Political Science

The goal of the undergraduate curriculum of the Department of Political Science is to expose students to the study of politics and the diversity of approaches and analytical techniques used by political scientists. The faculty of the political science department of Fordham University reflects this diversity, as does the undergraduate political science curriculum. The study of political phenomena and the nature of public life is an integral component of a liberal arts education. Through the curriculum, students also acquire skills in writing, communication, and analytical thought that are critical to a liberal arts education.

Given Fordham’s role as an urban, Jesuit liberal arts university, the diversity offered by the curriculum of the political science department serves the goals of the university in several key ways:

  1. it prepares students to think independently, with a tolerance for alternative viewpoints and a concern for current domestic and international issues;
  2. it is committed to the development of written and oral expression among its majors;
  3. it forces students to think critically and analytically about the relationship between values and public life; and
  4. it is committed to providing students with an education that is marked by a concern for the individual student and with the goal of educating men and women for others.

Early Admission to Master’s Program

Elections and Campaign Management

Please read the Early Admission to Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Master’s Programs section, which is located under the heading of Special Academic Programs in the chapter on Academic Programs, Policies, and Procedures of this bulletin. Outstanding Fordham undergraduate students with a grade point average of 3.2 or better are eligible to apply for early admission to the M.A. program in elections and campaign management. Students submit their application materials in the spring of their junior year and begin the program during the fall of their senior year.

Undergraduate students admitted to the program under the early admissions policy may take up to three graduate courses during their senior year with the approval of the program director. These courses will count toward the B.A. and are accepted for the M.A. in elections and campaign management. Students should also seek the approval of their undergraduate adviser before registering their courses. Students following this option typically complete the degree requirements in their fifth year if they study full time. This policy applies to FCLC, FCRH, GSB, and PCS. Courses will be held at both the Lincoln Center and the Rose Hill campuses. Applications are made online through the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences website.

Political Science

Please read the Early Admission to Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Master’s Programs section, which is located under the heading of Special Academic Programs in the chapter on Academic Programs, Policies, and Procedures of this bulletin. Students normally apply at the end of their junior year. Applications do not need to include GRE scores unless the student is planning to apply for financial aid during the completion of their bachelor’s. This policy applies to outstanding students at FCRH, FCLC, and PCS.

In their senior year students take three graduate courses that count toward the B.A. degree and are accepted for the M.A. at Fordham. Graduate courses taken while still at the College must be approved by the director of graduate studies of the department. Students are able to complete an M.A. in political science in two semesters of full-time study, which is normally in their fifth year. Applications are made online through the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences website.

Program Activities

Internships

The political science department does not typically grant academic credit for internships. However, when an internship is integrated with an academic component, such as a tutorial, academic credit is possible. Students should see individual faculty members to discuss internship opportunities and the possibility of receiving academic credit.

The political science department also has formal arrangements for semester-long internship experiences off campus:

Internship in New York City Government

POSC 3120 Seminar: Internship in New York City Government. See Thomas DeLuca. Ph.D., 212- 636-6384, for information about POSC 3120 at Lincoln Center, which is offered during summers only.

Internship in New York State Legislature

The department offers an internship and courses through the New York State Assembly and New York State Senate Internship Programs. For information on these programs, contact Bruce Berg, Ph.D., 718-817-3957.

Washington Semester Program

Fordham University is formally affiliated with the Washington Semester Program of American University in Washington, D.C. Students interested in the Washington Semester Program must fill out an application, which can be picked up from Luz Lenis, Ph.D., sophomore dean, Keating 302, 718-817-4740.

Political Science Honor Society

Political science majors in Fordham’s undergraduate colleges are eligible to become members of Pi Sigma Alpha, the national honor society in political science. Pi Sigma Alpha was founded in 1920, and Fordham’s chapter, the Delta Zeta chapter, was chartered in 1961. Selection is made by department faculty from among seniors who have earned a minimum of 10 credits in political science courses, including at least one advanced-level course, and have achieved a qualifying grade point average both in the major and in their Fordham coursework as a whole. New members are honored at an induction ceremony held in the spring of each academic year.

For more information

Visit the Political Science Department web page.

Political science offers POSC 1100 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS, which fulfills the first social science core requirement. The advanced disciplinary requirement can be fulfilled by taking a second advanced-level course in political science. In addition, the department regularly offers courses that fulfill the American Pluralism, Global Studies, Eloquentia Perfecta (EP1 AND EP3), Interdisciplinary Capstone (ICC), and Values Seminar (EP4) core requirements.

POSC 1100. INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS. (3 Credits)

Introduces students to major approaches to the study of politics. Discusses such key concepts as power, democracy, and justice, analyzes a variety of political actors, including political parties, interest groups, and voters, and examines the functioning of different political institutions in comparative perspective.

Attributes: AMST, FRSS, SSCI.

POSC 1298. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS COMPARATIVE. (3-6 Credits)

POSC 1300. THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND ITS CRITICS. (3 Credits)

The European Enlightenment was an intellectual and political movement committed to preventing religious warfare. This course surveys the work of major Enlightenment political philosophers such as Immanuel Kant, John Locke, and Mary Wollstonecraft; considers the arguments of counter-Enlightenment authors; and surveyscontemporary debates in Islamic political thought about religion, politics, and the role of women in Islam.

Attributes: EP1, FRSS, MANR, SSCI.

POSC 1999. TUTORIAL. (1 Credit)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

Attribute: PLUR.

POSC 2001. POLITICAL ANALYSIS. (4 Credits)

Provides students with the essential methods and concepts for the quantitative analysis of political phenomenon, such as polls and election returns. Techniques of analysis introduced will include graphics, descriptive statistics, cross-tabular and correlation analysis, hypothesis testing, and computer applications. The goal of the course is to make the student a component consumer of political analysis. It will also focus on how political analysis is used in the real world, e.g. by campaign strategists and governments. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 2102. INTRODUCTION TO URBAN POLITICS. (4 Credits)

A study of politics and power within urban political systems, including an examination of their historical development, current political economy, and prospects for the future. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, PLUR, URST.

