Theatre and Visual Arts

Theatre

The Fordham Theatre Program trains emerging artists to develop their process through mentored exploration in performance, directing, design and production, and playwriting. The best way to learn is by doing, so our experiential curriculum includes 20 studio and four mainstage productions a year. It encompasses classical and experimental work, and is taught by a faculty with diverse aesthetics. Artistic freedom is crucial, so we give students agency; our studio season is created and run completely by students. Process is primary; a result is only a point in time in a continuous process. Collaboration is the keystone of the art of theatre; therefore, the first course for all our theatre majors is a year long class in collaboration. Merging the professional world with our training means that we coproduce on our MainStage with leading New York City theatre companies. Graduates of the Fordham Theatre Program are skilled, flexible, and empowered to meet the demands of our dynamic, evolving field. Ignite your vision. Begin your practice.

Visual Arts

The study of visual arts provides students with technical knowledge and skills as well as a critical and historical understanding of the field. The visual arts at Fordham are open to all students and are taught within the context of a liberal arts education. Students are given a knowledge base particularly suitable to today’s visually oriented world and job market. Classes are small, with considerable one-on-one contact with the instructor. Critique is emphasized in all classes, and students are given the resources to develop and take full advantage of their creativity. Engagement in New York City’s culture, museum and gallery tours, studio visits, and visiting artist lectures are an integral part of each concentration’s curriculum. In addition, students are encouraged to explore on their own and to take advantage of all that New York City has to offer as the arts capital of the country. There is an opportunity for senior thesis projects, study abroad, internships, and tutorials in each area of concentration.

Architecture and Theatre Design

To prepare students for careers in construction and theatre industries, major students in Visual Arts (Architecture) and Theatre (Design and Production) share drawing and 3-D design foundation courses, and are encouraged to sample a wide range of specialized upper-level offerings across the full breadth of the design disciplines. Advisement is especially crucial in these programs, so that the students needs and capabilities are best matched by course selections and sequences both in these majors and in the core.

Pre-Architecture Program

Fordham’s pre-architecture program is designed to prepare students for professional training in architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, historic preservation, urban and regional planning, and urban design. Most graduate schools do not specify a particular major for admission, but a concentration in architecture within a visual arts major is generally recognized as an appropriate and useful preparation for all the environmental design professions. At Lincoln Center, architecture students share foundation and elective courses with the theatre design students. At Rose Hill, certain minor programs may be of special interest to pre-architecture students, for example engineering physics and business administration. Pre-architecture, an introduction to the environmental design professions, is available as a visual arts major or art history major, but also as a visual arts minor in association with majors in environmental policy, urban studies, or engineering physics.

For graduate school application advice and admission requirements please refer to the Pre-Architecture section of this Bulletin. For students who plan to work immediately after graduation, this concentration will support careers in real estate, construction and community development. Students leave the program with highly sought skills in computer-aided drafting and design (CAD). 

Program Activities

Ildiko Butler and Lipani Galleries

The Center and Lipani Galleries are maintained by the faculty for professional and student art exhibitions. Gallery director: Stephan Apicella-Hitchock. Visit the Fordham University Galleries for more information.

Honors in Visual Arts

To graduate with honors, a visual arts student must complete and exhibit a senior thesis project. Majors wishing to have a senior exhibition must submit an application to Junior Review in the spring of their junior year. After Junior Review, students approved for a senior exhibition will work with an adviser and will be admitted to VART 4600 SENIOR SEMINAR: STUDIO ART in the fall of their final year. Students who do not qualify for admission to Senior Seminar may, with instructor and departmental approval, still complete a senior thesis and/or a portfolio.

Visual Arts Awards

Up to three Ildiko Butler Travel Awards are given annually for independent research in the medium of photography. A travel award and a visual arts award are given in honor of Susan Lipani. The travel awards are offered to juniors for summer study abroad prior to senior year. A portfolio award in honor of James Storey is offered to a senior whose work over her or his years at Fordham has shown evidence of exemplary talent and potential.

Junior Review

In the spring of their junior year, visual arts majors wishing to do a seminar thesis will submit a portfolio of their work for faculty review. The purpose of this review is to determine admission to the VART 4600 SENIOR SEMINAR: STUDIO ART. A subsequent review in the following fall will determine if a student will receive a senior exhibition.

For more information

Visit the Theatre program web page

Visit the Visual Arts department web page

Visit the Pre-Architecture Program web page

The Department of Theatre and Visual Arts contributes VART 1101 URBANISM and THEA 1100 INVITATION TO THEATRE as courses to fulfill the fine arts requirement. VART 4300 REPRESENTATION IN ART is recommended for visual arts majors to satisfy their Values Seminar/EP4 requirement, but it is not required. It does not count as an elective toward the visual arts major.

Theatre courses

THEA 1100. INVITATION TO THEATRE. (3 Credits)

This course guides the student on an experiential tour of mounting a theatrical production. The role of the playwright is defined and each student will write a short scene. The function of the director is demonstrated by analyzing multiple stagings of the same text; each student will direct a scene. The actor is a primary element of theatre; each student will act a scene. We will explore the role of the designer who creates the physical world of the play; each student will conceive a design. Interwoven with the production elements will be a mini-survey of theatre history focusing on the Greek, the Elizabethan, the contemporary and the global theatre. Students will attend live performances of a plays.

Attributes: FACC, FRFA.

THEA 1151. DRAWING: ARCHITECTURE AND STAGE. (4 Credits)

Work in pencil, ink, charcoal, and other graphic media with an emphasis on proportion, scale, contrast, drawing the human figure in space, and movement sequences. Work with computer drawing tools for conceptual diagramming, linear perspective and storyboarding. Design projects outside of class times will be required. This course is intended for theatre/design and visual arts/architecture students. Satisfies foundation drawing requirement in the visual arts major core. Open to non-majors. Satisfies prerequisite for Drawing II.

Attributes: FASH, VART.

THEA 1152. DRAWING: ARCHITECTURE AND STAGE II. (2 Credits)

The continuation of Drawing: Architecture and Stage I.

Attributes: FASH, VART.

