to the present. We will explore the earliest evidence of Christianity in China, the Franciscan missions to the Mongols, the arrival of the Jesuits, the Chinese rites controversy, the persecution of Christianity, the rise of Protestant missions, and the explosive growth of Christianity in China today. We will also explore issues of church/state conflict, religious debate and conversion, and the complex interplay between foreign missions and Chinese developments. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, CNST, HIGH, INST, REST.

HIST 3920. Modern Japan. (4 Credits)

Japanese history since 1868. Equal attention will be given to the political, economic and cultural achievements of the Meiji era (1868-1912); to the unresolved strains that led to World War II; and to Japan's spectacular postwar recovery. The course will end with an examination of today's internal strains and external tensions. (Alternate years) \ Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, GLBL, HIGH, INST, IPE, ISAS.

HIST 3922. East Asian Cities. (4 Credits)

To 1800, half of mankind's urban history was East Asian history. Cities played central--if rather different--roles in the social, cultural, and political histories of China and Japan. After their incorporation at gun-point into a system of industrializing nation-states, pre-existing urban hierarchies were restructured, their functions transformed. In this course, we explore both the indigenous experience and its modern transformation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, CNST, COLI, GLBL, HIGH, INST, IPE, ISAS, URST.

HIST 3924. East Asian Capitalisms. (4 Credits)

An exploration of the changing roles money and markets have played in Chinese, Japanese and Korean development from pre-modern times to the first decades of the twenty-first century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIGH, HIUL, INST, ISAS.

HIST 3925. The Holocaust. (4 Credits)

As a quintessential genocide, the Holocaust is intensively studied by scholars. As the emblem for the most radical evil in the human experience, it has also widely captured the imagination of millions. Why is this so? Our course will explore the contemporary interest in the Holocaust by investigating its representation in film and the arts. We will also focus on the most significant historical issues: What is the connection between historical antisemitism and the Holocaust? How do we explain the behavior of the many thousands of perpetrators? The response of the victims? The heroism of rescuers? The failure of Pope Pius XII to do more for the victims? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, HUST, INST, IPE, ISEU, JWST, PJST, PJWT, REST.

HIST 3926. History of Political Thought in Britain from Civil War to Brexit. (4 Credits)

The study of British political thinkers will be based on their intellectual and political contexts and an analysis of their key political ideas. This will provide the student with a knowledge of the history of Britain from 1640 to the present and an understanding of some of the key political concepts which shape our understanding of contemporary politics. The course is influenced by the Cambridge School of the history of political thought and also has a goal of analyzing some of the major political ideas which will assist us in in considering the political future of our post-pandemic world. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

HIST 3929. History of Chinese in the Americas. (3 Credits)

In this course, students explore the history of Chinese people and culture in the Americas from a wide range of perspectives. Units will examine the history of Chinese migrations to North and South America from East and Southeast Asia, representations of Chinese in American media, diasporic Chinese gender identities, diasporic Chinese cuisines, Chinese-American literature, labor history, and the history of Chinese people and culture in New York City, among other topics. This course will embed the history of Chinese in the Americas in a global history of political, economic, and cultural flows and open up questions of "Which China?" and "Which America?" to historical scrutiny. Students will engage with primary materials to conduct original research and collaborate with others to apply historical methods.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, CNST.

HIST 3931. Colonialism and South Asia. (4 Credits)

This course provides an examination of the colonial incursions into South Asia. We will discuss the motivations and actions of colonial powers as well as responses by the local populations. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIGH, INST, ISAS, ISIN.

HIST 3939. History of Global Popular Music: From Africa to the Americas and Back. (4 Credits)

Who brought the banjo to the United States? How did jazz get to Paris? Why is reggae so popular in Ghana? In this course, students will learn the history of African and African Diasporic popular music as it has crossed the Atlantic with enslaved Africans, African American soldiers, Caribbean migrants, and students from West Africa. Through primary sources, songs, films, and academic texts, students will examine issues of globalization, consumerism, migration, pan­ Africanism, race, and gender in the history of Africa and the Black Atlantic. The final project will involve original research in local and online archives, and will be accompanied by a post on the course blog. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, HIGH, INST, ISAF, ISIN.

HIST 3942. Race, Sex, and Colonialism. (4 Credits)

In this course we will learn about the similarities and differences that characterize histories of interracial sexual relations in different political, social, economic, and legal contexts. We will focus on histories of interracial sexual relations in areas as diverse as colonial Zimbabwe, Haiti, Indonesia, and the U.S.A. Close attention will be paid to the position of women in these relationships, as well as their mixed race children. Case studies will be accompanied by foundational theoretical readings on race, colonialism, and sexuality. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, HIGH.

HIST 3944. Africa in the Age of Decolonization. (4 Credits)

Almost all of the nation-states in sub-Saharan Africa achieved independence from the European colonial powers in the mid-20th century. This course explores the diversity of experiences of decolonization in Africa through this period, with a focus on social, cultural, and economic dimensions of this change. We will look at how African cultures resisted and adapted to European colonial rule, the emergence of nationalist movements, broad social and cultural changes in class and gender, racial and ethnic conflict, mass urbanization, and the frequently destructive repercussions of Cold War high politics on African nation-states. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIGH, INST, ISAF.

HIST 3946. African Economies and Humanitarianism. (4 Credits)

Africa is one of the leading “emerging markets” in the world; it is also one of the most misunderstood and misrepresented. Through a historically grounded, but multidisciplinary approach, this course provides students with the knowledge and vocabulary to engage in and thrive in contemporary African economic markets and development sectors. We will cover the rise of African trade unions, environmental activism, conceptions of the African consumer, innovation in African technological and mobile sectors, big-state developmental models and projects, the impact of structural adjustment and international financial institutions on African economies and societies, the role of foreign companies and nations in African economies, African states’ attempts to reclaim colonized land, and the tech and start-up market in Africa. Close attention will be paid to the methodological approaches our authors take and to the theoretical insights we can draw from our diverse case studies to help us better discern the common and singular threads running through this expansive field of inquiry. You will also hear from guests who are currently making waves within the contemporary African business, development, and humanitarian climates. This is an intensive course for those interested in doing business, development, or humanitarian work in Africa. This course is also intended for people interested in learning more about the political-economic make-up of contemporary Africa. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AFAM, AFST, AHC, ECON, HHPA, HIGH, HUST, INST, IPE, ISAF, PJEC, PJRC, PJST.

HIST 3950. Latino History. (4 Credits)

This course explores the development of the Latina/o population in the U.S. by focusing on the questions of migration, race, ethnicity, labor, family, sexuality, and citizenship. Specific topics include: United States colonial expansion and its effects on the population of Latin America; Mexican-Americans, and the making of the West; colonialism and the Puerto Rican Diaspora; Caribbean revolutions and the Cuban-American community; and globalization and recent Latina/o migrations (Dominicans, Colombians). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, COLI, HIAH, HIUL, INST, ISIN, ISLA, LALS, LAUH, PJRC, PJST, PLUR, URST.

HIST 3951. Popular Education and Social Change in the Americas. (4 Credits)

Popular education emerged in the Americas as a liberation project nourished by revolutionary aspirations. The Brazilian educator Paulo Freire and others envisioned liberatory education by and for the people. This course will examine the historical moments and movements where popular education emerged. Taking up a range of voices and sources, we will consider the principles and practices that animated revolutionary projects and social movements in Cuba, Nicaragua, and El Salvador, among other Latin American and Latinx communities in the U.S. Together, we will learn from these experiences and enrich our own liberatory practices in and outside the classroom. This course is designed for students who have previous knowledge of Latin American or Latinx history. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, EP3, GLBL, HIGH, LALS, LAUH, PJSJ, PJST, PLUR.