POSC 2202. INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN POLITICS. (3 Credits)

An introduction to American govenment and politics. The course is a 3 credit version of POSC 2201: American Government & Politics, designed for summer sessions.

Attribute: AMST.

POSC 2203. INTRODUCTION TO THE AMERICAN LEGAL SYSTEM. (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the American legal system in theory and practice. It will examine issues of jurisprudence, as well as some of the procedural and substantive areas of the law. Among the legal principles/topics to be considered: The Rule of Law; The Bill of Rights; Precedent; Test Case; `Reasonable Person' Standard; Judicial Standing; U.S. Supreme Court; Organization of U.S. Court Systems; Freedom of Speech (`Hate' Speech); Legal Rights of College Students; Wrongful Convictions.

Attribute: AMST.

POSC 2205. THE U.S. CONGRESS. (4 Credits)

A study of the historical development and current operation of the U.S. Congress. Particular attention is paid to the impact of elections, political parties, formal and informal rules and procedures, and congressional committees on the policies produced by Congress, and to Congress' relation to the executive branch. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

POSC 2401. INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. (4 Credits)

This course will study the major philosophers from Plato to Marx, discussing questions such as the best regime, the nature of justice and the relation between the individual and the community. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 2501. INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL POLITICS. (4 Credits)

A look at modern nation-states in terms of national character, resources, industrial and military capacity, and geography. An examination of their foreign policies in terms of alliance and balance of power theories as influenced by regional and international organizations and movements. A study of war and its alternatives, such as diplomacy, peaceful change, peaceful settlement of disputes, and future models of world order. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, IPE, MEST.

POSC 2610. INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS. (4 Credits)

This course involves the systematic study and comparison of the world's political systems. It seeks to explain differences between as well as similarities among countries including the United States. Comparative politics is particularly interested in exploring patterns, processes, and regularities among political systems. It looks for trends, for changes in patterns, and tries to develop general propositions or hypotheses that describe and explain these trends. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, IPE, LALS.

POSC 2800. INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL ECONOMY. (4 Credits)

This course examines the relationship between politics and economics, exploring the ways in which societies overcome collective action problems and build institutions that facilitate cooperation and exchange. It introduces the major theoretical frameworks for understanding political economy and examines several contemporary issues in the United States, such as race, gender and class disparities; housing; hunger; education; government regulation; the relationship between domestic and international political economies; and more. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 2999. TUTORIAL. (1-2 Credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

POSC 3120. NEW YORK CITY INTERNSHIP. (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to help students gain practical experience in the operation of New York government and politics by working in offices of elected officials, governmental agencies, or non-partisan public interest organizations. Requirements will also include readings, short papers and discussions based on the internship experience. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, URST.

POSC 3121. NEW YORK CITY POLITICS. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, PLUR, URST.

POSC 3131. POLITICS, URBAN HEALTH, AND ENVIRONMENT. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the intersection of urban life, individual and community health and public policy. It will examine the evolution of urban public problems, the urban environment and the role and responsibility of society and the political system to respond to individual and health issues in urban settings. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, BIOE, ENST, EP3, PJST.

POSC 3205. THE U.S. COURTS IN THE FIGHT FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CIVIL RIGHTS. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the quest for legal and political rights by the African American community through the lens of the US judicial system. The timeline of the course is from the writing of the federal Constitution to the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Among the topics to be covered: slavery, the Reconstruction Amendments, segregation, the legal strategy of the NAACP, and federal civil rights legislation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 3209. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW. (4 Credits)

A casebook analysis of central issues of constitutional law. Examines the Constitution's origins, judicial review, federalism, separation and balance of powers, domestic and foreign affairs, the commerce clause, substantive due process, the rise of the administrative state, philosophies of interpretation. Presents the Constitution as defining a structure of government, rights and political economy. Examines the Constitution's role in American political development and democracy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

POSC 3210. CIVIL RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES. (4 Credits)

A casebook analysis of Supreme Court decisions on civil rights and civil liberties. Topics include freedom of speech and religion, the right to privacy, gender and racial equality, the death penalty, and protections against unreasonable searches and seizures. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

POSC 3213. INTEREST GROUP POLITICS. (4 Credits)

An examination of pressure groups and their role in the political process. Special attention will be paid to the origins of groups, who joins and who does not and how groups affect their own members. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, PLUR.

POSC 3214. THE U.S. CONGRESS. (4 Credits)

A study of the historical development and current operation of the U.S. Congress. Particular attention is paid to the impact of elections, political parties, formal and informal rules and procedures, and congressional committees on the policies produced by Congress, and to Congress' relation to the executive branch. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

POSC 3215. AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES. (4 Credits)

Examines the workings of American political parties and their role in the political system. Analyzes the role of parties across time, the effect of parties on the campaigns of presidential and congressional candidates, and the impact of parties on the workings of both the presidency and Congress as policymaking institutions. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

POSC 3217. THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY. (4 Credits)

An examination of presidential leadership, including the development, growth, and exercise of presidential power. Includes analysis of republican foundations of the presidency, organization and operation of office, role in domestic and foreign policy, relations with Congress, and the importance of character. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, EP3.

POSC 3219. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND THE DEATH PENALITY. (4 Credits)

The couse will examine the historical, philosophical, religious, and legal roots underlying the use of the death penalty by political systems. Part of the course will focus on contemporary U.S policy regarding the death penalty, relevant legal cases and social commentary. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

POSC 3220. CRIMINAL LAW AND JUSTICE IN THE U.S.. (4 Credits)

This course analyzes criminal law and justice, specifically using the Amendments (4th, 5th, 6th, and 8th) and how they relate to criminal procedure. The course will use current issues with criminal justice reform as a framework. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

POSC 3223. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: CRIMINAL JUSTICE. (4 Credits)

Case method analysis of Supreme Court decisions in the area of Criminal Justice. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3225. HUMAN TRAFFICKING AND THE LAW. (4 Credits)

The course will examine human trafficking and the ways in which the legal system addresses it in the United States. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: PJST.

