Initial Teaching Programs (MST)

Office: Room 1102
Phone: 212-636-6450

The programs of the Division of Curriculum and Teaching (C&T) prepare and develop teachers, at the initial and advanced levels, who are committed to personal and school excellence. The programs are designed to develop teachers’ knowledge, understanding, and skills to enable them to be successful, reflective practitioners. 

The Fordham Graduate School of Education is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 

In addition, our programs in early childhood are nationally recognized by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC); our elementary education program is nationally recognized by the Association of Childhood Education International (ACEI); our programs in special education are nationally recognized by the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC); our literacy programs are recognized by the International Reading Association (IRA); and our teaching English to speakers of other languages program is recognized by the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages International Association (TESOL). In addition, our adolescence education programs are nationally recognized by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), the National Council of Social Studies (NCSS), the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), and the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). 

ASGE 5112. FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT. (1-3 Credits)

A basic course dealing with the role of the school-based administrator in the administration of schools. The course takes up issues related to account management issues, school effectiveness, human resources, communications, and human relations.

ASGE 5119. FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISION. (3 Credits)

Considers the human, technical, educational, and moral aspects of supervision; possible arrangements and alternatives for supervision; effective practices in supervision; and needed involvement of supervision in school restructuring. Students will consider curricula, pedagogy, professional development and evaluation as part of this course.

ASGE 5902. MANAGEMENT OF CONTINUING AND ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAMS. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to provide an understanding of current behavior concepts, theories, and processes of management and supervision as applied to adult-education organizations and agencies.

ASGE 6105. HR I: THE GENERALIST. (3-4 Credits)

This course begins the program, introducing current issues faced by organizations and by HR departments in particular. We examine those functions typically enacted by HR generalists, including recruitment and retention, employee relations, and legal issues germane to HR (e.g., ADA, AFMA, OSHA, fire-at-will, sexual harassment).

ASGE 6110. HR II: THE SPECIALIST. (3 Credits)

This course explores the functions typically enacted by HR specialists, including benefits, compensation, succession planning, and labor relations.

ASGE 6130. INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP. (3 Credits)

Development of leadership in optimal staff performance and emphasis on factors that facilitate learning. Students will develop understand their role as instructional leaders using formal and informal observation protocols and practice assessing lessons using a variety of rubrics.

ASGE 6132. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR. (3 Credits)

Focuses on social/psychological forces influencing the behavior of the individual. Topics include communication, perception, motivation, attitudes, values, adult development, leadership, power, and influence.

ASGE 6145. LEADING IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY. (1-3 Credits)

Provides understanding and knowledge of the various cultural and ethnic groups in America and how they have impacted society and vice versa; explores concepts, issues, and dilemmas related to a multicultural, diverse society from both a historical and contemporary perspective; develops strategies to understand dynamics of the school community; and proposes solutions to meet challenges of a diverse society.

ASGE 6224. THE SUPERINTENDENCY. (3 Credits)

Consideration of the chief roles of the superintendent of schools, such as school board relationships; personnel; finance and budgeting; program planning; community relationships; local, state, and federal relationships; and evaluation.

ASGE 6225. BOARDS OF EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

The study of the role, responsibilities, power, and legal aspects of dealing with boards of education. Course is designed for board members, and practicing and prospective school administrators.

ASGE 6227. CASES AND SIMULATIONS IN ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION. (3 Credits)

This course uses a variety of cases and simulations to provide “situational data” for analysis of issues, problem solving, and leadership development.

ASGE 6322. SCHOOL FINANCE. (3 Credits)

Theory and practice of property taxation, tax and educational equity issues, understanding state school aid, and alternatives to existing funding patterns. It also considers the management of financial resources at the district and site level.

ASGE 6325. SCHOOL LAW. (3 Credits)

The legal status of the pupil, the teacher, and the superintendent; liabilities of school boards; inter-relationships of the school and the state. The interrelationships of the school board and municipality, as well as labor laws.

ASGE 6331. SHAPING EDUCATIONAL POLICY. (3 Credits)

A study of educational management as affected by public policies. Focus on political environments, decision-making processes, and legislation influencing education, as well as strategies and techniques for managing their impact on educational institutions.

ASGE 6333. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. (3 Credits)

This course deals with promoting the personal and career growth of people in organizations, using a model of a career life cycle, beginning with orientation and moving through each job change and promotion. Focus is on ways to provide challenging assignments to people through lateral rather than vertical moves.

ASGE 6338. ETHICS OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. (3 Credits)

Using case studies and theoretical analyses, this course examines the ethical issues that school administrators commonly face.

ASGE 6359. ADMINISTRATION OF POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

The course examines the variety of educational institutions beyond secondary education, including colleges and universities, community colleges, professional schools, and career preparation institutes from an organizational and management perspective. Beginning with an overview of the history and philosophy of post-secondary education, this course will consider how purpose, structure, function, budget, and operations have developed and changed to meet the changing needs of and demands on post-secondary education in the 21st century.

ASGE 6361. STRATEGIC PLANNING/CHANGE. (3 Credits)

The basic elements and dynamics of planned change are examined. Emphasis is on strategies for achieving change in urban schools, including examples of successful innovation. The course focuses on how school leaders use data and budgets to drive their instruction plans in a K–12 environment.

ASGE 6362. UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING CHANGE. (3-4 Credits)

Students learn to scan the internal and external environments to identify challenges and constraints, to understand stakeholders’ investments in maintaining or challenging the status quo, to understand and manage change in the context of various change models, and to align business strategies with organizational systems and structures.

ASGE 6371. HIST & DESCRIP RESEARCH. (3 Credits)

Techniques in the use of archival materials, primary sources, and secondary publications will be taught in the framework of educational policy research.

ASGE 6461. CRITICAL ISSUES IN ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION. (0-3 Credits)

Synthesizes research on enduring and emerging issues in administration and supervision including retrenchment, special education, finance and desegregation.

ASGE 6520. INTERNSHIP I. (3 Credits)

Systematic observation and planned participation in the administrative and supervisory activities of an urban or suburban school. Application must be submitted to the division chairperson by the end of the second month of the semester preceding internship.

ASGE 6521. INTERNSHIP II. (3 Credits)

Systematic observation and planned participation in the administrative and supervisory activities of an urban or suburban school. Application must be submitted to the division chairperson by the end of the second month of the semester preceding internship.

ASGE 6531. CLINIC FOR SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS. (1.5-3 Credits)

This clinic course provides a university setting in which present and prospective administrators can consider current issues, problems, and opportunities in contemporary school systems.

ASGE 6532. SEMINAR FOR NONPUBLIC SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS. (1-3 Credits)

This is an individualized, project-centered course in which participants will bring together multiple understandings and competencies developed in earlier courses and focus them in a synthetic way on a major problem or issue.

ASGE 6541. PERSPECTIVES ON LEADERSHIP. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to expose participants to various theories of leadership, to have them examine their own experience in working with a leader, to have them probe their own sources of motivation in seeking to exercise leadership, and to have them develop specific leadership skills and approaches in becoming accountable school leaders.

ASGE 6620. ADVANCED STATISTICS IN ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION. (3 Credits)

Covers statistical inference and prediction in research in educational leadership, administration, and policy, including parametric and nonparametric methods, and concepts of measurement and probability.

ASGE 6720. PROGRAM EVALUATION AND RESEARCH IN ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION I. (3 Credits)

Focuses on the nature of research as it applies to studies in educational leadership, administration, and policy. Includes the development of research topics and the selection of appropriate ways to investigate these topics. Students will learn how to use data to drive instruction.

ASGE 7320. DATA ANALYSIS & ACCOUNTABILITY. (3 Credits)

School administrators are challenged to mangage and analyze data to inform instruction and improve student performance. This course teaches the use of data for setting goals, monitoring progress and using data warehousing-thus holding educators accountable for results. Students will analyze and share data in "data cycle" format to inform educators and the public regarding what they receive from the district and/or read in the print and electronic media.

ASGE 7322. ECONOMICS AND FINANCE OF EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

Course studies the efficiency of the funding of education—including sources, budgets, uses, and effects—at the federal, state, and local levels. Key concerns are the equity of spending, the efficiency of resource utilization, the productivity of schools in relating dollars spent to student achievement, and the privatization of education (e.g., charter schools, vouchers, and school choice). Course has practical uses for school leaders who must set budgets, maintain sources of school income, and analyze the spending of funds in both public and private schools.

ASGE 7333. DATA ANALYSIS AND ACCOUNTABILITY. (3 Credits)

School administrators are challenged to manage, analyze, and use data to inform instruction and improve student performance. This course teaches the use of data for setting priorities and goals, monitoring progress, and data warehousing—thus holding educators accountable for results. Students will also analyze and share data in a “data cycle” format to inform educators and the public regarding what they receive from the district or read in the print and electronic media. The overall purpose is to use data analysis for school accountability, improvement, and reform.

ASGE 7428. SEMINAR IN LEADERSHIP. (3 Credits)

This advanced seminar deals with selected topics and issues in leadership. The course involves the exploration of theoretical frameworks as means of interpreting problems from the field and suggesting leadership responses to these problems.

ASGE 7429. SOCIAL THEORIES AND EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. (3 Credits)

This is an in-depth analysis of social theories and their implications for the restructuring of educational and other social institutions. The course focuses on structural-functional theory and other theories and their contemporary critics.

ASGE 7430. POLITICAL FACTORS IN ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION. (3 Credits)

The study of the effects of coalitions, local political systems, and power and authority with respect to administering and leading educational systems.

ASGE 7431. ADMIN & SUPV SEMINAR. (3 Credits)

An advanced seminar in administration and supervision; exploration and study of comprehensive professional concerns.

ASGE 7432. SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY. (3 Credits)

Focuses on application of organizational theory to school administration. Theories of Weber, Argyris, McGregor, Etzioni, and others will be examined.

ASGE 7435. STRATEGIC THINKING, PLANNING, AND IMPLEMENTATION. (3 Credits)

Every organization needs to grow, and today’s organizations need to do so in a competitive and ever-changing environment. The heart of the change process is in the strategy the organization selects to move forward. In this course, students learn to understand their industry, the competition, and their organization’s core competencies and values. They learn strategic models, including those of Michael Porter, Treacy and Wiersma, Hamel and Prahalad, Kim and Mauborgne, and Richard D’Aveni. Using Nadler and Tushman’s model for Congruence, they learn to align their organizations with the chosen strategy.

ASGE 7439. ADVANCED SEMINAR FOR NONPUBLIC SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. (1,3 Credits)

This course provides advanced study of administration in nonpublic schools. Issues of finance, curriculum, personnel, physical plant, instruction, and community relations are covered.

ASGE 7440. SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR. (1-3 Credits)

This course focuses on individuals and groups in the organization and on both the micro and macro perspectives of their behavior. The perspective, historical background, methodology, and theoretical framework for the field of organizational behavior will be presented. The emphasis will be on developing leaders with a vision that reflects an understanding of the social and psychological forces influencing the behavior of the individual in organizations and the dynamics, processes, and structures of organizational behavior.

ASGE 7442. LEADING ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the nature of discontinuous change and on managing the paradoxes of change including chaos and order. Several current theories of change will be presented and applied to students’ organizational settings. The emphasis will be on developing leadership skills for crafting a vision, mission, and strategic plan for change, as well as for aligning the organization behind the vision.

ASGE 7444. LEADING A LEARNING ORGANIZATION. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the nature of learning organizations (in business and in schools)—and the process that has been used to create and lead such organizations. While studying various leadership styles and perspectives, an ongoing emphasis will be placed on hypothesizing how these divergent interpretations of leadership can be applied to learning organizations. Teams will complete in-depth studies of actual learning organizations (in business and schools) and present these models. This will lead to an individual reflective plan centering on leading a learning organization.

ASGE 7446. SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE. (1-3 Credits)

This course focuses on the nature of organizational culture: how it comes into being, how to shape a culture, and how to change a culture. Students discuss the development of norms, values, and behaviors in an organization. Examples of effective as well as dysfunctional cultures are analyzed.

ASGE 7448. SEMINAR IN ETHICS AND SOCIAL JUSTICE. (1-3 Credits)

This course develops students’ vocabulary for discussing and clarifying ethical issues and for gaining understanding of ethical issues within organizations. The course helps students develop policies and strategies to address ethical issues within their organizations, toward their clients, and within the civic communities in which they are located.

ASGE 7450. SEMINAR IN THE SPIRITUALITY OF LEADERSHIP. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the nature of spirituality and on leading the building of community within organizations. The course will explore spirituality as it basically relates to education. Throughout the course, spirituality will be differentiated from formal religion. The spiritual dimension of educational practice will be presented as it pertains to building community with educators, families, organizations, and cultures.

ASGE 7530. CLINICAL PRACTICE IN ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION. (3 Credits)

This course provides students with applied field experiences designed to work out solutions to particular problems of practice.

ASGE 7531. ADVANCED QUALITATIVE RESEARCH. (3 Credits)

This course offers students the opportunity to engage in field research activities that focus on initial research design, data collection, and analysis.

ASGE 7721. RESEARCH IN ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION I. (3 Credits)

Emphasizes development of individual research proposals, using quantitative methods and design, in preparation for dissertation seminar.

ASGE 7731. RESEARCH IN ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION II. (3 Credits)

Continue development of conceptualizing research questions with emphasis on qualitative methodology.

ASGE 8001. RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP. (0 Credits)

ASGE 8505. DIRECTED RESEARCH IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP, ADMINISTRATION, AND POLICY. (1-3 Credits)

Designed for students who are developing research problems or projects for their doctoral studies.

ASGE 8750. DISSERTATION SEMINAR: EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP, ADMINISTRATION, AND POLICY. (3 Credits)

Seminar for advanced Doctor of Education candidates in the Division of Educational Leadership, Administration, and Policy who have completed all of their coursework. The purpose of the seminar is to assist students in developing an approved dissertation proposal.

ASGE 8751. DISSERTATION SEMINAR: EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP, ADMINISTRATION, AND POLICY, PHD. (3 Credits)

Seminar for advanced Doctor of Philosophy candidates in the Division of Educational Leadership, Administration, and Policy who have completed all of their coursework. The purpose of the seminar is to assist students in developing an approved dissertation proposal.

ASGE 9990. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1-4 Credits)

Designed to enable students to study selected topics in depth and to conduct research. For matriculated students only. An outline of the proposed work must be approved by the adviser. Registration requires approval of the professor directing the study, the division chair, and the director of graduate studies.

CLGE 6100. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CONTEMPORARY LEARNING AND INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH. (0-3 Credits)

Special topics for CLAIR program.

CLGE 6101. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CONTEMPORARY LEARNING AND INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH. (0-3 Credits)

Used with unique course title each time offered.

CLGE 6102. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CONTEMPORARY LEARNING AND INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH. (1 Credit)

This module will focus on analyzing data gathered in mixed method research.

CLGE 6103. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CONTEMPORARY LEARNING AND INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH. (1 Credit)

This module will focus on writing up and presenting mixed methods studies.

CLGE 6104. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CONTEMPORARY LEARNING AND INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH. (0-3 Credits)

This course shall be used with unique course titles and descriptions each time it is offered.

CLGE 6105. INTERVIEW ANALYSIS. (1 Credit)

This module will focus on analyzing interview data.

CLGE 6106. Academic Writing. (1 Credit)

This module will focus on writing for academic purposes.

CLGE 6140. FOUNDATIONS OF INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH I. (3 Credits)

Representative seminal and field/action research studies drawing on the professional literature in psychology, anthropology, linguistics, and education to develop an understanding of diverse research traditions.

Attribute: TE.

CLGE 6142. FOUNDATIONS OF INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH II. (3 Credits)

During this two-semester seminar, doctoral students will be immersed in representative seminal and field/action research studies drawing on the professional literature in psychology, anthropology, linguistics, and education to develop an understanding of diverse research traditions. Participants will explore research designs and processes in published studies for posing questions, and collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data from quantitative and qualitative perspectives. Drawing on the knowledge bases informing an interdisciplinary understanding of learning, we will design our individual and collaborative studies using hypothesis testing and hypothesis-generating stances, mindful of the ethical dimensions of these endeavors.