THEA 1210. INTRODUCTION TO FASHION DESIGN. (3 Credits)

This course explores the art and the business of fashion design by tracing its history in Europe and America; understanding the contribution of fibers to the medium; communicating design details through several modes of drawing; and investigating the market factors that shape contemporary fashion industry around the globe.

Attribute: FASH.

THEA 1220. FASHION TECHNIQUES. (3 Credits)

An overview of Fashion design techniques including research, fabric selection, sewing and basic pattern-making. From studying techniques used by contemporary and historical designers, this course will work through the basic skills necessary for students to create their own designs.

THEA 2001. THEATRE HISTORY I: MYTHOS. (4 Credits)

This semester begins with an examination of ancient performance traditions and the pivotal work of the ancient Greeks in the context of ancient cosmologies and in light of the function of the mythic imagination. It continues with an exploration of the centrality of mythos to the development of major theatrical movements in the Western Theatre from Medieval, through Renaissance and Elizabethan, and Neoclassicism.

Attribute: ALC.

THEA 2002. THEATRE HISTORY II: MODERNITY. (4 Credits)

This semester explores the umbilical connection between the volatile sweep of modernity and the development of protomodernist and modernist theatre. Advances in science and industry, expanded universes without and within, and tectonic socio-political changes all informed the dynamic expansion of form and function of the theatre. The course includes examination of the major schools of Western Modernism, notable works by artists in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, as well as an exploration of the profound influences of Non-Western forms and artists upon those schools.

Attribute: ALC.

THEA 2003. THEATRE HISTORY III: POSTMODERNISM AND THE PRESENT. (4 Credits)

This semester focuses primarily, though not exclusively, on contemporary U.S. theatre and performance, with an emphasis on core ideas of postmodernity and their centrality to the development of the wide range of artists, companies and forms that have emerged since the mid-20th Century. The impact of theatre engaging questions of cultural pluralism, sovereignty, race, class, gender and sexual orientation is considered in light of concurrent historical events. Particular attention is given to the rich complexities of methodology, representation and community as theatre, at the top of the 21st Century, continues its evolution.

Attribute: ALC.

THEA 2010. ACTING I. (4 Credits)

The course aims to strip away preconceived notions of acting, forge a visceral understanding of the unity of body and voice, demonstrate that expanding the imagination is the highest skill of the craft, and explore the nature of transformation; theatre is an art of radical change. Required Vocal Lab.

THEA 2015. ACTING FOR NON-MAJORS. (4 Credits)

Introductory acting technique for non-theatre performance majors. Emphasis on developing and freeing the voice, body, imagination, and emotions. Activities of the course include vocal and body warm-ups, theatre games and exercises, improvisation, and scene work.

THEA 2045. INTRODUCTION TO DIRECTING. (4 Credits)

This class introduces students to some of the basic tools of theatre directing by having them craft several short pieces that explore ways of using space, movement, gesture, light, sound, objects and spoken words to communicate a story to an audience. Open to non-majors.

THEA 2070. THEATRE DESIGN. (4 Credits)

Create a world for a play complete and true unto itself by thoroughly researching the text and characters through both visual and emotional research. Learn to react viscerally and instinctively to the text and then articulate that reaction through various forms used in the professional theatre: models, costume sketches, lighting sketches, sound landscapes, projection, drawings and research. This course will serve to instill a thorough process that can be utilized for the remainder of one’s theatrical career and will guarantee that a production will result whether you’re a playwright, director, designer or any theatre artist. No prerequisite. Open to non-majors.

THEA 2080. COLLABORATION I. (4 Credits)

First semester of a full year course for all theatre majors. The class introduces students to the areas of acting, directing, playwriting, design, and stage management, with focus on the art of collaboration.

THEA 2090. COLLABORATION II. (4 Credits)

Second semester of a full year course for all theatre majors. The class introduces students to the areas of acting, directing, playwriting, design, and stage management, with a focus on the art of collaboration.

THEA 2210. STAGE MAKEUP AND HAIR I. (3 Credits)

THEA 2212. STAGE MAKEUP AND HAIR II. (3 Credits)

THEA 2230. COSTUME DESIGN. (3 Credits)

Study of the principles involved in the design of costumes for the stage with an emphasis on research, the development of drawing and painting skills, and the investigation of character.

THEA 2235. COSTUME DESIGN II. (3 Credits)

Continuation of Costume Design.

Prerequisite: THEA 2230.

THEA 2511. THEATER AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN LATIN AMERICA. (4 Credits)

The history of Latin America has been a history of struggle for liberation from structures of colonialism and oppression. From this struggle new social values and artistic theories have emerged and served as paradigms for the worldwide movement toward greater humanization and social justice. This course is meant to examine the root causes of some of the social dynamics present in Latin America today, explore how these dynamics appear in performance practice unique to this social milieu, and experience some of the body of literature generated by Latin American artists engaged in this process.

THEA 2700. ACTING II. (4 Credits)

Introduction to scene study for the actor using the Stanislavsky approach. Work on scenes chosen from realistic plays. Students will study character development by exploring psychological objectives and how they are embodied in physical actions.

THEA 2750. PERFORMING ITALIAN. (4 Credits)

Students will advance their fluency in Italian by learning to act in Italian in summer residence in Rome. Jointly taught by a Professor of Italian and a Professor of Acting, the students will explore structure and grammar, and expand their vocabulary by reading, writing and speaking in a full-immersion mode as they learn how to inhabit a character using a play by Nobel-prize winning author Dario Fo. Acting is an exciting way to learn a language because one’s need to master the language is motivated by the desire to inhabit the imaginary circumstances created by great playwrights. The project will be enhanced by trips to Roman theatres, and the opera at The Baths of Caracalla.

Attributes: ITAL, MLL.

THEA 2805. STAGE MANAGEMENT I. (3 Credits)

THEA 2815. STAGE MANAGEMENT II. (3 Credits)

THEA 2900. THEATRE MANAGEMENT. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the managerial aspects of American theatre. Topics include: history of theatrical production and management in America, defining and understanding the differences between commercial and nonprofit theatre, basic management functions, types of theatre managers, forming a production company, understanding the actors’ unions and contracts, organizing a nonprofit theatre company, artistic policy choices, staffing, casting, theatrical tours, the role of the producer and presenter, budget planning, box office, fundraising, marketing and audience development, the publicity campaign, and advertising. The class is comprised of lecture, discussion and guest speakers from the New York City Theatre community.

