Anthropology

Note: "Sociology and Anthropology" is a single academic department at Fordham, but the academic information for each subject is listed on a separate web page. Information about sociology programs is listed under sociology.

The aim of anthropology is the comprehensive study of the human condition, the origins of our species in evolutionary biology, and the development of culture and society in its many variations among ancient and contemporary peoples. Its subject matter encompasses an immense time depth and a vast spatial range, including the simplest human societies and the most complex civilizations, including modern industrial nations. Anthropology brings together many areas of scientific and humanistic inquiry, unifying and integrating knowledge about people and their perceptions of the world, and it offers a balanced perspective on the momentous cultural changes wrought by globalization that are ongoing today.

A major in anthropology is important for those who seek to understand our multiethnic society and the varieties of culture on our planet. It is a valuable asset for any work entailing contact with the public and especially for careers involving international affairs or travel. The experience with cultural diversity that anthropology provides is excellent preparation for law, business, and other graduate studies, and its biological component makes it attractive to admissions officers of medical schools. The synthesizing nature of anthropology also makes it suitable for students pursuing a double major in which anthropology
is combined with other areas of the humanities and the natural and social sciences.

Program Activities

Honors and Awards

The department offers the opportunity for students to become members of Alpha Kappa Delta, the international honor society for sociology students. Each spring, students are inducted into Fordham’s Chapter Iota. At Rose Hill, the department honors its seniors at the end of year awards ceremony, Encaenia, by bestowing the Rev. Joseph P. Fitzpatrick, S.J. Memorial Award and the Rev. J. Franklin Ewing, S.J. Memorial Award for the best submitted essay by a graduating sociology and anthropology major, respectively. At Lincoln Center, the department also recognizes excellence in its graduating seniors with departmental honors in sociology and anthropology at its own diploma ceremony. The department also sponsors a Sociology Club, a Criminology Club, and an Anthropology Club at Rose Hill, and a Society for Sociology and Anthropology at Lincoln Center, all organized and governed by students.

Internships

Both sociology and anthropology majors and nonmajors are encouraged to take advantage of the Internship Seminar offered by the department. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop skills in social analysis, policy development, program evaluation, and interpersonal relations while being of service to others in a real-life setting outside the classroom. Employment opportunities include agencies and corporations in the New York metropolitan area, ranging from organizations in the public sector, including the New York State Department of Corrections, the Legal Aid Society, and the Puerto Rican Family Institute—to organizations in the private sector—including CBS, Merrill Lynch, and IBM. Each student is required to spend a minimum of eight to ten hours per week in an agency (public or private) or organization chosen to fit the individual student’s interests and expertise. All students who enroll in the program are required to do both the internship placement and to take SOCI 4900 INTERNSHIP SEMINAR). Field placements must be obtained through the internship program coordinator located in the Office of Career Planning and Placement.

Anthropology Resources

Departmental resources include Stone Age implements; ethnographic art and artifacts from Southeast Asia, the South Pacific, and Africa; a teaching collection of human skeletal material, an archive and database of colonial and early American bricks from New York City and a large collection of colonial and early American artifacts. In cooperation with the history department, the anthropology program at Rose Hill conducted the longest running archaeological excavation in New York City at the Rose Hill manor from 1985 to 2002, located on the Rose Hill campus. Artifacts from this campaign are undergoing laboratory analysis, for which students may volunteer to help.

For more information

Visit the Sociology and Anthropology department web page 

Sociology and anthropology offer the following which fulfill the first social science core requirement:

Course Title Credits
ANTH 1100INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY3
ANTH 1300INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY3
SOCI 1100INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY3

The advanced social science core requirement may be satisfied by an advanced-level course in sociology or anthropology. The course in Physical Anthropology, ANTH 1200 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY, fulfills the life science core requirement for nonmajors. In addition, the department regularly offers courses that fulfill the American Pluralism, Global Studies, Interdisciplinary Capstone, and Eloquentia Perfecta 1 and 3, and Values Seminar/EP4 core requirements.

Our Courses

ANTH 1050. ANTHROPOLOGY FOCUS. (3 Credits)

ANTH 1100. INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (3 Credits)

We live in a shrinking international arena that demands greater sensitivity to the diversity of cultural patterns surrounding us. In this course, students investigate human beliefs and behavior, particularly in regard to forms of communication, marriage and the family, adaptions to the environment and to political, economic and religious institutions in a variety of past and present cultures.

