Sociology

Note: "Sociology and Anthropology" is a single academic department at Fordham, but the academic information for each subject is listed on a separate web page. Information about anthropology programs is listed under anthropology.

Sociology is the study of group life—ranging from the analysis of passing encounters between individuals on a city street to the examination of current trends in globalization. As a social science, it combines scientific and humanistic approaches to study the diversity of social relationships in our modern world. As a liberal arts major, sociology represents excellent preparation for future graduate work by developing critical thinking and research skills, and it similarly provides fundamental grounding for students planning careers in law, business, social work, criminal justice, medicine, and international affairs. The scope of the discipline is quite broad, satisfying a variety of interests. A major or minor in sociology also offers a good background for students whose career goals involve marketing research, teaching, communications, government work, or extensive contact with the public and business. As such, sociology will provide a deeper understanding of the complex social and cultural world that shapes life experiences. The wide selection of courses offers students the opportunity to study crime and criminal justice, urban issues and public policy, social institutions, including education, the economy, religion, the family, and media, as well as social inequalities, including those of class, race, ethnicity, and gender.

Program Activities

Honors and Awards

The department offers the opportunity for students to become members of Alpha Kappa Delta, the international honor society for sociology students. Each spring, students are inducted into Fordham’s Chapter Iota. At Rose Hill, the department honors its seniors at the end of year awards ceremony, Encaenia, by bestowing the Rev. Joseph P. Fitzpatrick, S.J. Memorial Award and the Rev. J. Franklin Ewing, S.J. Memorial Award for the best submitted essay by a graduating sociology and anthropology major, respectively. At Lincoln Center, the department also recognizes excellence in its graduating seniors with departmental honors in sociology and anthropology at its own diploma ceremony. The department also sponsors a Sociology Club, a Criminology Club, and an Anthropology Club at Rose Hill, and a Society for Sociology and Anthropology at Lincoln Center, all organized and governed by students.

Internships

Both sociology and anthropology majors and nonmajors are encouraged to take advantage of the Internship Seminar offered by the department. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop skills in social analysis, policy development, program evaluation, and interpersonal relations while being of service to others in a real-life setting outside the classroom. Employment opportunities include agencies and corporations in the New York metropolitan area, ranging from organizations in the public sector, including the New York State Department of Corrections, the Legal Aid Society, and the Puerto Rican Family Institute—to organizations in the private sector—including CBS, Merrill Lynch, and IBM. Each student is required to spend a minimum of eight to ten hours per week in an agency (public or private) or organization chosen to fit the individual student’s interests and expertise. All students who enroll in the program are required to do both the internship placement and to take SOCI 4900 INTERNSHIP SEMINAR). Field placements must be obtained through the internship program coordinator located in the Office of Career Planning and Placement.

Courses outside the department

The following courses offered outside the department have the SOCI attribute and count toward the Sociology major and minor.

CourseTitleCredits
ANTH 3339IRISH AND MEXICAN MIGRATION: NEW YORK FOCUS4
ANTH 3341RACE, SEX, AND SCIENCE4
CEED 4245ETHICS IN RESEARCH4
FITV 4676TELEVISION AND SOCIETY4
PJST 4970COMMUNITY SERVICE/SOCIAL ACTION4
THEO 4052AN ETHICS OF MODERN SELFHOOD: THE PURSUIT OF AUTHENTICITY4
WGSS 3341RACE, SEX, AND SCIENCE4

For more information

Visit the Sociology and Anthropology department web page 

Sociology and anthropology offer the following which fulfill the first social science core requirement:

CourseTitleCredits
ANTH 1100INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY3
ANTH 1300INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY3
SOCI 1100INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY3

The advanced social science core requirement may be satisfied by an advanced-level course in sociology or anthropology. The course in Physical Anthropology, ANTH 1200 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY, fulfills the life science core requirement for nonmajors. In addition, the department regularly offers courses that fulfill the American Pluralism, Global Studies, Interdisciplinary Capstone, and Eloquentia Perfecta 1 and 3, and Values Seminar/EP4 core requirements.

ANTH 1050. ANTHROPOLOGY FOCUS. (3 Credits)

ANTH 1100. INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (3 Credits)

We live in a shrinking international arena that demands greater sensitivity to the diversity of cultural patterns surrounding us. In this course, students investigate human beliefs and behavior, particularly in regard to forms of communication, marriage and the family, adaptions to the environment and to political, economic and religious institutions in a variety of past and present cultures.

Attributes: FRSS, GLBL, LALS, MEST, SSCI.

ANTH 1200. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (3 Credits)

This introduction to physical (or biological) anthropology satisfies a core life science requirement and serves as a general survey of the biological focus of anthropology. The course summarizes the different areas of physical anthropology and covers the history of evolutionary theories, human genetics and adaptation, primate biology, behavioral ecology and conservation, and an extensive overview of the human fossil record. In particular, we emphasize the variations found in non-human primates and the biological and cultural changes that took place in our ancestors over the past 6.8 million years. Lab sessions will provide a practical introduction to human osteology, primate morphology, primate conservation, and comparisons of human fossil morphology.

Attribute: LSCI.

ANTH 1300. INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

How do we study society when no living members of that culture remain? Students will examine the ways by which archaeologists have inferred former patterns of behavior from surviving evidence through a survey of traditional methods as well as new scientific techniques. Students will study artifacts from the University's collection and 'excavate' their own archaeological site on paper to better understand the process of investigation.

Attributes: CLAS, FRSS, GLBL, IPE, MEST, SSCI.

ANTH 1413. LANGUAGE AND CULTURE. (4 Credits)

An introduction to linguistic science emphasizing the structure, functions, and origins of languages as the symbolic system of communication peculiar to humans. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: GLBL.

ANTH 1500. INTRODUCTION TO FASHION AND CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This introductory lecture course is required for students pursuing the Fashion and Culture minor. In this class, students will be introduced to cultural and media studies concepts that will equip them with the theoretical and methodological tools necessary to explore fashion as a historically situated and context dependent form of communication and meaning making. The course considers the implications of fashion within systems of power, every day acts of self-presentation, and larger politics of representation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: FCLC.

ANTH 1600. INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN VARIATION. (3 Credits)

This introductory physical anthropology course explores in detail issues of human biological variation, that is, why humans differ from each other. It satisfies a life science core requirement and examines evolutionary theories, human genetic variations, and human adaptations to environmental stresses. The main focus of investigation of human genotypic and phenotypic variations as observed in contemporary human populations to obtain an understanding of the biological basis for anatomical and physiological variation (incorrectly referred to as ‘race’ in a social context), including different evolutionary mechanisms that have shaped these variations, and how changing environments may have influenced these directions as well as the emergence of, and adjustment to, various chronic diseases. Lab sessions provide a practical introduction to cellular genetics, population genetics, osteology, anthropometry, statistics, and human evolution.

Attribute: LSCI.

ANTH 1999. SERVICE LEARNING-1000 LEVEL. (1 Credit)

In this student-initiated program, the student may earn one additional credit by connecting a service experience to a course with the approval of the professor and the service-learning director.

ANTH 2202. ANTHROPOLOGY OF PERFORMANCE. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

ANTH 2447. PASSAGES: LIFE CYCLES. (4 Credits)

Although the life cycle is biologically based, societies differ in the way they conceptualize the stages of life. This course explores differing concepts of personhood and how a person is linked to moral beliefs and ideologies of power. We examine the way rites of passage (e.g., birth, initiation ceremonies, marriage, parenthood, and death) shape personhood in different cultures. We consider how the perspectives of psychology and anthropology complement, challenge, and enrich our understanding of the life cycle. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: INST.

ANTH 2500. TABOO: ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE FORBIDDEN. (4 Credits)

Taboo helps identify sources of social danger, establishing prohibitions designed to protect society from that which it considers dangerous or repulsive. Yet, the prohibitions always exert an undeniable attraction, leading to a fascination with transgression. Through exploration of the anthropological notion of taboo-and related cross-cultural concepts of impurity, contagion, and transgression-this course will explore the extent to which prohibition and danger structure social life. Topics considered will include incest, cannibalism, eroticism, filth, murder, madness, and sin. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, INST, IPE.

ANTH 2520. INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

The course surveys methods in crime scene investigation and forensic archaeology. Often, the commision of a violent act leaves an unidentifiable corpse, which requires the expertise of a forensic anthropologist to identify the guilty party. Students will learn how forensic anthropologists create biological profiles from deceased individuals (using metric, non-metric, odontological, and genetic information). Notable persons and current research in the field will be introduced through the examination of case studies. The applications and abuse of forensic evidence in the courtroom and popular culture are also explored. Students will come to understand the direct relationship between archaeology, physical anthropology, and forensics in the quest not only to solve "Who Dunnit?", but "Who Was It?" Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

ANTH 2525. WHY ARE WE DIFFERENT? THE BASIS FOR HUMAN DIVERSITY. (4 Credits)

This course considers how and why people differ physically, the genetic and functional basis for these differences, and their significance for adaptation and survival. Topics covered will include variations in skin, hair, and eye color, body size and proportions, serological and biochemical distributions, nutritional requirements, diseases such as HIV and cancer, and growth patterns. Theoretical issues will also be discussed, including the concepts of race and the continuing evolution of the human species. There are no prerequisites for this course. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 2614. URBANISM AND CHANGE IN THE MIDDLE EAST. (4 Credits)

This course discusses urban traditions and theories in the Middle East. The course material will cover multiple Middle Eastern cities, old and new. Through ethnography we analyze the impact of colonial policies on the politics of space and place. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, MEST.

ANTH 2619. MAGIC, SCIENCE, AND RELIGION. (4 Credits)

Magic, science and religion will be analyzed, compared and contrasted. Problems in the comparative study of these topics, especially of religion, the "supernatural," and world view, are discussed in the context of various cultures. (Every other year). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: BIOE, GLBL, INST, IPE, REST.

ANTH 2620. THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF CITIES. (4 Credits)

This course explores the everyday life of cities in a range of international contexts. We will investigate the formation of urban neighborhoods, urban ties based on ethnicity and religious beliefs, multilingualism and changing notions of the city due to globalization. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, IPE, URST.