THEA 2999. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (2 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervisio from a faculty member.

THEA 3000. ACTING III. (4 Credits)

Continuation of intensive scene study based on the Stanislavsky system. Techniques of scene analysis, scoring and appropriate rehearsal procedures will be covered. Performance majors only.

THEA 3011. TEXT ANALYSIS. (4 Credits)

Through careful, intensive reading of a variety of plays with different dramatic structures and aesthetics, students begin to see that options exist for interpreting a script. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

THEA 3017. SONG AS SCENE. (4 Credits)

Learn how to effectively present musical material by exploring the text and combining it with sure vocal technique. An accompanist is present at each class, and different types of songs will be explored – ballad, up-tempo, comic/character, and pop/rock. Acting exercises will be used to fully flesh out the songs. Seamless transitions from scene to song to scene will be examined. The notion of singing as simply acting on pitch will be stressed. Open to non-majors and minors. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

THEA 3022. SONG AS SCENE II. (4 Credits)

Continuation of SONG AS SCENE (Pre-Req: THEA 3017).

THEA 3030. ACTOR'S VOCAL TECHNIQUE I. (2 Credits)

Vocal exercises for the actor to help release the voice, develop larger breathing capacity, and agility in articulation. Work on developing physical ease while exploring varieties of vocal projection through speech and song, and text. (Every fall)

THEA 3040. ACTOR'S VOCAL TECHNIQUE II. (2 Credits)

Advanced exploration of the voice.

THEA 3050. MOVEMENT FOR THE ACTOR I. (2 Credits)

This course will include: 1) Vigorous physical training to develop physical stamina along with Yoga breath-work and stretches to increase flexibility, agility, focus and concentration; 2) Butoh-influenced image work to develop body awareness and sensitivity as well as stimulate movement by images exercised by one's imagination; 3) Creating characters by exploring the center, weight, rhythm, colors and temperament of the character; 4) Individual and group improvisational exercises to learn to trust and act upon organic impulses.

THEA 3060. MOVEMENT FOR THE ACTOR II. (2 Credits)

Continuation of Movement I. This course will include: 1) Continuation from Movement I of developing physical stamina and intensifying breath and Yoga work; 2) Continuation of Movement I based on Butoh-influenced image work; 3) Deeper exploration of character work and also taking the character out of the naturalistic realm to invite another layer of understanding on a more unconscious level; 4) Exploring abstract movement; 5) Creating group and solo pieces.

THEA 3066. MUSICAL THEATRE INTENSIVE. (4 Credits)

A five-week summer intensive that offers a varied schedule of four classes: Musical Theatre workshop, Vocal techniques, Dance for Musical theatre,and Acting. Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., students will work in the classroom as a compnay. The early afternoon and evenings will include field trips, guest seminars, and attendance at Broadway, off-Broadway, and off-off Broadway plays and musicals. Find the program application online at fordham.edu/summer. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

THEA 3081. ADVANCED MOVEMENT III. (3 Credits)

Emphasis on Buoth inspired image movement works, utilizing imagination, concentration, centering and body expression. Development of solo work. Students also write/choreograph/direct for a larger ensemble. The class will culminate in a public showing of the class work.

THEA 3090. STAGE COMBAT. (3 Credits)

Students will become familiar with the concepts, techniques, and safety practices of stage combat. Each class begins with a warm-up/stretch and then moves into strengthening and isolation work. Each class ends with work on original, ongoing choreography.

THEA 3100. ACTING IV. (4 Credits)

This is a scene study course with an emphasis on integrating Stanislavsky technique with non-linear, non-realistic texts. The actors will work with playwrights outside the canon of mainstream realism such as Samuel Beckett, Gertrude Stein, Naomi Wallace, Erik Ehn, Heiner Müller, Adrienne Kennedy, Richard Foreman, Ruth Margraff, Caryl Churchill, Lisa D’Amour, Daniel Alexander Jones, and Suzan-Lori Parks. Work with heightened movement and voice extends the actors’ vocabulary.

THEA 3205. FROM PAGE TO STAGE. (4 Credits)

Page to Stage is an introductory directing class focused on translating a dramatic text into theatrical performance. The class is required for directing majors and open to theatre majors in other tracks. Using a single focal text, students will work individually and in teams on class exercises and homework assignments that explore key aspects of the director’s craft when working on a playscript, including text analysis, research, collaborating with designers and actors, staging, and the rehearsal process. The semester culminates in a final evening presentation of staged scenes from the model play. Prerequisite: THEA 3011: Text Analysis, except with special permission.

THEA 3253. MOLIERE: FROM PAGE TO STAGE. (4 Credits)

This course taught in French explores French Theatre and offers the opportunity to engage in the creative process from page to stage. Students will have the opportunity to participate in different capacities, such as performers, designers, dramaturgs, and stage managers. This course emphasizes the importance of working collaboratively. Students enrolled in the French and Theatre Programs will share their strengths and learn from each other. We will combine reading, theory, and analysis of a single play by Molière, and put what we learn into practice in rehearsal. The semester will end with a public performance.

Attribute: ALC.

THEA 3362. LIGHTING DESIGN. (3 Credits)

Investigates how lighting design completes the visual world. We explore how light can transform the theatrical space. Lighting is the key element to the forward movement of a theatrical production as it creates transitions between scenes and defines time and place as the story is told. We will also examine alternative functions and use of light within photography and architecture. Open to non-majors.

THEA 3374. LIGHTING DESIGN II. (3 Credits)

Continuation of THEA 3362.

THEA 3420. SOUND DESIGN I. (3 Credits)

From the physics of sound waves to the finesse of cueing, Sound Design covers the foundations of the field. The class will touch on topics in acoustics, system design, vocal reinforcement, sound effects, playback and audio development software, and the role of sound design in the rehearsal and tech process. The goal is to develop the conceptual rigor and practical technique to support a small production with an integral audio component.

THEA 3435. SOUND DESIGN II. (3 Credits)

Continuation of Sound Design. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: THEA 3430.