HIST 3955. Slavery Freedom/Atlantic World. (4 Credits)

The course will cover multiple regions of the Atlantic World – Latin America and the Caribbean, the U.S., Africa, and Europe – to understand slavery and freedom as intersecting global themes across space and time. Starting with indigenous and African slavery in the Spanish and Portuguese empires, we will understand how political and economic institutions, racial ideas, and even Enlightenment concepts about liberty informed a global history of human bondage. The course will look at a variety of materials, from slave narratives to court cases, databases, film, and literature to understand the experience of slavery and the fight for freedom through the perspectives of slaves as well as slave owners, slave traders, and abolitionists. We will also consider the development of African diasporic cultures in the Americas and the legacy of slavery in current debates about memory, reparations, and human trafficking. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AFAM, AHC, AMST, ASHS, EP3, GLBL, HIGH, HIUL, INST, ISAF, ISEU, ISIN, ISLA, LALS, LAUH, PJRC, PJST.

HIST 3961. Rebellion and Revolution in Latin America and the Atlantic World. (4 Credits)

The course will examine principal rebellions and revolutions in Latin America and the Atlantic World from the late colonial period to the twentieth century, including: the Haitian Revolution; Brazilian slave rebellions; the Cuban War of Independence; the Mexican and Cuban Revolutions; Central American revolutions; and Pinochet’s coup against Salvador Allende in Chile. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIGH, INST, ISLA, LALS, LAUH, PJSJ, PJST.

HIST 3962. Narratives of Truth and Justice in Latin America. (4 Credits)

There is no singular truth. In this course, students examine the varying truths that exist during and after civil wars, dictatorships, and political instability in 20th-century Latin America. As a class we will read testimonies and official documents, watch documentaries and films, and analyze other cultural productions to compare official and collective truths and how they influence memory and justice projects. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIGH, HIUL, LALS, LAUH.

Prerequisites: HIST 1400 or LALS 1400.

HIST 3965. Colonial Latin America. (4 Credits)

Latin America under Spanish rule. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMCS, AMST, ASHS, GLBL, HIGH, LALS, LAUH.

HIST 3967. Modern Central America. (4 Credits)

This course covers Central American history from the dictators of the 1930s until the revolutionary decades and their aftermaths. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, GLBL, HIGH, HIUL, LALS, LAUH.

HIST 3968. Mexico. (4 Credits)

The course covers the history of Mexico from pre-Columbian times to the present. It underscores major events (such as the Spanish conquest, independence, and the revolution) and long historical periods like the colonial era, the turbulent 1800s, nation-building in the 1900s, and U.S.-Mexico relations. It further seeks to explain how the colonial legacy, race, the state, and migrations have shaped Mexican culture and identity Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, GLBL, HIGH, INST, IPE, ISLA, LALS, LAUH.

HIST 3969. Latin America and the U.S.. (4 Credits)

This course will be a survey of the history of the Latin America policy of the United States and the impact of such policy on the Latin American countries. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, GLBL, HHPA, HIGH, HIUL, HUST, INST, ISIN, ISLA, LALS, LAUH, PJRC, PJST.

HIST 3972. Revolution in Central America. (4 Credits)

This course covers the history of Central America from the 1930s to the present. It provides the background necessary for students to understand the revolutionary movements in Central America in the 1980s. Among the topics covered will be the situation of political and social exclusion of large sectors of the population, the impact of the rapid expansion of export agriculture, insurgency and counterinsurgency strategies, U.S. strategic interests in the region and the role of liberation theology. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIGH, INST, IPE, ISLA, LALS, LAUH, PJSJ, PJST.

HIST 3974. Spaniards and Incas. (4 Credits)

This course traces Andean history from the growth of the Inca Empire in the 15th century through its conquest by the Spanish in the 16th century. The creation of a colonial Andean society forms the balance of the course which concludes with the Great Rebellion of the late 18th century. Specific attention will be given to the impact of Christian missionizing on indigenous populations. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, GLBL, HIGH, LALS, LAUH, PJRC, PJST.

HIST 3975. The Caribbean. (4 Credits)

This course will study the history of colonialism, slavery, emancipation and nationalism in the Caribbean, using both primary sources and scholarly studies. The African and European backgrounds to Caribbean history will receive particular attention. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, GLBL, HIGH, INST, IPE, ISLA, LALS, LAUH.

HIST 3977. Latin American History Through Film. (4 Credits)

We will screen Latin American and U.S. films to examine what we learn about events or ideas from Latin American history through film. We also will seek to understand how countries interpret their own particular histories in films. Readings will put the films into historical context. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, GLBL, HIGH, INST, ISLA, LALS, LAUH.

HIST 3982. The Islamic World and the Crusades, 1099-Ca.1700. (4 Credits)

This course aims to examine the crusading thought and movement from the Muslim perspective between the 12th and 18th centuries. The traditional scholarship has assumed that the Crusades did not leave any long-lasting mark or impact on the broader Islamic world. By uncovering the centrality of the Crusades for the development of Muslim society and culture in the Mediterranean throughout the medieval and early modern eras, the course hopes to challenge this established view. The main topics to be discussed include Muslim-Christian religious, political, and cultural encounters in the Mediterranean in the context of the Crusades; the rise of the Ottoman Empire at the frontier of Christendom in the 14th century; the Crusades launched against the Ottomans between the 14th and 18th centuries; and the role of the crusading thought and movement in the making of the Ottoman and Habsburg Empires in the 16th century, with each empire seeking universal dominion to unite Islam and Christendom. By engaging with materials and documents drawn from both Muslim and Christian sources, the course aims to establish the historical importance of the Crusades to understand both the unity and the diversity of the modern Mediterranean world. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIGH, OCHS, OCST, RSHR.

HIST 3983. Apocalypticism and Messianism in Islamic Thought and History. (4 Credits)

Apocalypticism, the belief that God has revealed the imminent end of the struggle between good and evil, has been a major element in Islamic tradition. Messianism, or belief that a savior will usher in a golden age, is intimately connected. This is a general introduction to the central themes in Islamic apocalypticism and messianism from early Islamic period to present time. It will analyze the history of beliefs related to the imminence of the Last Days in Islam in various contexts and explore the ways in which apocalyptic expectations shaped Muslim and Christian encounters. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HHPA, HIGH, HUST, INST, ISME, MEST, MVST.

HIST 3985. Ottoman Empire/ 1300-1800. (4 Credits)

The course proposes to trace the history of the Ottoman Empire from its emergence in the early fourteenth century (ca. 1300) as a small frontier principality, to its growth into a world empire in the sixteenth century, and then down to its final dissolution in 1923. Bringing the political, cultural, and social aspects of the six-century-long imperial history together, the course seeks to understand the ways in which the Ottoman past shaped the modern middle east. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, COLI, HIGH, MEST, OCHS, OCST.

HIST 3986. Religion and Politics in Islamic History. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the Islamic Political Thought from the rise of Islam to present, with a strong emphasis on the historical context. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, GLBL, HIGH, INST, IPE, ISME, MEST, OCHS, OCST, PJRJ, PJST, REST.

HIST 3989. History and Cinema: The Middle East and North Africa in Film. (4 Credits)

This course uses documentary and feature films to examine the modern Middle East and North Africa with an emphasis on the post-1945 period. Focusing on several aspects of this region critical to world affairs, the course surveys colonialism, imperialism, and the struggle for independence, as well as such contemporary factors as political authority and dissent, religion, gender, minorities, the origins and consequences of wars, the role of outsiders, and other factors. Film uses drama, comedy, music, and visual settings, sometimes all at once, offering viewers opportunities to understand the dynamics of this region from the perspective of the filmmakers, screen writers, actors, and others involved in film production. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIGH, HIUL, MEST.