POSC 3228. CIVIL RIGHTS. (4 Credits)

A casebook analysis of legal responses to public and private discrimination, with emphasis on race and gender. Examines Supreme Court decisions, laws, and politics, involving the 5th, 13th, 14th, 15th, and 19th amendments, equal protection and level of scrutiny, civil and voting rights, public accommodations, employment, private associations, schools, privacy, "natural" roles, the public/private dichotomy. Studies movements for equality. Evaluates busing, affirmative action, pay equity and other remedies. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, PLUR.

POSC 3231. JUDICIAL POLITICS. (4 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to the study of law and courts as political institutions and judges as political actors. Topics include judicial behavior and policymaking, the politics of Supreme Court nominations, the role of public opinion in shaping judicial doctrine, and the impact of courts on society. Because this is an American Pluralism course, a major objective of the course is to increase knowledge of how reform groups have used the courts to combat discrimination based on race, sex, and sexual orientation. The course also explores how the structure of the legal system systematically advantages some litigants more than others based on class. The primary institutional focus is the U.S. Supreme Court, but we also study other courts as well, including the state supreme courts and lower federal courts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, PLUR.

POSC 3232. FAMILY, LAW, AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: POSC 1100.

POSC 3233. YOUTH AND THE LAW. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: POSC 1100.

POSC 3301. CAMPAIGNS AND ELECTIONS. (4 Credits)

This course undertakes an in-depth study of campaigns and voting, with an emphasis on the presidential and congressional elections. We will examine elections from the perspectives of candidates, political parties, interest groups, the media, political consultants, and voters. In addition, we will address some basic questions about elections in America: What are the rules? Who wins and why? What difference do elections make? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

POSC 3302. VOTING BEHAVIOR AND ELECTIONS. (4 Credits)

Why people vote the way they do; the role of issues in vote choice; the quality of the American electorate; party systems and electoral change. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3307. ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS. (4 Credits)

The course introduces students to the history and evolution of environmentalism and environmental policy from a comparative perspective. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, ENST, ENVS, INST, IPE, URST.

POSC 3309. WOMEN IN AMERICAN POLITICS. (4 Credits)

This course examines the role of women in three major areas of American politics: women as citizens and voters; women as candidates of elective office; and women as political officeholders. The course analyzes each of these areas in the context of the unique experience women have had both historically and currently. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, WGSS.

POSC 3310. RACIAL AND ETHNIC POLITICS. (4 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to the major theoretical frameworks in the racial and ethnic politics literature. The class will help students better understand how incorporation, identity, and participation shape political identity in the US. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, LALS.

POSC 3311. AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS. (4 Credits)

A survey of American social movements. Students will be introduced to empirical and theoretical scholarship on movement mobilization and tactics, focusing on how movements address marginalization. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3313. POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY. (4 Credits)

This course draws from psychology and political science to explore the psychological sources of political behavior. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3315. POLITICAL PARTICIPATION. (4 Credits)

Studies the relation between participation, political effectiveness and American democracy. Analyzes who participates and how; who doesn't, and why. Examines political participation and questions of gender, race, education, class and ideology. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

POSC 3316. MASS MEDIA AND AMERICAN POLITICS. (4 Credits)

This course looks at the role that the mass media play in American Politics specially and democracy in general. Particular topics will include the evolution of media-governmental relationships, the impact of technological and economic forces on the media's role in politics, and the growth of government concern with media relations. We will also consider the impact of the media on the attitudes and behaviors of citizens, the public agenda and the policy making process. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, COMC, COMM, JOUR.

POSC 3317. MEDIA AND PUBLIC OPINION. (4 Credits)

A critical examination of the nature, formation, and distribution of public opinion and partisan attitudes in the United States. Emphasis on the importance of the media in the formation of public opinion and the connection between public opinion and democracy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

POSC 3319. FILM AND POLITICS. (4 Credits)

Views and analyzes films in class as a means of exploring the relationship between popular culture, political values/ideologies, and political socialization in American life. Also studies genre, filmmaking style and structure, and overt versus subtle messages to further examine film's point of view. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3321. AMERICAN PUBLIC POLICY. (4 Credits)

Analysis of the process of policy making at the national level, including the politics of selected policy issues. Students examine how some issues never make it to the public agenda and the forces that shape those that do. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

POSC 3324. POLITICS OF IMMIGRATION. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, IRST, LALS, PLUR, URST, WGSS.

POSC 3326. LATINO POLITICS. (4 Credits)

The class will cover the history and contemporary role of Latinos in the U.S. political system. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3327. GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN US POLITICS. (4 Credits)

This course locates gender and sexuality central to the study of US politic, looking at how gender and sexuality shape opinion formation, candidacy, election outcomes, group identity formation, political interests, policy design, and political representation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, WGSS.

POSC 3404. AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT. (4 Credits)

What does it mean to be an American? What are the principles of American politics? This course poses these questions to key figures in American political thought, including Jefferson, Hamilton, Madison, Tocqueville, Dubois, Goldman, Rawls, Strauss, and Connolly. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

POSC 3405. RADICAL AND CONSERVATIVE THOUGHT. (4 Credits)

Some modern thinkers have advocated far reaching changes in the political and economic systems, notably the followers of Karl Marx in their pursuit of socialism, or, more radically, communism. Other political thinkers are defenders of classical ideals of liberty or of tradition. We shall read and discuss some key primary writings by thinkers advocating radical political change and by thoughtful defenders of tradition. Writers on the Left include Marx, Lenin, Trotsky and Marcuse. Those on the Right include Ortega y Gasset, Carl Schmitt, Oakeshott and Hayek. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3411. CLASSICAL POLITICAL THOUGHT. (4 Credits)

The politics of the Ancient World will be studies through the writings of Sophocles, Euripides, Plato, Aristotle and others in order to understand ideas of family, property, freedom, torture, truth, and the struggles for individual and collective power. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, CLAS.