THEA 3455. PROJECTION DESIGN I. (3 Credits)

THEA 3460. PROJECTION DESIGN II. (3 Credits)

THEA 3564. FRENCH THEATRE AND PERFORMANCE (TAUGHT IN FRENCH). (4 Credits)

This course explores Contemporary French Theatre and offers the opportunity to engage in the creative process from page to rehearsal to a full public performance at the end of the semester. It teaches students how to express themselves more effectively in French. It develops the ability to communicate thoughts and feelings to others. We will combine acting, history, reading, theory and analysis of major modern playwrights. Invited guests from the French and bi-cultural theatre community in New York City will share their experiences with students, and provide opportunities for students to practice their new skills and learn more about. Taught in French.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

THEA 3600. MASTER CLASS IN DESIGN. (4 Credits)

This course is taught by a designer who is illuminary in the field and will explore theory, practice and career issues for designers.

THEA 3700. PLAYWRITING. (4 Credits)

This playwriting workshop is the cornerstone of the playwriting program. It intentionally welcomes writers of many levels of experience to one dynamic space. The goals of the workshop are to teach basic craft and create an environment that will guide the writers' explanation of their individual voices. We concentrate on four major issues: storytelling, character, structure, and language.

Attribute: ENGL.

THEA 3750. PLAYS AND SCREENPLAYS. (3 Credits)

The purpose of the five week project is to write a one-act play and a short screen play, and to explore the relation between the two forms. Elements of craft will be introducted to provide a vocabulary and a scaffolding. Contemporary plays and screenplays will be used as models.

THEA 3800. INTERNSHIP. (2-3 Credits)

Supervised placement for students interested in work experience.

THEA 3900. CUEING AND NARRATIVE. (3 Credits)

This course will incorporate the study of both Lighting and Sound Design to explore storytelling through Theatrical Design choices.

THEA 3910. PERIOD AND STYLE. (3 Credits)

This course will incorporate the study of both Scenic and Costume design to explore storytelling through theatrical design choices.

THEA 3985. SET DESIGN I. (3 Credits)

Investigates how the design of an environment creates the world of a play while learning how to break down a text, we explore character development as well as an emotional response to the play so that research can be done. Through models and sketches, students learn their process and how to articulate their ideas.

THEA 3987. SET DESIGN II. (3 Credits)

Continuation of Set Design I.

THEA 3999. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (3 Credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

THEA 4000. CREATING A CHARACTER. (4 Credits)

Advanced scene study employing exercises and exploration specifically designed to give the actor a technique with which to develop a distinct characterization. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: THEA 3100.

THEA 4001. CREATING A CHARACTER II. (4 Credits)

Continuation of creating character THEA 4000.

Prerequisite: THEA 3100.

THEA 4025. FLYING SOLO. (4 Credits)

This will be an intensive, practical course for students interested in creating a short solo performance piece. Creative work will be accompanied by in-depth documented research into the student's particular area of interest. In addition to their creative work, each student will be responsible for a substantive research project on a performance artist, assigned to them by the instructor.

THEA 4045. YOUNG, GIFTED, AND BLACK. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary course will explore themes of political, social, and personal transgression and transformation in the cultural tradition of Black American Theatre and performance from the Harlem Renaissance, through the Black Arts Movement to the present. The interrelationship of text, music, and movement will be highlighted to underscore significant aesthetic innovations and also to allow for a discussion of plays, playwrights, and performers in the fullest possible context.

Attribute: PLUR.

THEA 4100. ACTING SHAKESPEARE. (4 Credits)

An investigation of the various historical and contemporary techniques of acting Elizabethan verse through close textual analysis and in-class performance of scenes from Shakespeare's plays. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

THEA 4120. ACTING SHAKESPEARE II. (4 Credits)

Advanced Scene and text work in Shakespeare. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

THEA 4143. SHAKESPEARE: TEXT AND PERFORMANCE. (4 Credits)

This course will study Shakespeare's plays first as texts and then as performance, focusing on the literary/historical aspect of a play, and then the same play as a theatrical script for realization in a performance setting. Through close readings from these widely disparate points of view, we will try to grasp how the theater acts to engage audiences and create meanings, and how time and culture are expressed in both text and performance. We'll investigate questions about adaptation, authorship, the status of "classic" texts and their variant forms, the transition from manuscript, book and stage to film and digitally inflected forms of media. The final project can be an essay, the student's short video of a Shakespeare excerpt, or a brief performance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

THEA 4148. MEDIEVAL DRAMA. (4 Credits)

Divine mysteries and scurrilous scatology, Everyman's workaday struggles and a king's political quandaries, lavish one-night courtly entertainments and massive Biblical plays performed by an entire community: the drama of the English late Middle Ages (roughly 1350-1500) was resourceful, local, non-professional, and endlessly inventive. In this course, we study medieval English drama along three axes: as literary texts full of humor, pathos, and meaning; as evidence for historical performance practice and theater history; and as scripts brimming with possibility for performance. Combining intensive reading of medieval play texts with key works by important theater practitioners, we examine medieval drama on its own terms and ask what it means to read and perform these works in the 21st century. To help answer this question, students collaboratively design, direct, and stage a medieval dramatic work of their choosing as a final project. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENGL, ICC, MVST.

THEA 4250. ACTING FOR THE CAMERA. (4 Credits)

Introduces the actor to the techniques of acting for the mediums of television and film, including issues of scale, angle, and material. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: THEA 3100.

THEA 4260. ACTING FOR THE CAMERA II. (4 Credits)

A continuation of Acting for the Camera I. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: THEA 4250.

THEA 4301. PERFORMANCE AND ART. (3 Credits)

This acting course for dancers will work in developing original scenes based on poetry, sculpture, paintings and scene study. Emphasis on work with physical actions and creating a physical and psychological score to illuminate actor-created work. Focus on imagination, writing and performance skills. For Alvin Ailey BFA majors.

THEA 4302. RUSSIAN THEATRE WORKSHOP. (2 Credits)

This course conducted in Moscow includes work in acting, movement, dance, voice, Russian theatre history, and a study of the current Russian theatre. It is taught by the faculty of the Moscow Art Theatre School.

