Course Listings

Pastoral Counseling (PCGR)

PCGR 6310. Human Growth and Development. (3 Credits)

This course will explore the development from birth and adolescence through the tasks and crisis of middle and later life. Stage theories, cognitive, social and emotional development will be the focus of this course. Special consideration will be given to spiritual life issues throughout the development process.

PCGR 6380. Theology of Pastoral Counseling and Spiritual Care. (3 Credits)

This course addresses theological and spiritual issues in the field of pastoral care and counseling and proposes a theological method for reflecting on these issues.

Attribute: CSGE.

PCGR 6382. Social and Cultural Foundations of Pastoral Counseling. (3 Credits)

This course will explore the multicultural dimensions of counseling. It will elborate the social and cultural goals of therapy from this perspective. Various theories, research and practice of counseling will be developed, including the spiritual dimensions of the theory.

PCGR 6384. Professional Ethics in Pastoral Counseling. (3 Credits)

An exploration of critical issues in the ethical practice of counseling and psychotherapy, this course addresses the roles and responsibilities of the professional counselor. Using case studies and small group work, students will explore potential ethical conflicts and methods of ethical reasoning, as students develop skills to work through ethical conflicts in the counseling setting.

PCGR 6386. Pastoral Counseling Theory. (3 Credits)

Faith and ministry of pastoral counseling. Consideration of religious resources and identity, theories of the counseling process and pratical issues of therapeutic relationship, contract, setting, referral, etc.

PCGR 6390. Psychopathology & Diagnosis. (3 Credits)

The course will introduce students to the basics of psychopathology and psychological diagnosis for use in clinical and pastoral work. This course is designed to help students cultivate the ability to think critically and creatively about psychopathology and diagnosis “on the ground,” so that they can work from a diagnostic standpoint that is human, flexible, empathic, and non-judgmental, with a focus on the real person one meets in the consulting room or ministry setting. Within this framework, the course will cover interviewing and assessment skills, DSM 5 categories, ethical considerations, character/personality issues, and pastoral assessment. Weekly case studies will be used to practice the art of diagnostic formulation, with an eye toward treatment planning and case formulation.

PCGR 6410. Psychology and Religion/Spirituality. (3 Credits)

This course explores spirituality and religious experience from a psychological viewpoint. The theories of Freud, Jung, Winnicott, and others are engaged in order to understand how our psychology affects our religious lives and vice versa. Using text, experiential exercises, and critical reflection, we will engage our own religious history and traditions, and explore what it means to be a fully alive human being.

Attribute: CSGE.

PCGR 6420. Marriage/Family Therapy. (3 Credits)

A systemic approach to family treatment. A survey of the major contributors to the field, using videotape demonstrations of family sessions. Genograms will be used to explore family-of-origin issues.

PCGR 6440. Pastoral Counseling Skills. (3 Credits)

This course integrates humanistic counseling theory with intragroup practice. Students use audio and video recordings, and focus on developing the listening skills of attending, accurate empathy, clarifying, and focusing.

PCGR 6510. Advanced Life Span Issues and Career Counseling. (3 Credits)

This course explores the advanced lifespan issues of adulthood, through the lens of pastoral and clinical care. Specific focus will be given to issues of career and vocation.

PCGR 7330. Assessment and Appraisal of Individuals, Couples, and Families. (3 Credits)

This course of study presumes a working knowledge of family systems theory and practice. the theoretical approach employed for individual and family functioning will be structural, solution focused and narrative family therapy. The course will focus on the clinical assessments and presentation by both students and course instructor of real family interactional issues. There will be the consideration of the impact of culture and cultural differences in understanding and responding to the patterns of family interactions.

PCGR 7410. Research Methods in Pastoral Counseling. (3 Credits)

This course will be a review of research in pastoral counseling. It will introduce basic concepts and methods of qualitative research, consider ways of studying change as a result of pastoral care and counseling interventions and programs, and familiarize students with basic skills in evaluating research literature.

PCGR 7420. Death, Dying, and Bereavement. (3 Credits)

This course will focus on integrating theoretical knowledge, ministerial skills, and personal experiences in relation to specific topics and issues. Students will learn not just how to minister but how one goes about explaining the meaning of loss, death, and grief.

PCGR 7422. Group Process: Th & Tech. (3 Credits)

An experiential and didactic introduction to group process. Group-as-a-whole, interpersonal and general group models. Applications to the different forms of pastoral ministry. Limited enrollment (three hours), (No audit).

PCGR 7426. Group Process/Dynamics. (3 Credits)

This course will meet weekly for three hours. The first hour will be experiential and two hours will focus on various Group theories, group facilitation, group leadership and an understanding of the challenges that may occur in setting up groups. The various stages of Group development will be explored. Students will be required to apply to the theory to an actual group and/ or apply it to a group that will be part of their ministry. Basic skills, Counseling Theories are prerequisites for this course.

PCGR 7450. Trauma: Counseling and Ministry Issues. (3 Credits)

An introduction to trauma theory and care issues to enhance the practices of counseling, pastoral care, and ministry. This course includes nuero-psychological, psychodynamic, and relational approaches to trauma-informed work, Integrates theological and spiritual perspectives.

PCGR 7471.  Clinical Instruction and Integration Process I. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to accompany the Field Placement for students in the Clinical Pastoral Counseling 60-Credit Program. Students will engage current approaches to counseling and psychotherapy in dialogue with their own clinical work. Classes will focus on the presentation of students' clinical work in connection with relevant topics in the clinical literature, addressing such matters as transference and countertransference, addictions treatment, spiritual issues, and working with trauma. The aim of the course is to integrate previous classroom work and clinical experience, so that students are prepared to begin work as professional counselors and therapists.

PCGR 7472. Clinical Instruction and Integration Process II. (3 Credits)

This continuation course is designed to accompany the field placement for students in the clinical pastoral counseling 60 Credit Program. Prerequisite: REGR 6839.

Prerequisites: REGR 6839 or PCGR 7471.

PCGR 8999. Tutorial. (0 to 6 Credits)

Pastoral Ministry (PMGR)

PMGR 6510. Theology of Ministry. (3 Credits)

This course treats ministry as a culturally complex and theologically significant practice. Starting from contemporary concerns, we ask where ministry comes from, what it can be today, and where it might go. We focus on developing responsible and relevant accounts of ministry that enrich practice today.

PMGR 6612. Ministry with Latinxs. (3 Credits)

This course presents a comprehensive introduction to the principal issues related to U.S. Latinx Christianities from an ecumenical perspective. The course is divided into three parts: The Landscape of Latinxs in the U.S., Latinxs and the Churches, and Hispanic Ministries. Among the topics covered are: the history of the principal Latinx groups in the U.S. (Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans, and Central Americans), the churches’ responses to Latinxs, parish ministry, youth ministry, the sacraments, popular religiosity, and an introduction to U.S. Latinx/Hispanic theology.