CLGE 6240. GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES ON LANGUAGE, CULTURE, AND EQUITY. (1-3 Credits)

Provides theoretical and research exploration of global conceptualizations for communicating and learning in more than one language.

CLGE 6280. MULTICULTURAL COMPETENCIES AND TOOLS OF AWARENESS, TRANSFORMATION, AND ADVOCACY. (3 Credits)

Grounded in interdisciplinary theory, research, and practice implications for effective learning, this course is designed to develop: (a) foundational multicultural competencies, particularly in the self-awareness components of empathic resources and hidden biases, and (b) culturally relevant tools for promoting educational achievement for all students, including those vulnerable to discrimination. Students will be challenged to reflect on their own cultural biases, expand their conception of appropriate professional roles, and develop awareness, knowledge and skills necessary to facilitate effective learning opportunities with diverse students. This course incorporates didactic, experiential, cognitive, affective, individual, and small group models of learning.

CLGE 6380. STANDARDIZED AND ALTERNATE ASSESSMENTS FOR STUDENTS AT RISK OR WITH DISABILITIES. (3 Credits)

Focus on practices and policies related to the use of standardized and alternative assessment approaches for understanding and supporting student learning, instructional planning, and policy making.

Attribute: TE.

CLGE 6400. LEARNING THROUGH LANGUAGE. (3 Credits)

An interdisciplinary course focusing on the relationship for teachers and supervisors between language as a tool for learning and language as evidence of learning. Particular emphasis will be placed on the relationship between these concerns and the need for improving the reading and writing proficiencies of students in all levels of education.

CLGE 6440. UNDERSTANDING CONTEMPORARY LITERACIES. (3 Credits)

Introduces various frameworks of literacy in the contemporary world.

CLGE 6540. DEVELOPMENT IN CONTEXT. (1-3 Credits)

This course will review current thinking in developmental psychology as reflected in prevailing developmental theory and curent areas of research.

CLGE 6545. STRUCTURAL, PHILOSOPHICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS OF ARGUMENT. (0-3 Credits)

Explores the form and function of arguments in writing and discourse.

CLGE 6550. MOTIVATION TO LEARN. (1-3 Credits)

This course will focus on taking an in-depth look at achievement motivation from a psycholgical perspective.

CLGE 6555. BECOMING LEADERS OF CONTEMPORARY LEARNING. (0-3 Credits)

Examine contemporary learning through the forces that are generally attributed to reshaping education in the 21st century.

CLGE 7150. PROGRAM ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION II. (1-3 Credits)

This courses focuses on how to assess the effectiveness of educational service delivery systems, both in schools an other human service settings.

CLGE 7152. PRGM ASSESS & EVAL II. (1-3 Credits)

Focuses on how to assess the effectiveness of educational service delivery systems, both in schools and other human service settings.

CLGE 7175. INTERNSHIP IN CONTEMPORARY LEARNING AND INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH. (0-3 Credits)

Students shall engage in professional experiences in the schools and/or education related agencies as interns. Prerequisite: CLGE6140 and CLGE6142.

CLGE 7190. ADVANCED SEMINAR IN INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH I. (0-3 Credits)

Team taught, two semester will scafford the skills and learning of research apprentices though the process of conducting interdisciplinary, ethnographic, field, and empirical research studies.

CLGE 7192. ADVANCED SEMINAR IN INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH II. (0-3 Credits)

Team-taught, two semester seminar will scafford the skills and learning of research apprentices through the process of conducting interdisciplinary, ethnographic, field, and empirical research studies.

CLGE 7194. ADV SEM INTERDIS RES III. (0-1 Credits)

Three semester seminar will scaffold the skills & lerning of research apprentices through the process of conducting interdisciplinary, ethnographic, field, & empirical resarch studies.

CLGE 7220. CLOSING THE OPPORTUNITY/ACHIEVEMENT GAP. (3 Credits)

Provides educators, leaders, and policy makers with the skills, knowledge, and dispositions to work with diverse youth populations.

CLGE 7240. MULTILINGUAL LITERACY: EXPLORING LITERACY IN MULTIPLE LANGUAGES AND CULTURES. (3 Credits)

Provides theorectical and research foundations to the intersection of lanugae and culture across literacy practices in multiple educational, social, and georgraphical contexts.

CLGE 7340. CONTEMPORARY INTERVENTIONS FOR STRUGGLING READERS AND WRITERS. (3 Credits)

It is estmiated that more than 10 million children in the United States have some degree of oral-language-based reading disability. Roughly 80 percent of children referred for special services require support services in reading, writing, and oral language. Best contemporary practices rely on interdiscplinary teams to assess difficulties and plan interventions. This interdisciplinary course draws from the fields of literacy, learning disabilities, psychology, and neuroscience in examining theories and research in reading and writing processes and best practices for universal design.

CLGE 7490. TEACHING COMPOSITION IN THE 21ST CENTURY: THEORY AND PRACTICE. (1-3 Credits)

This course will explore cognitive and sociocultural perspectives of writing and ask students to consider and practice methods for teaching and researching issues of composition in the 21st century.

CLGE 7520. COGNITION, TECHNOLOGY, AND INNOVATION. (0-3 Credits)

Overall objective of course is to gain and apply knowledge of human information processing, motivation, and creativity to the design of effective instruction.

CLGE 7570. POSITIVE TRAJECTORIES: RESILIENCE AND ADAPTATION. (1-3 Credits)

CLAIR. Provides an overview of the extant research on the individual, community, and cultural qualities that facilitate optimal develpment amount "at risk" learners.

CLGE 8001. CAPSTONE RESEARCH PROJ. (0-1 Credits)

To establish candidacy, CLAIR doctoral students are required to work on a capstone project and schedule a hearing with the capstone committee.

CLGE 8002. CAPSTONE RESEARCH PROJ. (0-1 Credits)

To establish candidacy, CLAIR doctoral students are required to work on a capstone project and schedule a hearing with the capstone project committee. The function of the project is to demonstrate the breadth and depth of scholarship, and the unique talents and experiences of each student. As such, this project should be tailored to the student’s interests and ideally tied to the dissertation. During this experience, the student will select and work closely with a mentor, who will help in the development of the capstone project. This mentor can be the student’s academic advisor or another faculty member with whom the student has research interests in common. Successful defense of the capstone project will establish doctoral candidacy.

CLGE 8110. DISSERTATION SEMINAR: CONTEMPORARY LEARNING AND INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH. (3 Credits)

Seminar for advanced doctoral candidates who have completed all coursework for their degree. The purpose of the seminar is to have students develop an approved proposal for their doctoral dissertation.

CLGE 8111. DISSERTATION SEMINAR: CONTEMPORARY LEARNING AND INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH. (3 Credits)

Seminar for advanced doctoral students. PRE-REQUISITE: CLGE 8001.

CLGE 9990. CLGE SPECIAL TOPICS. (0-3 Credits)

CTGE 5065. INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY INTO ELEMENTARY EDUCATION. (1 Credit)

This course assumes introductory knowledge, skills, and understanding of concepts related to technology including the ability to access, generate, process and transfer information using appropriate technologies as well as familiarity with various software programs. This course will assist students in planning, designing, implementing and assessing learning environments and experiences supported by technology. This course will emphasize computer capabilities for teaching, classroom management, the use of assistive technology and communicating electronically from a K-6 perspective.

CTGE 5066. TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES TO CHILDREN. (3 Credits)

This basic course in social studies education provides a conceptual and operational framework for reflective, pre-service teachers, systematically reflecting on research, theory, and practice as these influence teacher decision-making for enhancing student learning in social studies.

CTGE 5153. TEACHING THE GIFTED AND TALENTED. (0-3 Credits)

Characteristics and problems of gifted students, and ways of meeting their intellectual needs and interests. Emphasis will be placed on innovations, appropriate materials, and activities.

CTGE 5154. INCLUDING EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS. (0-4 Credits)

This course will introduce concepts, skills, and assistive technologies that enable teachers to include students with exceptionalities in regular classes. Emphasis will be on students with mild disabilities; in addition, we will learn about students with the full range of disabilities and special health care needs, along with the kinds of provisions often made for them in an Individualized Education Program (IEP). The course focuses on three interconnected strands: the effect of disabilities on learning and behavior, skills to identify student strengths and areas of need in order to individualize instruction, and collaboration with others to prepare students to their highest levels of academic achievement and independence within inclusion settings. Students are encouraged to create ideal inclusion models.

CTGE 5155. SPECIAL EDUCATION FOUNDATIONS: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE. (3 Credits)

Trace the principles, policies, practices, and perspectives of special education over time in the US and other countries. Students shall complete 8 hours field work focused on students with disabilities. Pre-Requisite for all special education courses.

CTGE 5157. ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES FOR YOUNG CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES. (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of assessment approaches and practices in early intervention and early childhood special education programs. Students will obtain skills in administering formal and informal assessments, implementing culturally unbiased instruments and procedures, and interpreting and communicating assessment results for planning intervention and evaluating instruction and programs. The role of the family in the assessment process is emphasized.

CTGE 5159. ASSESSMENT OF ALL CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES. (3 Credits)

This course prepares students to use formal and informal educational diagnostic methods for assessment, analysis and evaluation of children with disabilities. Issues of non-biased assessment and instructional implications are included.

CTGE 5160. INSTRUCTIONAL MODIFICATIONS FOR ADOLESCENTS IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS. (3 Credits)

This course will prepare teachers of adolescents to include students with disabilities and special health care needs in their regular content-area classes. Primary focus is on adapting and individualizing instruction and designing assessments to accommodate these students. In addition, the course will address refining skills for improving reading comprehension of content-area text and for collaborating with others to identify strengths, and preparing students with disabilities and special needs to their highest levels of academic achievement and independence. Prerequisite: CTGE 5154 Including Exceptional Students.

CTGE 5161. DIFFERENTIATING INSTRUCTION FOR ALL STUDENTS. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the development of curricula that is provided in a variety of educational settings. This course assumes that a classroom includes students of different physical and cognitive abilities, students of different racial ethinic, religious, and socio-economic origin, and students who demonstrate individual learning styles. The emphasis of this course is on the teaching-learning process via a decision-making model for differentiating instruction. This process considers the materials, presentation style, organization of classroom instruction (small group, individual, ect.), and the use of technology in differentiating curricula. Recognizing instruction as a callaborative process, this course will examine ways to build collaborative skills needed to establish positive professional relationships with parents, psychologists, social workers, administrators, community agencies, and paraprofessionals.

CTGE 5165. CONSULTATION AND CO-TEACHING IN COLLABORATIVE CLASSROOMS. (0-3 Credits)

Develop the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions related to effective communication and shared problem solving used daily in supporting students, families, and the community. Students will complete 8 hours field work focused on students with disabilities.

CTGE 5166. COLLAB & CO-TEACHING. (0-2 Credits)

Develop the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions related to effective communication and shared problem solving used daily in supporting students, families, and the community. Practice facilitation roles and responsibilities in key school structures such as IEP meetings, pre-referral intervention assistance teams, RTI Teams, working with Para educators, transition planning, and collaborative or co-teaching. Learn how to use positive behavior intervention and supports, functional behavioral analysis, and behavioral consultation. Plan how to develop a collaborative classroom culture where diversity strengthens a learning community.

CTGE 5167. BEHAVIOR INTERVENTIONS AND EFFECTIVE CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. (3 Credits)

This course will prepare teachers in special education to support students with disabilities in multicultural settings through the use of positive behavior intervention and supports, functional behavioral analysis, behavioral consultation, explicit instruction, current issues in behavior management. This course will also enable teachers to establish and create a safe, positive, supportive classroom environment in the classroom through behavior change and management.

CTGE 5170. ASSESSMENT OF ALL LEARNERS WITH DISABILITIES. (3 Credits)

Examine assessments to determine eligibility for special education and responsiveness to instruction, including norm-referenced texts, criterion-referenced assessment tasks, and curriculum based assessments.

CTGE 5175. TEACHING ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS AND SOCIAL STUDIES IN INCLUSIVE ADOLESCENCE CLASSROOMS. (3 Credits)

Learn Strategies for resolving dilemmas of learner differences when planning curriculum content, daily learning experiences, and assessments specifically for English language arts and social studies courses.

CTGE 5176. TEACHING MATH AND SCIENCE IN INCLUSIVE ADOLESCENCE CLASSROOMS. (1-3 Credits)

Learn Strategies for resolving dilemmas of learner differences when planning curriculum content, daily learning, experiences, and assessments specifically for math and science courses.

CTGE 5177. EVID-BASED PRAC ST DISAB. (3 Credits)

Through this course, candidates will develop skills necessary to provide specifically designed instruction to students with mild, moderate, severe, and multiple disabilities including assistive technology, know and be able to use research-based teaching methods of core content areas; including instructional technology, and acquire sufficient pedagogy skills to teach secondary English language arts and social studies in a supportive role. In addition, candidates will learn how to provide access to the general education curriculum through modifications, accommodations, remediation, and acceleration.

CTGE 5200. FIELD EXPERIENCE SEMINAR: ISSUES IN REFLECTIVE PRACTICE. (0 Credits)

This continuous-enrollment seminar and series of field placements focus on issues in schooling practices. Field experiences progress from observation to guided practice with small and whole groups of students. Teacher candidates are assigned to field experiences across a variety of settings and grade levels appropriate to their area of study. The seminar is intended as a vehicle for critical and collaborative reflection, through which theory can be integrated with practical experiences. The seminar also provides a structure for organizing workshops in the prevention of child abuse, drug and alcohol abuse, and violence, and for developing the skills and knowledge necessary to provide a sense of community in a safe, respectful, and nurturing classroom environment.

CTGE 5201. STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR: ISSUES IN REFLECTIVE PRACTICE. (3 Credits)

The continuous-enrollment seminar and series of student-teaching placements focus on issues in schooling practices. Student-teaching experiences progress from guided practice with small and whole groups of students to full-time student teaching with ongoing responsibilities for curriculum and instruction. Teacher candidates are assigned to student-teaching experiences across a variety of settings and grade levels appropriate to their area of study. The seminar is intended as a vehicle for critical reflection through which theory can be integrated with practical experiences.

CTGE 5203. FLD EXP SEM IN SERVICE. (0 Credits)

This seminar/field placement focuses on integrating theory and practice in a setting and grade level appropriate to the candidates's area of study. Foci include observing, guided practice with dmall and whole groups of students with the seminar designed as a vehicle for critical and collaborative reflection.

CTGE 5205. INTERN FELLOWS SEMINAR. (0 Credits)

CTGE 5210. FIELD EXP ED. (0-3 Credits)

Zero credit and fee for TFA and AELE grant.

CTGE 5211. PRACTICUM FOR IN-SERVICE TEACHERS. (0 Credits)

Supervised student teaching in a setting selected under advisement. Analysis of innovative designs and application of theory to practice. Critical analysis of student competency through self-evaluation and supervisory feedback. Open only to students who already possess initial or professional certification.

CTGE 5212. TEACHING THE ARTS IN CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. (1 Credit)

Introduction to creative and expressive development in children, and to the theory and practice of appreciating and producing drama, movement, music, and the visual arts, as well as the integration of the arts into interdisciplinary curricula.

CTGE 5216. L/T IN PR/EL GRDS:SOC ST. (4 Credits)

CTGE 5222. PRACTICUM FOR IN-SERVICE TEACHERS. (3 Credits)

Supervised student teaching in a setting selected under advisement. Analysis of innovative designs and application of theory to practice. Critical analysis of student competency through self-evaluation and supervisory feedback. Open only to students who already possess initial or professional certification.

CTGE 5224. RDG WRIT LANG ARTS. (3 Credits)

CTGE 5227. TEACHING MATHEMATICS TO CHILDREN. (3 Credits)

This basic course in mathematics education provides a conceptual and operational framework for reflective, pre-service teachers, systematically reflecting on research, theory, and practice as these influence teacher decision-making for enhancing student learning in mathematics.

CTGE 5230. FRAMEWORK FOR EDUCATION FOR ALL YOUNG CHILDREN. (0-3 Credits)

A critical analysis of the theoretical and empirical bases for working in early childhood settings developed for young children with and without disabilities. Overview of legislation, program models, and program review.

CTGE 5232. EARLY CHILDHOOD CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT. (3 Credits)

Conceptual analysis and evaluation of existing early childhood curricula, including emerging trends and issues, educational assessment of the young child, strategies and issues, formulation and implementation of educational goals and objectives, and instructional and behavioral.