ANTH 2650. WHY JOHNNY CAN'T READ. (4 Credits)

What is the role of schooling in US society? This course will explore the socio-cultural contexts of educational institutions in the United States, as well as the historical development of prevalant theories of education and learning. Topics and debates in education include testing and curriculum standards, language policies and classroom literacy practices, drop-out rates, minority and low-income population access to education opportunities, the charter school movement, teaching methodologies, school accountability, and the role of technology in the classroom, among others. The class will also investigate what is means to be a student in a linguistically and culturally diverse society. How do young and adult learners form their own educational communities both inside and outside the classroom? How are families, peer networks, religious institutions, workplaces and other community spaces also important educational sites? How have expectations in the US, especially as they relate to and change along with, national and global political ideas of social/ economic development and progress. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: PJST.

ANTH 2700. YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT: THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD. (4 Credits)

As the center of all significant human rituals and ceremonies, food is studied by a range of natural and social scientists. For the anthropologist, food is connected to the human body, health social relations, identity, and even ideology; we are literally what we eat. This course examines the role food plays in shaping cultural practices throughout the world. Students will explore changing concepts of food through time, beginning with early humans, modes of food production, and consumption. Through primary literature, lectures, local ethnic markets, and sharing meals throughout the semester, this class will immerse you in the theoretical and empirical significance of the cross-cultural significance of food. Bon appetit! Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

ANTH 2770. ANTHROPOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the experience of childhood cross-culturally, including, for example, toddlers in New Guinea, North American tweens, and child soldiers in Sierra Leone. We will address issues such as discipline, emotion, authority, and socialization within the broader context of race, religion and gender. Special attention will be given to the effects of war, poverty, and social inequality on children and the recent development of a set of universal human rights for children. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, INST, IPE.

ANTH 2880. HUMAN SEXUALITY IN CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

Human sexuality in Cross-Cultural Perspective. Human sexuality presents a challenge to anthropology which, as a general practice, continues to divide the biological from cultural. Sexuality depends on biology, but its actual practices arise in specific cultural contexts, which vary widely. In this course, we examine older anthropological theories of sexuality as well as a new emerging interactionist paradigm that recognizes the power of both biology and culture. Specific topics include enthnographic method in the study of sexuality, evolutionary theory, cultural constructivism, heteronormativity, and gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender issues, in a range of societies. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, IPE, WGSS.

ANTH 2885. ANTHROPOLOGY OF ECONOMICS. (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the major theoretical and methodological perspectives in the anthropological study of human economies, past and present. The course will explore the principles and history of economic analysis in anthropology, including the cultural factors that shape and guide economic behavior in diverse societies from the stone age to modem times. Readings will cover topics in ethnography, human ecology, social theory, political economy, and economic development. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 2886. ANTHROPOLOGY OF GENDER AND SEXUALITY. (4 Credits)

Are sex roles biologically determined or culturally defined? A cross-cultural perspective provides a unique opportunity to explore answers to this question through an examination of the roles of men and women in marriage and the family and in economic, political and religious institutions, as well as how such roles are interrelated with conceptions of masculinity, femininity, honor and shame. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, INST, IPE, WGSS.

ANTH 2888. GENDER AND ISLAM. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, MEST.

ANTH 2890. VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Culture affects what and how we see, and what we see affects our culture. Film, still photography and video each enable anthropologists to capture and analyze aspects of this relationship, and of culture in general. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 2999. TUTORIAL. (2 Credits)

ANTH 3002. ART AND ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

In this class, we will explore the century-long dialogue between anthropology and the creative arts. From Picasso and Matisse appropriating African arts, and Zorah Hurston drawing on her anthropological research for her novels, to Michael Taussig's use of fiction as an ethnographical tool, the study of culture and the creation of art have long been closely intertwined. We will read essays, ethnographies, poems, novels, and life histories, tracing the possibilities of anthropology as a creative discipline and a way of understanding creativity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 3110. ANCIENT CULTURES OF THE BIBLE. (4 Credits)

What was it really like in Biblical times? Through an archaeological investigation of the Holy Land, particularly the Canaanite, Israelite and classical cultures of Old and New Testament times, this course provides students with a better understanding of the ancient social and religious background of our modern Judeo-Christian tradition. Extensively slide illustrated. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, CLAS, GLBL, MEST, PJST, REST.

ANTH 3111. NEW WORLD ARCHAEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

What were the Americas like before the arrival of Europeans? This course investigates the prehistory of the western hemisphere with emphasis on the arrival and expansion of hunter-gatherer societies throughout the New World. Explore ancient Native American cultural adaptations from the Ice Age to today's global warming within the diverse and dynamic habitats of early times. Students will gain a broader appreciation of American Indian culture and diversity, as well as its extraordinarily long record of survival and achievement. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, LALS, MVST.

ANTH 3115. INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

The interdisciplinary field of medical anthropology focuses on the study of health and healing within cultural, biosocial and cross-cultural contexts. Students will develop an understanding of how to apply core concepts and methods from anthropology to understanding and addressing problems located at the intersection of culture, well-being, disease and death.

ANTH 3152. SPORTS AND NATIONAL POLITICS. (4 Credits)

This course looks at sports as a very serious (and entertaining) enterprise comprising multiple levels, from lighthearted enjoyment needed to keep us sane every week, to the insane passions of national rivalries usually camouflaged in other political and cultural arenas. Sport is also serious business in that it commands so many cultural and financial resources and international media attention. Ultimately the course will look to explore how sports is central to our national and transnational existence and is an essential in post-modern consumerist world that seeks to erase the traces of global capitalism's homogenizing project of domesticating differences. In this light, sport and global culture of the body at play, constitute a fundamental dimension of the contemporary transnational landscape. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, INST.

ANTH 3154. SPORTS: AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

Why is sports so pervasive throughout the world? Sports entertains and generates billions in revenue, but it has a more profound role in human society. This course will examine sports as an integral part of human culture that can both reproduce and challenge cultural structures. We will discuss how issues such as race, class, gender, sexuality and nationalism are embodied and performed on the field and in the stands, using the context of multiple sports. While we will take a critical look at sports, this course will also approach the topic with an eye to the common human experience of joy in the game. As Galeano said, “when good soccer happens, I give thanks for the miracle and I don't give a damn which team or country performs it.” Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 3180. ETHNOGRAPHIC METHODS: CULTURES OF NEW YORK CITY. (4 Credits)

This course explores the cultural diversity of New York City from an Anthropological perspective. The focus will be on how different groups use urban public spaces, e.g., ethnic and religious communities within the city and urban subcultures. Students will use readings to inform their own ethnographic research on the cultures of New York. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, EP3, URST.

ANTH 3197. PEOPLES OF SOUTH ASIA. (4 Credits)

This course explores the people, history, culture and politicsof South Asia. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 3220. ARCHAELOGY, LANGUAGE, AND GENETICS: THE POLITICS OF IDENTITY. (4 Credits)

The course explores parallel lines of investigation in archaelogy, linguistics, and evotionary biology that have been used to construct social and cultural identity. We will survey ways in which people have approached this matter, including origin myths, art, text, language change, material culture, and genetic mutation, then compare the findings of these disparate fields to consider how they have been used, and might be used, to assemble a picture of the past from the perspective of individuals, archaeologists, and political leaders. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

ANTH 3260. POLITICS OF REPRODUCTION. (4 Credits)

The biological reproduction of the human species is a complex process that engages all major institutions of society: family, religion, morality, health, economy, and government. Using cross-cultural and social historical materials, this course will examine cases in which the control over reproduction is contested, focusing on such issues as family limitation, new reproductive technologies, and child custody. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction .

Attributes: ASSC, BIOE, GLBL, PJST.

ANTH 3330. RACE AND URBAN LANDSCAPE. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the segregation of whites and blacks in urban communities in the United States. As blacks moved into urban communities in the South and migrated ot cities in the North and West from the late 19th century to the mid 20th century, whites segregated them and instituted "Jim Crow" practices that denied them equal rights. What did Jim Crow look like on the urban landscape? Students will be able to answer this question as the learn about the growing confinement of blacks and establishment of ghettos on the landscape of a number of U.S. cities including Chicago, and New York. Students will read several historical and anthropological studies of urban communities in the United States. They will learn some of the techniques anthropologists use, such as mapping, observation, and historical research, to study Harlem. In addition, students will become familiar with the holistic anthropological approach that explores race in the urban landscape as well as documents the political, economic, religious, and social forces that shape the city environment. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

ANTH 3339. IRISH AND MEXICAN MIGRATION: NEW YORK FOCUS. (4 Credits)

The course will take a comparative look at the historical and contemporary Irish and Mexican migrations to New York City. Special emphasis will be given to ethnographic exploration and analysis of the different communities' migration processes, including how each has impacted on the city, and also transformed the origin populations back home in Ireland and Mexico. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, LALS, MVST, SOCI.

ANTH 3340. ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES ON RACE AND ETHNICITY. (4 Credits)

A cross-cultural, interdisciplinary consideration of the concepts of race and ethnicity, this course examines racial and ethnic categories and explores how they form, how society gives them meaning and the circumstances under which they change. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, IPE, LALS, PLUR, URST.

ANTH 3341. RACE, SEX, AND SCIENCE. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to interdisciplinary debates about the relationship between race, sex, and gender, on the one hand, and science, technology, and medicine, on the other. We will examine two interrelated questions: How do scientific claims influence cultural understandings of race, gender, and sexuality; and how do cultural beliefs about race, sex, and gender influence scientific research and knowledge production? The course will explore the role that understandings of race, sex, and gender have played in the development of Western science; the relationship among race, sex, gender, and scientific research in genomics and health disparities research (among other fields); and finally, the ways in which race, gender, and social inequalities become embodied and affect human biology. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, LALS, SOCI, URST, WGSS.

ANTH 3343. GHETTOS AND GATED COMMUNITIES. (4 Credits)

How do humans order their urban landscapes? Do different cultures segregate certain peoples in the urban landscape? Do cultures exclude certain groups from certain neighborhoods? Students will become acquainted with ghettos and gated communities in different cultures around the world and compare them with their own to discover what they share and don’t share. Students will learn how anthropologists study global urban communities. Topics to be covered in this course are urbanization, creation of ghettos and gated communities, influences on the urban landscape from gender, political, economic, social, and global forces. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, EP3, GLBL, INST, PJST, URST.

ANTH 3347. ANTHROPOLOGY OF HIV/AIDS. (4 Credits)

This course explores the cultural, historical, political, economic, and public health aspects of HIV/AIDS. We will study the emergence, development, and contemporary meaning of HIV/AIDS in the US and internationally, impacts across multiple sectors of society, experience of affected populations, responses of health, political and social sectors; and varying approaches to prevention and treatment. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 3351. COMPARATIVE CULTURES. (4 Credits)

This course will survey the diversity of cultures in the world and the processes that have produced similarities and differences among and within various geographic areas. Some of the central topics of discussion include human adaptation and adaptability, social change, modernization and ideas of development in small scale as well as in complex societies today. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, GLBL, INST, IPE, LALS, MEST.