PMGR 6613. U.S. Latinx Theology. (3 Credits)

This course presents an introduction to the theological output of U.S. Latinx theologians from an ecumenical perspective. We begin with an overview of U.S. Latinx theology as a contextual theology and then proceed topically, looking at U.S. Latinx Catholic theology, U.S. Latina feminist theology, and U.S. Latinx Protestant theology.

PMGR 6616. Latinx Preaching. (3 Credits)

A practicum in preaching to Latinx congregations with review of the pertinent literature on different preaching styles and Latinx audiences. Facility in Spanish required.

PMGR 6617. Latinx Spirituality. (3 Credits)

This course presents an introduction to the way Latinos and Latinas live out their relationship or faith in God or spirituality. While the focus of the course will be on Latinx Christian spirituality—both Catholic and Protestant—attention will also be paid to non-Christian Latinx spiritualities, especially Santería. We begin with an overview of the variety of spiritualities practiced by Latinos and Latinas and then proceed topically looking at popular Catholicism, the Latinx celebration of the sacraments, Marian devotion (especially to Our Lady of Guadalupe), New Ecclesial Movements (especially the Charismatic Renewal and the Neo-Catechumenal Way), Mainline Latinx Protestant spirituality, and Latinx Pentecostalism.

Attribute: CSGE.

PMGR 6618. Hisp Family Ministry & Catechesis. (3 Credits)

Latinxs are deeply religious, and their way of experiencing God and life is often different from that the U.S. mainstream culture. This course will study the lived reality of U.S. Hispanic families. It will challenge participants to critically reflect, analyze, and articulate in what ways family ministry and family catechesis is embodied in families and faith communities today; to explore what helps or hinders religious development within families, and the responsibility of church and society to foster growth in faith; to explore experientially based frameworks for ministering with Latinx communities; and to nuance their role as religious educators. Our conversation partners will include the writings of U.S. Hispanic theologians and religious educators.

PMGR 6620. Models of Pastoral Theology. (3 Credits)

PMGR 6650. Ethics in Pastoral Ministry. (3 Credits)

Ethics in Pastoral Ministry is an online course that addresses ethical conduct in ministry for professionals working in a supervisory or leadership capacity with emphasis on legal issues and moral decision-making. The course will focus on the formation of conscience as it relates to the self, ministry, and society. It includes case studies and the application of ethical principles to real-life situations as well as the study of theory. It is theoretical, establishing a theological basis for ethical conduct and moral decision-making, and practical, giving students skills and resources to deal with the various issues they may encounter in ministry .

PMGR 6780. Analysis for Ministry. (3 Credits)

Analysis for Ministry is a graduate seminar that seeks to assist ministers of the Gospel to reflect on the context of their pastoral practice in light of Catholic social teaching and social science analysis. Readings will focus on social justice concerns at the global, national and local level.

PMGR 7510. Theology of Ministry. (3 Credits)

This course treats ministry as a culturally complex and theologically significant practice. Starting from contemporary concerns, we ask where ministry comes from, what it can be today, and where it might go. We focus on developing responsible and relevant accounts of ministry that enrich practice today.

PMGR 7616. Latinx Preaching. (3 Credits)

A practicum in preaching to Latinx congregations with a review of the pertinent literature on different preaching styles and Latinx audiences. Facility in Spanish required.

PMGR 7617. Latin@ Spirituality. (3 Credits)

This course presents an introduction to the way Latinos and Latinas live-out their relationship or faith in God or spirituality. While the focus of the course will be on Latino Christian spirituality---both Catholic and Protestant---attention will also be paid to non-Christian Latino spiritualities, especially Santería. We begin with an overview of the variety of spiritualities practiced by Latinos and Latinas and then proceed topically looking at popular Catholicism, the Latino celebration of the sacraments, Marian devotion (especially to Our Lady of Guadalupe), New Ecclesial Movements (especially the Charismatic Renewal and the Neo-Catechumenal Way, Mainline Latino Protestant spirituality, and Latino Pentecostalism. This course is for Doctor of Ministry students only and will require doctoral level participation and additional research/writing elements.

PMGR 7628. Past & Pract Theology. (3 Credits)

Theological study of Christian experience and practice in their individual and community dimensions. History of pastoral/pratical theology and its contemporary developments. Dialogue between present Christian communities and Christian tradition.

PMGR 7650. Ethics in Pastoral Ministry. (3 Credits)

Ethics in Pastoral Ministry addresses ethical conduct in ministry for professionals working in a supervisory or leadership capacity with emphasis on moral decision-making. The course will focus on the formation of conscience as it relates to the self, ministry, and society. It includes case studies and the application of ethical principles to real-life situations as well as the study of theory. It is theoretical, establishing a theological basis for ethical conduct and moral decision-making, and practical, giving students skills and resources to deal with the various issues they may encounter in ministry.

PMGR 7688. Spec Topics: Pastoral Studies. (3 Credits)

Spiritual exercises across religious and cultures is a comparative practical theological study. We place the spiritual exercises of Ignatius of Loyola in conversation with spiritual exercises from diverse traditions - while learning from the complexity of the Ignatian heritage. A critical appreciation for spiritual exercises will inform the practice of such exercises today.

PMGR 7712. Ministry with LatinxS. (3 Credits)

This course presents a comprehensive introduction to the principal issues related to U.S. Latinx Christianities from an ecumenical perspective. The course is divided into three parts: The Landscape of Latinxs in the U.S., Latinxs and the Churches, and Hispanic Ministries. Among the topics covered are: the history of the principal Latinx groups in the U.S. (Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans, and Central Americans), the churches’ responses to Latin@s, parish ministry, youth ministry, the sacraments, popular religiosity, and an introduction to U.S. Latinx/Hispanic theology. This course is for Doctor of Ministry students only and will require doctoral level participation and additional research/writing elements.

PMGR 7713. U.S. Latinx Theology. (3 Credits)

This course presents an introduction to the theological output of U.S. Latinx theologians from an ecumenical perspective. We begin with an overview of U.S. Latinx theology as a contextual theology. We then proceed topically, looking at U.S. Latinx Catholic theology, U.S. Latina feminist theology, and U.S. Latinx Protestant theology. This course is for Doctor of Ministry students only, and it will require doctoral-level participation and additional research/writing elements.

PMGR 8030. Capstone:Pastoral Studies (MA). (3 Credits)

The concluding capstone course for all students in the M.A. Pastoral Studies degree.