CTGE 5233. EARLY LEARNING THROUGH PLAY. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on creating, implementing, and assessing appropriate play experiences in diverse early childhood classrooms. The development of play and its potential for learning across the curriculum will be addressed, with emphasis on the preschool, kindergarten, and early primary grades. Helping families understand the value of play in early learning also will be included.

CTGE 5234. FAMILY, COMMUNITY, AND ALL YOUNG CHILDREN. (3 Credits)

This course critically examines the ecology of early childhood; the young child as a reactive and proactive agent in dynamic interaction with forces in the physical and social environment (family, home, neighborhood, media, legislation, child advocacy, etc.); the reciprocal relationship between early childhood education, family, and community.

CTGE 5241. RDG/LIT: K-12 SPANISH. (3 Credits)

CTGE 5242. TEACHING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY TO CHILDREN. (3 Credits)

This course will provide opportunities to critically analyze recent concepts, theories, and practices in developing a science curriculum. Current trends, technologies, and technological issues and their impact on society will be explored. Emphasis will be placed upon gaining knowledge bases for the life, physical, and earth sciences. Opportunities will be provided to develop an understanding of instructional technologies as tools for reflective practitioners, and to evaluate their use and effectiveness.

CTGE 5245. CHILDREN’S LITERATURE IN A MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY. (3,4 Credits)

Issues of equity and justice are explored through literature. Adult and children’s literature are used to examine the concept of cultural pluralism—the values, traditions, and aspirations of various immigrant and ethnic groups. Introduction to various genres and uses of literature in the early childhood and childhood language arts program.

CTGE 5247. TEACHING LINGUISTICALLY AND CULTURALLY DIVERSE CHILDREN. (3 Credits)

Theory and practical approaches and strategies to make content relevant and understandable to students in mainstream classrooms who may lack English language proficiency, experience, and background.

CTGE 5252. MATH CURRICULUM 7-12. (3 Credits)

CTGE 5259. CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

This course familiarizes students with the trends and issues facing the specific disciplines in the social studies. The course will examine trends, issues, and implications for the future of American history, global studies, government and politics, economics, anthropology, sociology, and psychology. A strong content base and an appreciation of contemporary issues will enable students to understand the current status of social studies and the implications for the future.

CTGE 5261. TEACHING AND ASSESSING SOCIAL STUDIES: ADOLESCENTS. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on recent developments and persistent issues of classroom practice in the teaching of secondary social studies, and on developing skills in teaching methods such as reflective inquiry, problem solving, critical thinking, decision-making, and assessment. Disciplines include anthropology, economics, geography, history, jurisprudence, political science, psychology, and sociology.

CTGE 5270. TCHG BIOLOGY TO ADOL. (3 Credits)

This course familiarizes students with a variety of methods and materials for teaching biology in the secondary schools. The development and analysis of the goals and content of a secondary biology course is emphasized using short- and long-range planning, adherence to curricular standards, assessment of student achievement and teacher effectiveness, instructional applications of technology, and other instructional methods and strategies. Course activities provide a basis for the development of competent biology teachers, including familiarity with relevant journals, issues, sources of information and instructional assistance, and opportunities to practice reflection. The goals and objectives of the course are in concert with the National Science Education Standards for professional development of learning biology content, learning to teach biology, lifelong learning, and integrated programs.

CTGE 5271. TEACHING AND ASSESSING BIOLOGY: ADOLESCENTS. (3 Credits)

This course familiarizes students with a variety of methods and materials for teaching biology in the secondary schools. The development and analysis of the goals and content of a secondary biology course emphasized using short- and long-range planning, adherence to curricular standards, assessment of student achievement and teacher effectiveness, instructional applications of technology, and other instructional methods and strategies. Course activities provide a basis for the development of competent biology teachers, including familiarity with relevant journals, issues, sources of information and instructional assistance, and opportunities to practice reflection in action.

CTGE 5272. TEACHING AND ASSESSING SCIENCE IN ADOLESCENT CLASSROOMS (7-12). (3 Credits)

Teaching and assessing science in adolescent classrooms. This course familiarizes students with a variety of methods and materials for teaching science (biology, earth science, physics and chemistry) to adolescents.

CTGE 5275. INTEGRATING MATH, SCIENCE, AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

This is a culminating course in the secondary math and science education programs. It assumes a strong knowledge base in math and/or science content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and pedagogical knowledge. One goal of this course is to gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of models of intergrated teaching and learning such as project-based learning, problem-based learning, thematic and interdisciplinary teaching and learning. The second goal is to explore technology through intergrated learning activities and projects. In order to gain this knowledge and experience we will engage in dialouge, investigation, analysis and refelction of specific projects that integrate math, science and technology in secondary school. The course will culminate in teams of students developing an MST integrated project to be utilized in their own teaching practice.

CTGE 5276. CLINICAL SEMINAR IN ADOLESCENCE SCIENCE EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to develop skills and habits of mind that are requisite to reflective practitioners of teaching. Course participants will engage in reflective discourse with peers and mentors to engage in a process of continuous learning in professional practice. The focus of the discussions, assignments, and mentoring/instructional activities will be on developing pedagogical content knowledge and skills needed to positively impact the life and learning of all students.

CTGE 5279. CONTEMPORARY SCIENCE EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to provide students with a familiarity with the origins and growth of the ideas of science education. It will also examine past, current, and emerging issues affecting science education.

CTGE 5280. TEACHING CHEMISTRY TO ADOLESCENTS. (3 Credits)

This course integrates the knowledge and processes of chemistry with chemistry teaching and learning. Teachers build and develop reflective teaching and learning practices that will enable them to teach, support, and assess students of diverse interests, abilities, and culture. The goals and objectives of the course are in concert with the National Science Education Standards for professional development of learning chemistry content, learning to teach chemistry, lifelong learning, and integrated programs.

CTGE 5281. TEACHING AND ASSESSING CHEMISTRY: ADOLESCENTS. (3 Credits)

This course integrates the knowledge and processes of chemistry with chemistry teaching and learning. Teachers build and develop reflective teaching and learning practices that will enable them to assess, teach, and support students of diverse interests, abilities, and cultures.

CTGE 5283. TEACHING AND LEARNING MATH IN THE MIDDLE GRADES. (2 Credits)

In this course, students focus on understanding the learning challenges and requirements of middle school mathematics. It will focus on topics such as proportional reasoning, rational numbers and operations, and problem solving. Students will explore opportunities for discovery and investigation, strategic thinking, reasoning and justification, and efficient algorithms. They will also examine the use of a variety of tools intended to assist students in their learning.

CTGE 5284. TEACHING AND LEARNING FOUNDATIONAL TOPICS AND MATH. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on methods that foster student development in their understanding of algebraic and geometric mathematics as well as problem solving and modeling. A model of essential understandings for the developing mathematics teacher is provided in the diagram below. This course will expand a teacher candidate’s knowledge in each area but it will focus on knowing and understanding algebraic and geometric thinking.

CTGE 5285. TEACHING AND LEARNING ADVANCED TOPICS IN MATH. (3 Credits)

This course is designed for pre-service and in-service teachers to deepen their knowledge and understanding of a range of advanced mathematical topics in preparation of teaching secondary mathematics. These topics will include recursive functions, curve-fitting, trigonometry, matrices, linear programming, probability and statistics. It is expected that students in this course have previously taken numerous “content” courses in mathematics. In this course, content related to secondary mathematics education will be examined in depth with a focus on conceptual understandings and modeling applications. We will also examine mathematical algorithms, their justifications, and their connections to foundational procedures. We will explore utilizing the technological tools of graphing calculators, apps, and spreadsheets and discuss how these tools can be best used to deepen conceptual understandings. Problem solving and modeling will woven into each content focus to further develop and examine mathematical practices.

CTGE 5286. TEACHING AND ASSESSING MATHEMATICS: ADOLESCENTS. (3 Credits)

This course introduces a variety of instructional and assessment strategies for teaching mathematics to adolescents in grades 7 through 12. Discussions center on methods of planning, teaching, and managing mathematics classes. This course is taught during the student-teaching experience.

CTGE 5287. CLINICAL SEMINAR IN ADOLESCENCE MATHEMATICS. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to develop skills and habits of mind that are requisite to reflective practitioners of teaching. Course participants will engage in reflective discourse with peers and mentors to engage in a process of continuous learning in professional practice. The focus of the discussions, assignments, and mentoring/instructional activities will be on developing pedagogical content knowledge and skills needed to positively impact the life and learning of all students.

CTGE 5290. TEACHING PHYSICS TO ADOLESCENTS. (3 Credits)

This course integrates the knowledge and processes of physics with physics teaching and learning. Teachers build and develop reflective teaching and learning practices that will enable them to teach, support, and assess students of diverse interests, abilities, and cultures. The goals and objectives of the course are in concert with the National Science Education Standards for professional development of learning physics content, learning to teach physics, lifelong learning, and integrated programs.

CTGE 5291. TEACHING AND ASSESSING PHYSICS: ADOLESCENTS. (3 Credits)

This course integrates the knowledge and processes of physics with physics teaching and learning. Teachers build and develop reflective teaching and learning practices that will enable them to assess, teach, and support students of diverse interests, abilities, and cultures.

CTGE 5303. LRNG ENVIRON:REF FLD EXP. (3 Credits)

This course helps teacher candidates develop an awareness of the complexity of teaching through field experiences. Emphasis is placed on classroom application of and critical and collaborative reflection upon concepts, techniques, and theories learned in courses and other structured learning experiences. The course examines teacher candidates' perceptions about the classroom and their learning that are necessary for anticipated learning to occur, ways that teachers can learn about their diverse students, approaches to student motivation, the concept of effective classroom instruction for students within the full range of abilities, the planning and writing of unit plans, and classroom management systems. It also provides a struture for developing the skills and knowledge necessary to provide a sense of community in a safe, respectful, and nuturing classroom environment.

CTGE 5304. LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS FOR DIVERSE ADOLESCENTS: REFLECTIVE FIELD EXPERIENCE. (1-3 Credits)

This course focuses on assuming a professional stance in regard to developing curriculum and interacting with students and colleagues in schools. Teacher candidates develop an understanding of the processes integral to reflecting on and researching student knowledge while promoting student learning. Students in this course will learn how to use research to examine, reflect on, and modify instruction to increase their knowledge and skills in teaching all students. Diversity and social justice are recurring themes for discussion and reflection. In addition, this course focuses on the development of the professional portfolio to meet the requirements for a comprehensive examination for the pedagogical portion of the program.

CTGE 5305. TEACHING LINGUISTICALLY AND CULTURALLY DIVERSE ADOLESCENT STUDENTS. (3,4 Credits)

This course highlights instructional approaches and strategies for teachers of adolescents to promote oral and written English language development in culturally and linguistically diverse students. Emphasis is on creating an integrated classroom where the experiences, capacities, interests, and linguistic and cultural needs of adolescent English language learners are addressed. The course will examine language acquisition and development, as well as the impact of heritage and culture on the progress of English language learners.

CTGE 5307. RESEARCH AND ASSESSMENT WHILE TEACHING ADOLESCENTS. (3 Credits)

In this course, teacher candidates develop an understanding of the processes integral to researching student knowledge while promoting student learning. Teacher candidates will review, create, evaluate, and interpret a wide range of standardized and alternative approaches to assessment, acquiring an abundant repertoire of strategies for assessing student learning in the classroom context, and using that information to plan or modify instruction. Students will learn how to use research to examine and reflect on their teaching, and to update knowledge and skills in teaching.

CTGE 5308. STUDENT-TEACHING ADOLESCENTS: RESEARCH AND REFLECTIVE PRACTICE. (1-3 Credits)

This course focuses on assuming a professional stance in regard to developing curriculum and interacting with students and colleagues in schools. Teacher candidates develop an understanding of the processes integral to reflecting on and researching student knowledge while promoting student learning. Students in this course will learn how to use research to examine, reflect on, and modify instruction to increase their knowledge and skills in teaching all students. Diversity and social justice are recurring themes for discussion and reflection. In addition, this course focuses on the development of the portfolio to meet the requirements for a comprehensive examination for the pedagogical portion of the program.

CTGE 5357. INNOVATIVE CURRICULUM AND TEACHING PRACTICES AND MODELS. (3 Credits)

Examines innovative curriculum models and teaching methods to improve the learning conditions for students; exemplary programs and practices are discussed, including interdisciplinary teaching, and teaming of students and faculty; implications are drawn for maximizing student learning.

CTGE 5401. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING. (2-3 Credits)

First of four clinically-based courses in which candidates build a professional learning community focused on undertanding adolescent learning and teaching for social justice.

CTGE 5402. TEACHING AND LEARNING WITH DIVERSE ADOLESCENTS: ASSESSMENT & PLANNING. (0-3 Credits)

This is the second of four courses focused broadly on learning environments, learner development, collaboration, teaching and assessing, social justice, reflection, and continuous professional growth. This course provides initial preparation and practice in issues and strategies for teaching for social justice in classrooms with diverse students. The major areas of focus are classroom environments; adolescent development; assessment; and backward design. Candidates will reflect together on their clinical placements using standards of teaching and learning including the Danielson continuum and the Common Core State Standards. This course is connected to a three-five days/week internship that includes college-supervised student-teaching experience.

CTGE 5403. TEACHING AND LEARNING WITH DIVERSE ADOLESCENTS 3: DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION. (0-3 Credits)

This is the third of four courses focused broadly on learning environments, learner development, collaboration, teaching and assessing, social justice, reflection, and continuous professional growth. In this course candidates analyze evidence-based teaching practices in order to reflect on the impact of their teaching on student learning in middle and high schools, and they continue to practice using assessment to inform instruction. They engage in collaborative practices of instructional rounds in schools and looking collaboratively at student work. This course is connected to a five days/week practicum that includes college-supervised student-teaching experience. Prerequisite: CTGE 5410, CTGE 5402.

CTGE 5404. TEACHING AND LEARNING WITH DIVERSE ADOLESCENTS 4: REFLECTION & INNOVATION. (0-3 Credits)

This is the final of four courses focused broadly on learning environments, learner development, collaboration, teaching and assessing, social justice, reflection, and continuous professional growth. In this course candidates design and facilitate an innovative curriculum and engage in reflection through instructional rounds and looking collaboratively at student work. This course is connected to a four week, four days/week residency. Prerequisite: CTGE 5410, CTGE 5402. CTGE 5403.

CTGE 5411. PERS AND ISSUES ECSE. (0-3 Credits)

CTGE 5420. EDUCATING CULTURALLY AND LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE LEARNERS: PRE K-12. (3 Credits)

In this course Teacher Candidates in Early Childhood, Childhood, and Adolescence Education explore the characteristics, strengths, and needs of students who are culturally diverse and are learning English as an additional language (EAL). It highlights research-based instructional approaches and strategies to promote culturally responsive learning, and oral and written development in EAL across all content areas. The emphasis is on creating an integrated learning environment that enhances culture, language, and content knowledge and builds the academic achievement for all learners.

CTGE 5421. PLANNING INSTRUCTION FOR YOUNG CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES. (3 Credits)

This course shall enable students to structure physical and social environments, and to develop and implement instructional and intervention plans and procedures that are developmentally appropriate and respectful of family, cultural, language, and social diversity.

CTGE 5455. RDG SKILLS CHILD LD. (3 Credits)

CTGE 5505. FOUNDATIONS OF LANGUAGE AND LITERACY EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

Focuses on the linguistic dimension - systems of language, spoken-written language relationships, variation within and across languages - and cognitive dimension - perception and memory, reading comprehension, writing processes, literacy - of literacy and their interrelationships. Develops understandings of the history and structure of the English language, and of language development in individuals.

CTGE 5506. FOUNDATIONS OF LANGUAGE AND LITERACY EDUCATION IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS. (3 Credits)

Focuses on the linguistic dimension? systems of language, spoken-written language relationships, variation within and across languages - and cognitive dimension - perception and memory, reading comprehension, writing processes, literacy?of literacy and their interrelationships. Develops understandings of the history and structure of the English language, and of language development in individuals.