ANTH 3353. ANTHROPOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION. (4 Credits)

Although globalization began in the 14th century with the voyage of Columbus, it is very much a contemporary concept. More than any other social system, globalization has permeated every institution, structure, and human relationship, thereby generating a whole new structure of values. Even though globalization has resulted in more development, it also brought great inequalities, frustrations, and conflicts among nations. The objective of this course is to provide students with substantive knowledge and understanding of the process from its many anthropological and cultural dimensions. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: PJST, URST.

ANTH 3354. RACE, IDENTITY, AND GLOBALIZATION. (4 Credits)

The course will explore the power of racial discourses in the production of global difference over the last five decades. Particular emphasis will be placed on the work of James Baldwin to understand the insights of the North American civil rights movement, and its global influence since the 1960's. The civil rights movement coalesced at an important moment of global historical questioning, and along with the African and Caribbean nationl liberation movements, anti-Vietnam war protests, feminist and gay struggles and the student uprisings in Europe and Latin America, marked a particular manner in which to re-think global concepts such as democracy, citizenship, transnational identity, and political consciousness. The objective of the course is to make use of Baldwin's racial, national, and global reflections to understand the global effects of the progressive movements initiated five decades ago. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, INST, URST.

ANTH 3355. CULTURE AND ANTICOLONIALISM. (4 Credits)

In this course students will read and discuss major texts in the anticolonial traditions of Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean. The course will also address how the search for a "native" esthetics marked the cultural production of these regions in the Twentieth Century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

ANTH 3371. PEOPLE AND ENVIRONMENT. (4 Credits)

This course problematizes and examines the nature/ culture binary in terms of spaces & subjects through race; gender; technology; city – country/metropole – (neo) colony; “the environment” (as a priori vs. culturally constructed); discourses of environmentalism (values, expert/local knowledge, politicization/ depolliticiation); violence, disaster and ruin. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 3380. HAZARDS, DISASTERS, AND HUMAN EXPERIENCE. (4 Credits)

Sandy, Katrina, 9/11. Natural and anthropogenic disasters are not new (consider Pompeii or even Noah's flood), but because of global climate change, the intensity and frequency of storms is increasing along with tragic human suffering and property destruction. Anthropological perspectives are increasingly relevant to disaster prevention and relief efforts, especially since anthropologists participate in inquiry and cleanup in the aftermath of these disasters. By exploring the complexities of recent and past natural and human caused disasters, this course explores the ways in which cultures perceive and respond to disaster. We will identify pragmatic actions which can mitigate or prevent human suffering and improve relief efforts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, ENST.

ANTH 3393. GRAFFITI: THE CHALLENGES AND CONUNDRUMS OF STREET ART. (4 Credits)

The course will focus on the history and development of graffiti since its ancient inceptions in cities like Pompeii to its post-modern ex[ressions. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of graffiti in resisting and critiquing official state power, and how, over the centuries it has been a focus of state censorship and repression. Scholars and colleagues will also be invited to talk about graffiti from different perspectives. Meanwhile students are expected to carry out a research term paper about the history, development, and unique issues of graffiti in a particular urban center. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

ANTH 3400. POLITICS OF MEMORY: TORTURE, GUILT. (4 Credits)

The course will explore the politics of historical trauma, particularly looking at the manner in which contemporary societies deal with past forms of violence, oppression and hatred. Emphasis will be placed on the United States, Chile and South Africa in terms of assessing how each of these nation­states have looked to deal with foundational forms of gen cide and ethnocide. Part of the course will also look at reparations and the creation of Truth and Reconciliation Commissions as ways to reconcile with past exploitative legacies. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 3406. RACE AND GENDER IN VISUAL CULT. (4 Credits)

The course will explore how different racial, engendered and class elements affect visual culture. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the cultural production in the Americas but this will be contrasted with other areas and regions from today's globalized and migrant world. The students will be taught how to assess visual culture and the varying powerful and multi-faceted medium it represents. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 3450. THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF NATIONALISM AND IDENTITY. (4 Credits)

Nationalism is a potent force in the modern world, and national affiliation is a major component of social identity. We will start by examining the origins of and main theories on the "nation." We will discuss how identity is formed in relation to the nation, and the intersection of national identity with other identities such as ethnicity, race, and gender. We will define “nationalism” and look at the role it plays in various aspects of the global world, including migration, national liberation movements, conflict and the rise of the "all-right." The course will use a variety of case studies, but particular attention will be paid to the development of national identity and the rise of nationalism in the United States.

ANTH 3470. PEOPLE AND CULTURES OF LATIN AMERICA. (4 Credits)

This course surveys the diversity of Latin America as a continent and as a complex mixture of peoples and cultures with an increasing presence in the United States. It will place particular emphasis on the discussion of ethnicity, race, gender, religion, artistic production, and economic and political inequality. The aim of the course is to understand the cultural and social particularities of contemporary Latin America and to place them in a global context. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, LALS, PJST.

ANTH 3472. LATINO IDENTITY AND CULTURE. (4 Credits)

The course will explore Latino identity and culture. Latinos are the fastest growing ethnicity and largest minority group in the United States. Not surprisingly, defining what unifies and divides Latinos as a whole is a matter of great complexity. In this matter, the course will start with the exploration of the immigrant / migrant experience and assess the central question, woven throughout the group's experience, "can Latinos ever be from here?" Hence, the subtitle "Ni de Aqui, Ni de Alla" - "Not from here, not from there." To this degree, the course will also engage the term "Latino"; How was it created?; What are its most important personal meanings and political implications?; and what is the Latino potential of power and influence? This also implies that the course also must engage the educational and economic disparities, media stereotypes and perceptions that may cloud the group's existence. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 3481. AFRO-BRAZILIAN CULTURE, POLITICS, AND IDENTITY. (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the topic of Afro-Brazilian culture through examining aspects of its history and contemporary dynamics. The course offers a panorama of the processes of formation and transformation of Afro-Brazilian culture, analyzing how its main elements, such as samba, capoeira, and Candomble shifted from a marginalized position to become central components of Brazilian national identity. The course also examines the relationship between black culture and local politics in Brazil, and the representations of Africa in the formulation of contemporary black identities in the Diaspora. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: LALS.

ANTH 3483. BOND, BOURNE, AND BRITAIN: THE NOSTALGIA OF EMPIRE. (4 Credits)

“Bond, James Bond,” has become indicative of a particular gendered kind of seductively choreographed “cultured” behavior. It is both telling and theoretically productive that the imperial tenets of this spy character are always hidden under a façade of masculine charm and civilizing ideals. This melodramatic façade has been inherited in the recent Jason Bourne cinema thrillers as well, where it is now an American serviceman, not a British one, who upholds the ideals of democracy and what is right and wrong in a global setting that, more than ever, is exploding into violence and chaos. The course will explore the cultural legacy of the Bond genre, replicated in a “similar but different” manner by the Bourne contributions, in creating ideas about the global ecumene, postcolonial identities, and the production of whiteness in a supposedly post-racial world. Ultimately, the course will focus on the nostalgia of empire exercised by polities such as Great Britain, and most recently the United States, that keep reproducing greater popular cultural products (in films and music) as their own political and financial stronghold on old colonies continues to wane. Perhaps the British Nobel laureate, Doris Lessing, most succinctly highlighted this problematic when she turned down the prestigious Order of the British Empire, publicly wondering what would be the purpose of joining an order of something (i.e., British Empire) that no longer exists. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

ANTH 3487. LONDON UNDERGROUND: HISTORY, MYTHS, AND TRADITIONS. (4 Credits)

The city of London is one of the most cosmopolitan and culturally diverse cities in the world, with over a third of its current residents having been born outside of Great Britain. It has experienced a long history of occupations, its name itself coming from the Latin Londinium given to the city by its Roman conquerors. Since then, it has seen centuries of cultural life and political organization, becoming the pride of the British Empire and the destination of hundreds of thousands of current and former members of the empire. This course will use the metaphor of the London Underground to explore the multiple layers of history, myth, and tradition that make up the city of London. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 3510. MUSEUMS: CULTURES ON DISPLAY. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the purposes museums serve and the meanings museums create in New York City and throughout the world. We will consider practices of collecting and displaying both objects and people, and we will cover both the historical development of museums and contemporary museums-related controversies. The course will frequently meet at New York City museums for in-situ learning experiences. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: URST.

ANTH 3520. FORENSIC INVESTIGATION OF THE HUMAN SKELETON. (4 Credits)

To understand how the human skeleton is utilized to identify the deceased and sometimes solve crimes, knowledge of skeletal biology and anatomy is paramount. This course has two primary objectives: first to provide basic but solid knowledge of the human skeleton, and second to explain the application of that knowledge to forensic anthropology. Students can expect to obtain a critical understanding of human skeletal anatomy and forensic osteology, as well as the ability to think critically about the recent media glamorization of forensic practice. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

ANTH 3570. APPLIED HUMAN RIGHTS. (1 Credit)

Most people working on international affairs, and other disciplines internationally oriented, might confront cases of human rights violations. Some international workers try to prevent those directly, or to deal with these impacts, and others need to document, at least partially, those violations as the relate to their core mission (e.g. implement health programs for teenagers in a conflict area, or address displacement of indigenous peoples by corporations). How can we understand the relations between different international programs and human rights works? What are the similarities, differences and intersections? What ablities and methods are required for all international workers confronting human rights violations? What are some of the most recent successes in international law and domestic regulations? In this seminar, we will present diverse examples in several domestic regulations? In this seminar, we will present diverse examples in several countries that intersect with human rightts violations. We will describe the professional roles of different team members (lawyers, psychologists, social workers, doctors, communitiy actors, etc.) and the tools and protocols needed in order to successfully register their experiences (in context of warfare, environmental damage, and even in natural disasters). We will listen to the testimonies of survivors and human rights workes, and will present specific cases emphasizing the security needs and the risks involved in those.

Attributes: ASSC, BIOE.

ANTH 3605. MOTHERING AND MOTHERHOOD. (4 Credits)

This course provides an in-depth look at what is often assumed to be the most basic and fundamental building blocks of all human relations: mothering. But what does it mean to be a mother? Who is allowed to mother? Whose motherhood is lost or denied? What qualifications does it take mother? And how does what appears to be the private practice of motherhood, intersect with larger political processes, gender ideals and hierarchies, science and technology, and public expressions of intimacy? We will explore the concepts of mothering and motherhood to understand its dynamics beyond birth, bake sales, and kissed boo-boos. This course provides an opportunity to question and rethink mothering and motherhood in a variety of social and cultural contexts both within and outside the U.S. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: WGSS.