POSC 3412. MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT. (4 Credits)

Through selected readings of major political theorists, this course will examine the ideas of the individual, the state, and society, from the 16th through the 19th century. The course will trace the development of such theories as democracy, socialism, communism, and totalitarianism. Writers whose works will be examined include Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Wollstonecraft, Hegel, Marx, and Freud. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3413. CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. (4 Credits)

This course considers contemporary answers to the perennial questions of political philosophy, including what is human nature? and what political principles accord with human nature? We read leading figures in liberalism (Rawls), conservativism (Strauss), civic republicanism (Arendt), communitarianism (Taylor), and postmodernism (Deleuze and Guattari, Connolly). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC.

POSC 3414. POLITICS, NATURE, AND HISTORY. (4 Credits)

Some thinkers have appealed to nature as a way of understanding the political community and its concerns. Others have claimed that history is far more important than human nature in understanding politics. We shall be looking at this debate as it unfolds in the writings fo political thinkers both in antiquity and in the modern era. We shall be discussing writings from such theorists as Aristotle, Augustine, Hobbes, Kant, Nietzsche, Freud, Skinner, and Heidegger. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3415. POLITICS, REASON, AND REVELATION. (4 Credits)

How do different prominent political thinkers, such as Augustine, Maimonides, Locke, Spinoza, and Mill view the compatibility of the demands of religion and the needs of political communities? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3416. LIBERALISM AND ITS CRITICS. (4 Credits)

Modern liberal political thought, its intellectual roots and varieties; consideration of the best of liberalism's critics; examples will be drawn from philosophical, popular and public policy sources. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3418. ISLAMIC POLITICAL THOUGHT. (4 Credits)

The relationship between religious authority and political legitimacy in the classical and modern Islamic worlds. Various ways Muslims over the past 1,400 years have thought about the proper distribution of power and authority in their societies. What is an "Islamic state," and has there ever actually been such a thing? How did classical Muslim thinkers deal with the disjunction between political reality and political ideals? How have Sunni and Shiite thinkers differed in their conceptions of proper government? How useful a concept is "Islamic fundamentalism," and how modern is it? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, INST, IPE, MEST, PJST, REST.

POSC 3419. POLITICS AND (SCIENCE) FICTION. (4 Credits)

We shall be reading and discussing works of fiction, especially science fiction and fantasy, which center upon political themes and ideas. Such works will deal with modern political movements such as libertarianism, communism and fascism. Authors include, among others C.S. Lewis, R. Heinlein, A. Rand, G. Orwell, and N. Spinrad. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 3420. WOMEN AND FILM. (4 Credits)

Students will examine the representation of women as subject of film and politics. Through texts placing women's history in context with emancipation in political life, students will view films which address these controversies. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3421. POLITICAL THEORY IN POPULAR CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to political ideologies such as liberalism, conservatism, socialism, anarchism, nationalism, fascism, feminism, ecologism, and multiculturalism. The course then sees how these ideas express themselves in the Marvel Universe, including the comic books, movies and Netflix series. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, COMC, COMM, REST.

POSC 3422. POLITICS OF THE PRESENT. (4 Credits)

A survey of recent and contemporary political thought, focusing on 19th- and 20th-century writers. Readings will include Lenin, Goldman, Bernstein, Nietzsche, Freud, Michels, Weber, deBeauvior, Sartre, Camus, and Irigaray. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3423. POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES. (4 Credits)

Beginning with a theoretical inquiry into the nature of political movements, this course will examine a variety of political ideologies (including anarchism, socialism, communism, fascism, nationalism, conservatism, liberalism, feminism and minority liberation) which are associated with such movements. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, COLI, INST, IPE.

POSC 3429. DEMOCRATIC THEORY. (4 Credits)

This course studies theories of modern democracy, their historical antecedents, their foundational assumptions about power, human nature and identity, and areas of agreement and disagreement between them over key ideas such as rights, equality, citizenship, justice, and difference. It evaluates contemporary democratic practices in the "era of globalization" through the lens of each theory. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, INST.

POSC 3436. CAPITALISM AND ITS ALTERNATIVES. (3 Credits)

What is the philosophical foundation of capitalism? What are the viable alternatives to capitalism? This course considers answers to these questions from the fields of economics, political theory, and humanistic management. Authors covered include Adam Smith, Milton Friedman, and FA Hayek.

POSC 3500. ADVANCED INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY. (4 Credits)

Writing and speaking intensive examnation of international relations and foreign policy theories. Subjects include international security, international organizations, foreign policy analysis, psychological theories, and diplomacy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: EP3.

Prerequisite: POSC 2501.

POSC 3502. UN AND POLITICAL LEADERSHIP. (4 Credits)

In this summer course, diverse aspects of diplomacy, desicion-making and policitcal leadership at the United Nations will be reviewed, theory , research practice and eithical issues considered. Includes excercises, fieldwork, and visits to the U.N or diplomatic community. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 3505. INTERNATIONAL LAW. (4 Credits)

Historical evolution of general principles of international law. Modern transformation of the law of nations under the impact of growing complexity of international relations; relationship between the national and international legal systems. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, IPE.

POSC 3507. INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS. (4 Credits)

An examination of the international system for the protection of human rights: legal and political theory, cultural relativism, diplomatic protection and the concept of human rights law; legal instruments and institutions; substantive law. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, COLI, IPE, URST.

POSC 3508. THE POLITICS OF HUMANITARIANISM IN AFRICA. (4 Credits)

This course explores contemporary international politics of humanitarianism in Africa, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Issues to be analyzed iinclude international, regional, and sub-regional responses to complex humanitarian emergencies and natural disasters in Africa; the politics of forced displacement, gender- based violence, famine, civilian protection of women and children in armed conflict, and emergency shelter and camp management; local perceptions of humanitarianism; therelationship between international peacekeeping and humanitarianism; and early engagement and recovery through international peacebuilding on the continent. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, HUST, INST, PJST.