THEA 4305. CLOWN AND IMPROVISATION. (4 Credits)

Examining different comedic traditions, students will study techniques from commedia dell'arte, clown and improvisation. Drawing on the teachings of contemporary artists such as Keith Johnstone and Phillippe Gaulier, the course will demonstrate and sharpen comedic skills by creating a sense of continuity between traditional and contemporary comedy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

THEA 4400. SENIOR AUDITION I. (2 Credits)

Prepares students to audition for professional theatre companies, agents, casting directors, and graduate schools. Students develop two audition pieces (one classical/one contemporary) and also learn to prepare cold readings. Guidance also provided in the preparation of pictures and professional resumes. Performance majors only. (fall, senior year)

THEA 4410. SENIOR AUDITION II. (2 Credits)

Preparation of the Senior Showcase, in which students present scenes, monologues, and songs for producers, agents, and casting directors. Performance majors only.

THEA 4425. DESIGN SHOWCASE. (2 Credits)

This course focuses on presenting and discussing students' work as a design or manager while developing their understanding of the business of theatre and their potential role in it. We look at portfolios, resumes, and CVs, cover letters, and production books and talk with establised professionals and recent graduates about the best strategies for entering the New York and regional theatre communities. Design and Production students only, required for participation in the annual Design Showcase.

Prerequisite: THEA 3205.

THEA 4500. THEATRE, CREATIVITY, AND VALUES. (4 Credits)

This Senior Values Seminar is designed to give students an opportunity to examine and reflect upon creativity and the theatre. How does creativity mark the distinctness of the human person? How does human creativity point to the presence and action of God? What purpose does the theatre serve for society? Emphasis is placed on personal integration of philosophical principles and personal technique and craft. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: EP4.

THEA 4501. DIRECTING PRODUCTION WORKSHOP. (3 Credits)

An advance production class that shepherds students through the process of producing a fully-staged production for public performance.

THEA 4505. DESIGN PRODUCTION WORKSHOP. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to run with Directing Workshop to merge design and directing students in practical production experiences. In the process, students will hone their ability to analyze text, shape a design idea, communicate with artistic collaborators, create working drawings and models, plan a production schedule, and create and manage a budget. The focus is play production and attending and discussing university and professional productions.

THEA 4520. DIRECTING PRODUCTION WORKSHOP II. (3 Credits)

An advanced production class that shepherds students through the process of producing a fully-staged production for public performance.

THEA 4530. DIRECTING PRODUCTION WORKSHOP III. (3 Credits)

An advanced production class that shepherds students through the process of producing a fully-staged production for public performance.

THEA 4800. INTERNSHIP. (4 Credits)

Supervised placement for students who are interested in work experience. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

THEA 4999. TUTORIAL: THEATRE AND DRAMA. (1-4 Credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

Visual arts courses

VART 1055. FIGURE DRAWING I. (4 Credits)

The study of the figure through direct observation: various techniques of rendering and diverse media will be explored. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 1101. URBANISM. (3 Credits)

A historical introduction to the issues, principles and processes of urban design in western societies. Lectures will trace the evolution of selected cities (from ancient Athens to contemporary Los Angeles) taking into consideration the design decisions that have affected our built environment and urban culture. Field Trips. (Satisfies Fine Arts core requirement).

Attributes: FACC, FRFA, INST, URST.

VART 1124. PHOTOGRAPHY I. (4 Credits)

Instruction is offered in basic camera and darkroom techniques of black-and-white photography. Class will also include critiques of students' work and discussions of aesthetic questions pertaining to photography. Students should have adjustable cameras. Additional darkroom hours required. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COMM.

VART 1128. INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY. (4 Credits)

This class is an introduction to the fundamentals of digital photography. Assignments throughout the semester encourage students to explore some of the technical and aesthetic concerns of the medium. Photoshop is used as the primary editing tool. A 3.2 or higher megapixel camera is required. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: NMDD.

VART 1135. VISUAL THINKING I. (4 Credits)

A foundation course in visual communication. The course will cover the following topics: visual perception, composition, light and color, drawing perspective, words and images, graphic design, photography and photo montage. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COMM, NMDD.

VART 1136. VISUAL THINKING: PERSPECTIVES, PAINTING, AND DRAWING. (4 Credits)

An introductory course in visual perception with an emphasis on formal, historical and theoretical concerns in painting and drawing. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: FCLC.

VART 1150. DRAWING I. (4 Credits)

Work in pencil, ink, charcoal, and other graphic media designed to involve students in various approaches and attitudes toward representation and expression in drawing. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 1160. ARCHITECTURAL LANGUAGE. (4 Credits)

(Formerly VART 2060 - Architectural Design I.) Introducing the basic language of 3D form and space making, this studio course involves students in the process of architectural vision, critique, analysis and creation. Emphasizing short, elementary in-class assignments, students learn to use the same tools --sketching, diagramming, scale model making, and computer modeling and animation-- used by design professionals to shape our world. Lab fee. All are welcome. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: URST.

VART 1161. FORM AND SPACE. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 1162. DRAWING, MANUAL & COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN/DRAFTING FOR ARCHITECTURE, STAGE, AND INTERIORS. (3 Credits)

Work in pencil, CAD (Computer Aided Drafting), and other media with emphasis on proportion, scale, highlight, shade, and shadow. Computer drawing tools are used for conceptual diagramming, stage blocking & choreography, linear & isometric perspective, and story boarding. Using the tools of sketching, orthographic drafting, and computer modeling we will explore scenic design and the dramatization of architectural space. This course is intended for theatre/design and visual arts/architecture students, but is open to all.

VART 1180. PAINTING I. (4 Credits)

An introductory course in painting, emphasizing basic formal and technical concerns. Acrylic paints will be used. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 1257. AVANT-GARDE FILM/VIDEO. (4 Credits)

This studio course will explore the practice of current avant-garde film and video from a visual arts perspective. Various artists' strategies for creating challenging work will be considered, including the use of abstraction, appropriated imagery, autobiographical detail, disjunctive sound image relationships and other aesthetic choices. The course will include field trips to view current experimental films and videos at museums, film festivals and art galleries. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 1265. FILM/VIDEO I. (4 Credits)

An introduction to film/video production techniques used to make short projects. Students will study composition, lighting, and editing in creating their own Super 8 mm film and digital video work. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COMM, FITV, NMDD.