ANTH 3610. FAMILIES IN ECONOMIC CRISIS. (4 Credits)

At times in US history, millions of American families have been in economic crisis. Such crises have significantly altered patterns of household composition and social relations, especially regarding jobs, home, and family life. This course will examine theories and policies of economic conditions and labor market trends across a broad spectrum of income brackets and culturally diverse households, including housing, alternative living arrangements, educational access, job security, occupational and industry specific employment and unemployment trends, and customs and traditions of marriage and social relations between the sexes. The course will use a comparative and historical approach by reviewing the influence of the Great Recession on American families as compared to the impact of previous recessions (for example, the mid-1970s, the early to mid 1980s and early 1990s). Readings will be drawn from the social sciences in such disciplines as: cultural anthropology, political economy, sociology, and gender and sexuality studies. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

ANTH 3620. BORDER CULTURES IN THE CITY: SUMMER IN NEW YORK. (1 Credit)

The course will explore a migrant New York City normally not visable to most of the native inhabitants of the city. In this manner, the course will allow students to meet and understand the different struggles and lived-in reality of migrants, particularly Mexican ones, as they strive to make a dignified living for themselves and their families. The course will look to asses and discuss the physical, cultural and emotional border culture that migration has created between Mexico and the United States but also between many of the Central and South American nations. To this degree it will also explore the newly invigorated Latino culture in the United States, one that figures more and more prominently in the future of the United States and the continent. Finally, through daily lectures and site visits to migrant organizations and communities students will explore the myriad of manners in which politcs of identity and culture have taken shape and have shaped our city.

Attribute: ASSC.

ANTH 3710. BILINGUALISM: LOCAL PRACTICES AND GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES. (4 Credits)

Human beings have produced at least 7,000 languages in the history of the world, many communities support the use of more than one of these within their boundaries and many individuals acquire multiple languages over the course of a lifetime, sometimes switching among tongues within the same conversation even in today's global English. The course examines the many approaches that sociolinguists and linguistic anthropologists have developed for studying how and why humans do this. What are the causes and consequences of retaining moe than one language in our domestic lives, cultural institutions, and nation-states? What are the costs and benefits? Why, in short, do humans continue to value and invest in bilingualism, both locally and globally? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: INST.

ANTH 3725. CULTURE AND CULTURE CHANGE. (4 Credits)

Selected issues in the relationship of human behavior and culture. Issues dealt with in this course include the concept of culture, culture and the individual, culture contact, and culture change. (Every other year) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, INST, IPE, MEST.

ANTH 3726. LANGUAGE, GENDER, AND POWER. (4 Credits)

An examination of how everyday language use is constituted by cultural ideas about gender, power, and identity. Various theoretical frameworks are analyzed through ethnographic case studies which include Mexico, Malagasy, Senegal, Hungary, Nepal and the United States. We focus on issues such as prestige, politeness, inequality and hierarchy, language shift, multilingualism, code-switching, and literacy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: INST.

ANTH 3771. PYRAMIDS, GODS, AND MUMMIES. (4 Credits)

The course looks to explore the myriad of manners in which these politics of identity and culture have taken shape over the last centuries (and even millennia). Through lectures, readings and site visits to archaeological and historical sites around Puebla and Mexico City the course will assess how these migrating notions of culture have served to enable contesting identities across and through the border production between the United States and Mexico. It is particularly useful to view this dynamic from down below to better complete the authoritative picture officially espoused by the governing bodies of both countries. To this degree the value of the course will be to explore, first through lectures, secondly through site visits, and thirdly through small research papers and a final small research project how sometimes similar, and at other times differing, notions of what it means lobe American has permeated the landscape of the continent, and continues to fuel our cultural and political identities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 3800. INTERNSHIP. (3 Credits)

ANTH 3888. ARAB WOMEN AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS. (4 Credits)

This course explores the participation of Arab women in social movements before and after the 2011 “Arab Spring”. The course will be examining why and how women contribute to political and social changes, the challenges they encounter, and the changes in their understanding of their roles as citizens in the postcolonial nation-state. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: INST.

ANTH 3999. SERVICE LEARNING-3000 LEVEL. (3 Credits)

In this student-initiated program, the student may earn one additional credit by connecting a service experience to a course with the approval of the professor and the service-learning director.

ANTH 4004. Art Worlds: Anthropology and Sociology Perspectives. (4 Credits)

Incorporating methods and insights from sociology and anthropology, and drawing on the resource of the immediate context of New York City's cultural communities and institutions, this course will analyze many of the arts and artistic communities of New York City. The study of culture generally, aand art worlds more specifically, allows us to understand art and culture not only as aesthetic experiences, but also as institutional, economic, social and political phenomena. Our summer mid-day time slot will allow us to avail ourselves of numerous field trips and cultural excursions to support our discussions, readings, and lectures. This course currently fulfills an Interdisciplinary Capstone Core requirements for Fordham College students and is expected to be listed as an EP3 course by Summer 2014. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 4005. ANTHROPOLOGY OF J.R.R. TOLKIEN. (4 Credits)

The fictional writing of J.R.R. Tolkien, including The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings, has many direct correlations with historical Europe, and beyond its literary value, it can serve in some ways as an ethnographic account of the curious land of Middle Earth. The works describe and extraordinary panorama of myth and borrowed facts, from which we can refine our understanding of the "other" through analysis of sociolinguistics, funerary ritual, cultural norms, and archaeology while simultaneously exploring the sources of Tolkien's imaginative creations. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

ANTH 4114. ANTHROPOLOGY OF HEALTH HEALING AND SOCIAL JUSTICE. (4 Credits)

Health and illness will be studied as an interrelationship of biology, ecology, and culture in antiquity and contemporary societies. Among concepts of health and healing explored in Euro-American and non-Western cultures are: What is "normal"? What causes disease? Who can heal? What treatments are provided? What impact does modernization have on these cultural patterns? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, BIOE, GLBL, ICC, INST, IPE, LALS.

ANTH 4344. REPRODUCTIVE TECHNOLOGIES: GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

The interdisciplinary course will focus on issues in technology and reproduction, emphasizing the view that reproduction is not simply a biological process, but one that is laden with symbolic, political, and ideological meanings. Drawing on the fields of anthropology, sociology, history, public health, law, and science, technology and society. We will examine the contested meanings of reproduction, in particular how reproductive technologies are changing lives around the globe. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, ICC.

ANTH 4373. ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN SURVIVAL. (4 Credits)

This course is an inquiry into the biological and cultural processes by which human populations have adapted to the world's diverse ecosystems. Particular attention is devoted to issues of group survival in difficult habitats and the environmental impact of preindustrial and recently Westernized cultures. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENST, ENVS, GLBL, ICC, IPE.

ANTH 4490. ANTHROPOLOGY OF POLITICAL VIOLENCE. (4 Credits)

Political violence happens everyday, whether we endure it personally or hear about it through the media. But seldom do we ask ourselves what it is. This course investigates the nature of political violence and articulate its many forms from the anthropological perspectives of gender, class, ethnicity, economics, and of course, politics. Specific areas of study include Northern Ireland, Germany, Sudan, Palestine, Mexico, Argentina, China, Australia, and the U.S. The course will discuss the motivations for action (or inaction) by governments, elites, and insurgents, and students will get to know some of the organizations working against political violence. Field trips will include visits tothe United Nations, The United Holocaust Museum, and Ground Zero. Podcasts, news broadcasts, movies and audio documentation of events will provide further access to examples of global political violence. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, INST, IPE, PJST.

ANTH 4722. PRIMATE ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION. (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to primates. Through lectures, readings, discussions, and observation projects, students will investigate the emergence of the order and explore the diversity of primates around the world. The course will address issues of ecological adaptation, social organization, and conservation, especially of the species most threatened by extinction, and it will illustrate how habituation projects make it possible to conduct effective field studies. The evolutionary basis of the special characteristics of primates will be discussed, as well as the question of what nonhuman primate behavior can tell us about ourselves. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENST, ENVS, ICC.

ANTH 4802. ARCHAEOLOGY OF NEW YORK. (4 Credits)

The history of New York City and its environs takes on a completely different feel when the people and times are illustrated using material culture, the artifacts representing the daily activities of previous lives. Borrowing from the university's extensive collection of objects dating from prehistory to the 20th century, the course will examine former times through the lens of the items recovered from archaeological excavations, landfills, subsurface trash accumulations, and construction worksites in order to provide a more personal and intimate view of the past. Historical in the broadest sense, the curriculum will not include a detailed chronology of the city but instead explore the worlds of household, industrial production, urban infrastructure, and other social dimensions that the real objects make accessible. Aspects of conservation and curation of these rare documents of the past will be covered as well. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 4998. SENIOR THESIS. (4 Credits)

Independent research under mentor guidance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 4999. TUTORIAL IN ANTHROPOLOGY. (1-4 Credits)

Supervised individual study project.

Attribute: GLBL.

SOCI 1025. SOCIOLOGY OF AMERICAN CULTURE. (3 Credits)

A course for international students that introduces them to the study of American culture and identity; readings from the social sciences, literature, and history.

Attributes: AMST, ESL, PLUR, SSCI.

SOCI 1050. SOCIOLOGY FOCUS. (3 Credits)

SOCI 1100. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY. (3 Credits)

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. This course serves as a prerequisite to all other sociology courses and seeks to stimulate students to continue to deepen their understanding of societies.

Attributes: FRSS, SSCI.

SOCI 1999. TUTORIAL. (1-3 Credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

SOCI 2200. SOCIOLOGY OF CULTURE. (4 Credits)

"Culture" is a people's entire way of life expressed in language, art, law, religion, and other collective practices such as work, leisure, sports, food, and dress. Aspects of contemporary cultures including multiculturalism groups identity, and global consciousness are studied. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 2410. INEQUALITY: CLASS, RACE, AND ETHNICITY. (4 Credits)

The recent history of the U.S. as a nation of distinct socioeconomic classes and the persistence of racial and ethnic conflict as a factor affecting inequality. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, LALS, PLUR, URST.

SOCI 2420. SOCIAL PROBLEMS OF RACE AND ETHNICITY. (4 Credits)

This course explores the historical and contemporary issues surrounding the impact that race and ethnicity have in society. Students will examine how racial and ethnic criteria often guide important economic, political, and social decisions that affect access to resources by various groups and which usually have major consequences for the individual. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, LALS, MVST, PJST, PLUR, URST.