POSC 3509. POL HUMANITARIAN INTERVENTION. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 3510. STATECRAFT AND NEGOTIATION. (4 Credits)

This course explores strategic interaction and interstate bargaining from both theoretical and practical perspectives. It is first and foremost a political science course. We will cover theoretical and policy studies on such topics as nuclear disarmament, trade, and human rights. But theory and policy are fundamentally driven by real world situations and dynamics, which we will elucidate through simulation. These simulations will provide you with an opportunity to test out theories and approaches, understand strategic interaction, and develop as successful negotiators. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, EP3.

Prerequisites: POSC 2501 or POSC 2610.

POSC 3511. WAR AND PEACE. (4 Credits)

This course introduces the student to the leading theories of the causes of war and peace. After an introduction to the major theoretical perspectives on conflict, strategy and interstate wars (wars between political rivals) will be the primary focus in the first half of the course. Later we will examine the role of ethnicity and nationalism in internal conflicts, as well as non-conventional forms of warfare. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, HUST, INST, PJST.

POSC 3516. CONFLICT ANALYSIS/RESOLUTION. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on post-Cold War international conflict analysis as an instrument of peacemaking. We will analyze inter-state, internal, state-formation, and protracted social conflict and focus on the development of conflict analysis and resolution as an interdisciplinary component of international studies. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, EP3, HUST, PJST.

POSC 3520. MIDEAST AND THE WORLD. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the international politics of the Middle East and North Africa defined as the whole of the Arab world plus Israel, Turkey, Iran, and those states neighboring these countries that have influence on the region's external relations. Emphasis will be placed on the colonial and postcolonial periods with particular attention paid to the post-World War Two era. Competing theoretical approaches to the study of international politics will precede a more issue-based analysis of the key factors that animate the region's behavior in world affairs. Topics receiving in-depth treatment include: inter-state conflicts, oil politics, political system types and their relationship to international politics, the role of religion, terrorism, external actors influence on the region, United States foreign policy goals, instruments, and actions, among others. No prior background in Middle East studies is assumed. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, GLBL, INST, IPE, MEST, PJST.

POSC 3521. GLOBAL GOVERNANCE. (4 Credits)

This course introduces the student to the leading past and contemporary theories and perspectives in the study of global governance. It provides the student with the ability to survey and understand the wide variety of information regarding multiple aspects of global governance and prepares students to assess the possibilities for the global future and its impact on our lives. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, INST, IPE.

POSC 3522. UNITED NATIONS. (4 Credits)

Structure and powers of contemporary international organizations; the role of the U.N., and regional organizations as related to war, peaceful change, and development. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, INST, IPE, PJST.

POSC 3526. DEM TERRORISM AND MODERN LIFE. (4 Credits)

This course examines the requisites of democracy and modernity as ways of thinking and ways of life and the threat posed to them by terrorism. It asks, what is terrorism, why does it exist, how fundamental are the conflicts it is embedded in, how extensive a threat is it to th U.S. and others, and how can it be stopped? It analyzes the vulnerabilities (and considers the strengths) of modern, highly technological, media driven, highly integrated, international liberal social and economic regimes and the modern philosophical systems with regard to terrorism, and considers ways to mitigate points of danger. Finally, it considers the advantages of democracy and modernity in overcoming this threat. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, INST, PJST.

POSC 3527. UNITED NATIONS PEACE OPERATIONS. (4 Credits)

This course examines the challenges of contemporary peacekeeping, peace enforcement, and peacebuilding through the institution of UN peace operations. Students will explore the generational evolution of UN peace operations since 1945, and focus on key issues related to effective peacekeeping, peace enforcement, and peacebuilding, including sovereignty/non-interference; troop-contributing country interests and political will; civil-military interactions; civilian protection; mission mandates and rules of engagement; and regional as well as UN headquarters politics. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, HUST, PJST.

POSC 3528. CIVIL WARS AND THE DEVELOPING WORLD. (4 Credits)

Civil wars are those conflicts that are internal to a particular country and its sovereign borders. However, contemporary civil wars in the developing world have particular features that merit a deeper study: structural causes related to globalization, complex regional dynamics, and an emerging normative consensus internationally on both the right and responsibility to intervene to halt the violence. The course will examine the the causes, internal dynamics, nature of violence, organizational structure, role of outside interveners, role of gender, and consequences of civil wars in the developing world. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, INST.

POSC 3529. Politics of Building and Keeping Global Peace. (4 Credits)

Students in this course will develop and apply theoretical and empirical knowledge to analyze effectively the politics of building and keeping global peach through focused case analyses, as well as interaction and exchange with key actors from the UN's Department of Peachkeeping Operations; the UN Peacebuilding Commission; the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights; the UN diplomatic community, and select NGO's working in the areas of peacebuilding and humanitarian repsonse. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 3530. U.S. FOREIGN POLICY. (4 Credits)

This course will consider the goals and instruments of United States foreign policy, both in the security and economic realms, as well as through an historical context. Students will examine how foreign policy is made, contending explanations, as well as the main actors involved. Current issues and controversies will be used to test different theoretical approaches. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, INST, IPE.

POSC 3531. US SECURITY POLICY. (4 Credits)

This course analyzes US security policy, specifically including the topics of American military operations and policy, the increase in unconventional warfare, and the threats unique to the 21st century world. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 3540. POLITICS OF CYBERSPACE. (4 Credits)

This course examines the impact of the Internet on the political system. Topics include the potential of the internet to deepen public debate, the use of the Internet by political parties and social movements, and the challenge of the Internet to prevailing conceptions of privacy and property. Extensive use of web sites. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3605. COMPARATIVE DEMOCRACY. (4 Credits)

An examination of current explanations of stable democracy and an attempt to apply them to small, fragmented democracies of Western Europe. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, GLBL, IPE.