HIST 3990. North American Environmental History. (4 Credits)

The course will explore various aspects of North American Environmental History. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, ENMI, ENST, ENVS, EPLE, ESEL, ESHC, HIAH, URST.

HIST 3991. History of the American Indians. (4 Credits)

Not long ago, 15 million people lived in what is now the continental U.S., organized into roughly 500 broad groups, speaking thousands of languages, and living in hundreds of thousands of villages. They cultivated plants that became among the most important in the world by the 20th century, especially maize: now the most widely cultivated grain on earth. They confounded the medieval conception of the Creation and course of history, forcing Europeans to reexamine everything they thought they knew. And they helped to shape the U.S., by maintaining powerful military and political confederacies in the interior. They did not merely serve as guides; they did not walk in moccasins through time, leaving not a mark on the landscape; they did not go quietly to their reservations. This course examines American Indians from their own points of view, from those of whites, and from the ways that Indians changed American culture and environment. It is broadly chronological but mostly topical, covering the period from 13,000 years ago to after World War II through a series of issues and events. The course assumes no previous knowledge of American Indians and is offered as part of Fordham's Eloquentia Perfecta initiative. Accordingly, students will learn to write and speak. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, ENST, ESEL, HIAH, PJRC, PJST, PLUR.

HIST 3992. Capitalism. (4 Credits)

Political economy is the social science that treats the sources and methods of production for subsistence and wealth. It is the study of how political systems conceive of and organize economic life and of the ideas people hold as they set out to derive wealth from nature. Its founding authors are still read today, so convincingly did they establish the questions and the borders of the discipline. Yet these authors had a troubled relationship with the environments where commodities originate. They tended to deny that ecology and economy could possibly come into conflict. Instead, they proposed mechanistic models in which the market resolved all contradictions. This seminar considers the various ways that capitalist societies have appointed resources and conceived of nature, progress, and wealth. IT IS A TOPICAL HISTORICAL SURVEY INTENDED TO TEACH THE ORIGINS, QUALITIES, AND HISTORICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF THIS POWERFUL SOCIAL SYSTEM. The course assumes no knowledge of economics and only a basic knowledge of American and European history. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, ENST, ESEC, ESEL, ESHC, HIGH, INST, IPE, ISEU, ISIN.

HIST 3993. Environmental History: New York City. (4 Credits)

Explores the ecological implications of New York City's commercial expansion and global influence. Subjects will include physical infrastructure, parks, urban redevelopment, and trade. Students will choose part of the city to examine its environmental history. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, ENST, ESEL, ESHC.

HIST 3994. Climate and Society. (4 Credits)

This is a course about climate change, understood geologically, anthropologically, and historically. It considers three broad kinds of climate change. First, we will consider the causes of ice ages, including the last glacial maximum. Second, we will look at the sudden cooling in global temperatures that took place between 1350 and 1850 known as the Little Ice Age. And third, we will study how the end of the last event coincided with a period of warming that has not ended. We will cover the causes and discovery of carbon-induced global warming. The course combines science, history, politics, and popular culture. Students will evaluate arguments and weigh evidence in order to become historians of these complicated events. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, ENST, ESEL, ESHC, HIAH, HIGH, INST, ISIN.

HIST 3998. People and Other Animals in History. (4 Credits)

This upper level seminar explores the history of humans' relationships with animals, especially in scientific or medical settings. Animals, while pre-eminently natural objects, are always understood in cultural contexts and cultures mark the boundaries between humans and non-human animals very differently. This course examines the number of ways that relationships between humans and non-human animals have been imagined and conducted over the past centuries. Contexts explored include hunting, domestication of livestock, commodity-exchange, specimen collecting, zoos, museums, pet-keeping, scientific laboratories, and children's fiction. Themes include shifting ideas about animal intelligence and agency, humans' moral and ethical obligations to animals, and limits on humans' use of animals. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, ALC, ENST, ESEL, ESHC.

HIST 3999. Tutorial. (3 to 4 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

Attribute: AHC.

HIST 4000. History, Philosophy, and Law: Problems in Interpretation. (4 Credits)

This seminar explores constitutional interpretation from the different perspectives of history, philosophy, and law. The course will survey a variety of different scholarly approaches and examine a range of landmark Supreme Court decisions. . The class will examine the different modalities of constitutional interpretation used by judges: text, history, structure, prudential arguments, and philosophical/ethical arguments. The readings will be drawn from leading historians, philosophers, legal theorists. The course will probe a variety of interpretive problems and issues at the intersection of these three disciplines. Should we treat the Constitution’s text as fixed or should we embrace the idea of a living Constitution? How do historians deal with the issue of Constitutional meaning? How have philosophers grappled with the same issues? How should we interpret the Constitution? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

HIST 4005. American Photography: History and Art. (4 Credits)

An interdisciplinary study of the history, art, and practice of photography. This course explores the place of photography in American history and culture. Students will study the renowned photographers and important types of photography, such as documentary and landscape. We will also practice photography - making pinhole cameras and learning the technical elements of picture taking. The class will include field trips and meeting with photographers and curators. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AMST, ICC.

HIST 4007. Medieval Autobiographies. (4 Credits)

Although writing about oneself is often considered classical or modern, and autobiography was not classified as a genre until the eighteenth century, a handful of medieval clerics, monks, mystics, nobles and merchants wrote about their own lives. These autobiographical accounts, and the conventions and societies that shaped them are the topic of the course. By asking both the questions of genre, narrative voice, subjectivity and authorship usually posed by literary analysis, and the historical questions of what such sources about past authors, audiences and the societies that read and copied the lives, the goal is to understand autobiography and the sources themselves from an interdisciplinary perspective. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: HIMH, ICC, MVST.

HIST 4008. Race and Gender in the Old West. (4 Credits)

This course uses fiction and history in an interdisciplinary approach to explore the nineteenth-century American West. It incorporates race and gender as categories of analysis to examine how concepts of racial ideology and gender roles affect social, cultural, and economic spheres. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HIAH, ICC, IRST, LALS, LAUH, PJGS, PJRC, PJST, PLUR, WGSS.

HIST 4009. Film, Fiction, and Power in the American Century. (4 Credits)

Visual and written representations of American power have influenced, challenged and even transformed U.S. relations in the world. With their capacity to reach millions, films and fiction do more than tell stories or entertain audiences. They also have the unparalled means to shape values and beliefs, and to convey attitudes toward the nature and practice of American power. What sort of themes of international power did authors, screen-writers, and directors address in the twentieth century? What do these reflections on power reveal about American society, its politics, and its place in the world? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AMST, APPI, ASAM, ASHS, HIAH, ICC.

HIST 4031. Rise of the American Suburb. (4 Credits)

An examination of the nineteenth century origins of the suburb as a counterpoint to the city and the role of nature in shaping the design of this new form of country living. The twentieth century transformation of the suburb into the American dream will be evaluated in light of the resultant sprawl and the policy critiques of this pattern of growth. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASHS, ICC, URST.

HIST 4048. Israel: History, Society, Politics and Culture. (4 Credits)

The seminar will examine Israel’s history, society, politics and culture from a variety of interpretive orientations and disciplinary outlooks. At its foundation is the history of Israel, broadly construed, from the birth of Zionism to the present. We will explore a multi-layered picture of Israeli culture through different voices, genres and styles. We will discuss the origins of Zionism and the main tenets of Zionist thought and its practical manifestations: immigration to Palestine and the development of Jewish settlement (Yishuv) under British Mandate. We will explore the origins of the Arab-Jewish conflict and survey the Jewish-Arab confrontations as well as various plans to resolve the conflict. We’ll examine the peopling of the Jewish state and the effort to create a new Jew. We will study Arab Jewish relations in Israel and the tensions that led to the creation of a multi-cleavage society: Ashkenazi-Sephardic; ultra-orthodox-secular; Arab-Jewish. Students will engage with contemporary cultural production and various representations of Israeli society, while focusing on the elements that make up Israeli identity. The reading and films provide a selection of both hegemonic and peripheral narrative discourses, and concentrate on themes that are usually overshadowed by the ongoing political crisis in the region. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, GLBL, HIGH, HIST, HIUL, ICC, INST, ISME, JSHI, JWST.