PMGR 8530. Evangelization: Faith& Culture. (3 Credits)

This course is a theological exploration that treats evangelization as an important stake in Christian tradition that involves Christian practice with practices of contemporary society. We look continually to the real-world contexts of students and to an intensive consideration of what evangelization entails in a cultural, including religiously, diverse world.

PMGR 8628. Pastoral and Practical Theology. (3 Credits)

This is a class about the foundations and formations of practice-minded theologies, especially as those theologies inform and enrich the practice of pastoral professionals. Fundamental questions about the relationship between religious tradition and contemporary practice are explored.

PMGR 8632. Research Seminar: Pastoral Theology and Practice. (3 Credits)

This seminar prepares D.Min. students to write their doctoral thesis. We explore some fundamental approaches to conducting research into pastorally significant experience today, so as to deepen students' research competence and facilitate readiness for conducting ministry-relevant research. Students will generate a sound draft of a proposal for their D.Min. thesis.

PMGR 9999. ST Tutorial-Pastoral Ministry. (3 Credits)

This course is reserved for students pursuing a special research topic in Pastoral Ministry with the approval of the area faculty and Dean.

Religion (RLGR)

RLGR 0920. Writing for Grad Research I. (1 Credit)

Course will cover how to write at the graduate level in Theology, Spirituality, Pastoral Ministry, and Counseling and Religious Education. Course topics will include composition, structure, style, coherence and analysis.

RLGR 0921. Writing for Grad Research II. (1 Credit)

Continuation of RLGR 0920. Course will cover how to write at the graduate level in Theology, Spirituality, Pastoral Ministry, and Counseling and Religious Education. Course topics will include composition, structure, style, coherence and analysis.

RLGR 6010. Old Testament. (3 Credits)

An in-depth examination of the first five books of the Bible. Historical origins of these texts in ancient Israel and the continuing significance fo their central theological themes of promise, law, creation, election, redemption, and liberation. Introduction to the exegetical methods of modern biblical study.

RLGR 6011. New Testament. (3 Credits)

This course will engage questions about the development of the Christian canon while reading parts of the New Testament in the context of first century Judaism.

RLGR 6018. John's Gospel in Greek I. (3 Credits)

A close reading of the Greek text with detailed exegesis of selected passages.

RLGR 6019. John's Gospel in Greek II. (3 Credits)

A close reading of the Greek text with detailed exegesis of selected passages.

RLGR 6024. The Prophets. (3 Credits)

A study of Old Testament prophets and prophetic books from historical, literary, and theological perspective with particular focus on the prophets’ roles and their enduring message.

RLGR 6030. Christology. (3 Credits)

This is an introductory Christology course principally from a Roman Catholic perspective. Biblical, historical, and contemporary Christology will be examined.

RLGR 6031. Theology of Human Person. (3 Credits)

An inquiry into the meaning and possibilities of becoming fully human from a contemporary theological perspective complemented by a mulitidisciplinary perspective. This course grounds theories of conversion, asceticism and ministry in an adequate understanding of the human, with special attention to gender issues and social justice implications.

RLGR 6032. Church and Society. (3 Credits)

Explores various ways of envisioning how faith communities can structure their internal lives and their relationship to the world. Includes a historical survey of understandings of church and society from biblical times to the present, with specific emphasis placed on using the resources of Scripture and Christian Traditions to help faith communities discern what God is enabling and requiring of them in the world today.

RLGR 6033. Sacraments: Theology and Rites. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the history and theology of the sacraments, and the contemporary rites that are used to celebrate them in the Roman Catholic Church.

RLGR 6070. Liturgical Theology. (3 Credits)

This course will explore contemporary articulations of liturgical theology, including Roman Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox. Through readings and classroom discussion, students will be assisted in arriving at a theological basis for the explanation of worship and the liturgical traditions ot the church.

RLGR 6872. History of the Jesuits. (3 Credits)

This course offers an intensive look at the founding and progress of the society of Jesus. Starting with the founder, St. Ignatius of Loyola the course will progress through key documents and missionary activity up to the 21st century.

RLGR 7031. Theology of the Human Person. (3 Credits)

This course is an inquiry into the meaning and possibilities of becoming fully human from a contemporary theological perspective complemented by a multidisciplinary perspective. We will ground theories of conversion, asceticism, and ministry in an adequate understanding of the human, paying special attention to gender issues and social justice implications. The 7000-level course is for Ph.D. and D.Min. students only, and it requires work beyond what is required in the 6000-level course.

RLGR 7032. Church and Society. (3 Credits)

Doctoral only section (DMIN and PHD). This course reviews how the community established by Jesus Christ, also known as the Church, has been theologically understood over time.

RLGR 8872. History of the Jesuits. (3 Credits)

This course offers an intensive look at the founding and progress of the society of Jesus. Starting with the founder, St. Ignatius of Loyola the course will progress through key documents and missionary activity up to the 21st century.

RLGR 8999. Independent Study. (3 Credits)

A tutorial in the area of Religion.

Religious Education (REGR)

REGR 6102. Foundations of Religious Education. (3 Credits)

This course is an examination of the various theological, philosophical, and educational models that inform the foundations of religious education. Students will examine how these models have influenced different schools, theorists, practitioners, and materials of religious education. Criteria for evaluating the adequacy of competing models will be offered.

REGR 6120. Education for Peace and Justice. (3 Credits)

This course focuses on developing a greater understanding of the social ministry of the Christian churches. After a historical survey of Christian attitudes toward peace and justice, participants will explore ways of bringing a concern for peace and justice issues into liturgy, preaching, religious education, and pastoral ministry. The course also examines how to relate Christian understandings of peace and justice to everyday work, and to civic, political, and family life.

REGR 6125. Moral Education/Develop. (3 Credits)

This course explores various aspects of moral education. The topic will be explored from various perspectives: theology, psychology, education, sociology, and the arts. It will aid those involved in religious education and pastoral ministry to make efeective use of the arts in their work. Provides a framework for exploring foundational issues of morality and moral development, including how our understandings of the human person, community, and attitude toward the natural environment shape our moral outlook. Emphasis is placed on enabling religious educators and pastoral ministers to make moral formation an integral dimension of education in Christian faith.

REGR 6130. Theological Issues: Religious Education and Ministry. (3 Credits)

The course explores major Christian classical themes in contemporary theological development. Foundational concepts of revelation, scripture and tradition, Trinity, creation, Jesus the Christ, and sin and grace are examined. The practical ministerial and educational implications of these developments will be collaboratively pursued.

REGR 6134. Rel Ed & Pastoral Formation. (3 Credits)

This course probes and provides foundational categories for analyzing and engaging in the practice of religious education. The historical origins and contemporary foundations of the field are explored. Classical and contemporary models of religious education are compared and contrasted in terms of their conceptual framework and use in pastoral settings.