Attributes: FRSS, GLBL, ISIN, SSCI.

ANTH 1200. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (3 Credits)

This introduction to physical (or biological) anthropology satisfies a core life science requirement and serves as a general survey of the biological focus of anthropology. The course summarizes the different areas of physical anthropology and covers the history of evolutionary theories, human genetics and adaptation, primate biology, behavioral ecology and conservation, and an extensive overview of the human fossil record. In particular, we emphasize the variations found in non-human primates and the biological and cultural changes that took place in our ancestors over the past 6.8 million years. Lab sessions will provide a practical introduction to human osteology, primate morphology, primate conservation, and comparisons of human fossil morphology.

Attribute: LSCI.

ANTH 1300. INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY. (3 Credits)

How do we study society when no living members of that culture remain? Students will examine the ways by which archaeologists have inferred former patterns of behavior from surviving evidence through a survey of traditional methods as well as new scientific techniques. Students will study artifacts from the University's collection and 'excavate' their own archaeological site on paper to better understand the process of investigation.

Attributes: CLAS, FRSS, GLBL, IPE, MEST, SSCI.

ANTH 1413. LANGUAGE AND CULTURE. (4 Credits)

An introduction to linguistic science emphasizing the structure, functions, and origins of languages as the symbolic system of communication peculiar to humans. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: GLBL.

ANTH 1500. INTRODUCTION TO FASHION AND CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This introductory lecture course is required for students pursuing the Fashion and Culture minor. In this class, students will be introduced to cultural and media studies concepts that will equip them with the theoretical and methodological tools necessary to explore fashion as a historically situated and context dependent form of communication and meaning making. The course considers the implications of fashion within systems of power, every day acts of self-presentation, and larger politics of representation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: FCLC.

ANTH 1600. INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN VARIATION. (3 Credits)

This introductory physical anthropology course explores in detail issues of human biological variation, that is, why humans differ from each other. It satisfies a life science core requirement and examines evolutionary theories, human genetic variations, and human adaptations to environmental stresses. The main focus of investigation of human genotypic and phenotypic variations as observed in contemporary human populations to obtain an understanding of the biological basis for anatomical and physiological variation (incorrectly referred to as ‘race’ in a social context), including different evolutionary mechanisms that have shaped these variations, and how changing environments may have influenced these directions as well as the emergence of, and adjustment to, various chronic diseases. Lab sessions provide a practical introduction to cellular genetics, population genetics, osteology, anthropometry, statistics, and human evolution.

Attribute: LSCI.

ANTH 1999. SERVICE LEARNING-1000 LEVEL. (1 Credit)

In this student-initiated program, the student may earn one additional credit by connecting a service experience to a course with the approval of the professor and the service-learning director.

ANTH 2202. ANTHROPOLOGY OF PERFORMANCE. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

ANTH 2447. PASSAGES: LIFE CYCLES. (4 Credits)

Although the life cycle is biologically based, societies differ in the way they conceptualize the stages of life. This course explores differing concepts of personhood and how a person is linked to moral beliefs and ideologies of power. We examine the way rites of passage (e.g., birth, initiation ceremonies, marriage, parenthood, and death) shape personhood in different cultures. We consider how the perspectives of psychology and anthropology complement, challenge, and enrich our understanding of the life cycle. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, ISIN.

ANTH 2500. TABOO: ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE FORBIDDEN. (4 Credits)

Taboo helps identify sources of social danger, establishing prohibitions designed to protect society from that which it considers dangerous or repulsive. Yet, the prohibitions always exert an undeniable attraction, leading to a fascination with transgression. Through exploration of the anthropological notion of taboo-and related cross-cultural concepts of impurity, contagion, and transgression-this course will explore the extent to which prohibition and danger structure social life. Topics considered will include incest, cannibalism, eroticism, filth, murder, madness, and sin. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, INST, IPE, ISIN.