VART 1800. INTERNSHIP. (1 Credit)

VART 1999. TUTORIAL. (1 Credit)

In this student-initiated program, the student may earn one additional credit by connecting a service experience to a course with the approval of the professor and the service-learning director.

VART 2003. GRAPHIC DESIGN & DIGITAL TOOLS. (4 Credits)

In this course the student will learn the basic tools and operations of several different graphics programs. Photoshop, Illustrator, and QuarkXpress will be explained through demonstrations, tutorials, and weekly assignments. The focus will be on a conceptual and analytical approach to design vocabulary and problem solving. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COMM, NMDD.

VART 2004. DESIGN INTRODUCTION. (3 Credits)

This course introduces the student to basic language and practice of Graphic Design. Through demonstrations and hands on assignments students will learn the essential skills needed in producing elegant design solutions and gain a proficiency in the use of the industry design programs, Adobe Suites.

VART 2050. DESIGNING THE CITY. (4 Credits)

A hands-on course in the theory and practice of urban design, showing how a mixture of idealism and realism contributes to the design of more "live-able" cities. Theoretical models ( e.g., modernism, garden cities, suburban development urban renewal, and new urbanism) are presented in slide lectures. Students will design urban neighborhoods by computer modeling and animation. A creative and practical course in urban design, focusing on the relationship between people and the built environment. Although urban design is a visual discipline, its roots and purposes are interdisciplinary, combining high ideals with hard realism. Readings, walking tours, and research examine the historical roots of current urban design problems and practices. Seminar discussions highlight the goals: regenerative neighborhoods and lively public places. Smart growth, sustainable communities, and new urbanism are contrasted with suburban sprawl and auto-centered development. Students use Mac-based CAD software to visualize great new public places in New York--practicing the imaginative are of the possible. Visits during office hours are recommended. Field trips and lab fee are required. Recommended to Urban and Environmental Studies students, but open to all. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENST, ENVS, URST.

VART 2055. ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN. (4 Credits)

This introductory course explores the physical relationship between mankind and nature. Slide presentations, field trips and readings will outline the histories and forms of settlement patterns, landscapes and gardens, and our increasing interest in sustainable development, renewable energy and conservation. Sketching, design and model-building in landscape settings. Intended for design, history and science students. Required field trips and lab fee. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENST, ENVS, URST.

VART 2065. INTERIOR AND ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: THEA, URST.

VART 2070. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I. (4 Credits)

A design studio course, synthesizing contextual, artistic, environmental and functional requirements in the design of public spaces, landscapes, furnishings, and buildings. A relatively simple term project, set in a landscape environment, is prefaced by exercises in analysis, skill building, theory, critique and fabrication. (Formerly VART 2060/3070 Architectural Design). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: THEA, URST.

VART 2085. SUSTAINABLE NEW YORK. (3 Credits)

An intensive summer workshop in big city "green" design. Intended for majors in visual arts, environmental studies, and/or urban studies, this course might interest anyone concerned about New York City's future in an era of rising energy costs and environmental risk. Walking tours; field trips; reading program and discussion; visits to buildings, parks, and contruction sites; illustrated presentations; guest speakers from state and city agencies, NGOs, nonprofits, and private sector innovators. At least one day each week will be based at Solar One, located on the East River at 23rd Street, or the Science Barge in the Hudson River at 44th Street. By term's end, each student will present an independent research or design project.

Attributes: ENST, ENVS, URST.

VART 2121. ABSTRACTION. (4 Credits)

We think abstractly and routinely navigate the complex abstract structures of our world. Abstractart- themajor art form of the last century-has tried in many different ways to come to grips with this situation. This course rather than treating abstraction as a style considers it as a way of thinking visually as astructure for creativity and expression. Working across material disciplines, the course will employ painting, drawing, three dimensional Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 2130. PAINTING II. (4 Credits)

Intermediate instruction is offered in painting. Emphasis will be placed on developing individual approaches to the solving of creative problems within the context of 20th-century historical and critical concerns. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisites: VART 1150 or VART 1180.

VART 2140. COLLAGE AND MIXED MEDIA. (4 Credits)

A course emphasizing the formal, material and thematic exploration inherent in collage and mixed media techniques. Different visual disciplines and approaches will be combined to produce two- and three-dimensional work. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 2150. DRAWING II. (4 Credits)

A workshop in various techniques and media. Field trips to museums and galleries. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 2185. PHOTOGRAPHY II. (4 Credits)

Students will initiate specific photographic projects, which they will pursue throughout the semester, while they consider work of certain 20th-century masters of photography. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: VART 1124.

VART 2196. LARGE-FORMAT PHOTOGRAPHY. (4 Credits)

Large format-view camera technique, which produces large negatives and permits extraordinary image control, will be taught along with medium photography in this intermediate level class. Students will work on short, specific technical assignments as well as a long-term individual project. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 2265. FILM/VIDEO II. (4 Credits)

Advanced film/video production techniques will be explored as students complete several projects over the course of the semester. Students will shoot 16mm film and video and learn sound design and post-production digital effects. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COMM, FITV, NMDD.

Prerequisite: VART 1265.

VART 2400. FUNDAMENTALS OF WEBSITE DESIGN. (4 Credits)

This class will introduce the key concepts in designing and building websites from an aesthetic and technical perspective. Through lecture, critical analysis and hands-on assignments students will learn how to design and build a creative and effective website. The focus of the class will be on presenting and exploring the fundamental industry standard programming language and website practice: HTML, CSS, Navigational Structures, interactivity, and Information Architecture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: NMDD.

Prerequisite: VART 2003.

VART 2500. TYPOGRAPHY AND DESIGN. (4 Credits)

Structured as a lab course, the fundamental perception, concept and method of graphic design will be introduced through a series of set projects and exercises. We will explore how graphic design can engage, inform and challenge the viewer as well as how the design of visual communication is influenced by social, political and cultural issues. Through lectures, slide presentations, assignments and class discussions, we will examine the formal aspects of typography, the relationship between type and image, and the impact of new technologies on design practices today will be examined. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: NMDD.