POSC 3610. POLITICAL ECONOMY OF DEVELOPMENT. (4 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to the politics and comparative study of international development, both human and economic. A central question will help organize the course: why have some countries developed successfully, while others have not? Whereas much of Western Europe, North America and East Asia have experienced economic development, much of Africa has not. Latin America, Eastern Europe and Eurasia are hybrids, with both pockets of success and failure. While defining what success or failure may mean in light of globalization, our collective focus will be on how best to understand such differences Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, GLBL, IPE, LALS, PJST, URST.

POSC 3611. THIRD WORLD POLITICS. (4 Credits)

The study of contemporary politics of the Third World. An examination of state formation, participation, dissent, resistance movements, nationalism, migration development policies, and issues of class, ethnicity, and gender. Case studies will be chosen from Africa, Latin America, and Asia. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, GLBL, INST, IPE, LALS, MEST.

POSC 3613. POLITICAL MOVEMENTS. (4 Credits)

Explores modern political resistance to established forms of power. Analyzes goals, programs, and ideologies of political movements. Whether they seek revolution or reform, political movements make urgent moral and political claims on society and can even transform social and political systems. This course evaluates such impact on society and the state. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, INST.

POSC 3614. POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS. (4 Credits)

Suppose for a moment that you are a political advisor to the United States government or a major Intergovernmental Organization (IGO) and your task is to come up with an ideal combination of political institutions for a new democracy. You are asked to choose among different types and combinations of institutional rules and practices - such as the organization and operation of the executive, the structure of the legislature, the type of electoral system, and the relationship between the central and local governments. Which political institutions would you recommend? Why? We will ask whether an optimal combination of political institutions exists by examining the effect of these institutions on a broad range of outcomes such as political inclusiveness, citizen participation, economic growth and income distribution, political conflict among the branches of government, proximity between government policy and voter preferences, public goods provision, political corruption, and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, EP3.

POSC 3616. POLITICAL ECONOMY OF POVERTY. (4 Credits)

This course examines the causes of widespread poverty in the developing world from a political economy perspective. The aim is to understand the relationship between political, economic, and social phenomena in causing, perpetuating, and alleviating poverty across the globe. Course readings include classic texts in the field, policy strategies and debates, and case studies on Latin America, Middle East, South and East Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa. Critical analysis of the issues and approaches is strongly encouraged. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, GLBL, INST, IPE, LALS, PJST.

POSC 3621. EUROPEAN POLITICS. (4 Credits)

Introduction to the politics of contemporary Europe including analyses of political economy, democratic governance, and political integration. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, IPE.

POSC 3622. POLITICS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION. (4 Credits)

The European Union (EU) embodies a unique political and economic partnership. With the total population of almost 500 million people, it is one of the largest economies in the world and a major trade partner with the United States. Furthermore, EU is an influential actor in world politics. How does EU work? What are the prospects for the expansion of the euro zone? How do citizens of EU affect policymaking processes at a supra-national level? This course will address these issues through the analysis of EU institutions, policies, and political processes. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, INST, IPE.

POSC 3623. ISLAM IN EUROPE. (4 Credits)

This course aims at acquainting students with the history and present situation of Muslim communities across Europe. The political significance of identity and image among Muslims in Europe will be addressed in depth. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, COLI, INST, IPE, MEST.

POSC 3624. THE QU'RAN AND HADITH IN THE GLOBAL POLITICAL PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

This course analyzes: the Qur'an as a Muslim common constitution and a sacred and historical book; Hadith (Sunnah) as a second source of Muslim faith and of Qur'an interpretation; the relationship between Christians, Jews and Muslims through Qur'an and Hadith; the misunderstanding of Qur'an and Sunnah in the terror era. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, MEST, REST.

POSC 3631. CHINA AND RUSSIA IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE. (4 Credits)

This course provides a broad overview of political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in contemporary China and Russia. Both countries have recently experienced streaks of positive economic growth and begun to reassert their political muscle in the international arena, as seen in China's vital role in US negotiations with North Korea and Russia's annexation of the Crimea and engagement in military operations in eastern Ukraine. The course places an analysis of current events in historical perspective, examining the emergence and development of the communist states, along with the introduction of market reforms and the persistence of state repression. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, GLBL, INST.

POSC 3632. CHINA AND U.S. IN GLOBAL ERA. (4 Credits)

This course compares China and the U.S. with respect to political system, philosophy, and political economy. It includes lectures, discussion, joint Chinese-American student study projects, and field trips to important historic and contemporary Chinese political and cultural sites in southern China, and in Hong Kong and Macau. The class concludes with a discussion of the future of Chinese-American political and economic relations in the contemporary era of globalization. Fee Required. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, GLBL, INST, IPE.

POSC 3633. CHINA AND US-GLOBAL ERA/STUDY TO. (4 Credits)

This course compares China and the U.S. with respect to political system, culture, philosophy, and political economy. It includes a two-week study-abroad study tour and lectures, discussions, joint Chinese-American student study projects, and field trips to historic Chinese political and cultural sites in Beijing, Guangzhou, and Hong Kong. It also includes independent research and analysis in conjunction with the professor. Its goal is to enable students to better comprehend the future of evolving Chinese-American political and economic relations in the contemporary era of globalization. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, INST.

POSC 3634. THE GREAT LAW OF CHINA. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 3635. CHINA, JAPAN, KOREA, AND THE U.S. IN THE GLOBAL ERA. (4 Credits)

This course is a study tour and independent study to familiarize students with the political systems and cultures of China, Japan, and Korea and the relations between these countries and with the United States.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3641. LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS. (4 Credits)

An examination of Latin American politics from theoretical and case study perspectives. Topics include parties and interest groups, militarization of the state, environmental politics, revolution, development and human rights. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, GLBL, INST, IPE, LALS.

POSC 3642. CARIBBEAN POLITICS. (4 Credits)

The course is designed to introduce students to the politics of the Caribbean.Students will thus examine the politics of ethnicity, class, economic development, revolution and reform, women, and foreign intervention. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, IPE, LALS.