SOCI 2505. RELIGION AND SOCIAL CHANGE. (4 Credits)

The course explores questions about religion and social change in domestic and international contexts and how religious institutions adapt to changes in gender roles, urbanization, migration, and religious and ethnic pluralism. What roles have religious movements, including fundamentalism, played in modernization? Students examine under what conditions religion is compatible with the global spread of democracy, environmentalism or individualist conceptions of human rights. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, IPE, PJST, REST.

SOCI 2570. SOCIOLOGY OF FUNDAMENTALISM. (4 Credits)

The attack on the twin towers of New York, the assassination of doctors and bombing of abortion clinics, and the proliferation of suicide bombers and suicide cults are examples of true believers-- Muslim, Jew, Christian, and Hindu–at war with others in the name of faith. Dissent seems to be considered a heresy, and dogmatism seeks domination over democracy. Using film, selected readings, and occasional guest speakers, this course examines why in the 21st century, the most technologically-advanced, pluralistic, and globally unified era in the history of humanity, fundamentalism has become a dominant force on the world stage. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 2606. SOCIAL SCIENCE STATISTICS. (4 Credits)

Introduces the student to the basic concepts of both descriptive and inferential statistics. Both models will be presented, their assumptions delineated, and their application to research in the social sciences emphasized. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: URST.

SOCI 2607. SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH AND STATISTICS. (4 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the methodological approaches used in the social sciences, both in terms of designing research studies, and analyzing and interpreting data. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENST, URST.

SOCI 2650. BASIC RESEARCH METHODS. (4 Credits)

A survey of the basic tools for data collection and research design. Focus on decisions involved in the selection of the research problem, research design and the interpretation of data. Methods to be explored include participant observation, survey analysis, content analysis and the case study approach. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENST, URST.

SOCI 2701. INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE. (4 Credits)

An overview of the criminal justice system: law, its sociology, and its social and political functions. A critical examination of law enforcement agencies, the judicial system, and corrections. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, URST.

SOCI 2703. SOCIAL DEVIANCE. (4 Credits)

The study of deviance is closely related to social power and social class. Deviance from, or conformity to, social rules or norms raises the question, Who rules? The study of deviance has been particularly concerned with issues of class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: URST.

SOCI 2705. CRIMINAL JUSTICE POLICY. (4 Credits)

This course provides an overview of policies instituted at each level of the criminal justice system including police, corrections and courts. The class will focus on evaluating the benefits, costs and possible consequences associated with these policies. Focus will also be placed on the development of criminal justice policy taking into consideration: history, context, theoretical frameworks, and political factors. Special topics that will be covered include evidence-based interventions. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 2800. SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY. (4 Credits)

A survey of classical and contemporary theory that gives students a grasp of the history, nature, and significance of theory for the study of contemporary societies and sociocultural processes. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: FCRH.

SOCI 2801. SOCIAL THEORY AT THE CINEMA. (4 Credits)

This survey of classical and contemporary theory looks at sociological analysis through the lens of mainstream and independent cinema. The course considers the history, nature and significance of theory for the study of contemporary societies and sociocultural processes. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 2845. DRUGS, LAW, AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

This course examines the social organizations of illegal commerce in narcotics and other drugs, looking at this transnational business from the point of production to the points of consumption throughout the world. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: URST.

SOCI 2847. THE 60s: SEX, DRUGS, ROCK & ROLL. (4 Credits)

The 1960's was one of the most tumultuous eras in American history, marked by a revolutionary movement led by youth struggling for freedom on many levels. African Americans, with white support, struggled against the oppression of racial segregation of the South in the Civil Rights movement: young people sought sexual freedom and the right to experiment with drugs; musicians broke away from the restraints of traditional pop and folk songs and created rock and roll; politically minded youth attacked the traditional institutions of political and economic power by protesting against the war in Vietnam; women challenged traditional male attitudes that confined them to domesticity or inferior status in the work place and in society; gays organized against the repressive laws and prejudices against homosexuality. This course will show how all of these social strands intertwined using films, music and writings from the era. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

SOCI 2850. METHODS SOCIAL RESEARCH I. (4 Credits)

Students are introduced to the fundamentals of empirical research while actively being involved in the research process by conducting their own survey. The first course includes a survey of different methodologies used by social scientists. Students gain hands-on experience in writing a literature review, specifying a research question, developing research hypotheses, designing a questionnaire and collecting data through interviewing. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: URST, ZLB1.

SOCI 2851. METHODS SOCIAL RESEARCH II. (4 Credits)

The second course focuses on data analysis. Students learn simple descriptive and inferential statistics in conjunction with how to use the computer. These skills provide the basis for obtaining answers to research questions and testing hypotheses so that students can write their final research reports. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENST, URST.

SOCI 2870. GANGS IN AMERICA. (4 Credits)

This course examines the problem of street gangs in American society. Areas of interest include (1) the history of gangland, (2) evolving patterns of relationships between the gangs and social institutions, (3) the structure and culture of gangs, and (4) the ways in which gangs now spread. Course material includes theoretical literature empirical studies, and historical accounts Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: FCRH.

SOCI 2925. MEDIA, CRIME, SEX, AND VIOLENCE. (4 Credits)

Turn on the television set, pick up the local newspaper, go on the Internet or watch a movie. Wherever you turn, you will find the media saturated with stories about corrupt cops and honest cops, drug dealers and drug users, murderers and victims, organized crime and serial killers, crusading district attorneys and defense attorneys, corrupt lawyers and hanging judges, violent prisoners and convicted innocents. How accurate are these representations? What are the ideological messages and cultural values these stories communicate? In this course, you will learn how to demystify media representations in order to understand how and why they are produced, and who is responsible for their production. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, PJST, WGSS.

SOCI 2960. POPULAR CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This course will investigate the nature of contemporary popular culture. How do people spend their "spare time"? Does this vary with social class? Is sport the new religion? And how does this differ from that of earlier periods and simpler societies? (Every year) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, URST.

SOCI 2965. SCIENCE FICTION AND SOCIAL CRISIS. (4 Credits)

In a dreamworld inhabited by battle weary heroes and heroines who confront alien forces, where machines find human beings disposable and wizards' spells sometimes fail, where madmen create monsters that threaten humanity, we enter a realm in which science fiction often stands as a metaphor for the human condition, resurrecting quasi-mythological perceptions that have all but vanished in our nonfictional scientific world. Through the use of selected readings, feature films and lectures, this course will examine the sociological insights that science fiction films and literature offer about how we live our lives in the "here and now" of the post modern world. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

SOCI 2966. IMAGINING OTHER WORLDS. (4 Credits)

Confronted as we are by many major social problems throughout the United States and the world, is it possible to even image a better society than the present one. Drawing on utopian texts and science fiction novels and films, student will work in teams to blueprint a small-scale community of their choice that improves upon one that presently exists. The students will examine specific social structure such as families, educational institutions, gender relations, and political power, etc. They will work together and conduct fieldwork such as interviews, photography of sites, and graphic designs, to make a presentation at the end of the course. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 2999. TUTORIAL. (2 Credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

SOCI 3000. LATINO IMAGES IN MEDIA. (4 Credits)

An analysis of changing Latino images in U.S. media. The emphasis will be on English language film and television productions. Gender, color, and class issues will be examined. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COMC, COMM, LALS, PLUR, URST.

SOCI 3001. ETHICAL ISSUES IN JUSTICE. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

SOCI 3017. INEQUALITY IN AMERICA. (4 Credits)

A study of the ways in which inequalities of wealth, power, and prestige are institutionalized in complex societies. Social class and social status as they relate to other aspects of social organization and affect the life chances of individuals. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: LALS, URST.

SOCI 3021. SOCIOLOGY OF MEDICINE. (4 Credits)

This course explores the social context of health, disease, and illness in American society. Thematic issues include the experience of illness, the medical (and other healing) professions, health care policy, and the relations between providers and patients. The effects of social inequality on health and health care delivery are probed throughout the course. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: URST.

SOCI 3030. HIV/AIDS IN AFRICA. (4 Credits)

HIV/AIDS is both a biological and a social phenomenon. This course will examine the history and social evolution of the global pandemic as well as contemporary and future issues. Topics covered include the history and epistemology of HIV/AIDS, the social construction of the disease, demographic impacts, heavily affected social groups - such as orphans, and the global humanitarian and development response to the African HIV/AIDS pandemic. Students will acquire a better understanding of the varied issues related to HIV/AIDS, their emergence and effects on different individuals, groups, and societies in Africa. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, BIOE.

SOCI 3044. POVERTY AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT. (4 Credits)

This course is intended to provide students who have an interest in academic service learning with knowledge, skills and attitude they will need to shape their understanding of the socio-economic challenges of poverty, unemployment and inequality. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, PJST.

SOCI 3046. INTERNATIONAL SOCIOLOGY. (4 Credits)

An examination of the impact of globalization on worldwide social development goals; the formation of transitional families in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Europe; family strategies of migration for social and economic gain; and, policies to safeguard the human rights of transitional families. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, IPE, URST.

SOCI 3066. GLOBAL MEDIA: RACE, CLASS, GENDER AND ETHNICITY. (4 Credits)

This course will include readings on global media and pay particular attention to the representation and reception of racial, ethnic, gender and class groupings in mass media today. It will also examine how television programs exported from the US have affected basic social institutions, values and perceptions of race/ethnictiy, class and gender in other countries, and , in the US. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 3070. THE CITY AND ITS NEIGHBORHOODS. (4 Credits)

The course will introduce students to current debates about the urban experience. We will explore a variety of themes, including immigration, race, and ethnicity, urban culture and history, urban sociology and anthropology, urban politics and policy, and urban planning. The class will help students readily available sources of data to "discover" New York City neighborhoods. The class will include several outings to different New York City neighborhoods. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 3102. CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ISSUES AND POLICIES. (4 Credits)

Global issues such as world hunger, human rights, and nuclear war, as well as American issues concerning inequalities of wealth, civil rights, crime, family, and the role of government, are examined in this course. In addition to gaining an understanding of the social, political, and economic dimensions of these issues, students will carefully consider underlying value principles and religious ethics. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, PJST.

SOCI 3110. GLOBAL CONFLICT: WARS/RELIGION. (4 Credits)

Around the world, religion motivates both peace and justice efforts as well as lethal conflict. In this course, we explore the sociological context of these paradoxical dynamics and the promise of world movements aimed at a dialogue and nonviolence. An interdisciplinary perspective will introduce the student to the classical sociological studies of religion and conflict, contemporary issues of globalization, and the challenge of peaceful resolution. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, IPE, MEST.

