Modern Languages and Literatures

The Department of Modern Languages and Literatures offers a variety of programs in foreign languages and literatures and in related area studies. Its broad aim is to explore the linguistic and literary forms by which human beings have constructed and interpreted reality in order to develop in students a competence in one or more modern foreign languages and cultures. Works of imaginative literature, among other forms of cultural expression, such as film, music, theater and the visual arts, are the focus of our programs, as is the study of languages, upon which humanistic education, personal development, and professional training all depend.

The department offers language courses in Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin Chinese, Russian, and Spanish; majors in the following languages and literatures and area studies: French, German, Italian, and Spanish, and minors in Arabic, French, German, Italian, Mandarin Chinese, Russian, and Spanish.

Courses at the 2000 level normally concentrate on advanced language, communication, and cultural studies. Courses at the 3000 level normally concentrate on literary movements, periods, and themes. Cultural studies courses with a substantial literary component are also numbered at the 3000 level. Courses at the 4000 level normally concentrate on in-depth study of individual authors and texts and are conducted as seminars.

Program Activities

The department offers a broad range of activities for undergraduates and regularly sponsors film screenings in conjunction with courses and lectures. Invited speakers offer formal lectures, informal talks, seminars, and workshops either designed for or open to undergraduates. The students participating in the study abroad program in Granada, Spain, also publish the journal Por Granada, which collects the terms papers completed in the course Spain in Contest.

Awards and Scholarships

Each year the department bestows a number of awards and scholarships on Fordham students for excellence in the study of foreign languages, literatures and cultures, and for outstanding commitment to promoting foreign language learning and foreign culture awareness at Fordham and in the larger community. Awards and scholarships include:

  • The Francis R. Favorini Italian Achievement Award (FCRH)
  • The French Achievement Award (FCRH)
  • The German Achievement Award (FCRH)
  • The Anthony and Cecilia Guardiani Award (FCRH)
  • The Heydt French Award (FCRH)
  • The Heydt Spanish Award (FCRH)
  • The Istituto Italiano di Cultura Award (FCRH)
  • The Alfred A. Puglisi Travel Award to Italy (FCRH, FCLC, GSB, PCS)
  • The Russian Award (FCRH)
  • The Fernand and Santina Vial Scholarship (FCRH, FCLC, GSB)

Internships

Students who wish to pursue an internship and receive college credit for it should contact their major adviser and Career Services to identify internship opportunities relevant to their field of study and professional interests. Credits for internship tutorials will be granted depending upon the type of internship, the extent to which the relevant foreign language is used in the work environment, and the significance of the experience for a student’s course of study. The number of credits is contingent on the fulfillment of various requirements, such as regular meetings with the adviser, weekly written reports, and completion of a substantial final project, among others.

Student Clubs and Honor Societies

Modern languages and literatures students are encouraged to share and develop their literary and cultural interests by becoming involved in student clubs and Honor Societies at Rose Hill and Lincoln Center. Such clubs as the following sponsor academic and social events including lectures, film series, outings and dinners to foster an understanding and appreciation of foreign languages and cultures beyond the traditional classroom setting:

  • Academia Hispana (RH)
  • Le Cercle Français (RH)
  • CIAO Amici (LC)
  • The Deutscher Studenten Klub (RH)
  • Insieme Italian Cultural Society (RH)
  • La Société Française (LC)
  • The Honor Societies:
    • Alpha Mu Gamma (foreign languages, RH)
    • Gamma Kappa Alpha (Italian, RH and LC)
    • Pi Delta Phi (French, RH)
    • Sigma Delta Pi (Spanish, RH and LC)

Study Abroad

The modern languages and literatures faculty offer courses with study tour components in Austria, Chile, Cuba, and Germany and teach in Fordham-sponsored study abroad programs in Granada (Spain), and Rome (Italy). The department encourages students to study abroad for one or two semesters. Students who opt to apply study abroad credits toward their major or minor must seek approval from their major or minor adviser in their language area prior to their going abroad. See program requirements above for accepted maximum number of courses. Additional study abroad credits accepted by Fordham University may be applied as elective credits toward graduation, but not toward the major or the minor. For further information about study abroad, interested students should contact the department and the Office of International and Study Abroad Programs (www.fordham.edu/isap).

For more information

Visit the Modern Languages and Literatures department web page. 

The 2001-level course in a modern language other than English fulfills the language requirement. In order to achieve this level of mastery of a foreign language, a mastery that will allow students to comprehend a text of average sophistication in its oral and written form and to comment on it orally and in writing in a coherent and grammatically correct manner, the 2001-level course provides a critical analysis of selected cultural and literary texts, with composition, conversation, and review of pertinent grammatical structures.