REGR 6140. Curriculum and Religious Education. (3 Credits)

This course is an exploration of the what, who, where, when, why, and how of curriculum design in religious education. The various philosophies, principles, and processes of curriculum formation are critically examined. The course addresses the central question and activities of curriculum designers: what educative content do we make accessible to which learners under what governing structure? This question highlights the impact the nature of content, teaching processes, the readiness of learners, and the social-political arrangements of diverse educational settings has on a religious education curriculum.

REGR 6143. Imagination: Ministry and Religious Education. (3 Credits)

This course will explore the link between the imagination, patterns of church ministry, and religious educational activity. The role and power of imagination in disclosing new life and reenvisioning our work will be examined. A central focus of the course is the critical exploration of the images, metaphors, and guiding visions undergirding educational and ministerial work in churches and in our public life. Our educational and ministerial task is to create a counter-discourse to the dominant discourse of our time. Particular perspectives (religious, prophetic, feminist, artistic) will be employed as resources for enriching the imagination, fostering a counter-discourse, and cultivating imaginative activity with people.

REGR 6170. Spirituality and Arts. (3 Credits)

REGR 6180. Rel & Educ Dev of Child. (3 Credits)

Inquires into the spiritual, moral and educational development of children and the implications of this development for religious education. Emphasis is placed on developing a theology of childhood, and the influence of childhood faith development on adult spirituality.

REGR 6181. Family Ministry: Sp Questions. (3 Credits)

Investigation and analyses of specific problems related to family ministry. Topics will include single-parent families, families of "special needs" children, "hurting" families, and ministry for leadership couples and families.

REGR 6182. Community, Family & Rel Ed. (3 Credits)

A critique of current assumptions regarding the relationship of religion, family and education in an attempt to point toward appropriate models of religious education. A consideration of what helps or hinders religious development within families, and the responsibility of church and society to foster growth in faith.

REGR 6188. Religious Education and Human Development. (3 Credits)

How do our ministries foster growth for people of all ages to develop holistically and to mature as people of faith? This course examines this question as it explores a religious education perspective focused on the topic of human growth and development.

REGR 6202. Youth & Young Adult Ministry. (3 Credits)

Explores the personal and communal development of youth and young adults (11-30) through church teaching and such disciplines as philosophy, psychology, and sociology, education and religious education. A comprehensive framework for nurturing the faith and spirituality of youth and young adults is presented as an organizing framework for the course.

REGR 6204. Special Questions: Youth and Young Adult Ministry. (3 Credits)

This course offers a study of identity formation, sexual development, social consciousness, the influence of popular media culture, attitudes toward authority, and Generation X and millennial spirituality. Participants will explore ways of reenvisioning religious education and pastoral ministry to respond more adequately to contemporary youth culture.

REGR 6210. History of Religious Education. (3 Credits)

A study of principal movements and individuals in the history of religious education from the biblical and apostolic periods to the present time. An ecumenically oriented course that explores Catholic, Protestant and Orthodox developments.

REGR 6220. Ministry & Leadership. (3 Credits)

An investigation of the basic structures of organization and principles of administration and supervision as they apply to parish and other religious education settings. Emphasis is placed on the person and the role of leadership within evolving structures of parish and various learning communities.

REGR 6225. Church: Mission & Ministry. (3 Credits)

Explores the self-understanding of the Christian community in its classical forms and contemporary modifications. Biblical foundations and historical developments lay the foundation for revisioning the church in the modern world. The course is a study of the transformation of the church's self-perception, a reshaping of its ministerial forms and redesigning of its mission in the world. Examines the creative tension between continuity and change in light of some major current issues confronting the Christian community.

REGR 6311. Digital Catechesis. (3 Credits)

The Digital Catechesis course provides a new social landscape for imagining faith formation and religious education today. This new landscape integrates Pope Francis’ clarion call for the New Evangelization and the worthy potentials of the New Media, to come up with a leadership agenda that offer ways to explore and call into question traditional assumptions and understanding of both the catechetical and the technological. The course’s goal is to lead pastoral leaders to viewing digital catechesis as a vital expression of the truly catechetical in contemporary religious context.

REGR 6524. Latinx Spirituality. (3 Credits)

This course presents an introduction to the way Latinx people live out their spirituality, faith, or relationship with God. We begin with an overview of the ways Christian and non-Christian Latinx people practice their spiritualities. We then proceed topically, looking at popular Catholicism, Latino sacramentality, Marian devotion, new ecclesial movements, mainline Latino Protestant spirituality, and Pentecostalism.

REGR 6580. Adult Learning & Development. (3 Credits)

This course examinies key issues in the religious education of adults. It situates adult religious education within the broader framework of adult education theory, principles of practice and the application of this theory to contexts of faith communities. Foundation issues explored will include the meaning of adulthood, adult learning, and development, and adult social worlds.

REGR 6705. Religion Society & Culture. (3 Credits)

Explores various ways of thinking about how Christians and Christian faith communities can and should relate to the broader social world of which they are a part. Emphasis is placed on developing a heightened awareness of the ways religious educators and pastoral ministers can enable people to work for greater peace and justice in the world.

REGR 7102. Foundations of Rel Educ. (3 Credits)

An examination of the various theological, philosophical, and educational models that inform the foundations of religious education. The attempt will be made to show how these models have influenced different schools, theorists, practitioners and materials of religious education. Criteria for evaluating the adequacy of competing models will be offered. Additional Doctoral readings and assignments per instructor.

REGR 7120. Education Peace/Justice. (3 Credits)

This course is for PHD Students only. Focuses on developing a greater understanding of the social ministry of the Christian churches. After a historical survey of Christian attitudes toward peace and justice, participants will explore ways of bringing a concern for peace and justice issues into liturgy, preaching, religious education and pastoral ministry. The course also examines how to relate Christian understandings of peace and justice to everyday work, and civic, political and family life.

REGR 7130. Theo Issues:Religious Ed & Min. (3 Credits)

This course is for PHD Students only The course explores major Christian classical themes in contemporary theological development. Foundational concepts of revelation, scripture and tradition, Trinity, creation, Jesus the Christ, and sin and grace are examined. The practical ministerial and educational implications of these developments will be collaboratively pursued.

REGR 7140. Curriculum and Religious Education. (3 Credits)

This course is for Ph.D. students only.

REGR 7170. Spirituality and Arts. (3 Credits)

This course is for PHD Students Only.

REGR 7180. Rel & Educ Dev of Child. (3 Credits)

Inquires into the spiritual, moral and educational development of children and the implications of this development for religious education. Emphasis is placed on developing a theology of childhood, and the influence of childhood faith development on adult spirituality. Additional Doctoral readings and assignments per instructor.