POSC 3645. POLITICS OF IMMIGRATION. (4 Credits)

The course examines the politics of contemporary immigration. Topics include the construction of citizen and alien, the (re)negotiation of immigrant sexuality and sexual identity, the racialization of naturalization, the family and immigration law, the formation of social movements around immigrant rights, and a comparative analysis of immigration policies in the U.S. and those in Europe. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, INST, IRST, LALS, PJST, PLUR, URST, WGSS.

POSC 3651. COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE EAST. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the comparative politics of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) viewed from the competing theoretical perspectives of political economy and political culture. Focus will be placed on identifying key conceptual and empirical variables that help explain the nature and behavior of MENA states in the modern period. Among the relevant issues to be discussed include political elites, ideologies, institutions, parties, civil society, democracy, authoritarianism, conflict, political economy, religion, women, and ethnic groups, among others. No prior background in Middle East studies is assumed. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, GLBL, INST, IPE, MEST, OCST.

POSC 3800. INTERNSHIP. (3 Credits)

Supervised placement for students interested in work experience.

Attribute: ASSC.

POSC 3915. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY. (4 Credits)

This course introduces various theoretical frameworks explaining the international political economy and examine topics including trade, monetary policy, exchange rates, finance, multinational corporations, international institutions, and economic development. There is a particular focus on the distribution of benefits within an increasingly globalized world, and the ways in which interest groups work to advance their favored economic policies within this system. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ASSC, INST, IPE, LALS, PJST, URST.

POSC 3999. TUTORIAL. (3 Credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

POSC 4013. RELIGION AND AMERICAN POLITICS. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary seminar explores the nexus of religion and American public life. After treating topics related to electoral politics (e.g. candidate religion, voter religion, "value voters," religious rhetoric), students will then engage a series of "hot topics" that encompass (and often combine) both religious and political discourse. The goal is to provide students with two alternative, yet complementary methods of analyzing the intersection of religion and American politics - one from a political science perspective and one from a theological perspective. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMCS, AMST, ICC.

POSC 4015. AMERICAN ECONOMIC POLICYMAKING. (4 Credits)

This course surveys the major economic policies made by the U.S. government, political influences on economic policy making and the consequences of economic policy on politics. Some of the policies we will look at will include macroeconomic policy, fiscal and monetary policy, taxes, regulation and trade. Influences on economic policy making include the president, congress, interest groups and the public. We will also discuss the trade off between economic efficiency and equity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ICC.

POSC 4020. PLACE, SPACE, AND IMMIGRANT CITIES. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the main issues and current debates on immigrant minorities in large urban areas. Due to their density, cities represent microcosms of interaction and identity formation among and between different minority and majority groups. This often manifests itself spatially, as certain neighborhoods become areas of residence and territorial concentration for immigrant minorities. In the process of settling, immigrants also start identifying strongly with their spaces of settlement. This course will trace the historical patterns of this process, as well as explore its contemporary manifestations, as cities are being rediscovered and “gentrified,” rendering their neighborhoods into fierce battlegrounds of spatial contestation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, ICC, INST, URST.

POSC 4025. YOUTH AND POLITICS. (4 Credits)

Youth is widely regarded as the future of the nation and an agent of social change. How do young people participate in politics? What influences youth’s voting behavior and engagement in protest activity? What is the impact of family, schools, and social media on youth’s civic engagement? The course will address these issues from an interdisciplinary, cross-national perspective by drawing upon literature in anthropology, political science, psychology, and sociology and comparing youth experiences in the United States, East Asia, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, INST, PJST.

POSC 4036. HUMAN NATURE AFTER DARWIN. (4 Credits)

This course enters contemporary theological, political and scientific debates about how to conceptualize human nature after Darwin. We read Epicures, Lucretius, Augustine, Aquinas, Darwin and contemporary theologians, political theorists and scientists. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

POSC 4037. SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND REVOLUTIONS. (4 Credits)

Over the course of world history, various social movements were formed to challenge dominant power relations and bring about social change. Drawing upon literature in history, political science, and sociology, this course examines a wide range of challenger organizations and revolutions. In particular, this course discusses the development of several twenty-first century social movements and revolutions in the United States and abroad, including Black Lives Matter, the Occupy Wall Street, Otpor (Serbia), the Arab Spring (Middle East), Umbrella Revolution (Hong Kong), and EuroMaidan (Ukraine).

Attribute: ICC.

POSC 4210. SEMINAR: STATE, FAMILY, AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

This seminar will examine the relationship between political systems and the family by exploring the connection between varying philosophical/ideological perspectives on state intervention in the family. Public policy issues to be discussed will include marriage and divorce, adoption and foster care, child care, family and child autonomy and child and domestic abuse. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AMST, EP4, PJST, SRVL, VAL, WGSS.

POSC 4215. SEMINAR: PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS. (4 Credits)

The course will analyze the dynamics of presidential elections, including pre-nomination stage, nominations, campaigns, and voting behavior. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: AMST.

POSC 4220. SEMINAR: RELIGION AND THE LAW. (4 Credits)

What does it mean to live a religious life in a country that takes seriously the separation of church and state? What is the proper role of religion in public discourse? This course examines the status of religious expression in the law, examining such issues as school prayer, vouchers for religious education, and the teaching of intelligent design, as well as the role that religion has played in the decision making of the nation's leaders. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP4, SRVL, VAL.

POSC 4260. THE POLITICAL HISTORY OF SEX AND SEXUALITY IN THE UNITED STATES. (4 Credits)

This seminar examines the history of activism and political organizing by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people in the United States between 1950 and 2012. Using an interdisciplinary approach - across gender and sexuality studies, queer theory, critical race theory, political science, and history - we will explore: 1) the ways what lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender identities have been constructed in the context of US politics and 2) how lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and "LGBT" political interests achieve their meaning and are co-constituted by their intersections with other axes of identity, such as race, ethnicity, class, nation, and ability. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, WGSS.

Prerequisite: POSC 1100.