VART 2537. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN PHOTOGRAPHY. (4 Credits)

This course is a practical introduction to contemporary critical issues in photography. Students will generate a series of film based or digital projects informed by class readings and gallery visits. Class sessions will be comprised of regular critiques and discussions of theoretical readings. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 2545. PROJECTS AND CONCEPTS. (4 Credits)

A multi-media studio course that emphasizes creative solutions to a varied series of visual problems. The student will be able to use painting, drawing , collage, photography, sculpture, and video, as well as installation and performance to make artworks that “think out of the box”. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 2550. DESIGNING BOOKS, "ZINES" AND CHAPBKS. (4 Credits)

All students with an interest in self-publishing are welcome to the class. The focus will be on the design, layout, and production of a publication from cover to the copyright page. You will learn through weekly assignments and readings about design, type, paper, and binding techniques. We will look at and critique the numerous "indie" publications available and the final product will be a self-published book, "zine," or chapterbook. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COMM, NMDD.

Prerequisite: VART 2003.

VART 2600. GRAPHIC DESIGN CONCEPTS. (4 Credits)

In this class the focus will be on both the practical and creative aspects of the design process. Assignments will include magazine, book and brochure designs. Social responsibility in the context of a design's ability to educate, inform and propagandize, and deceive will also be examined. Emphasis will be placed on the articulation of ideas, process, writing skills and preparation of files for output as well as presentation, craftsmanship and typography. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: NMDD.

Prerequisite: VART 2003.

VART 2700. LOGOS, BRANDING, AND PRESENTATION. (4 Credits)

This advanced level class will focus on the development, design and presentation of an organizational product identity. The assignment will include research, a written proposal and a final presentation of a design for a logo, product, brochure and a promotional material. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: NMDD.

Prerequisite: VART 2003.

VART 2999. TUTORIAL. (2 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

VART 3001. DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY: JAPAN. (4 Credits)

This intensive class is designed as a platform for intermediate and advanced level students to further develop their photographic production with an emphasis on generating documentary projects focusing on the people, culture, and architecture of Japan. The megacity of Tokyo will serve as the starting point for our investigations, with image making itineraries that will take us from the cosmopolitan ward of Shinjuku, to the center of youth culture in Shibuya; and from the cutting edge fashion districts of Harajuku, to the temples and shrines of Asakusa. Concurrent with our photographic explorations we will examine contemporary exhibitions in venues such as the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography in Ebisu, as well as view the ancient collections housed in Japan’s oldest and largest museum, the Tokyo National Museum in Ueno. Traveling by Shinkansen bullet train at 300 km/h (186mph), we will make our way south to Kyoto, the nexus of traditional Japanese culture and history with approximately two thousand temples, shrines, and gardens that we can utilize as both the catalyst and stage for our photography. The extraordinary wealth of visual stimuli we will experience in Japan over ten days will certainly inspire, as well as function as the backdrop against which to critically discuss the strategies that photographers employ in communicating their interests. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 3025. DESIGNING BOOKS. (4 Credits)

The students will learn the fundamental principles, structures, and “typographic etiquette” involved in designing a book. Projects will include designing the exterior, book jacket, and interior page layouts of three kinds of books ranging from literary to the illustrated. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: VART 2003.

VART 3026. HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY BOOKS: 1844-2004. (4 Credits)

The class will survey the history of the publication of photography books from early works published in the mid-19th century, albums with tipped-in original photographs, through the invention of off-set reproduction at the turn of the 19th century, and self-made digital books at the end of the 20th. Influential books and formats will be reviewed. The class will visit a museum collection to see examples of rare out-of-print and limited edition items, such as Alexander Gardner’s Photographic Sketchbook of the Civil War, William Bradford’s Arctic Regions, and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 3030. ART DESIGN AND POLITICS. (4 Credits)

This class will investigate the design of political art through hands-on studio projects and the consideration of historical precedents and contemporary examples, print media, public art, and events, political organizations, museums and gallery exhibitions will form a back drop for the course. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: NMDD.

VART 3055. ECOLOGY FOR DESIGNERS. (4 Credits)

An introduction to functional ecosystems, and the application of that knowledge to the re-design of the urban built environment. Energy use patterns, resource management, water cycles, productivity, food production, systems integration will be inspected, leading to the proposition of a hypothetical urban ecosystem, which may include water re-cycling, habitat restoration, bio-mimicry, renewable energy, and vertical farming. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENST, URST.

VART 3056. URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN. (4 Credits)

A creative studio/seminar course in the design of renewable technologies, mixed use urbanism, hybrid ecologies; productive systems and resilient, sustainable cities. This is a synthetic studio, combining the concerns of Urban Design, Green Architecture, and Environmental Design in complex urban spaces, buildings, and networks. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ENST.

VART 3070. URBAN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I. (4 Credits)

(Formerly VART 3080.) A creative studio/seminar course in architectural design and theory synthesizing contextual, artistic, environmental and functional requirements in the design of public spaces and buildings using models, sketches, diagrams and computer modeling. Short assignments plus a major project, normally a public building in a complex urban context. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: URST.

Prerequisites: VART 1161 or VART 1160 or VART 2050 or VART 2055.

VART 3131. ABSTRACTION II. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 3132. PROJECTS AND CONCEPTS II. (4 Credits)

An advanced multi-media studio course emphasizing creative solutions to a variety of visual and conceptual problems. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: FCLC.

VART 3134. 20TH CENTURY ART: MODERNISM AND MODERNITY. (4 Credits)

A survey of the major developments of modern art from the late 19th century until today, with an emphasis on work done before 1940. This course will undertake the larger task of understanding modernism in art as a visual response to the conditions of modernity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 3135. CONTEMPORARY ART: MODERNISM AND ITS AFTERMATH. (4 Credits)

VART 3156. PAINTING III. (4 Credits)

Individual instruction is offered with group critiques and seminar discussions. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 3186. PHOTOGRAPHY III. (4 Credits)

Continuation of studies in photography at the advanced level. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: VART 2185 (may be taken concurrently).