REGR 7182. Community, Family & Rel Ed. (3 Credits)

A critique of current assumptions regarding the relationship of religion, family and education in an attempt to point toward appropriate models of religious education. A consideration of what helps or hinders religious development within families, and the responsibility of church and society to foster growth in faith. Additional Doctoral readings and assignments per instructor.

REGR 7188. Religious Education&Human Dev. (3 Credits)

This course is for PHD Students only. How do our ministries foster growth for people of all ages to develop holistically and to mature as people of faith? This course examines this question as it explores a religious education perspective to the topic of human growth and development.

REGR 7202. Youth & Young Adult Ministry. (3 Credits)

Explores the personal and communal development of youth and young adults (11-30) through church teaching and such disciplines as philosophy, psychology, and sociology, education and religious education. A comprehensive framework for nurturing the faith and spirituality of youth and young adults is presented as an organizing framework for the course.

REGR 7204. Spec Ques:Youth&Young Adul Min. (3 Credits)

This course is for PHD Students only. Offers a study of identity formation, sexual development, social consciousness, the influence of popular media culture, attitudes toward authority, and Generation X and Millennial Generation spirituality. Participants will explore ways of re-envisioning religious education and pastoral ministry to respond more adequately to contemporary youth culture.

REGR 7230. Spec Issues in Religious Ed. (3 Credits)

This course is an in-depth study of three key issues in the field of religious education. Its focus is the systematic treatment of: 1. An exploration of teacher-learning as the practice of revelation; 2. The nature, direction and scope of religious development; and, 3. The meaning of professional and its link to the professional identity of the religious educator. The three themes will be examined within the context of the current challenges facing church and culture.

REGR 7311. Digital Catechesis. (3 Credits)

Doctoral Students Only The Digital Catechesis course provides a new social landscape for imagining faith formation and religious education today. This new landscape integrates Pope Francis’ clarion call for the New Evangelization and the worthy potentials of the New Media, to come up with a leadership agenda that offer ways to explore and call into question traditional assumptions and understanding of both the catechetical and the technological. The course’s goal is to lead pastoral leaders to viewing digital catechesis as a vital expression of the truly catechetical in contemporary religious context.

REGR 7580. Adult Learning & Development. (3 Credits)

This course examinies key issues in the religious education of adults. It situates adult religious education within the broader framework of adult education theory, principles of practice and the application of this theory to contexts of faith communities. Foundation issues explored will include the meaning of adulthood, adult learning, and development, and adult social worlds. See Doctoral requirements on syllabus.

REGR 7705. Religion Society & Culture. (3 Credits)

Explores various ways of thinking about how Christians and Christian faith communities can and should relate to the broader social world of which they are a part. Emphasis is placed on developing a heightened awareness of the ways religious educators and pastoral ministers can enable people to work for greater peace and justice in the world. See Doctoral requirements on syllabus.

REGR 7910. Special Topics: Religious Education. (3 Credits)

See syllabus online for details of this special elective offering.

REGR 8063. Spir Direction Practicum. (0 to 6 Credits)

Integrates participants' spiritual and theological resources with sound counseling practice in one-to-one work with clients. Identifies and develops individual resources and self-understanding for discerning a call to this ministry, or refining skills for those already thus engaged. Case studies, role plays, verbatims, individual and group supervision. By invitation.

Attribute: YEAR.

REGR 8102. Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Religious Education. (3 Credits)

This course—for doctoral students only—is an examination of the various theological, philosophical, and educational models that inform the foundations of religious education. The attempt will be made to show how these models have influenced different schools, theorists, practitioners, and materials of religious education. Criteria for evaluating the adequacy of competing models will be offered.

REGR 8120. Education for Peace and Justice. (3 Credits)

(Doctoral Students Only) Focuses on developing a greater understanding of the social ministry of the Christian churches. After a historical survey of Christian attitudes toward peace and justice, participants will explore ways of bringing a concern for peace and justice issues into liturgy, preaching, religious education and pastoral ministry. The course also examines how to relate Christian understandings of peace and justice to everyday work, and civic, political and family life.

REGR 8125. Moral Education/Develop. (3 Credits)

“Doctoral Students Only” This course explores various aspects of moral education. The topic will be explored from various perspectives: theology, psychology, education, sociology, and the arts. It will aid those involved in religious education and pastoral ministry to make efeective use of the arts in their work. Provides a framework for exploring foundational issues of morality and moral development, including how our understandings of the human person, community, and attitude toward the natural environment shape our moral outlook. Emphasis is placed on enabling religious educators and pastoral ministers to make moral formation an integral dimension of education in Christian faith.

REGR 8130. Theological Issues: Religious Education and Ministry. (3 Credits)

“Doctoral Students Only” The course explores major Christian classical themes in contemporary theological development. Foundational concepts of revelation, scripture and tradition, Trinity, creation, Jesus the Christ, and sin and grace are examined. The practical ministerial and educational implications of these developments will be collaboratively pursued.

REGR 8140. Curriculum and Religious Education. (3 Credits)

(Doctoral Students only.) The course is an exploration of the what, who, where, when, why, and how of curriculum design in religious education. The various philosophies, principles and processes of curriculum formation are critically examined. It addresses the central question and activities of curriculum designers, namely, what educative content do we make accessible to what learners under what governing structure? This highlights the impact on the religious education curriculum of the nature of content, the teaching processes, the readiness of learners, and the social-political arrangements in the diverse educational settings.

REGR 8143. Imagination: Ministry & Rel Ed. (3 Credits)

"Doctoral Students only." This course will explore the link between the imagination, patterns of church ministry and religious educational activity. The role and power of imagination in disclosing new life and re-visioning our work will be examined. A central focus is the critical exploration of the images, metaphors and guiding visions undergirding educational and ministerial work in churches and our public life. Our educational and ministerial task is to create a counter-discourse to the dominant discourse of our time. Particular perspectives (the religious, prophetic, feminist, artistic) will be employed as resources for enriching the imagination, fostering a counter discourse and cultivating imaginative activity with people.

REGR 8180. The Religious and Educational Development of Children and Youth. (3 Credits)

This course—for doctoral students only—inquires into the spiritual, moral, and educational development of children, and the implications of this development for religious education. Emphasis is placed on developing a theology of childhood, and the influence of childhood faith development on adult spirituality.

REGR 8188. Seminar: Religious Education. (3 Credits)

Reserved for special seminar topics in religious education .

REGR 8189. Religious Education&Human Dev. (3 Credits)

“Doctoral Students Only.” How do our ministries foster growth for people of all ages to develop holistically and to mature as people of faith? This course examines this question as it explores a religious education perspective to the topic of human growth and development.