CTGE 5530. ADOL LITERACY ENGLISH LANG. (3 Credits)

This course will focus on "ways with words" and how to best promote language usage and literacy through our teaching. Topics explored will include linguistic dimensions/systems of language, relationships between spoken and written words, variations within and across languages, readings and writing processes, and of course, how to best incorporate this knowledge into practice as teachers of English language arts. Students will gain deeper understanding of the English language and systems of grammar.

CTGE 5531. LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN ADOLESCENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS. (2 Credits)

This course will focus on “ways with words” and how to best promote language usage and literacy through our teaching. Topics explored will include linguistic dimensions/systems of language, relationships between spoken and written words, variations within and across languages, reading and writing processes, and how to best incorporate this knowledge into practice as teachers of English language arts. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the English language and systems of grammar.

CTGE 5532. DEV LIT INTMEDIATE GRADES. (3 Credits)

Students examine ways of organizing and implementing curriculum and instruction that foster literacy development in a range of students in grade 5-9. Students explore strategies for assessing and improving reading comprehension and writing fluency, develop strategies for motivating intermediate students to read and write, and discover methods for integrating electronic and other non-print texts into the curriculum for developing literacy.

CTGE 5534. BEGINNING READING AND WRITING IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the development of linguistic and cognitive processes in emergent literacy and beginning reading and writing, as well as application in models for the instruction and assessment of reading and writing in young children. The course includes contemporary as well as historic approaches to the relationship between meaning-based literacy activities and word-level reading and spelling. It also includes material on classroom-based interventions for young children at risk of reading failure because of learning differences.

CTGE 5536. ASSESSING AND DEVELOPING LITERACY ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

In this course, students examine ways of assessing, organizing, and implementing curriculum and instruction that foster literacy development in a range of intermediate and high school grades. Students explore strategies for assessing and improving reading comprehension and writing fluency, develop strategies for motivating intermediate-grade students to read and write, and discover methods for integrating electronic and other nonprint texts into the curriculum as a means for developing literacy.

CTGE 5540. ADOLESCENT LITERATURE IN A MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY. (1-3 Credits)

An exploration of the role of diverse adolescent literature from multiple genres across the disciplines as a vehicle for introducing students to themselves, their world, and the worlds of other cultures. Works will include those written by women and authors from a variety of cultures. Students will plan curricula that incorporate a variety of instructional strategies, integrating adolescent literature across curriculum areas in order to foster lifelong habits of reading, critical thinking, and judgment in adolescent readers.

CTGE 5545. RDG DIAG:SEC SCH/ADULTS. (3 Credits)

CTGE 5547. LITERACY AND LEARNING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM. (1-3 Credits)

In this course, students will learn about reading and writing as processes, language and literacy development, the use of literature and meaningful writing activities in content area curriculum, and the acquisition of comprehension, critical thinking and study skills needed for a variety of text types. Assessment of literacy proficiencies will be examined. The focus of this course is on middle and high school application.

CTGE 5548. LITERACY ACROSS THE CURRICULUM IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS. (3 Credits)

This course has a threefold focus: an in-depth study of strategies for comprehending and creating text; integration of previous coursework in a comprehensive literature-based interdisciplinary theme unit; and an expectation that teachers or teacher candidates will teach, evaluate, and reflect upon this curriculum in their role as teacher-researchers. Topics include background knowledge, questions, and queries; reader response theory; cognitive and metacognitive strategies, interconnections between text structure in reading and text structure in writing; study and research strategies; and multiple print sources, including technology. The course promotes the individualization of curriculum for all children.

CTGE 5549. ASSESSING AND DEVELOPING READING AND WRITING IN SOCIAL STUDIES, SCIENCE, AND MATHEMATICS. (3 Credits)

In this course, students will learn about reading and writing as processes; language and literacy development; and use of literature and meaningful reading-writing strategies in content-area curriculum; and the acquisition of comprehension, critical thinking, and study skills needed for a variety of text types. Assessment of literacy proficiencies will be examined. The focus of this course is on middle and high school application.

CTGE 5551. REFLECTIVE PRACTICE AND FIELD EXPERIENCE I IN AN INCLUSIVE CHILDHOOD CLASSROOM. (1-3 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to schools and schooling practices. The Reflective Seminar is intended as a vehicle for critical reflection through which theory can be integrated with practical experiences. It focuses on several interconnected teaching strands: curriculum design, lesson planning, classroom organization, classroom management, assessment, reflective practice, collaboration and professionalism. Students in this seminar are viewed as reflective practitioners who draw from multiple models in planning for learning and teaching. This planning will build an inclusive community of learners, minimize behavior problems, and provide a welcoming, supportive environment for all children. The course meetings are designed to meet the varying needs of our students in either the traditional or alternative programs. The seminar also provides a structure for organizing workshops in child abuse prevention, drug and alcohol abuse prevention, and violence prevention. Field experiences progress from observation to guided practice with small and whole groups of students.

CTGE 5552. REFLECTIVE PRACTICE AND FIELD EXPERIENCE II IN AN INCLUSIVE CHILDHOOD CLASSROOM. (1-3 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to schools and schooling practices. The Reflective Seminar is intended as a vehicle for critical reflection through which theory can be intergrated with pratical experiences. It focuses on several interconnected teaching strands: curriculum design, lesson planning, classroom organization, classroom management, assessment, refelctive practice, collaboration and professionalism. Students in this seminar are viewed as reflective practitioners who draw from multiple models in planning for learning and teaching. This planning will build an inclusive community of learners, minimize behavior problems and provide a welcoming, supportive environment for all children. The course meeting are designed to meet the varying needs of our students in either the traditional or alterative programs.

CTGE 5553. REFLECTIVE PRACTICE AND STUDENT TEACHING I IN AN INCLUSIVE CHILDHOOD CLASSROOM. (1 Credit)

This course provides an introduction to schools and schooling practices. The reflective seminar is intended as a vehicle for critical reflection through which theory can be integrated with practical experiences. It focuses on several interconnected teaching strands: curriculum design, lesson planning, classroom organization, classroom management, assessment, reflective practice, collaboration, and professionalism. Students in this seminar are viewed as reflective practitioners who draw from multiple models of planning for learning and teaching. This planning will build an inclusive community of learners, minimize behavior problems, and provide a welcoming supportive environment for all children. The course meetings are designed to meet the varying needs of our students in either the traditional or alternative programs.

CTGE 5554. REFLECTIVE PRACTICE AND STUDENT TEACHING II IN AN INCLUSIVE CHILDHOOD CLASSROOM. (1-3 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to schools and schooling practices. The relective seminar is intended as a vehicle for critical reflection through which theory can be integrated with pracical experience. It focuses on several interconnected teaching strands: curriculum design, lesson planning, classroom oraganization, classroom management, assessment, reflective practice,collaboration and professionalism. Students in this seminar are viewed as reflective practitioners who draw from multiple models in planning for learning and teaching. This planning will build an inclusive community of learners, minimize behavior problems, and provide a welcoming, supportive environment for all children. The course meetings are designed to meet varying needs of our students in either the traditional or alternative programs.

CTGE 5631. SCIENCE CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION. (1-3 Credits)

Principles of curriculum construction applied to development of science sequences for children of various ages and ability levels, to assist teachers to understand and present basic concepts of science, and to utilize the environment in science teaching.

CTGE 5634. COMMUNITY BASED RESOURCES FOR SCIENCE. (3 Credits)

This course explores the resources of urban communities for teaching science at elementary and intermediate school levels. Field trips will include visits to urban centers for the study of astronomy, biology, and applied physics.

CTGE 5790. INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL THINKING. (2 Credits)

Has three interwoven strands. History, learning history, what is means to teach history.

CTGE 5791. SOCIAL STUDIES CURRICULUM. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to provide students with the research data, trends, and processes connected with developing an effective social studies curriculum. This course will have both a theoretical and practical focus, which will prepare students for all the steps needed to develop a curriculum—from framing goals and objectives to implementing the curriculum in middle and high school settings.

CTGE 5792. TOPICS HIST GEOG ECON. (2 Credits)

Candidates do a brief study of an economics/geography topic the and in-depth study of interdisciplinary theme across time and/or place.

CTGE 5793. CURRICULUM DESIGN. (3 Credits)

CTGE 5794. SOC STUD SCOPE & SEQ. (1 Credit)

Prepares candidates to develop a year-lone sequence of instruction in one or more 5-12 interdisciplinary content areas.

CTGE 5795. CLINICAL SEMINAR IN ADOLESCENCE SOCIAL STUDIES. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to develop skills and habits of mind that are requisites to reflective practitioners of teaching. Course participants will engage in reflective discourse with peers and mentors to engage in a process of continuous learning in professional practice. The focus of the discussions, assignments, and mentoring/instructional activities will be on developing pedagogical content knowledge and skills needed to positively impact the life and learning of all students.

CTGE 5834. CLINICAL SEMINAR IN ADOLESCENCE LANGUAGE ARTS EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to develop skills and habits of mind that are requisite to reflective practitioners of teaching. Course participants will engage in reflective discourse with peers and mentors to engage in a process of continuous learning in professional practice. The focus of the discussions, assignments, and mentoring/instructional activities will be on developing pedagogical content knowledge and skills needed to positively impact the life and learning of all students.

CTGE 5835. LANG ARTS/TCHG OF RDG. (3 Credits)

CTGE 5838. INTEGRATED INSTRUCTION IN ADOLESCENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS. (3 Credits)

This course will develop the knowledge, abilities, attitudes, and pedagogical approaches necessary for teaching English language arts to diverse secondary-level students. Emphasis is on selecting and designing instructional strategies, materials, and assessment tools for meeting the needs of all students in inclusive multicultural classes, and helping them meet the learning standards for English language arts.

CTGE 5839. INTEGRATED INST. ELA. ADOL. (2 Credits)

Develop the knowledge, abilities, attitudes, and pedagogical approaches necessary for teaching English language arts to diverse secondary-level students.

CTGE 5840. SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION. (3 Credits)

L2 Acquisition & Assess. Overview of the nature of second language acquisition processes with emphasis on teaching and learning. Areas addressed include: second-language acquisition, sociolinguistic and psycholinguistic factors in learning a second language, secondlanguage proficiency, characteristics of L2 learners, ESL programs, instructional approaches and instructional resources for teachers. Second Language Acquisition (SEC LANG ACQ) title changed September 13, 2011, and again DECEMBER 3, 2012 to SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISIT.

CTGE 5841. PRINCIPLES OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

Topics include an examination of local, national, and international types of bilingual curricular models and practices; sociolinguistic and psycholinguistic aspects of bilingualism; and approaches to concept development in bilingual students. Graduate students will examine the history of bilingual education in the US, the evolution of different ideologies about language, and their impact on language policies in schools will be conducted.

CTGE 5842. SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION AND ASSESSMENT. (3 Credits)

Overview of the nature of second language acquisition processes with emphasis on teaching, learning, and assessment. Areas addressed include second language acquisition, sociolinguistic and psycholinguistic factors in learning a second language, second language proficiency and development, and assessment of language competence and performance. In addition, the course will survey characteristics of emergent bilingual students, ESL programs, and instructional approaches and resources.

CTGE 5844. DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNICATION SKILLS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS. (3 Credits)

Practical approaches to development of language arts experiences, integrated bilingual and English language techniques, curriculum materials, and assessment procedures.

CTGE 5845. LEARNING CONTENT THROUGH LANGUAGE IN MULTILINGUAL CLASSROOMS. (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of English language instruction and development across the content areas when working with students who acquire English as an additional language. Particular attention will be given to investigating language demands of academic text; exploring instructional methods and instructional strategies to teach the language of academic text; and designing instruction guided by language standards as well as content standards of social studies, science, and mathematics in culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms.

CTGE 5846. TEACHING ENGLISH ORACY AND LITERACY TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES. (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the main theories and research related to the development of oracy and literacy when teaching students for whom English is an additional language. The learning processes of oracy and literacy as well as research-based instructional practices Pre-K to 12th grades will be examined. Attention will be given to the interconnection of these processes, similarities and differences between oral and written discourses, and the influence of the home language on developing oracy and literacy in English as an additional language. In addition, a survey of children and adolescent multicultural literature and its role in developing oracy and literacy will be conducted.

CTGE 5847. PRACTICUM IN TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES. (3 Credits)

Supervised teaching practice of a minimum of 180 hours in English as a Second Language classrooms. Bi-weekly seminars.

CTGE 5848. TESOL STUDENT TEACHING I. (1,3 Credits)

One semester of supervised student teaching in English as a second language in an accredited elementary, junior high or high school, including observations and wholeclass and small-group teaching. Seminar in effective teaching practices. CTGE 5849 Observing and Documenting Children’s Learning: Reflective and Effective English as a Second Language Practices (OBSERV ASSES DOCU: ESL) This course will introduce major child development and learning theories, and different assessment tools for observing and documenting the development and learning of English language learners. Implications for programming and instruction for English language learners will be discussed.

CTGE 5849. DESIGNING CULTURALLY AND TECHNOLOGICALLY RELEVANT INSTRUCTION. (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of designing instruction which integrates cultural, academic, and linguistic funds of knowledge that reside in families of culturally and linguistically diverse students and the neighborhoods and communities where schools are located. In addition, an examination of how instruction is enhanced through technological resources that connect learning in individual classrooms to the outside world will be conducted. Emphasis will be given to exploring socio-historical, -cultural, and -political influences on learning and teaching, as well as, enhancing education by bridging the gap between schools, families, neighborhoods, and communities.

CTGE 5850. OBSERVING AND DOCUMENTING CHILDREN’S LEARNING: REFLECTIVE AND EFFECTIVE EARLY CHILDHOOD PRACTICES. (3 Credits)

This course will introduce major child-development and learning theories, and different assessment tools for observing and documenting child development and learning. Implications for programming and instruction for young children will be discussed.

CTGE 5851. BILINGUAL INSTRUCTION ACROSS SUBJECT AREAS. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to provide an understanding of different pedagogical methods to develop bilingualism across subject areas. Additional attention is given to content curriculum and standards, negotiating academic content in more than one language and instructional strategies to scaffold academic language and text bilingually. The exploration of making cross-disciplinary and cross-linguistic connections in teaching and learning is required.

CTGE 5852. MULTILINGUAL ORACY AND LITERACY. (3 Credits)

This course explores the developmental processes of oracy and literacy in more than one language. Particular attention will be given to differentiating between oral language and oracy, reading and literacy, and monolingual and bilingual oracy and literacy development. The course integrates the study of metalinguistic strategies to support oracy and literacy development across languages and academic text. Graduate students conduct a survey of authentic and translated bilingual literature as well as the use of technology in bilingual classrooms.

CTGE 5853. PRACTICUM IN BILINGUAL/SECOND-LANGUAGE CLASSROOMS. (3 Credits)

Application and evaluation of teaching approaches, methods, and techniques in bilingual/second-language classrooms with pupils of limited English proficiency (LEP). Supervised student teaching of a minimum of 180 hours and clinical analysis by students and support personnel.

CTGE 5855. ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE FOR ADULTS. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the specific needs educators encounter as they prepare to teach adults who acquire English as an additional language. Principles of adult learning theory will be integrated with principles of ESL to provide students an opportunity to explore and reflect on theory meeting practice in this specific curriculum area.

CTGE 5858. TESOL STUDNT TEACHING II. (3 Credits)

Teacher candidates are required to complete a second semester of supervised student teaching in English as an additional/new language (EAL/ENL) in an accredited elementary , junior high, or high school under the guidance of a certified ESL teacher. this clinical experience will include reflective observations, designing lessons and mini units, and teaching individual, small groups, and whole group lessons. An in-depth analysis of performance of EAL/ENL students is required. In addition, attendance and meaningful participation in a seminar of effective teaching practices is required.

CTGE 5904. HUMAN RELATIONS IN ADULT EDUCATION AND HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT. (3 Credits)

Human relations theory and practice applied to the human problems found within institutional, bureaucratic, or service systems. Topics considered are maturation, stress, conflict, and improvement of human relations skills.

CTGE 5910. COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY FOR EDUCATORS. (1-3 Credits)

This course is designed to help educators explore how to use present and emerging technologies in their classrooms and for their professional and personal development. There are four major emphases in the course: personal computer skills development, computers as aids in record management and research, advanced computer applications, and other technologies available for teaching and learning. No prerequisites or prior experience with computers is necessary.