HIST 4057. Seminar: History and Film. (4 Credits)

This senior seminar will examine the practical and theoretical issues of using film as historical evidence and presenting the past on screen. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

HIST 4100. Seminar: Med Political Ideologies. (4 Credits)

The course surveys the great political conflicts of the Middle Ages with particular focus on their ideological foundations. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

HIST 4104. Food and Drink in Modern Society. (4 Credits)

Eating and drinking are basic human needs. But they are much more: they are also activities that in every culture and in every society, past and present, have been central to how individuals define themselves and interact with each other. During this interdisciplinary capstone seminar, we will use a variety of approaches to unravel the social meanings of food and drink, and of eating and drinking through time and space. During our meetings, we will study the history of specific foodstuffs and beverages, and we will examine how food and drinks have been consumed over time, not only in the home but also in public places. We will apply concepts, theories, and techniques developed in history, anthropology, sociology, literary studies, linguistics, philosophy, art history, and the sciences to “read,” that is, to contextualize and interpret, texts, documents, and images. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to approach issues and texts from a number of different angles and from the perspective of various disciplines. By combining them, we will get a richer understanding of the place that food, beverages, eating, and drinking have occupied in our societies, and how it has changed over time. The final paper will allow students to put these insights into practice. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AMST, ASHS, HIUL, ICC, INST, ISIN.

HIST 4105. The Early Modern World: Art and Science. (4 Credits)

European exploration and interaction in the 16th and 17th centuries expanded the horizons not only of the Europeans but of the entire world. It was also the beginning of a truly global system of exchange involving peoples, products, money, and microbes that in turned transformed European art, philosophy, religion, and science. This interdisciplinary capstone will analyze the dizzying world of early modernity through consideration of the way its scientists, artists and religious thinkers understood their society and treated the materials of their disciplines. We will trace first the economic and human consequences of this newly global system, for Europeans and non-Europeans alike, and we will then explore questions proper to each discipline at the time, the changes they underwent, as the ways that new interactions and discoveries shocked and exploded ancient traditions and authority, and how the approaches of the period compare to contemporary methods in each area. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: HIEH, ICC.

HIST 4111. Modern African Stories. (4 Credits)

In this course, we will read the most exciting and cutting-edge books published over the past 10 years about African people and societies. We will read books that ask unsettling questions and adopt unorthodox methodologies. Themes will include but are not limited to citizenship and nationality; knowledge production and decolonization; gender, modernization, and sexuality; policing and carceral systems; agency, ecology, and migration; and colonial science and psychiatry. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AFAM, AFST, AHC, GLBL, HIGH, HIUL, INST, ISAF, PJRC, PJST.

HIST 4115. Communication and Media in History: From Gutenberg to Google. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary capstone seminar will explore the role that communications and information media have played in history. It will focus more particularly on the transformations brought by new media, information technologies, and modes of communications, from the Greek alphabet and the 15th-century printing press to the internet and social media. By studying media past and present in their historical contexts, students will develop a sharper awareness of the profound ways in which communications and media have been shaping individuals and societies through time and place, in areas ranging from psychology, culture, and ideas to politics, economies, and social relations. The seminar will introduce students to a recent interdisciplinary field: communication history. It will also present theories and explanatory models elaborated in multiple disciplines—by communication and media scholars, sociologists, anthropologists, historians, neuroscientists, as well as literary scholars, philosophers, and cultural critics—to explain how communication media have been major forces in history. Themes and discussion topics will range broadly, from the ancient Middle East to early modern Western Europe and from the modern West to global virtual communities. Rather than trying to cover all parts of the world, all epochs and all media, each session will select a specific medium in a particular time and place to address a set of questions and topics critical for understanding the role of media in history. Readings will cover a combination of theoretical works with historical syntheses and case studies. As rapid shifts are remaking our media landscape and reshaping our world, the interdisciplinary study of communications media in history provides a grounding to understand what is at stake and offers a map to navigate turbulent, confusing times. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: CCUS, CMST, COLI, COMC, HIAH, HIEH, HIUL, ICC, INST, ISIN.

HIST 4120. Imagining Empire. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on how the modern British Empire has been represented in literature, film and historical writing. We will confine our examination to western views or empire, both critical and enthusiastic. Many of our observers get the history of empire wrong, but they nevertheless engage in British attitudes to global domination, racial and cultural assumptions of superiority, law and authority, and the use of force. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, INST, ISEU.

HIST 4137. Hysteria, Sexuality, and the Unconscious. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary seminar is sponsored by the Department of English and the Department of History. The seminar explores issues raised by hysteria, sexuality and the unconscious in turn of the twentieth-century western culture-topics that cross disciplinary boundaries. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: BEHR, BIOE, COLI, ENGL, HIST, ICC, INST, ISEU, ISIN, WGSS.

HIST 4152. The Italian Renaissance. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: HIEH, ICC.

HIST 4195. The Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem. (4 Credits)

The period following the First Crusade (1095 to 1099) saw the establishment in the eastern Mediterranean of one of the most diverse and complex societies of the medieval world. A French-speaking European aristocracy based in the holy city of Jerusalem ruled over a population including eastern Christians, Muslims, and Jews. This course introduces students to the history and culture of this society, looking closely at the surviving art and architecture and works written both by its inhabitants and by its Arabic and Greek-speaking neighbors in Syria and Byzantium. Particular attention will be given to the importance of archaeology and art history in challenging and complementing the evidence of the written sources. We will engage with the major historical debates concerning the organization of the kingdom and its final collapse, the relationship between the Latin Christian rulers and those they ruled, and the place of the kingdom within the long history of European colonization and conquest. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: HGVH, HIUL, ICC, MVST.

HIST 4295. Confucianism in Three Keys: The History, Philosophy, and Politics of Confucianism. (4 Credits)

Confucianism has taken many forms over the millennia, but its core ideas of self-cultivation, the proper ordering of society, the role of the individual in the social order, and the relationship between humanity and the cosmos have not only shaped the underlying fabric of Chinese civilization, they have deeply influences several neighboring East Asian societies as well. Now, after decades in disfavor, Confucianism is once again entering dialogues in modern global culture, but this time with lingering anxiety about what Confucianism actually is. With this in mind, this course will examine Confucianism from three main perspectives, the historical, the philosophical, and the political. It will also make broad use of interdisciplinary (and comparative) approaches from literature, religious studies, anthropology, and art history, so that Confucianism will not speak with a single voice, and our understanding will reflect the complexity of this evolving tradition. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: HIGH, ICC, INST, ISAS.

HIST 4307. Senior Seminar: The Making of the British Isles 1450-1660. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the history of Great Britain and Ireland from England's loss of its continental possessions in the mid-fifteenth century until the restoration in 1660 of Charles II as king of England, Scotland, and Ireland. Beginning in the late medieval period with an exploration of the English borderlands under the Tudors, the course will then chart the means by which the four nations of the British archipelago (English, Irish, Scots, and Welsh) were gradually brought into a multinational British state during the early modern period. Central to the course will be the historiographical debate surrounding the so-called 'new British history' and the difficulties associated with providing distinct but mutually dependent histories of four nations, rather than focusing on the uniqueness of each national unit.