ANTH 2520. INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

The course surveys methods in crime scene investigation and forensic archaeology. Often, the commision of a violent act leaves an unidentifiable corpse, which requires the expertise of a forensic anthropologist to identify the guilty party. Students will learn how forensic anthropologists create biological profiles from deceased individuals (using metric, non-metric, odontological, and genetic information). Notable persons and current research in the field will be introduced through the examination of case studies. The applications and abuse of forensic evidence in the courtroom and popular culture are also explored. Students will come to understand the direct relationship between archaeology, physical anthropology, and forensics in the quest not only to solve "Who Dunnit?", but "Who Was It?" Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

ANTH 2522. OLD BONES: DEATH AND DYING IN THE ANCIENT WORLD. (4 Credits)

This course uses human skeletal material, and the information gleaned from it, as a lens through which we can understand health, disease and death in the ancient world. Humanity has faced an uneasy tension with surrounding ecosystems, and each other, since the dawn of agriculture. The subsequent emergence of sedentary society allowed people to control ancient environments and achieve new levels of cultural sophistication, in numbers that were not possible for hunter-gatherers. These advances, however, came with a price. The emergence of complex society created fragile co-dependencies with plants and animals, and increased social stratification, urban crowding and territorial disputes. Population interactions led to the emergence and spread of disease, oppression and violence that has, throughout the course of history, killed millions. This course explores these trends in the transition between small nomadic bands and cities occupied by thousands. Students will learn about the way in which human skeletal material elucidates the impact that “progress” had for our species, and they will learn about and explore the way health, death, and dying will be forever imprinted on our ancient ancestors’ bones and teeth. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 2614. URBANISM AND CHANGE IN THE MIDDLE EAST. (4 Credits)

This course discusses urban traditions and theories in the Middle East. The course material will cover multiple Middle Eastern cities, old and new. Through ethnography we analyze the impact of colonial policies on the politics of space and place. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, ISIN, ISME, MEST.

ANTH 2619. MAGIC, SCIENCE, AND RELIGION. (4 Credits)

Magic, science and religion will be analyzed, compared and contrasted. Problems in the comparative study of these topics, especially of religion, the "supernatural," and world view, are discussed in the context of various cultures. (Every other year). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: BESN, BIOE, GLBL, INST, IPE, ISIN, LALS, LASS, REST.

ANTH 2620. THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF CITIES. (4 Credits)

This course explores the everyday life of cities in a range of international contexts. We will investigate the formation of urban neighborhoods, urban ties based on ethnicity and religious beliefs, multilingualism and changing notions of the city due to globalization. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, IPE, ISIN, URST.

ANTH 2700. YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT: THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD. (4 Credits)

As the center of all significant human rituals and ceremonies, food is studied by a range of natural and social scientists. For the anthropologist, food is connected to the human body, health social relations, identity, and even ideology; we are literally what we eat. This course examines the role food plays in shaping cultural practices throughout the world. Students will explore changing concepts of food through time, beginning with early humans, modes of food production, and consumption. Through primary literature, lectures, local ethnic markets, and sharing meals throughout the semester, this class will immerse you in the theoretical and empirical significance of the cross-cultural significance of food. Bon appetit! Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AMST, ASSC, ENST, ESHC, ISEU.

ANTH 2770. ANTHROPOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the experience of childhood cross-culturally, including, for example, toddlers in New Guinea, North American tweens, and child soldiers in Sierra Leone. We will address issues such as discipline, emotion, authority, and socialization within the broader context of race, religion and gender. Special attention will be given to the effects of war, poverty, and social inequality on children and the recent development of a set of universal human rights for children. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, INST, IPE, ISIN.

ANTH 2880. HUMAN SEXUALITY IN CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

Human sexuality in Cross-Cultural Perspective. Human sexuality presents a challenge to anthropology which, as a general practice, continues to divide the biological from cultural. Sexuality depends on biology, but its actual practices arise in specific cultural contexts, which vary widely. In this course, we examine older anthropological theories of sexuality as well as a new emerging interactionist paradigm that recognizes the power of both biology and culture. Specific topics include enthnographic method in the study of sexuality, evolutionary theory, cultural constructivism, heteronormativity, and gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender issues, in a range of societies. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, INST, IPE, ISIN, WGSS.

ANTH 2886. ANTHROPOLOGY OF GENDER AND SEXUALITY. (4 Credits)

Are sex roles biologically determined or culturally defined? A cross-cultural perspective provides a unique opportunity to explore answers to this question through an examination of the roles of men and women in marriage and the family and in economic, political and religious institutions, as well as how such roles are interrelated with conceptions of masculinity, femininity, honor and shame. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, INST, IPE, ISIN, WGSS.

ANTH 2888. GENDER AND ISLAM. (4 Credits)

This course will examine gender roles, ideologies, and debates in majority-Muslim societies around the world, as well as the global politicization of gender and Islam. Specific topics to be covered include gender in Islamic texts and law and their interpretation over the centuries; the gender question in political movements, ranging from nationalism to Islamism; sex segregation practices and the issue of honor; and Western images of Muslim women. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, ISIN, ISME, MEST.