CTGE 5920. ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND ADULT LEARNING THEORY. (3 Credits)

Provides an understanding of theories and research in adult learning and development. Explores the dynamic relationship between the domains of adult learning and development, as well as implications for the practice of adult education.

CTGE 6000. DEVELOPING EMERGING LITERACY. (3 Credits)

This course addresses emerging literacy in children from birth to age eight, with emphasis on the preschool and kindergarten years. It focuses on theoretical underpinnings and development of language, concepts about print, book knowledge, and early drawing and writing. Effective instructional and assessment strategies appropriate for diverse early childhood classrooms are emphasized. Children’s play as a vehicle for literacy development, as well as family literacy, is also included.

CTGE 6002. BEGINNING LITERACY DEVELOPMENT IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS. (3 Credits)

Theory- and research-based beginning reading and writing strategies for classroom teachers, K–3. The focus is on understanding the underlying processes that support strategies for young children in transition from spoken to written language, the development of phonemic awareness and invented spelling, the relationship between writing and reading, phonics, and the use of multiple cue systems in early decoding and strategies for the construction of meaning. The course will also include theory and research of special programs for young children with learning differences.

CTGE 6004. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES FOR WRITING ACROSS THE K–6 CURRICULUM. (3 Credits)

This course will provide teachers of literacy the opportunity to explore writing as a process and to develop instructional practices that may lead to growth in all students’ writing abilities across the childhood curriculum. In addition, students will have the opportunity to evaluate existing writing programs and to propose revisions to the programs to make them more effective.

CTGE 6006. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES FOR WRITING ACROSS THE 5–12 CURRICULUM. (3 Credits)

This course will provide teachers of adolescents the opportunity to explore writing as a process and to develop instructional practices that may lead to growth in all students’ writing abilities across the curriculum in grades 5 through 12. In addition, students will have the opportunity to evaluate existing writing programs and to propose revisions to the programs to make them more effective.

CTGE 6008. CRITICAL LITERACY, INQUIRY, AND LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN. (3 Credits)

Explores how literacy can be used in the classroom as a vehicle for the critical examination of various issues and topics. Examines the use of the disciplines—literatures, sciences, and social sciences—to provide the contents for the inquiry and the communication systems—language, art, music, mathematics, and movement—to provide the processes through which the content is encountered.

CTGE 6010. CRITICAL LITERACY, INQUIRY, AND LITERATURE FOR ADOLESCENTS. (3 Credits)

This course explores how inquiry and literature can be used in the classroom as a vehicle for the critical examination of various issues and topics with adolescents.

CTGE 6012. ASSESSMENT AND DEVELOPMENT OF LITERACY PROCESSES: BIRTH–GRADE 6: PRACTICUM I. (3 Credits)

Literacy educators adopt reflective teacher-researcher stances as they informally document and assess individual students’ reading and writing achievements while implementing instructional activities to promote literacy development in authentic settings for children from birth to grade 6. They design or select appropriate procedures for documenting, promoting, and evaluating learners’ strategies and proficiencies. Includes 25 hours of supervised practicum experience on site. CTGE 6012 is open only to matriculated students who have completed a minimum of nine credits in the program. Completion of CTGE 6012 requires satisfying Gateway assignments, explained in the program handbook.

CTGE 6014. ASSESSMENT AND DEVELOPMENT OF LITERACY PROCESSES: GRADES 5–12, PRACTICUM I. (3 Credits)

Literacy educators adopt reflective teacher-researcher stances as they informally document and assess individual students’ reading and writing achievements while implementing instructional activities to promote literacy development in authentic settings for students in grades 5-12. They design or select appropriate procedures for documenting, promoting, and evaluating learners’ strategies and proficiencies. Includes 25 hours of supervised practicum experience on-site. CTGE 6014 is open only to matriculated students who have completed a minimum of nine credits in the program. Completion of CTGE 6014 requires satisfying Gateway assignments, explained in the program handbook.

CTGE 6016. RESEARCH AND PRACTICE FOR STRUGGLING READERS AND WRITERS: GRADES 1–6, PRACTICUM II. (3 Credits)

Systematic documentation and analysis of literacy behaviors and literacy development of struggling readers and writers. Students adopt a reflective teacher-researcher stance as they implement and evaluate instructional activities intended to promote literacy growth. Includes 25 hours of supervised practicum experience on site. This course typically follows completion of CTGE 6012.

CTGE 6018. RESEARCH AND PRACTICE FOR STRUGGLING ADOLESCENT READERS AND WRITERS: GRADES 5–12, PRACTICUM II. (3 Credits)

Systematic documentation and analysis of literacy behaviors and literacy development of struggling readers and writers. Students adopt a reflective teacher-researcher stance as they implement and evaluate instructional activities intended to promote literacy growth. Includes 25 hours of supervised practicum experience on site. This course typically follows the completion of CTGE 6014. Completion of CTGE 6018 requires satisfying Gateway assignments, explained in the program handbook.

CTGE 6191. PHILOSOPHY AND CRITIQUE OF RESEARCH IN CURRICULUM. (3 Credits)

Examination of the principles for the design of educational research. Students will be trained to subject educational research to intensive analysis, defining all possible sources of variation.

CTGE 6192. RESEARCH IN THE TEACHING PROCESS. (3 Credits)

Students develop an understanding of processes involved in conducting classroom research through designing and implementing collaborative or individual classroom research projects. Issues include understanding the nature of classroom interactions and the learning process, the effects of specific techniques on learning, and the influence of the classroom environment on learning. Findings are reported through workshops and papers.

CTGE 6195. THEORY AND PRACTICE IN CURRICULUM AND TEACHING. (3 Credits)

A critical review of conflicting curriculum theories advanced and implemented in contemporary education. Steps in developing and implementing curriculum theory will be analyzed, and the role of theory in curriculum development will be emphasized from varying perspectives.

CTGE 6200. SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY. (0-1 Credits)

This course explores the use of various technologies in teaching and learning. Discussion of and practice with technologies is in service of developing content learning.

CTGE 6201. DEVELOPING DIGITAL LITERACIES. (0-3 Credits)

This course explores various aspects of digital literacies, including the use of multimedia technologies in teaching and learning. Discussion of and practice with technologies is in service of defining digital skills that students must develop to succeed in school and beyond.

CTGE 6203. CYBER COMMUNITIES FOR STEM. (1 Credit)

This course is designed to support the development of the habits of mind required to engage in Science/Math/Technology/Engineering (STEM) education from the perspective of both instructor and learner. Course participants will co-construct cyber-based discourse communities designed to contribute to the resources available for STEM educators.

CTGE 6260. MEDIA TCHN MATH SCIENCE. (3 Credits)

Students will be introduced to multimedia technologies and their use in science and mathematics education. The goals for the course include an understanding of multimedia technologies as tools for teachers (not replacements, not baby sitters). The most effective tools build cognitive theory into their design. Tools that incorporate cognitive theory are said to represent cognitive technologies. A second goal is to empower the student to evaluate educational software along multiple dimensions. An additional goal involves familiarization with modern graphic-user interfaces with a direct-manipulation style of interaction.

CTGE 6261. TECHNOLOGY IN READING, WRITING, AND SOCIAL STUDIES. (3 Credits)

The course will cover the uses of the computer and other technology in language arts and social studies at the elementary and secondary levels. Among the topics covered will be text processing, computerized tutorials, and computerized simulations. Students will review a range of technology-based instructional activities, as well as create technology-based materials.

CTGE 6262. APPLICATION OF COMPUTERS TO SPECIAL EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

Designed for teachers concerned with the educational needs of students with disabilities. Introduces computer software that is available for use by the teacher of students with the full range of disabilities and other health impairments. Experience using the Internet to access information, lesson plans, and resources helpful to the special education teacher.

CTGE 6265. EMERGING ISSUES IN TECHNOLOGY. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to help educators better understand how emerging issues in educational technologies influence their professional environment and pedagogical options. The course will focus on the educational transformations sometimes facilitated by electronic technology use and adoption. Going beyond learning particular techniques for integrating technology into the curriculum, this course takes a wider institutional view of the transformative potential of new technologies in education.

CTGE 6270. DATA, INQUIRY & TECH. (1-3 Credits)

This course for educators is designed to promote deep understanding or 1) the design of school based inquiry teams, and 2) the links between inquiry, student learning outcomes and technology.

CTGE 6300. CURRICULUM EVALUATION. (3 Credits)

Examination of evaluation strategies, techniques, and models applicable to the school curriculum. Study of the application of objectives to evaluation, development of evaluation designs, systematic approaches to assessment, problems of implementation, and accountability.

CTGE 6305. DEV DELAYS / EARLY INTERV. (3 Credits)

Provides an overview of the characteristics of disabling conditions in young children. It introduces the psychological, environmental and biological conditions, and the interactions among them that place children at risk for developmental delays and disabilities.

CTGE 6310. EDU STU W/DIS IN ELEM SCHS. (3 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to understanding children with disabilities and special health care needs.It examines the pshysical, social, emotional and learning characteristics of children identified as disabled and their impact on the family. It meets NYS Education department regulatory requirements for teachers of students with disabilities to understand the needs of students with autism.

CTGE 6320. COL/CONSULT W/FAM & PROF. (3 Credits)

Primary focus of this course is to understand roles that families, professionals, and communities play in the lives and education of children from various backgrounds.

CTGE 6326. PERSPECTIVES ON STANDARDIZED LANGUAGE AND LITERACY ASSESSMENT: POLICY AND PRACTICE. (3 Credits)

Focuses on issues, principles, and current practices in literacy assessment, examination of available measures and evaluation procedures of norm-referenced, language and literacy assessment, relationship of standardized assessment to instruction, and examination of strenghts and weaknesses of such instruments.

CTGE 6330. COMMUNICATION, TECH ARTS. (3 Credits)

Candidates shall develop skills necessary to provide specifically designed instruction to students with mild, moderate, severe, and multiple disabilities using assistive and instructional technology.

CTGE 6340. INTERVENTIONS READ / WRITE. (3 Credits)

Draws on the fields of literacy, learning disabilities, psychology, and neuroscience to examine ways to assess the reading and writing skills of students who struggle and to determine evidence based interventions that support their learning. MG, Chair, C&T, October 16, 2014.

CTGE 6350. POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on obtaining the knowledge and skills necessary to develop, implement, and evaluate the impact of positive behavior support on student behavior.

CTGE 6400. LANGUAGE FOR SCHOOL LEARNING: IMPLICATIONS FOR READING AND WRITING PROGRAMS. (3 Credits)

An interdisciplinary course focusing on the relationship for teachers and supervisors between language as a tool for learning and language as evidence of learning. Particular emphasis will be placed on the relationship between these concerns and the need for improving the reading and writing abilities of students in all levels of education.

CTGE 6401. TEACHING THE STRUCTURE OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. (3 Credits)

An introduction to theories of English language phonology, syntax, and semantics and their implications for developing English language understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills by speakers of other languages. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development of related teaching and learning approaches.

CTGE 6405. TEACHING AND ASSESSING COMPOSITION ADOLESCENTS. (1-3 Credits)

This course focuses on the teaching of writing in middle and high school English classes. Topics covered will include theories of writing and writing instruction, assessment of writing, and instructional practices in the teaching of composition.

CTGE 6410. TEACHING AND ASSESSING READING AND LITERATURE ADOLESCENTS. (3 Credits)

In this course, students examine ways of assessing, organizing and implementing standards-based curriculum and instruction that foster reading development and literary understanding for adolescents within the full range of abilities. The course provides opportunities to explore formal and informal strategies for assessing and improving reading comprehension and fluency, to develop strategies for motivating adolescents to read a wide range of literatures, and to plan differentiated instruction for reading and the study of literature to promote learning for all students.

CTGE 6415. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGLISH EDUCATION. (0-1 Credits)

This one-credit course focuses on a special topic related to the teaching and learning of English Language Arts.

CTGE 6500. INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES ON LITERACY; LINGUISTIC AND COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT. (3 Credits)

The course focuses on literacy as the interrelationship between and among linguistic dimensions (systems of language, spoken-written language, development connections, language variation) and cognitive dimensions (development, teaching, learning, understanding, and interpretations). Addresses competing theories of literacy, language, and learning, and the potential implications for decision-making by literacy leaders.

CTGE 6501. SOCIOCULTURAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DIMENSIONS OF LITERACY. (3 Credits)

Focuses on the sociocultural of literacy - group uses of literacy, literacy as a tool for knowledge and power - and the developmental dimensions - patterns of learning literacy, role of learner, adult and environment - and their interrelationships.

CTGE 6502. ENGLISH AS A WORLD LANGUAGE. (3 Credits)

This course explores English instruction and use around the world. Course readings will survey varieties of global Englishes. The purpose of speaking and writing English, by native and non-native speakers, and how these purposes influence teaching and learning are examined. Discussions are held on the international spectrum of English teaching approaches and local conditions that may influence their implementation. Graduate students analyze the impact of English instruction and its use around the world guided by socio-historical, socio-cultural, and socio-political lenses.

CTGE 6504. TCH & ASSESS COMP ADOL. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the teaching of writing in middle and high school English classes. Topics covered will include theories of writing and writing instruction, assessment of writing, and instructional practices in the teaching of composition. MG - OCTOBER 23, 2014. MSE.

CTGE 6532. DEVELOPING LITERACY IN INTERMEDIATE GRADES. (3 Credits)

In this course, students examine ways of organizing and implementing curriculum and instruction that foster literacy development in a range of students in the intermediate grades (grades 5-9). Students explore strategies for assessing and improving reading comprehension and writing fluency, develop strategies for motivating inermediate grade students to read and write, and discover methods for integrating electronic and other non-print texts into the curriculum as a means for developing literacy.

CTGE 6551. REFLECTIVE SEMINAR IN LITERACY EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

As a culminating experience in the Language and Literacy program, students engage in weekly seminar sessions reflecting on evolving personal, professional philosophies and proficiencies. Students will explore approaches to evaluating, organizing and enhancing literacy programs. Teacher research and practice as a literacy leader will result in the creation and presentation of a professional portfolio to a professional panel for evaluation and approval. The portfolio should contain evidence that the student has met each of the program objectives.

CTGE 6593. ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF LITERACY AND LANGUAGE PROGRAMS. (3 Credits)

The course deals with organization, administration, and problems of organizing a reading program. Attention is also focused on in-service teacher education.

CTGE 6608. LITERACY INSTITUTE. (0-3 Credits)

Important and emerging topics in literacy education; theories, current research and best practice applications for developing literacy proficncies K-12.

CTGE 6662. TEACHING GEOMETRIC CONCEPTS. (3 Credits)

CTGE 6781. INSTRUCTING BILINGUAL SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS. (3 Credits)

The course presents a general overview of multiple perspectives in teaching the bilingual/limited English proficient students with special needs: instructional models, individualized instruction, the role of English in teaching, literacy development in both languages, and content-area teaching.

CTGE 6782. BIL SPEC ED:ISSUES&TREND. (3 Credits)

CTGE 6810. SOCIOPOLITICAL DIMENSIONS OF EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to various pedagogical theories and leads to an understanding of how these theories relate to urban schooling in the 21st century. Several questions will guide the course: What are the relationships among power, knowledge, and social identities in the making of “teachers” and “students”? How is power—particularly in the form of class, race, gender, and other social stratifications—enacted, contested, and perpetuated in urban school contexts? Who is privileged? Who is disadvantaged?.

CTGE 6991. INTERNSHIP IN CURRICULUM AND TEACHING. (3 Credits)

Offered as a Guided Tutorial Course. Professional experiences in the schools or educational agencies other than schools, as interns to curriculum coordinators, supervisors, or consultants. Registration with approval of chairperson, faculty supervisor, and agency director.

CTGE 6992. INTERNSHIP IN CURRICULUM AND TEACHING. (3 Credits)

A continuation of CTGE 6991: Offered as a Guided Tutorial Course. Professional experiences in the schools or educational agencies other than schools, as interns to curriculum coordinators, supervisors, or consultants. Registration with approval of chairperson, faculty supervisor, and agency director.

CTGE 7000. SPECIAL TOPICS LANG LIT LRNG. (3 Credits)

CTGE 7190. STATISTICS AND QUANTIFICATION DESIGN. (3 Credits)

Statistical methods applied to curriculum research studies. Strategies for evaluating educational intervention, balancing internal and external validity, obtaining appropriate population samples and implementing multivariate designs.