REGR 8202. Youth & Young Adult Ministry. (3 Credits)

"Doctoral Students only." Explores the personal and communal development of youth and young adults (11-30) through church teaching and such disciplines as philosophy, psychology, and sociology, education and religious education. A comprehensive framework for nurturing the faith and spirituality of youth and young adults is presented as an organizing framework for the course.

REGR 8204. Special Questions: Youth and Young Adult Ministry. (3 Credits)

This course—for doctoral students only—offers a study of identity formation, sexual development, social consciousness, the influence of popular media culture, attitudes toward authority, and Generation X and millennial generation spirituality. Participants will explore ways of re-envisioning religious education and pastoral ministry to respond more adequately to contemporary youth culture.

REGR 8210. History of Religious Education. (3 Credits)

“Doctoral Students Only” A study of principal movements and individuals in the history of religious education from the biblical and apostolic periods to the present time. An ecumenically oriented course that explores Catholic, Protestant and Orthodox developments.

REGR 8230. Spec Issues in Religious Ed. (3 Credits)

“Doctoral Students Only” This course is an in-depth study of three key issues in the field of religious education. Its focus is the systematic treatment of: 1. An exploration of teacher-learning as the practice of revelation; 2. The nature, direction and scope of religious development; and, 3. The meaning of professional and its link to the professional identity of the religious educator. The three themes will be examined within the context of the current challenges facing church and culture.

REGR 8401. Research Methods. (3 Credits)

Research Methods course is for students in the PhD in Religious Education.

REGR 8580. Young Adult / Adult Ministry and Education. (3 Credits)

This course—for doctoral students only—examines key issues in the religious education of adults. It situates adult religious education within the broader framework of adult education theory, principles of practice, and the application of this theory to contexts of faith communities. Foundational issues explored will include the meaning of adulthood, adult learning, and development, and adult social worlds.

REGR ADVI. Faculty Advising. (0 Credits)

REGR MTNC. Maintenance of Matriculation. (0 Credits)

Spirituality (SPGR)

SPGR 6702. History of Christian Spirituality I. (3 Credits)

This course will explore a number of the significant figures and themes that characterized the development of Christian Spirituality from its beginnings until the Reformation. Readings will be drawn from classical spiritual texts and relevant secondary literature.

SPGR 6703. History of Christian Spirituality II. (3 Credits)

This course provides a solid grounding in the historical-critical, hermeneutical, and theological engagements with Christian Mysticism/Spirituality from the sixteenth through twentieth centuries. In addition to focusing upon representative Catholic, Protestant, Reform and Orthodox traditions, we examine recent expressions of globally contextualized Christian spiritualities. Course readings draw from classical spiritual texts and relevant secondary literature. Authors typically considered include Ignatius of Loyola, Martin Luther, Teresa of Avila, Madame Guyon, Francis de Sales, George Herbert, the author(s) of The Pilgrim's Tale, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, Howard Thurman, Gustavo Gutierrez, C.S. Song, and Desmond Tutu. Additionally, selected themes in Christian spirituality are considered, including feminist, ecological, and social justice spiritualities. In addition to weekly 1-page papers, the course capstone requirements adjust to student's degree programs: MA and Certificate students write either a research paper or project; doctoral students write a 20-page research paper.

SPGR 6720. Sacramental Spirituality. (3 Credits)

An exploration of present-day theological reflection, contemporary spirituality, and pastoral practice for ministry of the sacraments of initiation (RCIA) and the healing sacraments (reconciliation and anointing). The study and discussion will be biblical and ecumenical, interdisciplinary and multicultural.

SPGR 6740. Ignatian Spirituality for Ministry. (3 Credits)

This course examines the life and writings of St. Ignatius Loyola, offering (a) historical-critical and hermeneutical engagements with primary texts and (b) practical, contemporary, and diverse appropriations of Ignatian/Jesuit spirituality today. We examine especially two important primary sources, the Autobiography and Spiritual Exercises. We also survey some of the other writings that have come down to us: excerpts from his Spiritual Journal, the Constitutions of the Society of Jesus, and representative letters. Course capstone requirements adjust to student's degree programs: MA and Certificate students write either a research paper or project; doctoral students write a 20-page research paper.

SPGR 6742. The Ignatian Way. (3 Credits)

"The ministry of Jesuits -- and their partners -- in pursuing a Christian vision of the world is rooted in the personal experience of the sixteenth-century saint, Ignatius Loyola. In this course we shall study the life and work of that saint against the back-ground of the times in which he lived. We shall examine especially two important primary sources, his Autobiography, dictated to a fellow Jesuit near the end of his life, and his Spiritual Exercises, a remarkable and influential handbook for personal and spiritual renewal. We shall also survey his other writings that have come down to us: excerpts from his Spiritual Journal, the Constitutions of the Society of Jesus, and some of his Letters."

SPGR 6746. Franciscan Spirituality: Francis, Clare and Bonaventure. (3 Credits)

Explores the religious experiences of Francis and Clare from their own writings as well as biographical materials and examines the spiritual teachings that Clare and Francis bequeathed to the religious orders they founded. Special emphasis is placed on the balance they achieved between the contemplative and active lifestyles and on the evangelical values that characterize the Franciscan approach to ministry. Some consideration will be given to representative Franciscan figures who have exemplified the interplay of theology, spirituality and ministry, suggesting outlines of the same for today.

SPGR 6752. Christian Contemplation and Action. (3 Credits)

This course explores the writings and lives of five representative teachers and themes of contemplative prayer and active ministry: The Way of Discipline, with Thomas Merton; The Contemplative-Mystical Way, with Julian of Norwich; The Way of Practical Action, with Ignatius of Loyola; The Way of Beauty, with Gerard Manley Hopkins; The Prophetic Way, with Dorothy Day. The course considers these sources and traditions as living fonts of and challenges to our contemporary spirituality, and provides a broad over­view for more specific studies in Christian spirituality. This course is open to certificate- and master's-level students from all GRE areas and Fordham University programs. The course's capstone requirements are adjusted according to student's degree programs: master's and certificate students write either a research paper or complete a project.

SPGR 6792. Contemporary Christian Spirituality. (3 Credits)

Contemporary foundations, issues, movements and persons impacting the practice of Christian spirituality in a post-modern context. Issues discussed will include emobodiment, prayer, work and sexuality. Movements will include feminism, ecology and compassion/justice.