VART 3250. DESIGN AND THE WEB. (4 Credits)

In this class, students will learn how to design websites that maximize the mediums and limitations of technology. The class will explore the new directions websites are moving in, critically study websites that are successful both commerically and as a visual art form. The focus will be on how a website can be designed without sacrificing typography or good design. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: COMM.

Prerequisite: VART 2400.

VART 3257. SEMINAR: AVANT-GARDE FILM/VIDEO. (4 Credits)

This studio course will explore the practice of current avant-garde film and video from a visual arts perspective. Various artists’ strategies for creating challenging work will be considered, including the use of abstraction, appropriated imagery, autobiographical detail, disjunctive sound image relationships and other aesthetic choices. The course will include field trips to view current experimental films and videos at museums, film festivals and art galleries. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 3258. FILM / VIDEO INSTALLATION. (4 Credits)

Students will create their own video installations using multiple monitors and mixed sounds. Using video monitors and film loops, students will create their own moving image pieces for the gallery/museum context. We will consider historical background and how contemporary practitioners use multible screens and sound to explore unexpected terrain. Students will present their video installation work in a gallery show at the end of the semester. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: VART 1265.

VART 3261. DOCUMENTARY FILM/VIDEO PRODUCTION. (4 Credits)

Students will plan, shoot, and edit a short non-fiction film. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: VART 1265.

VART 3262. NARRATIVE FILM/VIDEO PRODUCTION. (4 Credits)

Students will plan, shoot, and edit a short fiction film. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: VART 1265.

VART 3267. FILM AND THE CITY. (4 Credits)

After looking at ways in which the city has been framed historically in films, students will pursue research in the city using video as their tool. Using interviews, screen text, voice over, and other documentary techniques, students will explore a project of interest to them and make a series of short films that reveal an aspect of the urban milieu. In class sessions and in one on one meetings with the professor, students will propose and refine their project and gather feedback about communicating in visual language on city issues. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COMM, URST.

VART 3268. FILM/ANIMATION. (4 Credits)

This course will explore 2 and 3 dimensional film and video animation. Past film artist works will be studied in the hopes of gleaning inspiration from the history of animation. Students will create their own films in this class using flat art (drawings, paintings, photographs, or collages) or sculptural objects. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: NMDD.

Prerequisite: VART 1265.

VART 3270. FILM, VIDEO, AND DANCE. (4 Credits)

Students will use easily accessible technology to create and record movements and images that extend their expressive range. Seminal works of film, video & choreography that solved problems in original and unexpected ways will be studies. This course is designed for art enthusiasts as well as those with training in film, video and/or dance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 3500. PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE DOCUMENTARY TRADITION. (4 Credits)

A course using 35mm black and white film. A dark room will be provided. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 3535. SEMINAR: HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY. (4 Credits)

The history of photography from 1839 to the present. The work of leading European and American photographers will be studied in the light of the technical, social and aesthetic issues of their time. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 3541. THE STREETS OF NEW YORK. (4 Credits)

This course will use the streets of metropolitan New York as its classroom and its laboratory. By studying the inital foundations, street layouts, building typologies, historial topology and geography of the region, with its architectural monuments and everyday street-life, we will seek to understand this city's past - ecological, urban, and architectural - and the implications for our shared future. Analytic comparisons to Rome, Beijing, London, Mumbai, Paris, Sydney, LA, and Chicago, with an emphasis on sustainability: parks, agriculture, solar, reslience. Walking tours. Studio visits. With notice, this course may meet off-campus.

VART 3800. INTERNSHIP. (3 Credits)

Supervised placement for students interested in work experience.

VART 3810. SEMINAR IN GRAPHIC DESIGN. (4 Credits)

This seminar course is open to all students interested in graphic design. Class will include visits to designers' studios, slide lectures, assigned readings and written essays. We will look at the role of the designer in society both in the past and present, and examine the art of graphic design. Social responsibility in the context of a design’s ability to educate, inform or propagandize and deceive will also be examined. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 3999. TUTORIAL. (3 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

VART 4090. SENIOR PROJECT ARCHITECTURE. (4 Credits)

In this advanced studio seminar, students may pursue a specific design project with the consent and guidance of a visual arts faculty member. Portfolio perparation. A program proposal, with a schedule, bibliography, and proposed site, is due at the outset. In this advanced studio seminar, senior students may design a specific project with consent and guidance of a visual arts faculty member. Portfolio preparation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: URST.

Prerequisites: VART 3070 or VART 3080.

VART 4100. SEMINAR MODERN ART: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES. (4 Credits)

A seminar class with readings, discussions, and presentations, emphasizing critical and historical trends in modern and contemporary art. Current museum and gallery exhibitions will be explored. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 4200. ART AND ETHICS. (4 Credits)

Since the eighteenth century the arts have been separated from the social functions-such as religious worship and political display-they had in the past been associated with, and are thought of as ends in themselves. How are we to think about this? What could art for "art's sake" be? What gives art or artworks value? How do artistic goals relate to moral imperatives? This course is intended to explore these questions by looking at a number of ways they have been posed and answered. This course satisfies the senior values seminar requirement of the University core. It does not count as an elective for the Visual Arts major. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: NMDD, SRVL.

VART 4300. REPRESENTATION IN ART. (4 Credits)

Representation in Art: Film/Video. Photography and Painting will deal with the ethics of representation, and consider how art deals with depictions of people. What is an artist's responsibility to his/her subject? This seminar will provide a sense of ethical insight and social morality into this aspect of visual literacy and will encourage students to be critical, active and engaged artists and viewers. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, SRVL.

VART 4600. SENIOR SEMINAR: STUDIO ART. (4 Credits)

This is a course for senior visual arts students who wish to have a senior project exhibition. The seminar will discuss critical issues relating to the making, presentation, and interpretation of contemporary art. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 4800. INTERNSHIP. (4 Credits)

Supervised placement for students who are intereseted in work experience. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

VART 4999. TUTORIAL. (1-5 Credits)

Supervised individual projects in photography, painting/drawing, graphic design, architecture or filmmaking/video. May be continued to a maximum of eight credits.