SOCI 3114. SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH AND ILLNESS. (4 Credits)

This course will focus on health, illness, and medicine from a sociological perspective. It will provide students with an overview of the development of medicine as in institution, the impact of medicine on society, the socialization of health care practitioners, the social determinants of health and illness, healthcare policies in the U.S. and around the world, and patients' experiences with illness. By the end of this course, students will be able to: (1) develop an understanding of the ways in which society and medicine influence each other, (2) connect multiple social factors with people's health; and (3) grasp the construction of diverse illness identities in patients with chronic diseases. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, BIOE.

SOCI 3120. CONTROVERSIES IN RELIGION AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS. (4 Credits)

This course examines religious and secular organizations' involvement in international policy domains such as development, humanitarian aid, human rights, STI prevention, and biological reproduction, with special attention to tensions that emerge over competing religious and cultural frameworks. We will explore how different perspectives- economic, medical, human rights, security, justice- variably prioritize or marginalize different voices, ethical considerations and potential solutions to the social problems we examine. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, EP3, PJST, WGSS.

SOCI 3136. INEQUALITY-WHY/EFFECTS. (4 Credits)

What are the causes and consequences of inequality? Special consideration is given to the inequalities associated with class, sex and racial/ethnic membership. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, PJST, PLUR, URST.

SOCI 3140. OLD AND NEW MINORITIES IN THE U.S.. (4 Credits)

The situations of old minority groups, such as African Americans, Japanese, and earlier European immigrants, as compared to those of more recent groups such as Puerto Ricans, Cubans, other Hispanics, and recent Asian immigrants, including refugees. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, LALS, PLUR, URST.

SOCI 3145. ENVIRONMENT TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the origins, breadth and present-day relevancies of environmental sociology. Topics include contextual analyses of philosophies of nature, historical emergence of industrial society -the nature of the materials cycle, cultural and cinematic (key films) analyses of environmental crisis, specific hands-on case studies, today's challenges and social movements, all this to bridge sociology and the natural and social sciences. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ENST.

SOCI 3148. POPULATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ISSUES. (4 Credits)

An examination of the interrelationships among development, population growth and migration. Fertility and migration (including urbanization) in the Third World will be reviewed in the context of development perspectives. The determinants and consequences of fertility and migration and their policy implications will be considered in a number of development sectors. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, GLBL, INST, IPE, LALS, PJST, URST.

SOCI 3149. ECONOMIC SOCIOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Economic sociology is the study of how the economy intersects with our culture, institutions, and social context. In this course, we seek to understand how economic activity, including the organization of production and consumption and the allocation of work, goods and profits and other scarce resources, is shaped by social relations. We will analyze the institutional and social foundations of markets and other mechanisms that facilitate the interaction of individuals, groups, institutions, societies and their environments in making their livelihoods, covering a variety of topics including information and uncertainty, economic inequality and stratification, globalization, social networks in markets, finding jobs, black markets, the market for human organs, and corporate crime and malfeasance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: LALS.

SOCI 3151. SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION. (4 Credits)

We spend a great deal of our youth in school. As taxpayers, our dollars provide major funing for school systems. Through a study of the current goals, functions, and structures of educational institutions, how these have changed over time, and how they are interrelated to other major institutions insociety, students will gain insights into social factors affecting their own experiences and their responsibility as taxpayers, as future parents, and, for some, as future teachers. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 3152. SOCIOLOGY OF SPORTS. (4 Credits)

In all societies, sports and athletics are socially organized into official events, group rituals, tests of manhood, areas for the expression of political sentiments. In modern societies they have become major industries (and their players, cultural heroes and celebrities); spectator sports and their audiences are important features of post-industrial societies. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 3154. POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY. (4 Credits)

This course will examine, discuss, and debate how power is distributed within and amongst groups on the local, national, and international levels. Some of the topics explored include the Elite, Pluralist, Marxist, Realist, and Corporatist perspectives; trends in democratization, voting, and political participation; the ideologies and utopian visions that sometimes motivate political action; the role of the media and special interest groups as agents of political socialization; and the global dominance of the West. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 3172. GOD IN A BOX: THE QUEST FOR RELIGIOUS MEANING ON FILM. (4 Credits)

An exploration of the foundational concepts in the sociology of religion, this course finds its inspiration in a wide range of films, from early silent classics to documentaries to foreign films to today's reality TV series. Through a rigorous study of selected works as well as supplementary readings, we gain a better understanding of the nature of religious belief and nonbelief, of communtiy and family, of ritual, of conversion, and of the relationship between religion and politics. Our focus is on the Judeo-Christian tradition, and our approach is interdisciplinary, centered on sociological thought but also drawing on film theory, history, philosophy, and psychology. No prerequisites are required, but the course is demanding in terms of reading, writing, and class participation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 3241. SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH AND ILLNESS. (4 Credits)

This course takes a sociological perspective on health and illness, considering them not simply as biological or medical phenomena but products of complex social, economic, political, and cultural forces. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 3242. MENTAL HEALTH AND HUMAN RIGHTS. (4 Credits)

This multi-disciplinary course examines mental health institutions and practices through the lenses of human rights and civil liberties. Course material focus on social, political, and economic factors that have shaped accepted understandings and treatment of mental illness historically and into the present, and various ways that gender, race, class and sexuality have played into societal distinctions between sick and well. Some specific topics include forensic psychiatry, civil commitment, deinstitutionalization and homelessness, diagnostic inflation, coercive forms of treatment and social movements advocating for the rights of individuals who receive mental health intervention. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: PJST.

SOCI 3249. FOR THE DEATH OF ME! SOCIO-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES ON DEATH AND DYING. (4 Credits)

The primary goal of this course Is to explore the social and cultural implications of the biological experience of human death and dying. Examples of topics that will be covered include: mortuary rituals and funerary behavior, the cultural construction of death, the effects of death on the social fabric, morning and bereavement, end-of-life issues, as well as ethical and moral Issues relating to death. Throughout the course, we will examine the fascinating variety of social and cultural responses to the biological fact of death. In doing so, we will explore Anthropological and Sociological literature that seeks to explain or interpret that tremendous variety. The course will be cross-cultural In Its outlook and will require students to make conceptual connections between theoretical literature and empirical observations. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 3255. SOCIOLOGY OF MEDIA. (4 Credits)

This course examines the role of the media, particularly the news media, as a dominant institution in a contemporary democratic society. Students will examine news media content,the structure of news media organizations, and the relationship of news media organizations to other dominant institutions. The materials used for examination will be a variety of contemporary case studies. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

SOCI 3256. POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY IN FILM. (4 Credits)

Film has played a central role in shaping the political landscapes of the 20th and 21st centuries and our collective understanding of them. The objective of this course is to enable students to read and analyze global and domestic politics through the medium of film an provide them with a firm grasp of theoretical and empirical issues in contemporary world politics from a sociological perspective. This course makes use of documentary, short-, and feature-length films to interrogate key themes in political sociology and analyze the most important political developments of our time. It also aims to provide students with an appreciation of the complex relationship between art and politics, history and mythology. Substantive areas of study will include: (1) terrorism and war (including civil war, military intervention, and the Cold War); (2) globalization, human rights, and "development"; (3) transnational and domestic social movements; (4) democratic and undemocratic political regimes; and (5) colonialism and imperialism. Readings will be drawn primarily from the field of sociology, but also from political science, history, and film and cultural studies. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 3260. POLITICS OF REPRODUCTION. (4 Credits)

The biological reproduction of the human species is a complex process that engages all major institutions of society: family, religion, morality, health, economy, and government. Using cross-cultural and social historical materials, this course will examine cases in which the control over reproduction is contested, focusing on such issues as family limitation, new reproductive technologies, and child custody. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, BIOE, GLBL, PJST.

SOCI 3300. "RACE" AND "MIXED RACE". (4 Credits)

The origins of "race," its historic role and social construction are examined. Ancient and modern day ideas are explored. Contrasts between the United States and Latin American conceptions of "race" and "mixed race" are analyzed. Future implications are discussed. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, LALS, PJST, PLUR.

SOCI 3401. GENDER, CRIME, AND JUSTICE. (4 Credits)

This course describes, explains, and challenges the treatment of men and women victims, offenders, and workers in the criminal justice system. In the process, we will examine and critique a)theoretical and empirical approaches to gender and crime, b)the role of the criminal law, and c)our responses to crime and victimization. Issues of race, class, and sexuality also will be raised. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, EP3, PJST, WGSS.

SOCI 3405. GENDER, RACE, AND CLASS. (4 Credits)

This course examines the relationship between gender, race, and class as overlapping dimensions of social experience in the U.S. Drawing on a variety of sources, including theoretical, ethnographic, and literary writings, each of these dimensions is considered as part of a complex approach to social problems. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, LALS, PJST, PLUR, URST, WGSS.

SOCI 3406. RACE/SOCIAL CONSTRUCT. (4 Credits)

This course concerns the evolution of racial typologies and classification system in the U.S. We will draw on a variety of texts from natural and social sciences, law, and literature to examine how "scientific" typologies of race are actually more reflective of power dynamics and social hierarchies than biological or genetic differences. Our goal is to understand the continuing significance of race in terms of social and economic power, as well and individual self-conceptualizations and identity politics. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, URST.

SOCI 3409. RACE AND GENDER IN VISUAL CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This course will explore how different racial, engendered and class elements affect visual culture. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the cultural production in the Americas but this will be contrasted with other areas and regions from today’s globalized and migrant world. The students will be taught how to assess visual culture and the varying powerful and multi-faceted medium it represents. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

SOCI 3415. DEVELOPMENT AND GLOBALIZATION. (4 Credits)

This course will investigate development and globalization issues. Initially taking a broad theoretical approach and then delving into specific nation-state case study examples, students will be challenged to consider how globalization in terms of technology-based interconnectedness, cultural Westernization, economic liberalization, and political/social democratization is changing the lives of people throughout the world. Aspects of integration, assimilation, and reactionary movements and trends will be explored. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, INST, IPE, URST.