ANTH 2890. VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

Culture affects what and how we see, and what we see affects our culture. Film, still photography and video each enable anthropologists to capture and analyze aspects of this relationship, and of culture in general. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 2892. POWER AND FILM: THE POLITICS OF REPRESENTATION. (4 Credits)

From Nanook of the North to Harlan County USA to Anthony Bourdain's travels to "Parts Unknown," filmmakers have tried to capture lives and communities that often veer far from their own experiences. But in our current age of global voices, who has the right of representation? How does a visual anthropologist, a documentary filmmaker or a television news correspondent convey cultural differences without condescension, appropriation or exploitation? Through close examination of documentaries and news pieces, this class will examine how the camera lens pretends to show its subjects "as is," but is actually filled with all the complications and challenges of representation. We will look at television footage from natural disasters to war zones to the crime blotter, where tight deadlines, physical danger, and linguistic distance can bend the image, and affect our understanding of conflict and victims. Who gets to tell these stories, how they are told, and how is this changing in a globalized world form part of the politics of representation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 2999. TUTORIAL. (2 Credits)

ANTH 3002. ART AND ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

In this class, we will explore the century-long dialogue between anthropology and the creative arts. From Picasso and Matisse appropriating African arts, and Zorah Hurston drawing on her anthropological research for her novels, to Michael Taussig's use of fiction as an ethnographical tool, the study of culture and the creation of art have long been closely intertwined. We will read essays, ethnographies, poems, novels, and life histories, tracing the possibilities of anthropology as a creative discipline and a way of understanding creativity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 3110. ANCIENT CULTURES OF THE BIBLE. (4 Credits)

What was it really like in Biblical times? Through an archaeological investigation of the Holy Land, particularly the Canaanite, Israelite and classical cultures of Old and New Testament times, this course provides students with a better understanding of the ancient social and religious background of our modern Judeo-Christian tradition. Extensively slide illustrated. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, CLAS, GLBL, MEST, PJST, REST.

ANTH 3111. NEW WORLD ARCHAEOLOGY. (4 Credits)

What were the Americas like before the arrival of Europeans? This course investigates the prehistory of the western hemisphere with emphasis on the arrival and expansion of hunter-gatherer societies throughout the New World. Explore ancient Native American cultural adaptations from the Ice Age to today's global warming within the diverse and dynamic habitats of early times. Students will gain a broader appreciation of American Indian culture and diversity, as well as its extraordinarily long record of survival and achievement. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, LALS, MVST.

ANTH 3115. INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (4 Credits)

The interdisciplinary field of medical anthropology focuses on the study of health and healing within cultural, biosocial and cross-cultural contexts. Students will develop an understanding of how to apply core concepts and methods from anthropology to understanding and addressing problems located at the intersection of culture, well-being, disease and death.

Attribute: ASSC.

ANTH 3154. SPORTS: AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

Why is sports so pervasive throughout the world? Sports entertains and generates billions in revenue, but it has a more profound role in human society. This course will examine sports as an integral part of human culture that can both reproduce and challenge cultural structures. We will discuss how issues such as race, class, gender, sexuality and nationalism are embodied and performed on the field and in the stands, using the context of multiple sports. While we will take a critical look at sports, this course will also approach the topic with an eye to the common human experience of joy in the game. As Galeano said, “when good soccer happens, I give thanks for the miracle and I don't give a damn which team or country performs it.” Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ISEU.

ANTH 3180. ETHNOGRAPHIC METHODS: CULTURES OF NEW YORK CITY. (4 Credits)

This course explores the cultural diversity of New York City from an Anthropological perspective. The focus will be on how different groups use urban public spaces, e.g., ethnic and religious communities within the city and urban subcultures. Students will use readings to inform their own ethnographic research on the cultures of New York. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AMST, APPI, ASHS, LALS, LASS, URST.

ANTH 3197. PEOPLES OF SOUTH ASIA. (4 Credits)

This course explores the people, history, culture and politicsof South Asia. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 3260. POLITICS OF REPRODUCTION. (4 Credits)

The biological reproduction of the human species is a complex process that engages all major institutions of society: family, religion, morality, health, economy, and government. Using cross-cultural and social historical materials, this course will examine cases in which the control over reproduction is contested, focusing on such issues as family limitation, new reproductive technologies, and child custody. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction .

Attributes: ASSC, BIOE, GLBL, PJST.

ANTH 3339. IRISH AND MEXICAN MIGRATION: NEW YORK FOCUS. (4 Credits)

The course will take a comparative look at the historical and contemporary Irish and Mexican migrations to New York City. Special emphasis will be given to ethnographic exploration and analysis of the different communities' migration processes, including how each has impacted on the city, and also transformed the origin populations back home in Ireland and Mexico. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AMST, ASHS, ASSC, LALS, SOCI.

ANTH 3340. ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES ON RACE AND ETHNICITY. (4 Credits)

A cross-cultural, interdisciplinary consideration of the concepts of race and ethnicity, this course examines racial and ethnic categories and explores how they form, how society gives them meaning and the circumstances under which they change. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, INST, IPE, ISIN, LALS, LASS, PLUR, URST.

ANTH 3343. GHETTOS AND GATED COMMUNITIES. (4 Credits)

How do humans order their urban landscapes? Do different cultures segregate certain peoples in the urban landscape? Do cultures exclude certain groups from certain neighborhoods? Students will become acquainted with ghettos and gated communities in different cultures around the world and compare them with their own to discover what they share and don’t share. Students will learn how anthropologists study global urban communities. Topics to be covered in this course are urbanization, creation of ghettos and gated communities, influences on the urban landscape from gender, political, economic, social, and global forces. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, GLBL, INST, ISIN, PJST, URST.

ANTH 3347. ANTHROPOLOGY OF HIV/AIDS. (4 Credits)

This course explores the cultural, historical, political, economic, and public health aspects of HIV/AIDS. We will study the emergence, development, and contemporary meaning of HIV/AIDS in the US and internationally, impacts across multiple sectors of society, experience of affected populations, responses of health, political and social sectors; and varying approaches to prevention and treatment. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ISEU.

ANTH 3351. COMPARATIVE CULTURES. (4 Credits)

This course will survey the diversity of cultures in the world and the processes that have produced similarities and differences among and within various geographic areas. Some of the central topics of discussion include human adaptation and adaptability, social change, modernization and ideas of development in small scale as well as in complex societies today. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, GLBL, INST, IPE, ISIN, ISWH, LALS, LASS, MEST.

ANTH 3354. RACE, IDENTITY, AND GLOBALIZATION. (4 Credits)

The course will explore the power of racial discourses in the production of global difference over the last five decades. Particular emphasis will be placed on the work of James Baldwin to understand the insights of the North American civil rights movement, and its global influence since the 1960's. The civil rights movement coalesced at an important moment of global historical questioning, and along with the African and Caribbean nationl liberation movements, anti-Vietnam war protests, feminist and gay struggles and the student uprisings in Europe and Latin America, marked a particular manner in which to re-think global concepts such as democracy, citizenship, transnational identity, and political consciousness. The objective of the course is to make use of Baldwin's racial, national, and global reflections to understand the global effects of the progressive movements initiated five decades ago. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, AMST, APPI, ASHS, ASRP, INST, ISIN, LALS, LASS, URST.

ANTH 3355. CULTURE AND ANTICOLONIALISM. (4 Credits)

In this course students will read and discuss major texts in the anticolonial traditions of Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean. The course will also address how the search for a "native" esthetics marked the cultural production of these regions in the Twentieth Century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, ISAF, ISIN, ISLA, PJST.

ANTH 3356. UPRISINGS: PROTEST AND RESISTANCE ACROSS THE GLOBE. (4 Credits)

This course will examine anthropologies of protest and resistance, with a special focus on urban and transnational social movements. It will offer anthropological tools for understanding resistance and power, as well as ethnographic methods for studying them. It will include case studies (for example, anti-colonial and anti-apartheid movements, the Arab Spring, and indigenous rights activism) and opportunities for students to research protest and resistance in digital media and in New York City. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, ASHS, ASSC.

ANTH 3380. HAZARDS, DISASTERS, AND HUMAN EXPERIENCE. (4 Credits)

Sandy, Katrina, 9/11. Natural and anthropogenic disasters are not new (consider Pompeii or even Noah's flood), but because of global climate change, the intensity and frequency of storms is increasing along with tragic human suffering and property destruction. Anthropological perspectives are increasingly relevant to disaster prevention and relief efforts, especially since anthropologists participate in inquiry and cleanup in the aftermath of these disasters. By exploring the complexities of recent and past natural and human caused disasters, this course explores the ways in which cultures perceive and respond to disaster. We will identify pragmatic actions which can mitigate or prevent human suffering and improve relief efforts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, ENST, ESHC, HHPA, INST, ISIN.