CTGE 7194. INTRODUCTION TO QUALITATIVE INQUIRY IN EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

In this course, students will examine the nature and characteristics of various qualitative inquiry traditions utilized in educational research. Emphasis will be placed on developing competence in qualitative research design, data collection, analysis, and report writing.

CTGE 7236. PROBLEMS AND ISSUES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

Examination of the concerns that affect practice and the child’s ability to learn. Selection of topics current to working with all young children in early childhood settings.

CTGE 7330. RES SEM: SECONDARY EDUC. (3 Credits)

CTGE 7460. ADVANCED SEMINAR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM. (3 Credits)

Focus on providing an appropriate curriculum for children, adolescents, and young adults with disabilities. Examination of curriculum evaluation strategies, techniques, and models applicable to both inclusive and special education classrooms. Students address issues of implementation and accountability. Students will apply this information in analyzing their own recent experiences in the classroom.

CTGE 7470. SEMINAR IN LANGUAGE DISORDERS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

Critical evaluation of major concerns in selected areas related to language development and remediation in the education of children, adolescents, and young adults with disabilities.

CTGE 7491. READING AND WRITING AS PSYCHOLINGUISTIC PROCESSES. (3 Credits)

This course examines theories and research on reading and writing processes as these influence and result from cognitive activities. Implications for classroom use of reading and writing as activities for increasing learning.

CTGE 7496. SOCIOLINGUISTICS: LANGUAGE AND READING ANALYSIS. (3 Credits)

Examines theories of linguistic analysis as they provide insight into psycholinguistic and sociolinguist processes affecting reading. Directions for research and implications for instructions.

CTGE 7568. ADVANCED PRACTICUM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

Practicum experiences for advanced students, designed to prepare for supervisory roles and for curriculum development specialists; emphasis on the analysis of clinical teaching in a variety of classroom settings.

CTGE 7570. ADVANCED STUDY ON PROBLEMS AND ISSUES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

Focus on current problems and issues in special education related to the development and education of children, adolescents, and young adults with physical, cognitive, and/or emotional disabilities. Emphasis will be focused on communication and language disorders, and literacy development of children with disabilities. Exploration of trends in providing educational services to students with disabilities; application of this information in analyzing our recent experiences in schools.

CTGE 7571. RESEARCH ISSUES AND POLICY TRENDS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

Focus on the design and conduct of research in special education. Critique recent research tools and techniques in the field and relate these to current needs for more informative research results in special education. Read examples of research that employ different types of research methodologies. Students will be encouraged to apply these concepts in their own classrooms and schools as a basis for their own field-based research.

CTGE 7591. EVALUATION AND TESTING IN LITERACY. (3 Credits)

Analysis and evaluation of current tests in reading; the major requirement for the course will be the construction of a new instrument to measure some part of the reading process. Recommended course: CTGE 7592.

CTGE 7596. THE COGNITIVE BASES OF LANGUAGE AND LITERACY. (3 Credits)

History and impact of the cognitive revolution on language and literacy curricula, theories, and research. Overview of historical theories and research on text processing as problem solving (e.g., reader response theory, metacognitive theory, schema theory, information processing theory). Recent neurobiological studies are considered as methods of observing literacy problem solving. Implications for curriculum and teaching. Includes possible links to the development of student research agendas.

CTGE 7597. TOOLS FOR INQUIRY IN LANGUAGE AND LITERACY EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

By "tool of inquiry" we mean both the reasearch designs and data-collection instruments used in language and literacy research. We will explore a range of tools used across the continuum of qualitative, mixed-method, and quantitative research, including coding of language samples as well as teacher-made and norm-referenced and criterion-referenced measures. This Tier 3 research course can be used as either the final course in the LLL 4 course research sequence, or as a 5th (elective) research course. As a Tier 3 course, it draws on previous course work in both qualitative and quantitative research.

CTGE 7820. GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES: LCE/CLAIR. (3 Credits)

Provides theoretical and research exploration of global conceptualizations for communicating and learning in more than one language.

CTGE 7843. SCND LANG PROFICNCY/LRNG. (3 Credits)

Survey of research on how students from diverse backgrounds acquire a second language; psycho-linguistic and sociolinguistic variables involved in curriculum; appraisal of techniques and instruments employed in such research; development of research models. Permission of chairperson or instructor required.

CTGE 7844. LANG/ED ASMT MLT LANG ST. (3 Credits)

Focuses on theoretical problems in bilingual and second-language studies; examination of available measures and evaluation approaches, for example, language dominance and proficiency instruments; criterion-referenced tests; and construction and application of new techniques and measures for such programs.

CTGE 7845. CURRICULUM MODELS: BILINGUAL/ESL PROGRAMS. (3 Credits)

The course provides theoretical and practical knowledge related to planning, development, and implementation of curriculum models and methods in bilingual and English as a second language program. The course focuses on (1) curriculum models and design typologies, (2) analysis of policy issues, (3) language and cultural issues, and (4) second language methods.

CTGE 8001. RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP. (0 Credits)

In the Research Apprenticeship the student is required to work closely with a research apprenticeshop faculty advisor to develop and carry out a research project. The student must register each of the 3 semesters and must attend the Research Colloquia each semester. Prerequisite: Permanent Matriculation staty plus 21 doctoral credits.

CTGE 8101. ADVANCED RESEARCH IN CURRICULUM AND TEACHING. (3 Credits)

Designed for advanced doctoral students who are developing dissertation topic areas or who are conducting research projects. The course is usually taken on an independent study basis because of unique student needs.

CTGE 8110. DISSERTATION SEMINAR IN LANGUAGE, LITERACY, AND LEARNING. (3 Credits)

Seminar for advanced doctoral candidates who have completed all coursework for their degree. The purpose of the seminar is to have students develop an approved proposal for their doctoral dissertation.

CTGE 8111. DISSERTATION SEMINAR IN LANGUAGE, LITERACY, AND LEARNING. (3 Credits)

A continuation of CTGE 8110: Seminar for advanced doctoral candidates who have completed all coursework for their degree. The purpose of the seminar is to have students develop an approved proposal for their doctoral dissertation.

CTGE 8502. DIRECTED RESEARCH IN CURRICULUM AND TEACHING. (3 Credits)

Designed for students who have completed their coursework and are developing research problems or projects for completion of doctoral studies. It may not be used to replace any degree course requirements.

CTGE 9000. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CURRICULUM AND TEACHING. (3 Credits)

Special topics in curriculum and teaching. (Permission of course instructor required.)

CTGE 9001. SPEC TOPICS C & T. (0 Credits)

CTGE 9002. SPEC TOPICS C & T. (0-3 Credits)

CTGE 9990. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (0-3 Credits)

Designed to enable students to study selected topics in depth and to conduct research. For matriculated students only. An outline of the proposed work must be approved by the adviser. Registration requires the approval of professor directing study, the division chairperson and the director of graduate studies.

EDGE 6100. ISSUES AND TRENDS IN AMERICAN EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

The course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to become familiar with the important movements, trends, and innovations that are shaping the education profession.

EDGE 6101. RACE AND MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION IN AMERICAN SOCIETY. (3 Credits)

Examines the concept of cultural pluralism—the values, traditions, and aspirations of various immigrant and ethnic groups; examines the institutionalized nature of prejudice and its impact on the cultural, economic, social status, and mobility patterns of selected ethnic groups.

EDGE 6106. HRE PRACTICUM I. (3 Credits)

This course integrates the knowledge and skills acquired during the program. In this first practicum, students identify an organizational problem and begin the consultation process. They must identify a sponsor, contract for the assignment, collect data and provide feedback to the appropriate organizational members.

EDGE 6107. HRE PRACTICUM II. (3 Credits)

This course continues the process begun in Practicum I. In partnership with the organization, students design and implement an intervention based on the data collected earlier in the consultation process. They must evaluate the performance outcomes associated with the intervention.

EDGE 6226. DESIGN OF INTERACTIVE LEARNING SYSTEMS. (3 Credits)

Cognitive theory and programming skills are taught that enable students to develop multimedia instructional software in a variety of paradigms (for example, simulation, coaching, hypertext, multimedia, tutorial, and drill and practice). To ensure instructional effectiveness, emphasis is placed on building instructional strategies (based on cognitive theory) into the design. To ensure usability, human-computer interaction issues are considered (again, based on cognitive theory). Prerequisite: PSGE 5220 or consent of instructor.

EDGE 6703. MEAS HUM RES ED. (3 Credits)

Focuses on understanding, using and developing assessment tools in the workplace. Students design an instrument, collect and analyze data, and write and present their findings. Measurement concepts of reliability and validity are discussed in relation to developing or purchasing assessment tools.

EDGE 8001. DOCTORAL RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP. (0 Credits)

A seminar (two consecutive semesters and a summer) in which the student is required to attend monthly seminars. The student is required to undertake research with a faculty member, culminating in a research project that demonstrates the student’s ability to do doctoral work. Prerequisite: Permanent Matriculation Status.

EDGE 9990. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (0-4 Credits)

Designed to enable students to study selected topics in depth and to conduct research. For matriculated students only. An outline of the proposed work must be approved by the adviser. Registration only by approval of professor directing study, chairman of the student’s division, and director of graduate studies.

EDGE 9995. DOCTORAL MAINTENANCE OF MATRICULATION. (0 Credits)

Doctoral Maintenance of Matriculation (0 credit) (DOCTORAL MATINTENANCE)

EDGE 9999. DISSERTATION MENTORING. (0 Credits)

Consultation with mentor and dissertation committee on defense of completed dissertation work.

PSGE 5203. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH. (3 Credits)

Presentation of the basic concepts, tools, and methods of research in education and psychology.

PSGE 5204. RESEARCH METHODS IN COUNSELING. (3 Credits)

Basic concepts, tools, and methods of research in counseling.

PSGE 5210. STATISTICAL METHODS IN EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Computation and interpretation of descriptive and inferential statistics. Measures of central tendency, variability, and relations. Probability theory and non-parametric tests of hypotheses.

PSGE 5301. PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS IN YOUNG CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES. (0-3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the characteristics of disabling conditions in young children. It introduces the psychological, environmental, and biological conditions, and the interactions among them that place children at risk for developmental delays and disabilities. It discusses the sociocultural and political contexts impacting child development, and the effectiveness of various intervention approaches and models so as to provide students with a knowledge base and skills for interventions.

PSGE 5302. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING. (3,4 Credits)

Theory and study of development and learning process during the adolescent years. This course examines the cognitive, psychosocial, and character development of children from age 12 to 18 and young adults, their learning abilities and processes; and individual, sociocultural, and other environmental factors affecting their learning and development.

PSGE 5314. PSYCHOLOGY OF CLASSROOM ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. (1 Credit)

The study of teacher-pupil interactions in classrooms. Characteristics of effective learning environments, time and behavior management, classroom climate, and leadership. Causes of student misbehavior and techniques for prevention and correction. Open only to matriculated students in one of Fordham’s initial teacher education programs.

PSGE 5316. PSYCHOLOGY OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING. (3 Credits)

This course will review current thinking in the study of child development as reflected in prevailing developmental theory and research. Course readings and assignments will address developmental issues throughout childhood within the physical, cognitive, and socioemotional domains. Special emphasis will be placed on the changes in learning that occur during infancy and childhood.

PSGE 5318. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING: PRE-K–GRADE 12. (3 Credits)

This course will provide an overview of psychological principles relevant to the process of learning and teaching as applied to the kindergarten through secondary-school learner. Topics will include theories of human development and learning, models of learning and instruction, and academic assessment.

PSGE 5500. PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS IN CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES. (3 Credits)

An introduction to understanding children with disabilities and special health care needs. Study of the physical, social, emotional, and learning characteristics of children identified as disabled.

PSGE 5505. PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING DISABILITIES. (3 Credits)

Identification of social, emotional, and learning characteristics of children diagnosed as brain injured, neurologically impaired, or learning disabled. Exploration of perceptual disabilities, language, and motivational and behavioral aspects of children who have learning problems.

PSGE 5620. INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING I. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the profession of counseling. The processes and techniques of counseling are studied. Emphasis on the development of active listening skills. Prevention and remediation are addressed. Must be taken with PSGE 5622.

Corequisite: PSGE 5622.

PSGE 5621. FOUNDATION OF PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING AND CONSULTATION. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the profession of counseling. The processes and techniques of counseling are studied. Emphasis on the development of active listening skills. Prevention and remediation are addressed. Must be taken with PSGE 5623.

Corequisite: PSGE 5623.

PSGE 5622. PRE-PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING I. (3 Credits)

Guided and supervised experience in individual counseling using a variety of counseling techniques. Must be taken with PSGE 5620.

Corequisite: PSGE 5620.

PSGE 5623. CLINICAL INSTR COUNS PROCESS. (3 Credits)

Guided and supervised experience in individual counseling using a variety of counseling techniques. Must be taken with PSGE 5621.

Corequisite: PSGE 5621.

PSGE 5625. THEORIES FAM COUNS:ASST. (0-3 Credits)

This course covers leading theories of family counseling and reviews a variety of family assessment procedures and techniques. The course has an applied focus and integrates multicultural and social justice perspectives in understanding and working with families both within and across cultures.

PSGE 5627. COUNS COLLEGE & POST HS. (3 Credits)

This course provides systematic training in counseling for post high school planning inclulding the college admission and selection process. Students will be introduced to concepts and practical skills required for competency in working with diverse populations: the traditionally aged college student applicant, the disadvantaged, the minority student, the gifted, the learning disabled, the student athlete, and the adult.

PSGE 5630. THEORIES OF COUNSELING FOR SCHOOL COUNSELORS. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to review and evaluate various theories of counseling. Students will be able to compare, contrast, and critique the theoretical approaches in terms of each of the theory's strengths, weaknesses and utility for multicultural populations and for furthering social justice advocacy. This course must be taken with PSGE 5632.

Corequisite: PSGE 5632.

PSGE 5631. COUNS THEORY & PRACTICE. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to review and evaluate various theories of counseling and to encourage students to develop their own conceptualizations of the counseling process. This course must be taken concurrently with PSGE 5633.

PSGE 5632. SOCIAL JUSTICE PRACTICUM IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL COUNSELING. (3 Credits)

Students will be placed in a 100-hour social justice oriented pre-practicum in a high need school. They will be conducting both direct and indirect counseling under the supervision of a certified school counselor. During the first half of the class, students will serve as a peer supervision of the pre-practicum experience. In the second half of the class, students will practice advanced counseling skills using a different theoretical orientation each week. This course must be taken with PSGE 5630.

Corequisite: PSGE 5630.

PSGE 5633. PRE-PRACTICUM IN APPLICATIONS OF COUNSELING THEORY TO PRACTICE. (3 Credits)

This course is the second semester of a two-semester pre-practicum experience. It must be taken concurrently with PSGE 5631 Counseling Theory and Practice. Students will apply various theories of counseling to specific cases though role plays and taped practice counseling sessions. Feedback will be provided by the instructor and peers.

PSGE 6226. DESIGN OF INTERACTIVE LEARNING SYSTEMS. (3 Credits)

See EDGE 6226.

PSGE 6308. COGNITION AND INSTRUCTION I: FOUNDATIONS AND BASIC PROCESSES. (3 Credits)

Historical and contemporary perspectives on the nature of minds and their relation to current psychological theories and research on cognition. Analysis will center on processes underlying perception and understanding—instructional implications will be discussed. Pre- or corequisite: PSGE 6312.

PSGE 6309. COGNITION AND INSTRUCTION II: PROBLEM SOLVING. (3 Credits)

Analysis of the cognitive theories and research on problem solving. Processes underlying imagery, reasoning, transfer of skills, and cultural influences on problem solving will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSGE 6308.

PSGE 6310. INSTITUTE ON APPLIED COGNITION. (3 Credits)

The relation between recent developments in the study of cognition to the solving of applied problems. The institute will be organized around a series of lectures led by noted researchers.

PSGE 6311. APPLICATIONS OF BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS IN EDUCATIONAL SETTINGS. (3 Credits)

Theory and application of psychological principles to modification of social and academic behavior in classrooms and other educational settings.