Attributes: AHC, IRST.

HIST 4308. Antisemitism. (4 Credits)

The history of anti-Jewish hostilities and their various manifestations from antiquity to the present. An examination of the theological, social, political, economic, and mythical elements of the hatred. Close readings of antisemitic texts to acquaint students with the full repertoire of antisemitic tropes: Jews as agents of cosmic evil and murderers of God, children of the Devil and followers of the Antichrist, money manipulators and usurpers of other peoples’ possessions, political connivers and conspirators, sexual predators, social corrupters. A study of the encoding and transmission of these ideas and an exploration of their continued contemporary appeal. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, EP4, GLBL, HIGH, INST, ISEU, ISIN, JWST, MEST, MVST, PJRC, PJST, REST, VAL.

HIST 4310. Africa, Race, and the Global Cold War. (4 Credits)

This course explores how Africans and African states negotiated and shaped the geopolitical climate of the Cold War era. Some of the major themes covered will be the role of race and racism in the Cold War; the relationship between the Cold War and Pan-Africanism; the Cold War and African decolonization and liberation; the Cold War and African sovereignty; and the Cold War and African development. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AFAM, AFST, AHC, EP4, GLBL, HIGH, INST, IRST, ISAF, ISHI, ISIN, PJRC, PJST, PJWT, VAL.

HIST 4312. Antisemitism and Racism. (4 Credits)

As seen in current events, racial prejudice is commonplace in our society, and antisemitism and racism are the core characteristics of white supremacy. This course will examine the history of ideas and beliefs espoused by racists and antisemites: the differences and similarities, the contrasts and overlaps. Based on a wide variety of sources—texts, including literary and legal; visual evidence, such as paintings, ephemera, and films; and scholarly works by historians, literary and legal scholars, and philosophers—we will examine the history of antisemitic and racist tropes, and place them in a range of contexts and multiple perspectives: theological, legal, social, political, economic, and mythological. We will discuss how these stereotypes emerged, how they are encoded and transmitted, and why they continue to appeal to contemporary racial sensibilities. We will try to historicize them, investigating change in racist and antisemitic ideologies over time, as well as how ahistorical framings of such can trap us into discourses that generalize at the sufferance of specificities. During this course, students will also work on a hands-on exhibition in the Fordham’s Special Collection. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AFAM, AMST, ASHS, ICC, INST, ISIN, JWST, PJRC, PJST, SL.

HIST 4331. US in the Middle East: 1945-Present. (4 Credits)

The seminar will examine how the United States replaced Great Britain as the preeminent power in the Middle East in the post-World War II era. We will study the conduct of the cold war in the Middle East, analyze American involvement in the Israeli-Arab conflict, examine the tensions arising from American dependence on foreign oil, and consider the conflict between American culture and the rise of Moslem fundamentalism. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HHPA, HIAH, HIGH, HIUL, HUST, INST, ISIN, ISME, JWST, MEST, PJRC, PJST.

HIST 4353. Renaissance and Renewal. (4 Credits)

The Renaissance and Reformation forced important changes in European religion and culture. Using a range of materials from art, literature, and religious writing, we will explore the renewal of Catholicism in the 16th and 17th centuries, especially in Italy, Germany, France, and Spain. Our goal will be to examine the interplay of religion, culture and life, and the significance of the Catholic Reformation in European and world culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH.

HIST 4362. Seminar: Daughters of Eve. (4 Credits)

This seminar will examine the history of law and deviance in Europe, 1500-1800, emphasizing in the second half of the course crimes associated with women, particularly infanticide, reproductive crimes, and witchcraft. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 4363. SEM: Europe and the Early Modern World. (4 Credits)

From 1450 to 1700, the European cosmos expanded intellectually to reach an infinite universe and materially to grasp the entire Earth. In this course, students will examine the transformation of understanding and power that made Europe the center of global empire and intellectual and cultural change. The reciprocal influence of the world upon European life, culture, and art is another important theme of this survey. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: HIUL, INST.

HIST 4435. Art of the Tudor Courts. (4 Credits)

This course coincides with the Metropolitan Museum of Art's major exhibition of art at the Tudor courts. Focusing on the rich visual culture of the English court from 1485 to 1603, it investigates the power of art to support the dynastic claims of the Tudor dynasty. We will explore the intersection of art and politics during the reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. Classes will meet both on campus and at the museum. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHRB, HIEH, HIUL, ICC.

Prerequisites: ARHI 1101 or ARHI 1102 or ARHI 1103.

HIST 4510. Conquest, Conversion, Conscience. (4 Credits)

The Spanish conquest of the New World and the forced conversion of its indigenous peoples were justified as rescuing indigenous peoples from the tyranny of their own sinfulness of cannibalism and bestiality. However, those same policies of conquest and conversion were also subject to intense scrutiny on moral and ethical grounds by Spaniards. In this course we will closely examine a series of case studies and the philosophical and ethical debates they gave rise to. To understand the echoes of such debates and moral claims in the contemporary world we will look at recent debates over the doctrine of just war and cultural/religious practices of indigenous people today. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AMST, APPI, ASHS, EP4, GLBL, HIGH, INST, ISEU, ISIN, LALS, LAUH, PJRC, PJST, VAL.

HIST 4542. Seminar: Italy Through Foreign Eyes. (4 Credits)

Research in Italian culture and politics as perceived through foreign observers. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, ISEU, ITAL.

HIST 4543. Sem: Fascism from Mussolini to the Present. (4 Credits)

Fascism has been described as the “major political innovation of the twentieth century” and, unfortunately, its fortunes do not seem to be over. This seminar will examine what distinguished fascism from other types of nationalist and authoritarian movements and regimes and what characterized its peculiar ideological makeup and style of rule. The main focus will be Italy, but other countries will also be examined briefly for comparative purposes. Topics will include the ideological origins of fascism, the movement phase and the establishment of the regime, the use of violence, the manufacturing of consent, the cult of the leader, gender politics, fascist racism and the Shoah, collaboration and resistance, legacies and memories, neofascism and the appeal of right-wing populism and authoritarianism in the crisis of contemporary democracies. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: HIUL.

HIST 4557. Seminar: The Third Reich. (4 Credits)

Examines the origins of the Nazi Dictatorship, considering the tensions within Germany that led to the collapse of liberal democracy. In addition, the course examines the culture and politics of the Third Reich. Emphasis will be on the interaction of race and imperialism. Other topics explored will include the police state, state-party relations, and welfare policies. Students will be expected to participate in weekly discussions as well as write both a short paper for class discussion and a longer, research paper. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, INST, IPE, ISEU.

HIST 4558. Seminar: Modern European City. (4 Credits)

This seminar examines issues in European urban history and the development of the city during the 19th and 20th centuries. It focuses on the process of urbanization and modernization that shifted Europe from a rural to an urban society, and considers the impact of the city, its economy, its culture, and its daily life. Topics include social reform, the boulevard builders, the world’s fairs, utopian planning and modernism, totalitarian visions, and mass culture, among others. The focus will be on European capital cities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, INST, URST.

HIST 4591. Seminar: Race, Sex, and Colonialism. (4 Credits)

In this Senior Values seminar, we will analyze the similarities and differences that characterize histories of interracial sexual relations in different political, social, economic, and legal contexts. We will focus on historical works that deal with interracial sexual relations in areas as diverse as colonial Zimbabwe, Haiti, Indonesia, and the U.S.A. Close attention will be paid to the methodological approaches our authors take and to the theoretical insights we can draw from our diverse case studies to help us better discern the common and singular threads running through this expansive field of inquiry. Case studies will be accompanied by foundational theoretical readings on race, colonialism, and sexuality. Weekly class presentations and revision writing will be a fundamental part of achieving eloquence in speaking and writing during the course of the semester. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, EP4, GLBL, HIGH, LALS, LAUH, VAL, WGSS.