ANTH 3393. GRAFFITI: THE CHALLENGES AND CONUNDRUMS OF STREET ART. (4 Credits)

The course will focus on the history and development of graffiti since its ancient inceptions in cities like Pompeii to its post-modern ex[ressions. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of graffiti in resisting and critiquing official state power, and how, over the centuries it has been a focus of state censorship and repression. Scholars and colleagues will also be invited to talk about graffiti from different perspectives. Meanwhile students are expected to carry out a research term paper about the history, development, and unique issues of graffiti in a particular urban center. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AMST, ASAM, ASSC.

ANTH 3470. PEOPLE AND CULTURES OF LATIN AMERICA. (4 Credits)

This course surveys the diversity of Latin America as a continent and as a complex mixture of peoples and cultures with an increasing presence in the United States. It will place particular emphasis on the discussion of ethnicity, race, gender, religion, artistic production, and economic and political inequality. The aim of the course is to understand the cultural and social particularities of contemporary Latin America and to place them in a global context. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, INST, ISLA, LALS, LASS.

ANTH 3510. MUSEUMS: CULTURES ON DISPLAY. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the purposes museums serve and the meanings museums create in New York City and throughout the world. We will consider practices of collecting and displaying both objects and people, and we will cover both the historical development of museums and contemporary museums-related controversies. The course will frequently meet at New York City museums for in-situ learning experiences. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AMST, APPI, ASAM, ASHS, URST.

ANTH 3520. FORENSIC INVESTIGATION OF THE HUMAN SKELETON. (4 Credits)

To understand how the human skeleton is utilized to identify the deceased and sometimes solve crimes, knowledge of skeletal biology and anatomy is paramount. This course has two primary objectives: first to provide basic but solid knowledge of the human skeleton, and second to explain the application of that knowledge to forensic anthropology. Students can expect to obtain a critical understanding of human skeletal anatomy and forensic osteology, as well as the ability to think critically about the recent media glamorization of forensic practice. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

ANTH 3570. APPLIED HUMAN RIGHTS. (1 Credit)

Most people working on international affairs, and other disciplines internationally oriented, might confront cases of human rights violations. Some international workers try to prevent those directly, or to deal with these impacts, and others need to document, at least partially, those violations as the relate to their core mission (e.g. implement health programs for teenagers in a conflict area, or address displacement of indigenous peoples by corporations). How can we understand the relations between different international programs and human rights works? What are the similarities, differences and intersections? What ablities and methods are required for all international workers confronting human rights violations? What are some of the most recent successes in international law and domestic regulations? In this seminar, we will present diverse examples in several domestic regulations? In this seminar, we will present diverse examples in several countries that intersect with human rightts violations. We will describe the professional roles of different team members (lawyers, psychologists, social workers, doctors, communitiy actors, etc.) and the tools and protocols needed in order to successfully register their experiences (in context of warfare, environmental damage, and even in natural disasters). We will listen to the testimonies of survivors and human rights workes, and will present specific cases emphasizing the security needs and the risks involved in those.

Attributes: ASSC, BESN, BIOE.

ANTH 3605. MOTHERING AND MOTHERHOOD. (4 Credits)

This course provides an in-depth look at what is often assumed to be the most basic and fundamental building blocks of all human relations: mothering. But what does it mean to be a mother? Who is allowed to mother? Whose motherhood is lost or denied? What qualifications does it take mother? And how does what appears to be the private practice of motherhood, intersect with larger political processes, gender ideals and hierarchies, science and technology, and public expressions of intimacy? We will explore the concepts of mothering and motherhood to understand its dynamics beyond birth, bake sales, and kissed boo-boos. This course provides an opportunity to question and rethink mothering and motherhood in a variety of social and cultural contexts both within and outside the U.S. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, ISIN, WGSS.

ANTH 3620. BORDER CULTURES IN THE CITY: SUMMER IN NEW YORK. (1 Credit)

The course will explore a migrant New York City normally not visable to most of the native inhabitants of the city. In this manner, the course will allow students to meet and understand the different struggles and lived-in reality of migrants, particularly Mexican ones, as they strive to make a dignified living for themselves and their families. The course will look to asses and discuss the physical, cultural and emotional border culture that migration has created between Mexico and the United States but also between many of the Central and South American nations. To this degree it will also explore the newly invigorated Latino culture in the United States, one that figures more and more prominently in the future of the United States and the continent. Finally, through daily lectures and site visits to migrant organizations and communities students will explore the myriad of manners in which politcs of identity and culture have taken shape and have shaped our city.