PSGE 6312. PSYCHOLOGY OF COGNITION AND AFFECT. (3 Credits)

To introduce students to the theoretical & empirical investigation of human learning. Emphasis is on understanding both the cognitive & affective basis of learning, and on new findings that improve understanding and to maximize the use of these complex human skills in relation to educational & psychological practice.

PSGE 6314. PSYCHOLOGY OF PROBLEM SOLVING AND CREATIVITY. (3 Credits)

Definitions of problem solving and creativity; theory, research, and measurement of the creative problem-solving process. Principles and procedures to increase creative thinking. Prerequisite: PSGE 6312 or instructor’s permission.

PSGE 6320. PSYCHOLOGY OF MOTIVATION. (3 Credits)

Theoretical and empirical investigation of human motivation and self-determination. Emphasis on understanding emotional and control processes responsible for motivating selected behavior. Prerequisite: PSGE 6312 or instructor’s permission.

PSGE 6324. ENVIRONMENTS FOR MANAGING CHALLENGING BEHAVIORS. (3 Credits)

Focus on planning and managing instructional environments for at-risk students and students with disabilities. Students will learn to establish secure learning environments that are structured to facilitate the academic and behavioral success of learners. Contemporary approaches to modifying behavior will be studied.

PSGE 6325. PSYCHOLOGY OF MEDIA. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to examine key issues and theoretical perspectives within the interdisciplinary field of media psychology. Course readings will concern the psychological underpinnings of various forms of media, including television, telecommunications, and multimedia, and their impact on the viewer from a psychosocial and cognitive vantage point. Special emphasis will be placed on the child and the adolescent user.

PSGE 6337. ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY: INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN. (3 Credits)

Theories and models of instructional design. Applications of theory and research in educational psychology to the analysis and development of instructional programs. Prerequisite: PSGE 6312 or permission of instructor.

PSGE 6338. DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF CREATIVITY PROGRAMS. (3 Credits)

Design, development, and evaluation of education and training programs to encourage creative thinking and problem solving. General problem-solving skills vs. discipline-based programs. Teacher and staff-development efforts. Selection and measurement of relevant creativity outcomes.

PSGE 6341. PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES. (3 Credits)

Theory and research in differential psychology applied to educational settings. Topics include age, sex, intellectual, socioeconomic, racial, and ethnic differences; cognitive styles; and special-talent abilities. Prerequisite: PSGE 6312 or permission of instructor.

PSGE 6345. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Social psychological theories, concepts, and research are studied. Topics include interpersonal relations, social learning, social motivation, communication, attitudes, groups and organizations, and social change.

PSGE 6401. SEMINAR IN THE PSYCHOLOGY OF BILINGUAL STUDENTS. (0-3 Credits)

This seminar provides a theoretical foundation for understanding critical issues that impact on the psychological functioning of bilingual children and adolescents in the schools. The main objectives are to develop a multicultural psychological perspective, including an understanding of the acculturation process, the nature of bilingualism, bilingual assessment, and bilingual pedagogical issues.

PSGE 6417. DEVELOPMENTAL AND INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the assessment and diagnosis of several disorders of early childhood onset. These disorders include mental retardation, autism, other pervasive developmental disorders, Rett’s Disorder, Asperger’s Syndrome, and various learning disabilities. The etiologies of these disorders, as well as how they are manifested throughout the life span, will be highlighted by reviewing relevant research and through course discussions.

PSGE 6418. EMOTIONAL DISORDERS OF CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE. (3 Credits)

Survey of causes and consequences of emotional problems of children and implications for educational planning. The major psychiatric and psychological classification systems are studied, as are the effects of social and cultural factors on emotional development.

PSGE 6446. CONSULTATION WITH FAMILIES IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY. (3 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the skills necessary to be effective consultants with families of young children.

PSGE 6602. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT. (3 Credits)

This course presents an overview of human development through the life span. Theories of psychosocial development are emphasized, as are the implications of life stage for counseling assessment and intervention. Multicultural and feminist perspectives on human development are included.

PSGE 6603. MULTICULTURAL ISSUES IN PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. (0-3 Credits)

The course is designed to provide psychologists, counselors, and school personnel with the requisite knowledge for working with clients and students of diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds. Intervention techniques for working with a variety of racial/ethnic and special populations are included.

PSGE 6605. COUNSELING PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION. (3 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to principles and methods of counseling program development and evaluation. Psychoeducational, therapeutic, developmental, and culturally appropriate interventions will be considered on individual, group, and system levels. The course focuses on developing and evaluating the effectiveness of counseling interventions based on research evidence. Students will apply the knowledge they gain—through course instruction, assigned readings, and focused reviews of literature relevant to their particular counseling interests—to develop a proposal for a counseling intervention program and design a plan for its implementation and evaluation. Prerequisites: PGSE 5620, 5622, 5204.

PSGE 6607. ASSESSMENT IN COUNSELING. (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to basic issues and procedures in counseling assessment and testing across the life span. It is part of the PSGE 6602 – PGSE 6607 counseling module, and the content is geared toward practicing professional counselors in a variety of settings. Multicultural and ethical issues are infused throughout the course content.

PSGE 6609. ADVANCED ASSESSMENT AND APPRAISAL IN COUNSELING. (3 Credits)

Prerequisite for the course is Assessment in Counseling (PSGE 6607). This course is required for students in the Mental Health Counseling program. This class focuses on clinical assessment in mental health counseling with an emphasis on objective inventories of personality and psychopathology. Students will be exposed to a number of assessments of personality and psychotherapy, with a particular emphasis on the range of inventories. Students will also learn diagnostic interviewing and semi-structured assessments of psychopathology. Multicultural and ethical issues are infused throughout the course content and process.

PSGE 6615. HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

This doctoral-level course provides students with an overview of the development of psychological thought, from its culturally indigenous origins in roughly 3000 BC, to Western influences in the late 19th century, through to the present and anticipated future of the field. Major topics include: philosophical influences in psychology, structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, Gestalt, psychoanalysis, multicultural psychology, and recent theoretical developments. While this course is organized in terms of the major schools of thought that have defined the field of psychology, there is extensive coverage of the history of “constructs” that have shaped the field of psychology, as well as exploration of pioneers in the field across race, gender, sexual orientation, and other individual differences. The course aims to promote a critical analysis of the history of psychology through deconstruction of the cultural and historical milieu that influenced the system of thought or construct under consideration. The place of counseling, vocation, multicultural, and social-justice-oriented psychology will be emphasized.

PSGE 6630. GROUP COUNSELING. (3 Credits)

Principles of group dynamics that have implications for group counseling are studied. Must be taken with PSGE 6632. Prerequisites: PSGE 5620 and PSGE 5622.

Corequisite: PSGE 6632.

PSGE 6632. PRE-PRACTICUM IN GROUPS. (3 Credits)

The course is an experientially focused group-counseling course in which students participate as both group members and leaders. Must be taken with PSGE 6630. Prerequisites: PSGE 5620 and PSGE 5622.

Corequisite: PSGE 6630.

PSGE 6640. CAREER COUNSELING. (3 Credits)

Theories, research, and processes of career development are examined. Must be taken with PSGE 6641. Prerequisites: PSGE 5620 and PSGE 5622.

PSGE 6641. PRACT CAREER COUNSELING. (3 Credits)

Focus is on assessment techniques and methods of career development. A casestudy approach is used. Must be taken with PSGE 6640. Prerequisites: PSGE 5620 and PSGE 5622.

Corequisite: PSGE 6640.

PSGE 6642. PRACTICUM IN CAREER COUNSELING. (3 Credits)

Focus is on assessment techniques and methods of career development. A case-study approach is used. Must be taken with PSGE 6640. Prerequisites: PSGE 5620 and PSGE 5622.

Corequisite: PSGE 6640.

PSGE 6645. GENERAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of psychopathology. The survey will begin by contextualizing notions of psychopathology within the historical milieu of the cultures of psychology and psychiatry. Methodological and taxonomic issues will be explored with an emphasis on the paradigm presented by DSM-IV. The major adult psychiatric disorders (both Axis I and Axis II) will be studied in detail. Related diagnostic and assessment strategies will also be discussed. Through readings and in-class activities, students are expected to develop an understanding of etiological, diagnostic, and treatment issues related to the various disorders addressed.

PSGE 6650. ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN COUNSELING. (3 Credits)

An integrating seminar in which the role and function of counselors in society are examined. Philosophical and psychological roots of counseling are studied, and the ethical guidelines of the major professional organizations are analyzed. Important issues facing the counselor are also studied. Must be taken with PSGE 6652. Prerequisites: Areas I, II, III, and IV from the counseling curriculum.

PSGE 6651. FIELD EXPERIENCE I IN MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING. (3 Credits)

This is the first field experience course (fall only) for master’s students in mental health counseling. Students function as mental health counselors under supervision in a hospital, college, or other agency settings. Experiences vary by site, are individually planned, and may include individual or group counseling, assessment, and attendance at case conferences or staff meetings. Students are responsible for locating and contracting with their own qualifying site, subject to the approval of the coordinator of master’s field experience and their adviser. The course includes group supervision, case presentations, and content specific to developing mental health counseling competencies. Corequisite: PSGE 6650. Prerequisites: PSGE 5620-5622, 5630-5632, 6630-6632, 6640-6641, 6602, and 6607.

Corequisite: PSGE 6650.

PSGE 6652. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN COUNSELING I. (3 Credits)

Students must complete 130 hours of supervised, off-campus experience. Site should be chosen with a view toward the student’s vocational goals. Students will function as counselors under supervision in schools, colleges, hospitals, or mental health agencies. The practicum experience of each student will vary according to his or her site. Ideally, each student will have an opportunity to engage in a wide range of counseling activities, such as individual counseling, group counseling, assessment, attendance at case conferences or other staff meetings, and gradually become acquainted with the total counseling program at the agency or school. Students must provide their own sites, subject to the approval of the field experience coordinator. Generally the course is to be taken during the fall semester of the final year of study. Must be taken with PSGE 6650. Prerequisites: PSGE 5620, 5622, 6640, 6630, 6632, 6602, and 6702.

Corequisite: PSGE 6650.

PSGE 6653. FIELD EXPERIENCE II IN MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING. (3 Credits)

This is the second field experience course (spring only) for master’s students in mental health counseling. Students function as mental health counselors under supervision in a hospital, college, or other agency settings. Experiences vary by site, are individually planned, and may include individual or group counseling, assessment, and attendance at case conferences or staff meetings. Students are responsible for locating and contracting with their own qualifying site, subject to the approval of the coordinator of master’s field experiences and their adviser. The course includes group supervision, case presentations, and content specific to developing mental health counseling competencies. Prerequisite: PSGE 6651.

PSGE 6654. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN SCHOOL COUNSELING II. (3 Credits)

This course is the second semester of a two-semester practicum experience for school counseling students. Students must complete 300 hours of a year-long field placement in a K-12 school under the supervision of a certified school counselor. In the course, students will present student cases to the class and seek and receive peer and instructor supervision . Student must present the instructor with a copy of the memorandum of agreement as well as the end of semester evaluation. Prerequisites: PSGE 5620, 5622, 6602,6630, 6632, 6640, 6641, 6652, & 6702.

PSGE 6655. FIELD EXPERIENCE III IN MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING. (3 Credits)

This course is offered as an option of a third field experience course (summer I only) for those master’s students in mental health counseling who completed the minimum number of supervised hours in the first two practica. Students function as mental health counselors under supervision in a hospital, college, or other agency settings. Students are responsible for locating and contracting with their own qualifying site, subject to the approval of the coordinator of master’s field experiences and their adviser. The course includes group supervision, case presentations, and content specific to developing mental health counseling competencies. Prerequisite: PSGE 6653.

PSGE 6656. MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING. (0-3 Credits)

This course is designed to equip students with the awareness, knowledge, and skills for counseling culturally diverse clients. Students will be exposed to leading theories of multicultural counseling and racial/ethnic identity development and will be involved in case-study analysis, role plays, and other diverse experiences.

PSGE 6659. TRAUMA INTERP NEUROBIO. (0-3 Credits)

Shall bridge the gap between advances in neuroscience & the practice of psychotherapy topics: the brain & affect regulations, neurobiology of attachment, brain intergration & the neurobiology of psychotherapy.

PSGE 6702. FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATIONAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT. (3 Credits)

Survey of measurement methods in education and psychology. Basic psychometric properties of tests, principles of test development, types of tests, and evaluations of tests are studied.

PSGE 7210. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN. (3 Credits)

Experimental and quasi-experimental research. Internal and external validity of experiments. Analysis of variance and covariance. Factorial designs, interpretation of main and interaction effects. Post hoc comparisons. Power analysis. Prerequisites: PSGE 5203, PSGE 5210 and PSGE 6702.

PSGE 7211. CORRELATIONAL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS. (1-3 Credits)

Regression analysis (RA) and the design and interpretation of research using the general linear model (GLM). Interpretation Multiple R, beta coefficients, standard error. Dummy coding and interaction effects. Also, path analytic methods. Prerequisite: PSGE 7210.

PSGE 7213. APPLICATION OF MULTIVARIATE TECHNIQUES IN EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Survey of multivariate statistics, including regression, discriminant function, canonical correlation, multivariate analysis of variance, and factor analysis. Emphasis is on the use of these techniques. Prerequisite: PSGE 7211.

PSGE 7301. ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Analysis of recent theory and research in developmental psychology. Prerequisite: PSGE 6301 or PSGE 6302.

PSGE 7372. PD PRO-SEMINAR IN THE PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. (0 Credits)

This course is designed to develop student basic skills as related to the practice of school psychology. The topics to be covered include professional identity development, school culture, engagement in the supervision process and professional writing and communications.

PSGE 7412. PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the theory of personality assessment. Practice in administration, scoring, and interpretation of selected projective techniques used with children, with emphasis on the Rorschach, Thematic Apperception Tests, and Drawings. Registration limited to matriculated students in school psychology with the permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: PSGE 7508.

PSGE 7413. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY: ADVANCED ASSESSMENT SEMINAR. (3 Credits)

This advanced seminar on assessment is designed to provide students with theoretical knowledge and applied skills in specialized areas of assessment. The specific topics covered will be offered as separate sections on an alternating basis. The major topics may include advanced personality assessment, neuropsychological assessment, preschool assessment, and dynamic assessment. Prerequisites: PSGE 7508 and permission from the instructor.

PSGE 7418. NON-BIASED ASSESSMENT AND DECISION-MAKING. (3 Credits)

In-depth examination of issues, research, and models in non-biased assessment. Topics will include adaptive behavior, problems in classification, test bias, fairness, and judicial and legislative influences. Prerequisite: PSGE 7508.

PSGE 7422. INSTRUCTIONAL CONSULTATION. (3 Credits)

Assessment and remediation of children with school learning problems. Teacher consultation, observation, task analysis, and evaluation of learning problems. Prerequisites: PSGE 7442 and PSGE 7445.

PSGE 7423. THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS IN THE SCHOOLS. (3 Credits)

This course is presented in two parts. The first part focuses on treatment efficacy, various therapeutic orientations, ethics, and law. In the second half, practical, empirically based intervention techniques appropriate for school psychological services for children and adolescents are discussed. Current best practices in the treatment of social, behavioral, and emotional problems are emphasized.

PSGE 7424. ADVANCED ASSESSMENT SEMINAR: BILINGUAL ASSESSMENT. (0-3 Credits)

This course is designed to train graduate students in how to conduct bilingual assessments. Conceptualization of assessment incoorporating specific ways of taking both culture and language into account shall be reviewed. It will extend prior knowledge of how to minimize bias in assessment and test construction.

PSGE 7425. ADVANCED INTERVENTION SEMINAR: PRESCHOOL INTERVENTION. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to be a topical seminar that will cover a number of major issues and trends in preschool intervention.

PSGE 7426. ADVANCED INTERVENTION SEMINAR: EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to be a topical seminar that will cover a number of major issues and trends in educational interventions.

PSGE 7427. ADVANCED INTERVENTION SEMINAR: BILINGUAL INTERVENTION. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to be a topical seminar that will cover a number of major issues and trends in interventions with bilingual students.

PSGE 7428. ADVANCED INTERVENTION SEMINAR: THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTION. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to be a topical seminar that will cover a number of major issues and trends in therapeutic interventions. Intensive supervision will be provided.