SPGR 6794. Women Mystics. (3 Credits)

This course will explore the experiences and theologies of women mystics as these have been reported throughout Christian history. Students will read selections from hagiographical texts such as the Acts of Paul and Thecia and the Acts of Perpetua and Felicitas, from the apothegmatic texts such as the sayings of the Desert Mothers, from the historical texts such as the Trial of Joan of Arc, and from the writings of women mystics themselves- such as Hildegard of Bingen, Clare of Assisi, Marguerite Porete, Catherine of Siena, Julian of Norwich, Teresa of Avila, Margaret Mary Alacoque, Therese of Lisieux, and Mother Teresa of Calcutta. History, sociology, psychology, theology, and other disciplines will serve to contextualize the consideration of these readings and will invite a careful comparison with present-day experiences. Students will also be invited to ponder the forces that have shaped our current canon of mystics and saints: whose lives remain invisible to study, and why? .

SPGR 6811. Meditation East/West. (3 Credits)

A Practical theoretical treatment of the tradition of Christian prayer and Eastern Meditation. Included are guided practices, reading and reflection.

SPGR 6830. Discernment in the Christian Tradition. (3 Credits)

This course offers a two-fold introduction to Christian traditions for the discernment of spirits. During the first half of the course, we pursue a historical review of the various articulations of spiritual discernment from New Testament foundations through the 16th century. During the second half of the course, we concentrate on the theory and practice of Christian discernment and decision-making grounded in the writings of St. Ignatius Loyola. We engage in a critical, close reading of Ignatius' "Rules for the Discernment of Spirits" (weeks 1 and 2) and "The Election," both texts from "The Spiritual Exercises," as well as selected letters and other writings by Ignatius. This course also emphasizes each student's personal appropriation of this material through the discussion of provided discernment case studies. Course capstone requirements are based on each student's degree program: master's and certificate students write either a research paper or project; doctoral students write a 20-page research paper.

SPGR 6834. Methods in Christian Spirituality. (3 Credits)

This course introduces graduate students to the academic discipline of Christian spirituality and to methods for researching and writing at the master's or doctoral level, employing the Graduate School of Religion and Religious Education's standard stylebook, Turabian (8th. edition). In consultation with the professor, students are free to pursue a research topic of their choosing; however, their research agenda must include a Christian spirituality component. Students already working on a thesis or dissertation may, with the professor’s consent, use a chapter thereof as their research paper for this course. Course topics include defining the academic discipline of Christian spirituality; the relationship between spirituality and theology; experience as an object of study; and the approaches to context, historical consciousness, multidisciplinarity, and hermeneutic theory. In this practical seminar, students collaboratively learn to research and write at the graduate level, as well as explore the rich offerings of Christian spirituality as an academic discipline. Course evaluation is based on active participation, frequent writing assignments, occasional presentations, writing group collaboration, Turabian quizzes, and a 20-page research paper appropriate to each student's degree program.

SPGR 7702. History of Christian Spirituality I. (3 Credits)

This course will explore a number of the significant figures and themes that characterized the development of Christian Spirituality from its beginnings until the Reformation. Readings will be drawn from classical spiritual texts and relevant secondary literature. This course is for Doctor of Ministry students only and will require doctoral level participation and additional research/writing elements.

SPGR 7703. History of Christian Spirituality II. (3 Credits)

For Doctoral students only. This course provides a solid grounding in the historical-critical, hermeneutical, and theological engagements with Christian Mysticism/Spirituality from the sixteenth through twentieth centuries. In addition to focusing upon representative Catholic, Protestant, Reform and Orthodox traditions, we examine recent expressions of globally contextualized Christian spiritualities. Course readings draw from classical spiritual texts and relevant secondary literature. Authors typically considered include Ignatius of Loyola, Martin Luther, Teresa of Avila, Madame Guyon, Francis de Sales, George Herbert, the author(s) of The Pilgrim's Tale, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, Howard Thurman, Gustavo Gutierrez, C.S. Song, and Desmond Tutu. Additionally, selected themes in Christian spirituality are considered, including feminist, ecological, and social justice spiritualities. In addition to weekly 1-page papers, the course capstone requirements adjust to student's degree programs: MA and Certificate students write either a research paper or project; doctoral students write a 20-page research paper.

SPGR 7720. Sacramental Spirituality. (3 Credits)

An exploration of present-day theological reflection, contemporary spirituality, and pastoral practice for ministry of the sacraments of initiation (RCIA) and the healing sacraments (reconciliation and anointing). The study and discussion will be biblical and ecumenical, interdisciplinary and multicultural. Additional Doctoral readings and assignments per instructor.

SPGR 7740. Spiritual Direction Practicum I. (3 Credits)

The Spiritual Direction Practicum I offers participants the opportunity to learn about the dynamics of prayer as a personal relationship with God, the spiritual direction relationship, elements of Ignatian spirituality, and the role of supervision. A grade of pass and an instructor's evaluation confirming skill development are required to move to Spiritual Direction Practicum II. Ordinarily, the practicum courses are taken at the conclusion of one's program; however, with the approval of the Spirituality Faculty Committee, a student still needing to fulfill a limited number of course requirements may also apply for admission to the practicum courses. The following courses are ordinarily completed before taking the practicum courses: Old Testament; New Testament; Christology or Theology of the Human Person; and Sacraments or Sacramental Spirituality or Church and Society. With faculty approval, one or more of these courses may be taken concurrently with the practicum courses. Note: This course is pass/fail only. Must be taken before the Spiritual Direction Practicum for all students: Theology of Spiritual Direction; Discernment in the Christian Tradition; and Basic Skills in Pastoral Counseling.

SPGR 7741. Spiritual Direction Practicum II. (3 Credits)

This course is a continuation of SPGR 7740. A grade of pass for SPGR 7740 and an instructor's evaluation confirming skill development at a successful level is required to register for this course. The course registration must take place with request to the assistant dean after Practicum I grades have been posted. Note: This course is pass/fail only.

SPGR 7746. Franciscan Spirituality: Francis, Clare and Bonaventure. (3 Credits)

Doctoral students only- please see syllabus requirements for doctoral students. Explores the religious experiences of Francis and Clare from their own writings as well as biographical materials and examines the spiritual teachings that Clare and Francis bequeathed to the religious orders they founded. Special emphasis is placed on the balance they achieved between the contemplative and active lifestyles and on the evangelical values that characterize the Franciscan approach to ministry. Some consideration will be given to representative Franciscan figures who have exemplified the interplay of theology, spirituality and ministry, suggesting outlines of the same for today.

SPGR 7751. Ignatian Spirituality for Ministry. (3 Credits)

For Doctoral students only. This course examines the life and writings of St. Ignatius Loyola, offering (a) historical-critical and hermeneutical engagements with primary texts and (b) practical, contemporary, and diverse appropriations of Ignatian/Jesuit spirituality today. We examine especially two important primary sources, the Autobiography and Spiritual Exercises. We also survey some of the other writings that have come down to us: excerpts from his Spiritual Journal, the Constitutions of the Society of Jesus, and representative letters. Course capstone requirements adjust to student's degree programs: MA and Certificate students write either a research paper or project; doctoral students write a 20-page research paper.