Attribute: ASSC.

ANTH 3710. BILINGUALISM: LOCAL PRACTICES AND GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES. (4 Credits)

Human beings have produced at least 7,000 languages in the history of the world, many communities support the use of more than one of these within their boundaries and many individuals acquire multiple languages over the course of a lifetime, sometimes switching among tongues within the same conversation even in today's global English. The course examines the many approaches that sociolinguists and linguistic anthropologists have developed for studying how and why humans do this. What are the causes and consequences of retaining moe than one language in our domestic lives, cultural institutions, and nation-states? What are the costs and benefits? Why, in short, do humans continue to value and invest in bilingualism, both locally and globally? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, ISIN.

ANTH 3725. CULTURE AND CULTURE CHANGE. (4 Credits)

Selected issues in the relationship of human behavior and culture. Issues dealt with in this course include the concept of culture, culture and the individual, culture contact, and culture change. (Every other year) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, AMST, APPI, ASHS, GLBL, HHPA, INST, IPE, ISIN, ISWH, MEST.

ANTH 3726. LANGUAGE, GENDER, AND POWER. (4 Credits)

An examination of how everyday language use is constituted by cultural ideas about gender, power, and identity. Various theoretical frameworks are analyzed through ethnographic case studies which include Mexico, Malagasy, Senegal, Hungary, Nepal and the United States. We focus on issues such as prestige, politeness, inequality and hierarchy, language shift, multilingualism, code-switching, and literacy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, ISIN.

ANTH 3771. PYRAMIDS, GODS, AND MUMMIES. (4 Credits)

The course looks to explore the myriad of manners in which these politics of identity and culture have taken shape over the last centuries (and even millennia). Through lectures, readings and site visits to archaeological and historical sites around Puebla and Mexico City the course will assess how these migrating notions of culture have served to enable contesting identities across and through the border production between the United States and Mexico. It is particularly useful to view this dynamic from down below to better complete the authoritative picture officially espoused by the governing bodies of both countries. To this degree the value of the course will be to explore, first through lectures, secondly through site visits, and thirdly through small research papers and a final small research project how sometimes similar, and at other times differing, notions of what it means lobe American has permeated the landscape of the continent, and continues to fuel our cultural and political identities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 3800. INTERNSHIP. (3 Credits)

ANTH 3888. ARAB WOMEN AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS. (4 Credits)

This course explores the participation of Arab women in social movements before and after the 2011 “Arab Spring”. The course will be examining why and how women contribute to political and social changes, the challenges they encounter, and the changes in their understanding of their roles as citizens in the postcolonial nation-state. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, ISME, PJST, WGSS.

ANTH 3999. SERVICE LEARNING-3000 LEVEL. (3 Credits)

In this student-initiated program, the student may earn one additional credit by connecting a service experience to a course with the approval of the professor and the service-learning director.

ANTH 4004. Art Worlds: Anthropology and Sociology Perspectives. (4 Credits)

Incorporating methods and insights from sociology and anthropology, and drawing on the resource of the immediate context of New York City's cultural communities and institutions, this course will analyze many of the arts and artistic communities of New York City. The study of culture generally, aand art worlds more specifically, allows us to understand art and culture not only as aesthetic experiences, but also as institutional, economic, social and political phenomena. Our summer mid-day time slot will allow us to avail ourselves of numerous field trips and cultural excursions to support our discussions, readings, and lectures. This course currently fulfills an Interdisciplinary Capstone Core requirements for Fordham College students and is expected to be listed as an EP3 course by Summer 2014. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

ANTH 4005. ANTHROPOLOGY OF J.R.R. TOLKIEN. (4 Credits)

The fictional writing of J.R.R. Tolkien, including The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings, has many direct correlations with historical Europe, and beyond its literary value, it can serve in some ways as an ethnographic account of the curious land of Middle Earth. The works describe and extraordinary panorama of myth and borrowed facts, from which we can refine our understanding of the "other" through analysis of sociolinguistics, funerary ritual, cultural norms, and archaeology while simultaneously exploring the sources of Tolkien's imaginative creations. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

ANTH 4114. ANTHROPOLOGY OF HEALTH HEALING AND SOCIAL JUSTICE. (4 Credits)

Health and illness will be studied as an interrelationship of biology, ecology, and culture in antiquity and contemporary societies. Among concepts of health and healing explored in Euro-American and non-Western cultures are: What is "normal"? What causes disease? Who can heal? What treatments are provided? What impact does modernization have on these cultural patterns? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: BESN, BIOE, GLBL, ICC, INST, IPE, ISIN, LALS.