PSGE 7429. INTEGRATION OF ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES. (3 Credits)

Supervised pre-internship experience in the integrated use of psychoeducational tests; histories; observation; and clinical interviews in the study of children, adolescents, and adults with learning and behavioral problems. Special considerations of assessment of minority children are addressed. The experience is based in the Rosa A. Hagin School Consultation Center and Early Childhood Center, where students will conduct assessments with clients and attend weekly staff meetings. Registration limited to matriculated students in school psychology or with the permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: PSGE 7508, PSGE 7412, and PSGE 7418.

Corequisite: PSGE 7499.

PSGE 7435. FOUNDATIONS OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Focus is on neuropsychology as a science, and its purpose is to assist psychology students in developing an understanding of the theoretical bases and principles underlying brain-behavior relationships. This course will be designed so that students of school, counseling, and educational psychology will be prepared in and introduced to the theoretical foundations of neuropsychology.

PSGE 7442. ROLE AND FUNCTION OF THE SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST. (3 Credits)

An analysis of the role of the school psychologist. Emphasis is on models for delivering effective services. Consideration of ethical and legal issues.

PSGE 7444. PSYCHOLOGY: HISTORY AND ETHICS. (3 Credits)

The course provides a survey of the development of theoretical issues and methodology of psychology from the early Greek philosophers to current trends, including historical and current approaches from various cultures. Additionally, ethical principles and practice considerations for the science and practice of psychology will be explored through a variety of sources.

PSGE 7445. THEORIES OF SCHOOL-BASED CONSULTATION. (3 Credits)

Theory and practice in school-based consultation, including mental health, ecological/behavioral, and organizational consultation.

PSGE 7452. CLINICAL SUPERVISION OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS. (3 Credits)

This course, conducted mainly as a practicum, analyzes the process of supervision and the basic steps in providing supervision of school psychologists. Emphasis is placed on actual supervisory experience, providing supervision to others, with students expected to spend two laboratory hours weekly in addition to regular class. Registration limited to PhD students in school psychology.

PSGE 7456. EVALUATION OF PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES DELIVERY PROGRAMS. (3 Credits)

Theories, models, and practice of program evaluation in psychological and educational services. Prerequisites: PSGE 5210 and PSGE 6702.

PSGE 7480. PROFESSIONAL DIPLOMA INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY I. (1.5-3 Credits)

Experience in providing school psychological services under qualified supervision that, in conjunction with PSGE 7481, is the equivalent of a full academic year. During the internship, students attend seminars on campus. Completion of appropriate coursework and program permission required. For professional diploma students only.

PSGE 7481. PROFESSIONAL DIPLOMA INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY II. (1.5-3 Credits)

A continuation of PSGE 7480.

PSGE 7482. PROFESSIONAL DIPLOMA INTERNSHIP IN BILINGUAL SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY I. (1.5-3 Credits)

Experience in providing school psychological services to a bilingual population under qualified supervision that, in combination with PSGE 7483, is the equivalent of a full academic year. Completion of appropriate coursework and program permission required. For bilingual professional diploma students only.

PSGE 7483. PROFESSIONAL DIPLOMA INTERNSHIP IN BILINGUAL SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY II. (1.5-3 Credits)

A continuation of PSGE 7482.

PSGE 7490. DOCTORAL INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY I. (1.5-3 Credits)

Experience in providing school psychological services under qualified supervision that, in conjunction with PSGE 7492, combines to be counted as the equivalent of a full academic year. Completion of appropriate coursework and program permission required (open only to PhD-degree students).

PSGE 7492. DOCTORAL INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY II. (1.5-3 Credits)

A continuation of PSGE 7490.

PSGE 7499. INTEGRATION OF ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES LAB. (0 Credits)

A required 7-hour lab that meets 1 hour every other week. The lab must be taken concurrently with PSGE 7429. Students receive supervised practice in test administration, learn various scoring and data analyzing programs and software, as well as gain experience in case conceptualization and report writing.

Corequisite: PSGE 7429.

PSGE 7500. CLINICAL PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Supervised pre-internship field experience in psychological services, eight hours weekly in an agency or school offering clinical services to children or adolescents. Registration limited to matriculated students in school psychology. Program approval required.

PSGE 7501. CLINICAL PRACTICUM IN BILINGUAL SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Supervised pre-internship field experience in psychological services, eight hours weekly in an agency or school offering clinical services to bilingual or limited English proficient children or adolescents. Registration limited to matriculated students in school psychology. Program approval required.

PSGE 7502. CONSULTATION PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Supervised pre-internship fieldwork in delivering consultation services in schools eight hours weekly. Integrating seminar meets on campus. Registration limited to matriculated students in school psychology; completion of appropriate coursework and program approval required.

PSGE 7503. CONSULTATION PRACTICUM IN BILINGUAL SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Supervised pre-internship field experience in delivering consultation services in schools serving bilingual or limited English proficient students, eight hours weekly. Integrating seminar meets on campus. Registration limited to matriculated students in school psychology; completion of appropriate coursework and program approval required.

PSGE 7507. RESEARCH SEMINAR IN THE PRACTICE OF PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

This is an advanced seminar designed to enhance skills in research methods useful in gathering and sharing information on the clinical utility of evidence-based practices.

PSGE 7508. COGNITIVE ASSESSMENT. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the process of cognitive assessment, including administration, scoring, and interpretation of several intelligence tests. Students are expected to assess several individuals and to write reports based on these assessments. The knowledge base that students are expected to obtain through this course consists of the history of intelligence testing, current theories of intelligence, alternative approaches to traditional assessment procedures, and issues in the measurement of intelligence.

PSGE 7510. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY EXTERNSHIP I. (0 Credits)

The externship provides an opportunity for students in the school psychology program to enhance research or practice-related skills and competencies above and beyond those typically required in the program. Participants are supervised by a field supervisor at an external setting and by school psychology faculty member(s). The externship could be taken after the completion of appropriate coursework or practica. Prerequisite: permission from instructor.

PSGE 7511. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY EXTERNSHIP II. (0 Credits)

A continuation of PSGE 7510.

PSGE 7520. DOCTORAL EXTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. (1.5 Credits)

The externship consists of a specific professional experience during which students enhance the attitudes, knowledge, and skills learned during the program and practiced as part of their practica experience. The focus of the externship is on improving one’s skills in a specific area of school psychology practice in preparation for internship or future employment. Goals for the externship should be in keeping with the school psychology program goals.

PSGE 7530. COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY EXTERNSHIP I. (0 Credits)

This course is intended for doctoral students in the Counseling Psychology program who wish to gain additional clinical experience by working in the field. Students must have completed the entire doctoral practicum sequence. Prerequisite: PSGE 7658.

PSGE 7531. COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY EXTERNSHIP II. (0 Credits)

This course is intended for doctoral students in the Counseling Psychology program who wish to gain additional clinical experience by working in the field. Students must have completed the entire doctoral practicum sequence. Prerequisite: Counseling Psychology Externship I.

PSGE 7532. COUNS PSY EXTERNSHIP - SUMMER. (0 Credits)

This course is intended for doctoral students in the Counseling Psychology program who wish to gain additional clinical experience by working in the field. Students must have completed the entire doctoral practicum sequence. Prerequisite: PSGE 7530 and PSGE 7531.

PSGE 7609. ADVANCED PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the theory of projective personality by assessment. Practice in administration, scoring and interpretation of selected projective techniques of children and adults, with emphasis on the Rorschach, Thematic Apperception Tests and Drawings. Registration limited to doctoral students.

PSGE 7612. ASSESSMENT IN PERSONALITY. (3 Credits)

Covers the ethics, administration, scoring and interpretation of both projective and objective personality tests. Students shall receive supervision in these aspects of testing.

PSGE 7613. INTELL ASST: CHILD/ADULT. (3 Credits)

Study of the major theories of cognitive and neuropsychological abilities. Intelligence is analyzed as a major individual difference characteristic in clinical and educational settings. Skills developed in the administrative scoring, and analysis of major intelligence measures.

PSGE 7615. ADULT PSYCHOPATHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

The course provides an overview of the etiology, course assessment, and treatment of adult disorders. Psychological, biological, and sociocultural perspectives of psychopathology are examined and differential diagnostic issues are explored. This course is intended for advanced (post-master’s) graduate students. For doctoral students.

PSGE 7620. THEORIES OF COUNSELING. (3 Credits)

Consideration of the major theories of counseling, including psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, and phenomenological models. Common factors and distinct features are analyzed, as is the research supporting the models. Recent integrative efforts are studied.

PSGE 7630. PSYCHOLOGY OF SMALL GROUPS. (3 Credits)

The principles of group dynamics are analyzed with an emphasis on contemporary theories of group behavior.

PSGE 7640. PSYCHOLOGY OF CAREER DEVELOPMENT. (3 Credits)

A critical analysis of theories and research concerning career development. Application of psycho-logical theories to the career development of diverse persons are studied. Prerequisite: PSGE 6640 or equivalent.

PSGE 7649. CLINICAL SUPERVISION AND CONSULTATION IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Students will study the developmental processes involved in the training of therapists. The nature of the supervisory relationship will be explored in depth and students will identify skills necessary for sound supervisory practice. Clinical consultation in mental health settings will also be addressed. Prerequisite: PSGE 7655.

PSGE 7654. DOCTORAL PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY I. (3 Credits)

This is the fourth course in the series of 4 practicum courses for doctoral students in counseling pyschology. Students engage in closely supervised practice of counseling and psychotherapy in a professional setting for a minimum of sixteen hours each week. Approval of the site and supervisor by the practicum coordinator is required as is the student's eligibility to start the practicum. Theoretical emphasis of this semester is on integrative approaches to psychotherapy. Taping of counseling sessions is required. Master's level practicum.

PSGE 7655. DOCTORAL PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY II. (3 Credits)

The course is the second half of the field experience in counseling psychology required of students who are matriculated in the counseling psychology program. The course requirements are as described for PSGE 7654. Prerequisite: PSGE 7654.

PSGE 7656. DOCTORAL PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY III. (3 Credits)

This is the third semester of practicum for doctoral students in counseling psychology. Students engage in closely supervised practice of counseling psychology in a professional setting 16 hours each week, including one hour of face-to-face, individual supervision by a doctoral-level psychologist. Approval of the site and supervisor by the practicum coordinator is required. Taping of counseling sessions is required. Prerequisites: PSGE 7654 and PSGE 7655.

PSGE 7657. PRACTICUM IN SUPERVISION IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Theories and methods of clinical supervision will be studied. This course requires weekly supervision of master’s-level trainees following the class period. Prerequisite: PSGE 7655.

PSGE 7658. DOCTORAL PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY IV. (3 Credits)

This is the fourth course in the series of 4 practicum courses for doctoral students in counseling pyschology. Students engage in closely supervised practice of counseling and psychotherapy in a professional setting for a minimum of sixteen hours each week. Approval of the site and supervisor by the practicum coordinator is required as is the student's eligibility to start the practicum. Theoretical emphasis of this semester is on integrative approaches to psychotherapy. Taping of counseling sessions is required. Prerequisite PSGE 7656.

PSGE 7667. INTERNSHIP IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY I. (0 Credits)

A full-year, full-time experience in providing psychological services under qualified supervision in an approved agency (PSGE7668, PSGE7669). A formal application process is required, which must be completed and approved by the program in the year prior to the beginning of the internship. All coursework except the dissertation seminar must be completed before enrolling in this course.

PSGE 7668. INTERNSHIP IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY II. (0 Credits)

The second term (Fall, Spring, Summer) of the internship requirement that is described in PSGE 7667.

PSGE 7669. INTERNSHIP IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY III. (0 Credits)

The third term (Fall, Spring, Summer) of the internship requirement that is described in PSGE 7667.

PSGE 7680. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

Qualitative research methods useful in the field of counseling psychology are examined. An overview of philosophy of science is included.

PSGE 7681. QUANT RES METHODS I. (3 Credits)

This first course in a two-semester sequence on applied statistical methods focuses on quantitative data analysis techniques used in the social sciences with special emphasis on designs and methods in psychological research. We then will cover analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Multiple Regression - the predominant tools for analyzing experimental and non-experimental quantitative data. Completion of an extensive statistics project is an essential component of this course.

PSGE 7682. QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY II. (3 Credits)

This second course in a two-semester sequence on applied statistical methods focuses on quantitative data analysis techniques that are frequently used in the social sciences with special emphasis on designs and methods in psychological research. Topics covered in this course include advanced regression analyses, multivariate approaches (MANOVA, path analyses), and factor analysis. Completion of an extensive statistics project is an essential component of this course.

PSGE 7711. PSYCHOMETRIC THEORY. (3 Credits)

Classical and modern test theories, latent trait analysis, scaling methods, and introductory factor analysis are studied. Prerequisites: PSGE 5210 and PSGE 6702.

PSGE 7712. RECENT TRENDS IN MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION. (3 Credits)

Seminar on issues and developments in testing and evaluation. Original research and writing are required. Prerequisite: PSGE 7711.

PSGE 7900. PROSEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL SERVICES. (0 Credits)

The proseminar serves as an orientation to the research process, allows students to learn about faculty research interests and encourages discussions of research topics. It constitutes an initial developmental step in the research process and is linked to the Experimental Design and Statistics Methods courses.

PSGE 8001. RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP. (0 Credits)

In the Research Apprenticeship in Psychological and Educational Services, the student is required to work closely with a research apprenticeship faculty advisor to develop and carry out a research project over the course of three consecutive semesters. The student must register each semester for PSGE 8001. In addition to conducting research PES Research Colloquia each semester. Prerequisite:Permanent Matric Status.

PSGE 8100. COLLEGE TEACHING INTERNSHIP IN PSYCHOLOGY AND SERVICES. (0 Credits)

Supervised field experience as a college-level instructor. On-campus seminars. Prerequisite: Permission of the program faculty.

PSGE 8672. SOCIAL AND ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY. (3 Credits)

The social, professional, legal, historical, and ethical issues and standards relevant to the field of counseling psychology will be explored. This course is taken during the first semester of doctoral study in counseling psychology.

PSGE 8999. DISSERTATION SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL SERVICES. (3 Credits)

Consultation with faculty on the development and conduct of dissertation research. Prerequisite: Permission of program faculty.

PSGE 9990. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1-3 Credits)

Designed to enable students to study selected topics in depth and to conduct research. For matriculated students only. An outline of the proposed work must be approved by the adviser. Registration requires the approval of the professor directing study, the division chairperson and the director of graduate studies.

UEGE 5102. HISTORICAL, PHILOSOPHICAL, AND MULTICULTURAL FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN EDUCATION. (3,4 Credits)

This introductory course examines the historical and philosophical roots of public education and discusses how this system is related to the social, multicultural, political, and economic life of the nation. As a course in educational foundations, this course examines the concept of cultural pluralism—the values, traditions, and aspirations of various immigrant and ethnic groups, and the ways in which those differences influenced schooling cultures and processes.

UEGE 6001. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION. (1,3 Credits)

An examination of the philosophies underlying contemporary policy issues in education with an emphasis on egalitarian versus meritocratic positions.

UEGE 6241. URBAN EDUCATION: PROBLEMS AND PERSPECTIVES. (3 Credits)

An analysis of those trends and innovations most likely to shape urban education delivery systems in the future.

UEGE 6243. THE IMPACT OF PREJUDICE ON MINORITY GROUPS IN AMERICA. (3 Credits)

Examines the institutionalized nature of prejudice and the cultural, economic, and social status of selected minority groups.

UEGE 6276. HISTORY OF EDUCATION. (1-3 Credits)

An examination of selected innovations in American public and nonpublic education with an emphasis on use of the past to improve current practice.

UEGE 6330. URBAN SOCIOLOGY AND EDUCATION. (3 Credits)

An analysis of group values, mobility patterns, and intergroup relations as they affect metropolitan school systems. Emphasis on the education of ethnic minority groups.

UEGE 9990. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1-3 Credits)

Designed to enable students to study selected topics in depth and to conduct research. For matriculated students only. An outline of the proposed work must be approved by the adviser. Registration requires the approval of the professor directing the study, the division chairperson, and the associate dean of academic affairs.