HIST 4610. Seminar: Jewish Society and Culture in Eastern Europe. (4 Credits)

Our understanding of the life of east European Jews has been dominated by the Hollywood and Broadway blockbuster "Fiddler on the Roof." The "shtetl," a small insular town where Jews were said to have lived, has been the paradigm of east European Jewish experiences. But the powerful imagery of the "shtetl" is largerly a creation of 19th-century writers. This is a course that will take us beyond the popular stereotypes, and will look at the history the Jews in eastern Europe from the initial settlement of the Jews there until the eve of modernity. We will examine how - beyond popuar culture - historians and writers have shaped our understanding of Jewish history in that region, and how the persisting imagery of eastern European Jews was created. Why were certain stories told? What can different historical sources show us about Jewish life in Eastern Europe? We will discuss how Jewish history in eastern Europe was studied by historians, and couple the narratives created by scholars with historical sources: privilege charters, crime records, rabbinic responsa, anti-Jewish literature, and others. We will try to probe the relation between history, historical sources, and historical writings. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, JSPM, JWST.

HIST 4631. Seminar: US in the Mid East: 1945-Pres. (4 Credits)

The seminar will examine how the United States replaced Great Britain as the preeminent power in the Middle East in the post-World War II era. We will study the conduct of the cold war in the Middle East, analyze American involvement in the Israeli-Arab conflict, examine the tensions arising from American dependence on foreign oil, and consider the conflict between American culture and the rise of Moslem fundamentalism. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, HHPA, HIAH, HIGH, HUST, INST, ISME, JWST, MEST.

HIST 4635. Seminar: Screening the Past. (4 Credits)

Through the writings of historians, filmmakers, film scholars and our viewing of selected films we will explore the increasingly busy intersection where the paths of historians, film scholars, and filmmakers - not to mention the wider public - meet. It is a selective introduction to the theory and practice, promise and danger, of cinematic history. We will focus on films about history, analyzed as both secondary "histories" and "texts" whose content, production, and reception are primary sources for an understanding of our culture and its historical/screen memory. We will explore how the different methodologies and emphases of history and film studies can inform each other and generate historical film criticism in class discussion, short essays, and a major research paper. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

HIST 4654. Medieval London. (4 Credits)

This course draws on material and documentary sources to explore the towns-cape of medieval London-its wards, streets, and buildings- and the social life of its people, including their daily routines, work, and rituals. We will examine such documentary sources as chronicles, charters, and wills, along with material evidence from human skeletons, excavation houses and churches, coins, pottery and clothing. This also contains a digital humanities component; students will be responsible for an online project to create illustrated reports and medieval objects and sites in London. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: HIMH, HIUL, ICC, MVST.

HIST 4657. Seminar: New York City History. (4 Credits)

Advanced readings and research in the history of New York City, 1621-2016. Topics for common reading and discussion might include the politics and culture of the city, the rise of the urban infrastructure and distinct neighborhoods, the city’s changing population, etc. Students will produce and present a research paper on a topic of their own choosing. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, ASHS, IRST.

HIST 4666. SEM Know Your Enemy: The Devil in History. (4 Credits)

This senior seminar examines the character and representation of the Devil in western culture, from the Hebrew scriptures to the modern day. Sources in translation range from ancient biblical texts and medieval saints’ lives to plays, operas, movies, and novels. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: HIMH, MVST.

HIST 4671. Seminar: Technology and Society. (4 Credits)

In this course, we will try and understand the critical relationship between technology and society in the modern era, with a focus on 19th and 20th century America. Our goal is to go beyond descriptions of material objects and investigate the role of technology and its cultural markers (such as "progress") in broad social, political, cultural, and economic contexts. We will study a wide range of technological systems (such as the telegraph, the telephone, and the Internet), consumer technologies (household appliances, the birth control pill), and "Big Science" (such as the atomic bomb) with a goal to discerning how technology and society have shaped each other in the modern world.

Attributes: AHC, HIAH.

HIST 4700. Seminar: Med Political Ideologies. (4 Credits)

The course surveys the great political conflicts of the Middle Ages with particular focus on their ideological foundations. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

HIST 4704. Seminar: The First Crusade: Themes and Sources. (4 Credits)

This course takes as its focus a pivotal moment in world history, when a massive expedition of as many as 100,000 western European Christians departed from their homelands in 1095 and 1096 on a three-year military pilgrimage that ended with the violent conquest of Jerusalem in 1099. The journey saw an unprecedented combination of penitential piety and extreme violence; deft and desperate political and military maneuvering; and complex encounters between Christians, Jews, and Muslims that would have implications for centuries. In this course, students will explore a wide range of themes that have emerged from scholarly debates surrounding the expedition, its origins, and impact. Students will conduct original research using a variety of original source materials in English translation, including letters, eyewitness accounts, and literary epics, and have the opportunity to participate in digital humanities projects on the cutting edge of historical scholarship. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 4705. Seminar: Disease in the Middle Ages. (4 Credits)

This senior seminar course provides a platform for readings, discussion, essay-writing, and oral presentations for juniors and seniors interested in the cultural, medical, normative, and spiritual responses to disease and health issues in the West from 500-1500 AD. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, BEHR, BIOE, HIMH, MVST.

HIST 4708. Seminar: The Great War. (4 Credits)

World War I is often taken as the beginning of the “short” 20th century, the “seminal disaster” of a century of disasters. This seminar explores the war through the lenses of diplomatic, military, social, and cultural history, to understand the ramifications of the war and the terms of peace across the globe and on home fronts. Themes will include the politics of war and peace, the conduct of war, mobilization and social change, the politics of food, western imperialism and the Islamic world, the collapse of empires, and the problems of memory. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH, IRST, ISLI.

HIST 4710. Seminar: Early Modern British Empire. (4 Credits)

This seminar considers the rise and fall of Britain’s “first empire” and the transition to its second, roughly covering the period from 1485 to 1830. Special attention will be paid to the political, economic, and cultural impact of empire on Britain itself as well as effects of and resistance to British dominion in India, Ireland, and America. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, IRST.

HIST 4711. Seminar: Post-WWII Britain. (4 Credits)

This course will offer a close examination of the history of postwar Britain. Through course readings and intensive discussion, we will consider how WWII and its aftermath changed British society; how processes of decolonization remade the British metropole; how a social democratic consensus was built and then dismantled; how people of color forged cultural institutions and social movements in the face of persistent white hostility; how conventions around gender, sexuality, and family life evolved; how the troubles in Northern Ireland unfolded; and how constitutional questions, including those concerning national sovereignty, fractured British political life. In addition to coming to terms with these historical processes, we will also work to understand how these processes interacted with the study of history in postwar Britain. We will explore how contemporary political conundrums affected the sorts of research questions British historians were asking; how history curricula in British public schools evolved; and how everyday people found new ways to relate to and learn about the past. By combining history and historiography in these ways, this course will help students think carefully about how the study of history is bound up with contentious and contingent historical processes. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIEH.

HIST 4715. Oil and Power in the American Century. (4 Credits)

This Senior Seminar will examine the historical evolution of the crucial link between oil, diplomacy, and national security in the twentieth century. Students will discuss the role of oil consumption in modern life, the guiding principles of the foreign oil policies of the United States in Latin America and the Middle East, and the social, political, and economic structures related to the production and consumption of oil. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST.