SPGR 7752. Christian Contemplation & Act. (3 Credits)

This course—for doctoral students only—explores the writings and lives of five representative teachers and themes of contemplative prayer and active ministry: The Way of Discipline, with Thomas Merton; The Contemplative-Mystical Way, with Julian of Norwich; The Way of Practical Action, with Ignatius of Loyola; The Way of Beauty, with Gerard Manley Hopkins; The Prophetic Way, with Dorothy Day. The course considers these sources and traditions as living fonts of and challenges to our contemporary spirituality, and provides a broad over­view for more specific studies in Christian spirituality. Doctoral students write a 20-page research paper.

SPGR 7760. Christian Spirituality and Leadership. (3 Credits)

This course examines the intersection between classic texts in Christian spirituality and contemporary texts on leadership studies. The oldest corporations in the West are the monasteries and the Catholic Church. Many spiritual treatises are aimed at helping people understand how to lead communities in an effective manner through word and example. Contemporary writers about leadership, such as Jim Collins, stress spiritual qualities such as humility and hope as important for leading companies into greatness. Whereas the spiritual writings have little quantitative evidence associated with them, the leadership studies provide such analysis; however, books on leadership studies tend to lack any depth behind such concepts as humility or even good advice as to how to achieve it, which texts from the history of Christian spirituality provide. By bringing these horizons together, the course will help students to understand the practical value of Christian spirituality in business, administration, and politics.

Attribute: CSGE.

SPGR 7792. Contemporary Christian Spirituality. (3 Credits)

Contemporary foundations, issues, movements and persons impacting the practice of Christian spirituality in a post-modern context. Issues discussed will include embodiment, prayer, work and sexuality. Movements will include feminism, ecology and compassion/justice. This course is for Doctor of Ministry students only and will require doctoral level participation and additional research/writing elements.

SPGR 7794. Women Mystics. (3 Credits)

This course will explore the experiences and theologies of women mystics as these have been reported throughout Christian history. Students will read selections from hagiographical texts such as the Acts of Paul and Thecia and the Acts of Perpetua and Felicitas, from the apothegmatic texts such as the sayings of the Desert Mothers, from the historical texts such as the Trial of Joan of Arc, and from the writings of women mystics themselves- such as Hildegard of Bingen, Clare of Assisi, Marguerite Porete, Catherine of Siena, Julian of Norwich, Teresa of Avila, Margaret Mary Alacoque, Therese of Lisieux, and Mother Teresa of Calcutta. History, sociology, psychology, theology, and other disciplines will serve to contextualize the consideration of these readings and will invite a careful comparison with present-day experiences. Students will also be invited to ponder the forces that have shaped our current canon of mystics and saints: whose lives remain invisible to study, and why? This course is for Doctor of Ministry students only and will require doctoral level participation and additional research/writing elements.

SPGR 7811. Meditation East/West. (3 Credits)

A Practical theoretical treatment of the tradition of Christian prayer and Eastern Meditation. Included are guided practices, reading and reflection. DMIN/PHD Students Only.

SPGR 7830. Discernment in the Christian Tradition. (3 Credits)

This course offers a two-fold introduction to the Christian tradition of the discernment of spirits. During the first part of the semester, we pursue a historical review of the various articulations of spiritual discernment within the Christian traditions, from New Testament foundations through today. In the second part of the semester, we concentrate on the theory and practice of Christian discernment and decision-making grounded in the writings of St. Ignatius Loyola. Additional doctoral readings and assignments per instructor.

SPGR 7834. Methods in Christian Spirit.. (3 Credits)

For Doctoral students only. This course introduces graduate students to the academic discipline of Christian Spirituality and to methods for researching and writing at the MA or Doctoral level, employing the GSRRE standard stylebook, Turabian (8th. edition). In consultation with the professor, students are free to pursue a research topic of their choosing; however, their research agenda must include a Christian spirituality component. Students already working on a thesis or dissertation may, with the professor’s consent, use a chapter thereof as their research paper for this course. Course topics include defining the academic discipline of Christian spirituality; the relationship between spirituality and theology; experience as an object of study; the approaches to context, historical consciousness, multidisciplinarity, and hermeneutic theory. In this practical seminar, students collaboratively learn to research and write at the graduate level, as well as explore the rich offerings of Christian spirituality as an academic discipline. Course evaluation is based on active participation, frequent writing assignments, occasional presentations, writing group collaboration, Turabian quizzes, and a 20-page research paper appropriate to each student's degree program.

SPGR 7870. Spiritual Direction: Theology and Practice. (3 Credits)

This course explores the experience of spiritual direction from the standpoint of both the director and the one directed. It situates the contemporary ministry of spiritual direction within the history of the Christian tradition, and draws upon interdisciplinary and interreligious perspectives in order to examine critically a diversity of past and present theologies, processes, and models of spiritual direction.

Attribute: CSGE.

SPGR 7888. Special Topics: Spirituality. (3 Credits)

Reserved for special courses in Spirituality.

Attribute: CSGE.

SPGR 7902. Ignatian Spirituality for Ministry. (3 Credits)

Limited to DMin students. Engaging in ministry within an Jesuit/Ignatian spirituality context involves pursuing a Christian vision of the world rooted in the experience and writings of the sixteenth-century Basque saint, Ignatius of Loyola. In this hybrid course, we (1) examine the life of Ignatius against the background of his socio-historical and theological context, (2) engage in a close, critical reading of representative texts, and (3) survey various contemporary approaches to the appropriation of his spiritual tradition, with an emphasis upon ministerial practices. We examine especially two important primary sources, his Autobiography, dictated to a fellow Jesuit near the end of his life, and The Spiritual Exercises, a remarkable and influential handbook for personal and spiritual growth. We also read excerpts from his Spiritual Journal, the Constitutions of the Society of Jesus, and Letters. Capstone requirement: 20-page research paper, which is due later in the spring semester.

SPGR 8500. Comprehensive Exam MA Christian Spirituality. (0 Credits)

Required for completion of the MA in Christian Spirituality concentrations, Generalist and Spiritual Direction.

SPGR 8870. Spir Dir: Theol & Pract. (3 Credits)

(PHD and DMIN students only) This course explores the experience of spiritual direction from the standpoint of both the director and the one directed. It situates the contemporary ministry of spiritual direction within the history of the Christian tradition, and draws upon interdisciplinary and interreligious perspectives in order to examine critically a diversity of past and present theologies, processes, and models of spiritual direction.

SPGR 8998. Special Topics: Spirituality. (3 Credits)

A tutorial in the area of religion.