SOCI 3418. CONTEMPORARY IMMIGRATION IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

Over the past decades, immigration has again transformed the United States. It is also producing significant changes in other countries, from the European nations that used to send their citizens to the United States more than a century ago, to oil-rich Middle Eastern states and developing nations. This class explores multiple questions related to immigration: Why do people migrate across international borders? Can states control migration, especially "unwanted" migrants? We examine the policies that let some people in, while keeping others out and then consider incorporation, the process by which foreign "outsiders" become integrated in their new home. Are immigrants and their children becoming part of the U.S. mainstream? What is the mainstream? The arrival of newcomers also affects the cultural, economic, political and social dynamics of the countries and communities that receive them. How do sociologists evaluate and theorize immigrant integration? Finally, the course looks at topical debates around membership, including citizenship. The large-scale movement of people raises questions about belonging, nationality, and social cohesion. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP3, INST, LALS, MVST, PJST, PLUR, URST.

SOCI 3426. RACE, RACISM, AND WHITENESS. (4 Credits)

Normally approached from the standpoint of people of color, analyses of race and racism in America remain incomplete without a consideration of the particular historical, cultural, and epistemological dimensions of white experience. In this senior-level special-topics course, students will critically examine this legacy from an anti-racist perspective. After reviewing canonical observations about whiteness by Black intellectuals’ including W.E.B. Du Bois, James Baldwin, Frantz Fanon, and Bell Hooks, students will have an opportunity to consider more recent submissions to the field of critical whiteness studies, including the historical work of figures like Noel Ignatiev, as well as cultural analyses by figures like Richard Dyer. In addition to coming to a greater appreciation of the particularities and contradictory dimensions of whiteness (a category that , even in critical race theory, is often rendered as an abstract universal), students will work toward devising an understanding of what might constitute an effective anti-racist practice for white people today. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

SOCI 3427. HISPANICS/LATINOS IN THE USA. (4 Credits)

Explores the Hispanic mosaic in the U.S. Special emphasis is given to Hispanic education, culture and assimilation; the political significance of Hispanics; issues of gender, color and race; and work and the changing economy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, LALS, PLUR, URST.

SOCI 3450. TRANSNATIONAL SOCIAL MOVEMENTS. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, INST.

SOCI 3456. MODERN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS. (4 Credits)

Social movements in 20th-century America have been vehicles of political protest, social change, and sometimes also resistance to change. Under what circumstances are social movements successful and what has been their impact on American institutional life and popular culture? In addition to a general and theoretical assessment of social movements, this course introduces students to particular movements that have formed over such issues as alcohol consumption, racism, war, and abortion. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, PJST, PLUR, WGSS.

SOCI 3460. SOCIOLOGY OF EMOTION IN PUBLIC SPACE. (4 Credits)

As we move from a print-oriented society to a visually-oriented society, display of emotion in mass publics establishes new forms of social interactions. The social arenas that we inhabit become real- life stages of presentation of self and observation of others, which ultimately establish imagined public communities that inform our perceptions of public life. This course explores social arenas such as public parks, memorials, stadiums, and public street life within the context of media, race, class, sex, culture, and the globalized community. Individual and group performances in these spaces establish dramas where authenticity is perpetually sought after in the hope of discovering life-affirming experiences. Through the use of selected readings, films, and lectures, the course emphasizes sociological insights on our role as participants in emotional dramas in public. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 3470. GLOBAL REFUGEE MIGRATION. (4 Credits)

This course is designed as a survey of the major issues associated with the subject of refugees. We shall proceed by dealing with a series of different themes including defining a refugee, causes of refugee situations, asylum and protection, emergency relief and non-governmental organizations, the impact of refugees on receiving countries, resettlement and repatriation. The last four weeks of the course will focus on the Middle East and Africa. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, PJST.

SOCI 3471. UNDOCUMENTED MIGRATION. (4 Credits)

The undocumented category is technically not a “legal” category but is indirectly established by immigration law as it creates categories of admission. The number of undocumented immigrants began to increase after the 1965 amendments to the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, which restricted immigration from Latin America. Between 1990 and 2007, the number of undocumented immigrants living in the United States tripled but then stalled and declined slightly, perhaps as a result of the Great Recession. Although the majority of the undocumented are from Mexico and the popular stereotype is of migrants sneaking across the Southern Border, this category is composed of all individuals who entered the country without inspection, as well as visa overstayers; it thus includes people from every region of the world. The class will explore these dimensions and other aspects of the contemporary situation of undocumented immigration and immigrants in the U.S. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, LALS.

SOCI 3500. CONTEMPORARY FAMILY ISSUES. (4 Credits)

This class focuses on the sociology of the family by exploring issues relating to the status and functioning of families in contemporary United States society. The issues examined include sexuality, childbearing, divorce and remarriage, domestic violence, links between generations and the current state of social policy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, WGSS.

SOCI 3502. WORK, INEQUALITY, AND SOCIETY IN 21ST CENTURY AMERICA. (4 Credits)

How has the world changed and what will it look like in the future? How will it meet the needs of those entering the job market, & how can we democratically govern the conditions of the employment? This course examines the organization and development of labor markets and work in the contemporary United States. Topics will include the structure of occupations & the growth of service, information and "creative" sectors: the changing character of jobs and the rise of "precarious" labor: discrimination and access to opportunities: the interaction of gender, work and family; wages; income inequality & the provision of benefits like health insurance and retirement security; unions and movements for economic justice. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

SOCI 3503. WORK, FAMILY, AND GENDER. (4 Credits)

This course examines how two key institutions in society – the workplace and the family – interact with one another. Special emphasis is placed on the critical ways that work-family balance and conflict are conditioned by gender. The course will cover the impacts – both negative and positive – of work demands upon individuals’ family lives, as well as the effects of family obligations upon workers and workplaces. Students will be familiarized with voluntary responses to work-family challenges on the part of individuals, families, and employers, as well as relevant public policies in the U.S. and around the world. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, EP3, WGSS.

SOCI 3506. DIVERSITY IN AMERICAN FAMILIES. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the forms and structures of the family with emphasis on practices and ideologies, and how they vary by race/ethnicity, immigration status, gender, and sexuality. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, EP3, LALS, PLUR, WGSS.

SOCI 3507. QUEER THEORY. (4 Credits)

Drawing on aspects of poststructuralist theory to extend the critical insights of post-New Left movements for gender and sexual liberation, queer theory has since the mid-1990s become a major intellectual current in a variety of cognate fields including sociology, anthropology, women's studies, cultural studies, media studies, and more. In this senior-level special-topics course, students will familiarize themselves with key themes and debates in queer theory through a critical evaluation of canonical works by figures including Adrienne Rich, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Judith Butler, Jose Esteban Munoz, and Lee Edelman, as well as through an assessment of the observations of detractors like Adam Isaiah Green. Following the work of jasbir Puar, the course will conclude with an analysis of "pink washing" and the corresponding incorporation of queer issues into the hegemonic national projects of Israel and the United States. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, PLUR.

SOCI 3601. URBAN POVERTY. (4 Credits)

This course deals with contemporary issues and problems in cities, with a special focus on residential segregation and urban poverty. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, LALS, PJST, PLUR, URST.

SOCI 3602. URBAN SOCIOLOGY. (4 Credits)

One of the most significant developments in human history has been the development of cities. This course will examine the evolution and contemporary characteristics of cities in sociological perspective. The course includes a descriptive overview of the growth and development of cities and a discussion of the current state of urban America. Particular attention will be paid to New York City. We will also analyze various theoretical approaches to understanding urbanization, such as the human-ecological and Marxist theories. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, PLUR, URST.

SOCI 3603. URBAN AMERICA. (4 Credits)

This course offers an introduction to urban sociology and to the study of American urban society. Particular attention will be paid to New York City. Topics include the rise of “global” cities like New York, metropolitan growth and inequality, urban policy, and politics, patterns of class, racial, and ethnic group formation, and local community organization. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, PJST, PLUR.

SOCI 3606. THE GLOBAL CITY. (4 Credits)

What's so special about New York? Why have we come here? What binds so many diverse people together? The answer to these questions is usually contested, but the debate in urban sociology has increasingly had to do with the concept of the "the global city." The globalization paradigm started in the 1970s when the importance of cities grew as the continued relevance of national boundaries was increasingly questioned. This class will trace the historical emergence of the global city, covering the economic restructuring of the 1970s, the central theoretical literature, and several thematic topics exploring new neighborhood dynamics, labor relationships, new forms of segregation and fragmentation, as well as changing issues in central aspects of urban life, such as public space, shopping and consumption, immigration, etc. We will maintain a special focus on New York City, and by the end, you will have your own answers to such timeless urban questions. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

SOCI 3610. THE FAMILY. (4 Credits)

The study of American family patterns within the context of cultural variations throughout the world. Course will examine past myths about the American family; present trends in American family life, such as changing sex roles, new concepts of child rearing, and adjustment of kin networks to metropolitan settings; and newly emerging forms of marriage and the family. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

SOCI 3621. SOC ISS DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING. (4 Credits)

With wars and terrorism rampant throughout the globe, polarization in religion and politics, challenges to sexual freedom and democratic social movements, explosions of unimaginable wealth amidst unbearable poverty, and countless other social narratives both hidden and apparent, it is the documentary filmmaker in the trenches who records, analyzes, and preserves in word and image the momentous events taking place here and now. This course looks at the role of documentary filmmakers in today’s society as they capture and expose to public view the great upheavals of our times and the power struggles that lie behind them. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 3623. FILM AND RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE. (4 Credits)

Film and the Religious Experience is designed to give students a lively and challenging introduction to the major themes of religion from a sociological perspective, using film as the catalyst. The course will combine lectures with group discussion inspired by screenings (comprising Hollywood classic and contemporary films, early silents, documentaries, and experimental works) and readings (foundational texts by Durkheim, Weber, and William James to more recent books such as Religion in Film, John R. May and Michael Bird, eds.). The focus will be on the Judeo-Christian tradition and the Americas, but will also include some discussion of Eastern religions and alternative/outsier communities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 3670. HISPANIC WOMEN. (4 Credits)

An examination of the changing roles of Hispanic women with regard to Hispanic men, motherhood, the labor force experience, sexual awareness, media myths, political and economic power and women's liberation. The structural position and changing concepts of Hispanic women in the Americas will be examined through the lenses of analytical work and literature. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: LALS, PLUR, URST.

SOCI 3701. INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE. (4 Credits)

The course provides students with an overview of the three major areas of the United States criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts and corrections. The course takes a critical approach to the criminal justice system by questioning, challenging and examining all sides of various problems and issues. Class format will be a blend of lectures, discussion,presentations and class exercises. Police ride-alongs and a courtroom visit also will be arranged for those interested. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: URST.