HIST 4716. History of One: The Art of Biography. (4 Credits)

This seminar explores biography as a form of United States history. It asks crucial questions: What are the sources and methods employed by biographers? How does biography construct identity? How can one person's life tell us about the times? How does biography construct and validate shared moral values and social, cultural, or political practices? What do biographies of dissidents tell us? What patterns can we discern in the genre? Students will read and analyze biographies written by academic historians, and special emphasis will be placed on the questions of how historians construct a biography and how they place individuals into larger historical conversations. Students will write a bibliographical essay surveying the treatment of a particular individual, as well as research and write a chapter in the biography of an individual of their choice. They will ask other important questions about the individual and their times: What deficiencies exist in current research and writing? How might they be addressed? In taking this critical and constructive approach, the seminar will engage students in the art of writing historical biography. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

HIST 4725. Seminar: Global Histories and Stories. (4 Credits)

How do we know about the lives of people who left no records of their own? Can a work of fiction or a person’s memory be a source of history? How do history, travel, and narrative connect the lives of an 11th-century merchant and a modern-day traveler? These are some of the questions students will explore in this senior seminar through examples from around the world, from the streets of Cairo to the trans-Atlantic slave trade, from biographies, films, novels, oral histories by perpetrators and survivors of state terror, and from students’ own family histories, among other sources. Every week, we will explore different world regions and methodologies, and students will simultaneously create original projects over the course of the semester. This senior seminar fulfills a history major requirement. The seminar is also open to seniors majoring in any field who are interested in writing a research paper based on primary sources. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, GLBL, HIUL, LALS, LAUH.

HIST 4726. Seminar: Questions of Global Capitalism. (4 Credits)

Since its foundations, the modern ideas and institutions that we call “capitalism” have posed a range of ethical and political questions: What is the meaning of freedom? What is the point of work? How should humans think about and value non-human nature? Is perpetual social and economic inequality a problem? In this seminar, we explore these questions through the writings of political theorists and the stories of people from various world regions, from Asia to the Americas, since the eighteenth century. Possible topics include slavery, contract labor, consumerism, debt, climate change, the meat industry, and the growth of government.

Attributes: AHC, INST, ISIN.

HIST 4727. Seminar: Economic Life and British Colonialism. (4 Credits)

This course examines the history of capitalism from the particular vantage point of Britain’s colonies, from the 17th to 20th centuries. We focus in particular on economic life in three world regions that represent different forms and moments of British colonialism: the Americas, South Asia, and the Middle East. Our objective is to understand the varieties of both capitalism and colonialism, and how these two “isms” were historically connected. We ask, among other questions: how did capitalism accommodate or challenge the diverse cultural and social practices found in the British colonial world? Possible topics include trade in settler colonial North America, caste and labor in colonial India, land in British-mandate Palestine, and time-consciousness in the veiled protectorate of Egypt. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIGH, INST, IRST, ISEU, ISIN.

HIST 4748. Seminar: The Worlds of the Enlightenment. (4 Credits)

This senior seminar focuses on the developments that transformed Europe during the Age of Enlightenment in the eighteenth century and ushered in the modern era. We will approach the period from a variety of angles to uncover how transformations in the realm of ideas, culture, politics, society, commerce, and communications shaped new worlds, not only in Europe but also globally. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

HIST 4758. Seminar: Europe: Prosperity to Crisis. (4 Credits)

This seminar concerns the important themes in European history since 1945: the social-democratic consensus and the glorious thirty years of economic growth; the cold war; the loss of empire and the emergence of multiculturalism; the social and cultural revolution of the 1960's; the communist empire, its collapse and the aftermath. We will also focus on the historical roots of the multiple crisis which faces contemporary Europe, involving the challenge of massive emergency immigration, the development of radical-right parties, the appearance of anti-democratic governments in some post-communist states, economic stagnation, and the instability of the Euro. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, ISEU.

HIST 4760. Seminar: Immigration to the U.S.. (4 Credits)

This course examines important development in American immigration. It focuses on major migratory waves and on the reception immigrants have received. Coverage includes Chinese, Irish, Italian, Jewish and Mexican immigrants, among other possibilities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, LALS, LAUH.

HIST 4767. Seminar: Torture and the Western Experience. (4 Credits)

Torture and physical coercion have been elements of European judicial and disciplinary systems since the time of ancient Greece. This research and writing seminar will trace the history of torture in western societies until the present, the controversies surrounding its use, its significance for western understanding of the self and the body, and its implications for modern European and American culture and life. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS, IPE, PJST, PJWT.

HIST 4768. Seminar: Gender, Sex and Society in the Early U.S.. (4 Credits)

This course explores western ideas about men’s and women’s bodies, sexuality, and reproduction spanning the 1600s-1800s. Topics include marital relations, historical views of gender and the body, conceptions of sexually transmitted disease, and debates about men’s and women’s roles as midwives. Content will revolve primarily around the United States and also around the larger British Atlantic World, including Britain itself. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AHC, ASHS, WGSS.

HIST 4771. Seminar: In Search of the Founders' Constitution. (4 Credits)

Americans venerate the Constitution, but there is surprisingly little agreement over what the Constitution means and how it should be interpreted. These disagreements are as old as the Constitution itself. This course surveys the origins of the Constitution, including its relationship to English common law, natural rights theory, and enlightenment political theory. It will also examine the struggle over the Constitution and the battle between Federalists and Anti-Federalists, as well as the early battles between Jefferson and Hamilton. Finally, we will look at several modern constitutional controversies, such as gun control, federalism, and the role of religion in public life. For instance: What do the Founding Generation’s debates over these issues reveal about today’s debates? Should we seek to interpret the Constitution according to its original meaning or would the Founders have disavowed such an inquiry and embraced a more dynamic living constitutional model? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, AMST, APPI, ASHS.

HIST 4772. Seminar: Colonial Latin America. (4 Credits)

This seminar focuses on the colonial period of Latin American history from the late 15th to the early 19th centuries. Topics may include (among others): the arrival of European explorers, conquistadors, and missionaries; their incursions into Indian land and indigenous practices; the exploitation of Indians and Africans; conversion efforts and forms of resistance; racial and gender hierarchies; criollo prerogatives; and the development of regional and national identities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIGH, LALS, LAUH.

HIST 4780. Sem: History of Capitalism. (4 Credits)

Political economy is the social science that treats the sources and methods of production for subsistence and wealth. It is the study of how political systems conceive of and organizes economic life and of the ideas people hold as they set out to derive wealth from nature. Its founding authors are still read today, although they tended to deny that ecology and economy could possibly come into conflict. Instead, they proposed mechanistic models in which the market resolved all contradictions. This seminar considers the various ways that capitalist societies have apportioned resources and conceived of nature, progress, and wealth. It is a topical historical survey intended to teach the origins, qualities and historical manifestations of this powerful social system. The course assumes no knowledge of economics and only a basic knowledge of American and European history.

Attributes: AMST, APPI, ASHS, ENST, ESEC, ESHC.

HIST 4825. Gandhi: A Global Intellectual History. (4 Credits)

This course is about the intellectual journey of Mohandas Gandhi and the interpretation of his ideas in an interconnected world. The course seeks to locate Gandhi in the context of his own times and thus to assess his place in the histories of India, Britain, and South Africa. It examines the intellectual life, practice, and legacy of Mohandas Gandhi. We will read some of his important ideas, including truth-force, non-violence, and techniques of non-violent resistance, and a critique of Western civilization as well as the intervention of his critics. Taking a global historical perspective, then this course will discuss the intellectual contributions of Martin Luther King Jr. and Nelson Mandela, both of whom drew on Gandhi’s ideas and practices. The goal of this course is to introduce students to the perspectives of global and intellectual history. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AFAM, AHC, GLBL, HIGH.