POSC 4305. SEMINAR: AMERICAN POLITICS. (4 Credits)

This course studies contemporary American political development through analysis of the historical and philosophical roots, current ideologies and practices, and likely future of U.S. politics. Using democratic theory, and political, and policy analysis it examines selected aspects of contemporary political behavior, agendas, ideologies, and institutions to explain current trends in American politics. It studies, in particular, the relation between power, social structure, and politics in order to assess the viability and character of political democracy today. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 4315. SEMINAR: POLARIZATION IN AMERICAN POLITICS. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the causes and consequences of partisan polarization in American politics. Topics to be covered include polarization in Congress, are ordinary citizens polarized, the role of religion, class and race in fueling partisan polarization on the policy making process. Since this is a seminar students are expected to be able to work and the impact independently by carrying out an extensive research project addressing some aspect polarization. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 4400. SEMINAR: GLOBAL JUSTICE. (4 Credits)

What is global justice and how can we achieve it? This course considers answers to this question from Enlightenment philosophers,and contemporary liberals, cosmopolitans, feminists, neoliberals, realists, Muslims, and Buddhists. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP4, INST, IPE, PJST, URST, VAL.

POSC 4420. SEMINAR: NATIONALISM AND DEMOCRACY. (4 Credits)

An examination of nationalism with particular attention to its effects on democratic principles and practices and its intersection with identity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 4430. SEMINAR: FREUD, POLITICS, SEXUALITY. (4 Credits)

The course will explore Freud's writings on infantile sexuality and sexual difference in their relation to his writings on culture, civilization, and politics. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 4515. SEMINAR: INTERNATIONAL POLITICS OF PEACE. (4 Credits)

Students in this course will integrate informed analysis and reflection to critique, orally debate, and articulate in writing their ideas regarding how actors in international politics can nurture, envision, (re)build, manage, enhance, and enforce ¿peace¿ in contemporary international politics. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP4, IPE, PJST, VAL.

POSC 4518. INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION: IDEAS, DEBATES, ACTORS. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the politics, theory and practice of international development cooperation, with particular focus on the 20th and 21st centuries. Issues under focus will include decolonization, modernization, development/underdevelopment, newly industrialized countries, sustainable development, financing for development, aid for trade, aid effectiveness, policy coherence for development, and cooperation for development along the North-South divide, international humanitarian cooperation and link between humanitarian and development work. Bilateral and multilateral mechanisms of development cooperation will also be explored, alongside major actors – international organizations, regional organizations, nation-states, and non-state actors. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, PJST.

POSC 4525. SEMINAR: GLOBALIZATION. (4 Credits)

This seminar provides an overview over the core theoretical views on globalization: its historical development, the main actors, and determinants of "winners and losers" of globalization. The second part of the seminar will use case studies that highlight specific issues most contested in the discussion of globalization to foster a connection between the theories we covered and the actual unfolding of globalization as experienced by a number of actors. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: IPE.

POSC 4526. SEMINAR: THE POLITICS OF HUMANITARIAN INTERVENTION. (4 Credits)

Political decisions about when, how, and whether to intervene in other countries’ affairs have been framed in humanitarian terms. The course provides students with an overview of the politics of humanitarian intervention and asks them to consider a variety of perspectives on the feasibility, effectiveness, ethics, and altruism of protecting civilians with force. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: PJST.

POSC 4530. SEMINAR: POLITICAL ECONOMY OF CONFLICT. (4 Credits)

Why do civil wars occur? Why are some conflicts so violent while others are not? Why are poor countries so conflict prone? Why are abundant natural resources so often associated with civil war? Why are some conflicts easier to resolve than others? This course will address these questions from the perspective of political economy, focusing on incentive structures, political institutions, and economic development. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: INST.

POSC 4535. SEMINAR: POST-COLD WAR HUMAN RIGHTS AND PROTECTION ARCHITECTURE. (4 Credits)

This seminar will explore the politics surrounding the unprecedented growth, development and advancement of the global human rights regime and protection of civilians architecture following the demise of the Cold War. The context of the emerging global governance order at the end of the 20th century will form the backdrop for the study of this transformation, and students will analyze the normative, political and peace and conflict dynamics that precipitated and informed its growth and development as well as develop a mastery of the theory and practice of international human rights and civilian protection. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

POSC 4620. SEMINAR: THE WORLD OF DEMOCRACY. (4 Credits)

This course studies democracies across of the globe. It analyzes the meaning of democracy in different cultures and theories, and compares political systems, including democratic nations that aspire to democracy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP4, PJST, VAL.

POSC 4800. INTERNSHIP. (1-4 Credits)

Analysis and discussion of selected topics and problems in political economy. Provides students the opportunity to work on guided research projects tailored to the student's interests and the course's objectives.

POSC 4900. SEMINAR: DEMOCRACY, DEVELOPMENT, AND THE GLOBAL ECONOMY. (4 Credits)

This course seeks to understand, analyze, and critique both liberalism and its alternatives. Specifically, we will explore how democracies and nondemocracies integrate into the global economy and how, in turn, the global economy impacts state politics, poverty, and prosperity. The goal of the course is to critically and scientifically assess the significance and success of diverse domestic political institutions and policies in advancing human welfare in our current era of economic interdependence. The course is structured to first cover the fundamental structures and values of democratic and undemocratic political institutions, liberal and state capitalist market models, and various economic development theories.Then, in the second part of the course, we will critically evaluate and discuss the complex relationships between these phenomena (democracy, development, and the global economy), focusing on the capacity, sustainability, and success of liberal goals and organizational structures in advancing the human condition. This is an advanced writing, research, and discussion based course for students interested in international political economy, international development, and/or comparative politics. We will dedicate substantial class time to research design and methodology, including case study analysis. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: EP4, IPE, PJST, VAL.

POSC 4999. TUTORIAL. (8 Credits)

Student and faculty member together design a course to meet the student's needs and interests, and to advance the student's knowledge and scholarship. The faculty member works directly with the student and guides the student's reading and research and/or analysis project. A tutorial is dependent on the faculty member's agreement to participate. It usually is a one-on-one collaboration, but also may be designed to accommodate several students at the same time.