ANTH 4341. RACE, SEX, AND SCIENCE. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to interdisciplinary debates about the relationship between race, sex, and gender, on the one hand, and science, technology, and medicine, on the other. We will examine two interrelated questions: How do scientific claims influence cultural understandings of race, gender, and sexuality; and how do cultural beliefs about race, sex, and gender influence scientific research and knowledge production? The course will explore the role that understandings of race, sex, and gender have played in the development of Western science; the relationship among race, sex, gender, and scientific research in genomics and health disparities research (among other fields); and finally, the ways in which race, gender, and social inequalities become embodied and affect human biology. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ICC, LALS, PLUR, SOCI, URST, WGSS.

ANTH 4344. REPRODUCTIVE TECHNOLOGIES: GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

The interdisciplinary course will focus on issues in technology and reproduction, emphasizing the view that reproduction is not simply a biological process, but one that is laden with symbolic, political, and ideological meanings. Drawing on the fields of anthropology, sociology, history, public health, law, and science, technology and society. We will examine the contested meanings of reproduction, in particular how reproductive technologies are changing lives around the globe. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: BESN, GLBL, ICC, INST, ISIN, WGSS.

ANTH 4373. ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN SURVIVAL. (4 Credits)

This course is an inquiry into the biological and cultural processes by which human populations have adapted to the world's diverse ecosystems. Particular attention is devoted to issues of group survival in difficult habitats and the environmental impact of preindustrial and recently Westernized cultures. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ADVD, APPI, ASRP, ENST, ENVS, EPLE, ESHC, GLBL, HHPA, ICC, IPE, ISIN.

ANTH 4490. ANTHROPOLOGY OF POLITICAL VIOLENCE. (4 Credits)

Political violence happens everyday, whether we endure it personally or hear about it through the media. But seldom do we ask ourselves what it is. This course investigates the nature of political violence and articulate its many forms from the anthropological perspectives of gender, class, ethnicity, economics, and of course, politics. Specific areas of study include Northern Ireland, Germany, Sudan, Palestine, Mexico, Argentina, China, Australia, and the U.S. The course will discuss the motivations for action (or inaction) by governments, elites, and insurgents, and students will get to know some of the organizations working against political violence. Field trips will include visits tothe United Nations, The United Holocaust Museum, and Ground Zero. Podcasts, news broadcasts, movies and audio documentation of events will provide further access to examples of global political violence. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: APPI, ASHS, HHPA, ICC, INST, IPE, ISIN, PJST.

ANTH 4722. PRIMATE ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION. (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to primates. Through lectures, readings, discussions, and observation projects, students will investigate the emergence of the order and explore the diversity of primates around the world. The course will address issues of ecological adaptation, social organization, and conservation, especially of the species most threatened by extinction, and it will illustrate how habituation projects make it possible to conduct effective field studies. The evolutionary basis of the special characteristics of primates will be discussed, as well as the question of what nonhuman primate behavior can tell us about ourselves. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ENST, ENVS, ESHC, ICC.

ANTH 4802. ARCHAEOLOGY OF NEW YORK. (4 Credits)

The history of New York City and its environs takes on a completely different feel when the people and times are illustrated using material culture, the artifacts representing the daily activities of previous lives. Borrowing from the university's extensive collection of objects dating from prehistory to the 20th century, the course will examine former times through the lens of the items recovered from archaeological excavations, landfills, subsurface trash accumulations, and construction worksites in order to provide a more personal and intimate view of the past. Historical in the broadest sense, the curriculum will not include a detailed chronology of the city but instead explore the worlds of household, industrial production, urban infrastructure, and other social dimensions that the real objects make accessible. Aspects of conservation and curation of these rare documents of the past will be covered as well. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 4998. SENIOR THESIS. (4 Credits)

Independent research under mentor guidance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

ANTH 4999. TUTORIAL IN ANTHROPOLOGY. (1 to 4 Credits)

Supervised individual study project.

Attribute: GLBL.