HIST 4860. Seminar: 1970'S: Revolutionary Decade. (4 Credits)

While the 1960s have been viewed as a decade of change in the U.S., the 1970s may well have been more revolutionary. Often dismissed as the inward-turning "Me Decade," the 1970s witnessed dramatic social, economic, and political changes. This seminar examines closely the decade's swirling currents: Watergate's effects, Vietnam's end, the extended Civil Rights Movements (feminism, Chicano, Asian-American, & Native American rights), the white ethnic revival, environmentalism's surge, the oil crisis and the end of America's era of affluence, and the rise of conservatism. We will study a wide range of materials from the decade--such as the Pentagon Papers, the environmental novel Ecotopia, films like The Godfather and StarWars, Jimmy Carter's epic "Crisis of Confidence" speech, and the Eagles' 1976 hit "Hotel California." Students will be required to complete a research paper, employing primary sources, on some aspect of the decade. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AHC, AMST, ASHS.

HIST 4900. Seminar: Transnational Lives. (4 Credits)

This course explores creative history writing on the diverse lives and experiences of people during the colonial encounter. We will read a range of non-fiction sources, including biographies, autobiographies, and creative writings that offer a new way of understanding the past. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

HIST 4905. Seminar: History of Food. (4 Credits)

Topics to be discussed: food as a driving force of history; history of specific foods; rituals of eating; food fashions; food as an aspect of national identity. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HIST, HIUL, INST, ISIN, LALS, LAUH.

HIST 4910. Seminar: Genocide. (4 Credits)

We will investigate the major instances of modern genocide, including the Armenian, Rwandan and Cambodian cases, the Ukrainian famine, and the holocaust. There is a comparative dimension to the course. What triggers genocide? How do modern cases compare to earlier ones? Why is rescue usually unforthcoming? How did the concept arise? How effective is punishment of perpetrators? Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AHC, HHPA, HUST, INST, ISIN, JWST.

HIST 4913. Social Darwinism: Theme and Variations in Global Context. (4 Credits)

Ever since Charles Darwin published his theory of biological evolution through natural selection, people have tried to borrow the scientific cache of his ideas and apply them to the development and administration of human societies. This course will look at the adaption and cultural impact of what later critics would call "Social Darwinism" in global context, with a particular emphasis on England, the U.S., and Asia. Topics will include pre-Darwinian cocepts of social development, popularization of scientific thinking, competing interpretations of evolutionary thought and social welfare, global circulations of ideas in the 19th and 20th c. political implications of "fitness", and resistance to Social Darwinism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASHS, BEHR.

HIST 4922. “Freedom Now”: Black Political Thought. (4 Credits)

Black thinkers over the past century in Africa, North America, and the Caribbean have been prescient theorists in deconstructing political-economic structures, power and marginalization, the human condition and exploitation, and race and gender relations on the individual, local, national, and international domains. Note: Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AFAM, AFST, AMST, APPI, ASHS, GLBL, HIAH, HIGH, INST, ISAF, ISIN, PJCP, PJSJ.

HIST 4933. Seminar: Cold War Science and Technology. (4 Credits)

Science and technology played a crucial role in shaping the Cold War across the globe. In this course, we will begin with the development of the atomic bomb and discuss the nuclear arms race and the popular culture of nuclear anxiety as embodied in film and literature. Other topics include the space race, the development of the internet, the origins of modern environmentalism, the rise of the military-industrial complex, and "everyday technologies" such as the birth control pill and mass media. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, APPI, ASHS, INST, ISIN.

HIST 4934. Seminar: Soviet Society under Stalin. (4 Credits)

This seminar will explore the enormous transformations in life in the Soviet Union under the rule of Joseph Stalin, one of the most brutal dictators of the 20th century and the architect of massive social transformation that turned Russia from a predominantly agrarian nation into a powerful industrial state. We will take a broader perspective on this history by looking at the roots of Stalinist rule in the Russian Revolution and follow that story to the dismantling of the Stalinist system in the 1950s. During this period, Soviet society was engulfed in a series of massive traumas, including a brutal civil war, heavy industrialization, collectivization of farmland, widespread upward social mobility, the establishment of a labor camp system, the Great Terror in the late 1930s, the horrific experience of World War II, and postwar reconstruction. We will explore each of these phenomena in detail with a broad interest in underlying social, political, and cultural contexts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

HIST 4954. Seminar: Law and Empire Iberian Atlantic. (4 Credits)

This course explores the centrality of legal practices in Spain and its American Empire from 15th to 19th centuries. Topics may include: legal cultures in early modern Spain and the Americas; debates over legality of the conquest; how indigenous people used law to their advantage; and legal questions of ethnicity and honor as related to marriage. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AHC, AMST, ASHS, GLBL, LALS.

HIST 4998. Study Tour: Medieval Spain. (4 Credits)

One of the great medieval pilgrimage routes, the Camino de Santiago crosses northern Spain from the passes of the Pyrenees to Santiago de Compostela. This study-tour will consider the legends of the Camino, some of its many surviving monuments, and the modern revival of the pilgrimage by walking for two weeks with the peregrinos/-as from Leon to Santiago de Compostela. This class will meet periodically at Fordham before the walk to discuss reading assignments and prepare. A journal is required at the end of the course. Fees and travel costs not included. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, LALS, LAUH, MVST.

HIST 4999. Tutorial. (1 to 5 Credits)

Supervised individual projects in historical research. (Every semester.) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AHC.

Courses in Other Areas

The following courses offered outside the department have the HIST attribute and count toward the history major and minor:

Course Title Credits
AFAM 1600Understanding Historical Change: Africa3
AFAM 2005American Pluralism4
AFAM 3001African American History I4
AFAM 3002African American History II4
AFAM 3030African American Women4
AFAM 3037Being and Becoming Black in the Atlantic World4
AFAM 3112The Sixties4
AFAM 3134From Rock-N-Roll to Hip-Hop4
AFAM 3140Contemporary Africa4
AFAM 3148History of South Africa4
AFAM 3150Caribbean Peoples and Culture4
AFAM 4000Affirmative Action and the American Dream4
AFAM 4650Social Welfare and Society4
ARHI 4435Art of the Tudor Courts4
ECON 5105Topics in Economic History3
ENGL 4005The Medieval Traveler4
ENGL 4137Hysteria, Sexuality, and the Unconscious4
HIST 4048Israel: History, Society, Politics and Culture4
HIST 4137Hysteria, Sexuality, and the Unconscious4
HIST 4905Seminar: History of Food4
IDIS 3071Baseball: The American Game4
INST 3859Post-1945: A Global History4
LALS 1400Understanding Historical Change: Latin America3
LALS 2005American Pluralism4
LALS 3950Latino History4
LALS 3951Popular Education and Social Change in the Americas4
LALS 3955Slavery Freedom/Atlantic World4
LALS 3967Modern Central America4
LALS 3968Mexico4
LATN 3045Livy4
MLAL 3035From Rust Belt to Green Belt: Germany's Ruhr Area4
MVST 3210King, Court, and Crusade: Writing Knightly Life in the High Middle Ages4
MVST 3501Between Conquest and Convivencia: The Spanish Kingdoms of the Middle Ages4
MVST 3700Medicine, Magic, and Miracles: Sickness and Health in the Early Middle Ages4
MVST 4005The Medieval Traveler4
MVST 4008Medieval Autobiographies4
MVST 4040Exploring Medieval New York4
MVST 4654Medieval London0-4
MVST 4998Study Tour: Medieval Spain4
MVST 5080Interdisciplinary London: Medieval Manuscripts, Sources, Methods4
URST 5030American Suburb: Rise and Fall3
WGSS 3002Feminist and Women's Studies4
WGSS 3416European Women 1800-Present4