SOCI 3708. LAW AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

How and when did law originate? What functions does law serve to the society and to the individuals within that society? Students will examine theories of jurisprudence and alternative sociological perspectives dealing with selected legal and constitutional issues in the United States and Europe. Particular attention is focused on legal policy and social change. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

SOCI 3710. VIOLENCE AND POLITICS. (4 Credits)

From the Battle of Blair Mountain to the recent explosion of riots in the wake of Darren Wilson's exoneration in Ferguson, Missouri, the story of American politics is indelibly marked by violence. Sometimes embraced, often denounced, but even more often sidestepped, debates about violence have tended to return (like all repressed phenomena do) with a frequency that only underscores their Importance. In this interdisciplinary undergraduate seminar, students will draw upon the insights of Sociology and other disciplines to assess America's social, historical, and cultural relationship to political violence. After reviewing theories of political violence by thinkers like Walter Benjamin and Carl Schmitt and subjecting foundational texts by figures like Thomas Jefferson and Louis Adamic to analytic scrutiny, students will consider important case studies including the historic split between Civil Rights and Black Power In the late 1960s, the Stonewall Rebellion of 1969, feminist engagements with violence after the second wave, and debates about violent tactics in the anti-globalization and Occupy movements. The course will conclude with an analysis of the ubiquitous and refracted forms of violence that pervade contemporary American culture (e.g. In video games) and an inquiry into recent police and vigilante violence against young Black men, including Oscar Grant, Trayvon Martin, and Michael Brown. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

SOCI 3711. AMERICAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS. (4 Credits)

This seminar course focuses on the administration of criminal justice and its relation to society, the police, prosecutor, defense attorney, judge, jury and correction agency. Observations at the courthouse allow for examination of constitutional rights, plea bargaining, jury selection, insanity defense and media coverage. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, URST.

SOCI 3713. CRIMINOLOGY. (4 Credits)

This course surveys the state of knowledge and theories explaining criminal behavior and attempts to control it by society. Although the sociological perspective on crime is emphasized, class discussion and the text attempt to examine the subject from a multidisciplinary point of view, especially with respect to legal, biological, and psychological views of crime. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: URST.

SOCI 3714. TERRORISM AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

This course examines the history and societal causes of terrorism in its many forms, and the state's and society's counter-terrorist response. Among issues to be examined are the nature of terrorist ideology and the source of support for, and opposition to, terrorism among the people that terrorists claim to represent. Other issues to be examined are prevention preparedness and emergency responses to terrorist attacks, and political, civil, and human rights challenges faced by countries dealing with terrorism in the 21st century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, IPE, MEST, PJST.

SOCI 3720. MASS INCARCERATION. (4 Credits)

This course considers what the disciplines sociology, the law, public health, and social work contribute to our understanding of the causes and consequences of mass incarceration in the US. We will consider underlying assumptions about drug use, justice and punishment; how social forces (e.g., religion, the economy, Jim Crow, and politics) have shaped official responses to drug use and other social problems; and examine the social, legal, public health, and economic consequences of mass incarceration and the War on Drugs for individuals, families, communities, and contemporary society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, PJST, PLUR, URST.

SOCI 3730. CRIME IN TIME AND SPACE. (4 Credits)

One of the most consistent findings in criminological research is that crime is not evenly distributed within the environment. This begs the question: why is crime concentrated in certain areas, times and seasons? In this course, students will be introduced to the theoretical and empirical research that has attempted to explain these processes. Students will also be introduced to spatial analysis using geographic information systems software packages including ArcGIS. Special topics that will be covered include homicide, burglary, robbery, and assault. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 3800. INTERNSHIP. (3 Credits)

SOCI 3806. INTERPERSONAL BEHAVIOR AND GROUP PROCESS. (4 Credits)

Groups we associate with and the organizational settings in which we interact provide important contexts that shape what we do and even the identities we assume in everyday life. The study of social roles, selves, and identities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 4004. Art Worlds: Anthropology and Sociology Perspectives. (4 Credits)

The study of culture generally, and art world more specifically, allows us to understand the arts not only as aesthetics experiences, but also as institutional, economics, social, and political phenomena. Incorporating methods and insights from sociology and anthropology, and drawing on the resource of the immediate context of New York City’s cultural communities and institutions, the course will introduce students to issues in and methods for cultural analysis. The analysis of art worlds will include: 1) a consideration of the intentions of creative agents or producers; 2) the distribution of these objects within particular systems; and, 3) the reception and interpretation of these objects by and within particular social groups or communities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

SOCI 4020. PLACE, SPACE, AND IMMIGRANT CITIES. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the main issues and current debates on immigrant minorities in large urban areas. Due to their density, cities represent microcosms of interaction and identity formation among and between different minority and majority groups. This often manifests itself spatially, as certain neighborhoods become areas of residence and territorial concentration for immigrant minorities. In the process of settling, immigrants also start identifying strongly with their spaces of settlement. This course will trace the historical patterns of this process, as well as explore its contemporary manifestations, as cities are being rediscovered and "gentrified," rendering their neighborhoods into fierce battlegrounds of spatial contestation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, INST, URST.

SOCI 4052. AN ETHICS OF MODERN SELFHOOD: THE PURSUIT OF AUTHENTICITY. (4 Credits)

The modern and postmodern self or identify, examined as a series of personal and moral conflicts and dilemmas. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COMC, COMM, ICC, THEO.

SOCI 4105. RELIGION, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY. (4 Credits)

This course considers the intersections of religion, gender, and sexuality. In many parts of the world, including the United States, and in many religious traditions, cultural and religious identity and continuity hinge on gendered practices and closely controlled sexual regimes. The goal of this course is to understand how religious institutions, communities, doctrines, practices and traditions shape gendered ideologies and practices, debates about sexuality and gendered division of labor, and the lives of men and women who participate in these religious communities. The course is organized conceptually; rather than learning about specific religious traditions, we will discuss thematic issues at the intersection of religion, gender, and sexuality. At various junctures we will discuss specific examples that span religious traditions, geographical locations, and historical periods. The course will therefore provide students with a sense of how contemporary and seemingly local debates are rooted in much broader conversations. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ICC, PLUR.

SOCI 4245. ETHICS IN RESEARCH. (4 Credits)

This course will examine approaches to responsible research practices across the natural and social sciences, with particular attention to research involving human participants. The course will provide an overview of the research process, foundations in research ethics, and provide examples of research across disciplines that exemplify scientifically valid and ethically sound research methods planning, implementation, and dissemination. In particular, the course will draw on long-standing research traditions in the field of sociology, and psychology in order to provide a foundation upon which ethical issues can be discussed. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: BIOE, EP3, ICC.

SOCI 4400. GENDER, BODIES, AND SEXUALITY. (4 Credits)

This course explores how gender and sexuality shape and organize our lives. We will examine how gender is built into structures, institutions, and ideologies of social life as well as the interaction between gender and other axes of inequality, including race, class, and sexual orientation. The course will examine the experiences of men and women in addition to those who do not fit into these gender categories. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ICC, PLUR.

SOCI 4408. DIVERSITY IN AMERICAN SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

An examination of historical and contemporary diversity in the United States. Diversity is defined according to ethnicity, race, religion, class, and other relevant social groups. A comparison of the situation of old and new ethnic and immigrant groups will be made with special attention to factors affecting integration into the society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: LALS, PLUR.

SOCI 4421. DISABILITY, LITERATURE, CULTURE: NEUROLOGICAL, MENTAL, AND COGNITIVE DIFFERENCE IN CULTURE & CONTEXT. (4 Credits)

Disability studies, the central focus of this course, is an inherently interdisciplinary field. Drawing particularly on two of its constituent disciplines, literature and sociology, this course will explore the questions and problems raised by neurological, mental and cognitive disabilities, as they relate to identity, community, and belonging. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ICC.

SOCI 4900. INTERNSHIP SEMINAR. (4 Credits)

Placement in a work setting of their choice provides students with an opportunity to assess their own career goals, while simultaneously enriching their understanding of how social groups function. Issues and topics from the sociology of formal organizations, including work role socialization, the organization as a social system, the bureaucracy and its public, formal and social processes in organizations, managerial ideologies and the relation between character and career are discussed. Placements must be obtained through the Internship Program located in the Career Planning and Placement Office. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 4902. INTERNSHIP SEMINAR: COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS. (4 Credits)

This seminar explores the context, forms, and goals of community organization in the United States with a focus on urban, social, and environmental issues. Class meetings with proceed in tandem with students’ internship placements in local community-based organizations or other agencies. Students may choose their own internships, and assistance will be provided to help those in search of placement. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ENST, URST.

SOCI 4933. RESEARCH SEMINAR. (4 Credits)

This seminar will focus on student research projects. Students will be expected to design and carry out a semester-long research project in the area of their choice. This is an interactive seminar stressing hands-on experience. Skills in topic selection, research design, and theory construction are emphasized. The project may be conducted in relation to an internship experience. (Permission by the Instructor required). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 4961. URBAN ISSUES AND POLICIES. (4 Credits)

A discussion of urban issues and policies. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ICC, PJST, URST.

SOCI 4962. HEALTH/INEQUALITY IN THE US. (4 Credits)

This course examines the patterns and causes of health inequalities across key social groups in the United States. Grounded in a social-ecological approach to health, students examine how the distribution of money, resources, and power creates marked differences in the social and physical conditions within which we live our lives. These conditions, known as the "social determinants of health," contribute greatly to the formation of health inequalities. Examples of the social determinants that are examined include race/ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual identity, immigration/nativity status, and residential location Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 4970. COMMUNITY SERVICE/SOCIAL ACTION. (4 Credits)

This course will deepen students understanding of the meaning of community service and social action in America and challenge them to confront the moral issues and social commitments necessary to be members of a just democratic society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, EP4, LALS, MVST, PJST, SRVL, URST, VAL.

SOCI 4971. DILEMMAS OF THE MODERN SELF. (4 Credits)

Modern selfhood or identity is studied as a series of conflicts or dilemmas "What is a self today?" What are the special problems of ourselves as modern and post-modern "subjects?" Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, EP4, SRVL, VAL.

SOCI 4990. CONFLICT RESOLUTION AND JUSTICE CREATION. (4 Credits)

This course examines the psychological, social, and philosophical foundations of peacemaking and conflict resolution drawing on theories and experience from sociology and philosophy, and to some extent theology. The course will include experiential exposure to workshops on conflict resolution and non-violent social action techniques, drawn from social justice organizations. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, LALS, PJST.

SOCI 4998. SENIOR THESIS. (4 Credits)

Independent research under mentor guidance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

SOCI 4999. TUTORIAL IN SOCIOLOGY. (1-4 Credits)

Supervised individual study. Provides an opportunity for students to work closely with an individual faculty member on a specific topic or project.