Language skills preparation: One to three courses. Students who need preparation before taking the required 2001-level course have:

  • Four entry points in French, Italian, and Spanish, depending upon their prior knowledge of the language:
    • 1001-Introduction I
    • 1002-Introduction II
    • 1501-Intermediate I
    • 1502-Intermediate II
  • Three entry points in Arabic, German, Japanese, Mandarin Chinese, and Russian:
    • 1001-Introduction I
    • 1501-Intermediate I
    • 1502-Intermediate II

All those beginning a language at the most basic level take an intensive one-semester course worth five credits in order to accelerate their progress. Other students begin with the course in which they are placed by the department and progress to the 2001 level. Heritage speakers of Spanish, who place out of levels 1001 through 1502 of the language, will take SPAN 2301 ADVANCED FOR SPANISH SPEAKERS instead of 2001 to fulfill the language requirement. Incoming freshmen seeking a substitution/waiver for the foreign language core through the Office of Disability Services must complete this process by the end of the fall semester of their sophomore year.

Exemptions: B.S. and B.F.A. students, B.A. students in PCS, and those majoring in natural science will not have a language requirement unless required for their major.

In addition, the department offers courses that fulfill the American Pluralism, Global Studies, Eloquentia Perfecta 2 and 3, Advanced Literature, and Interdisciplinary Capstone core requirements. It also offers service-learning courses that integrate language learning with service in New York City’s foreign-language-speaking communities.

Study abroad is an integral part of the study of foreign language, literature, and culture. Students are highly encouraged to study abroad in a foreign-language-speaking country for a semester or a year. For information on study abroad requirements and on applying study abroad course credits toward a major or a minor, please read below.

All courses counting toward the core language requirement and the major or the minor in a modern foreign language, literature, and culture must be taken for credit and a letter grade. When AP or IB credits are awarded as equivalent to the 1502 level in a language, these credits will be applied toward the core language requirement and, as elective credits, toward graduation, but they will not be applied toward the major or the minor in that language.

Modern Languages and Literature (MLAL) courses

MLAL 1010. SPANISH COLONIALISM THROUGH FILM. (3 Credits)

This course examines the diverse (personal, social, and national) narrations of one essential time period in the history of the Americas: the age of Spanish colonization of the New World. In particular, the course considers the recounting of this era through literary and visual means, through mainstream (the conquerors) and alternative (the conquered) perspectives, and through modern and traditional media.

Attributes: EP2, LAHA, LALS, MANR, TC.

MLAL 1100. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS. (3 Credits)

An introduction to linguistics, the study of language. The course surveys the core domains of theoretical linguistics including phonology, syntax, and semantics as well as select areas of applied linguistics. Taught in English.

Attributes: CLAS, COLI, ENGL.

MLAL 1500. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLINGUISTICS. (3 Credits)

An introduction to psycholinguistics, also called the psychology of language. The course focuses on how the mind and brain acquire and process language across the lifespan and in different populations. Taught in English.

MLAL 2000. TEXTS AND CONTEXTS: REMEMBERING ITALY'S LONG CENTURY IN LITERATURE, FILM, AND MUSIC. (3 Credits)

This course examines the way in which the literary and artistic forms of modern Italy represent political and social movements such as revolution, unification, modernization, and migration. We will focus on texts from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries that utilize differing modes -- such as fiction, nonfiction, film, poetry, and music -- and we will analyze how these texts draw upon, reflect and refashion the meaning of historical events. In juxtaposing texts of different types, we will explore the mechanisms by which symbols and ideas are inherited through and adapted to differing contexts. Taught in English.

Attributes: EP2, TC.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1102.

MLAL 2100. ADVANCED GERMAN GRAMMAR. (4 Credits)

The course is designed to help students gain more insight into the structure of the German language and to further develop and strengthen their knowledge of German grammar. Survey and practice of German grammar as well as more advanced features of German syntax and style. Course will be conducted in English with readings and exercises in German. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

MLAL 2601. RUSSIAN CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (4 Credits)

This course provides intensive practice of spoken and written language with an emphasis on vocabulary building and idiom fluency. The course uses various media from film to news sources in order to expand students' familiarity with contemporary Russian culture. Recommended for students interested in pursuing upper-level Russian literature and culture courses. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MLAL 2820. GERMAN TEXTS ON FILM. (3 Credits)

Subtle: Paralles and doppel ganger. Thix course investigates identity through paralles lives and uncanny encounters .

Attribute: COLI.

MLAL 3000. GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES. (4 Credits)

This course investigates contemporary theories of gender and sexuality from a range of disciplinary perspectives. The course explores how gender and sexuality function as dimensions of social identity, difference, inequality, and power. Students will be introduced to a range of theoretical schools that concern a range of identities, respond to earlier theoretical formulations, and engage activism and historical experiences. Students will be introduced to concepts such as the social construction of gender, queerness, gender difference, intersectionality, universalism, identity politics, reproductive justice, materialist and/versus symbolic theories, masculinity studies, critical race theory, sex positivity and pornography studies, and a range of feminist accounts of gender. The course foregrounds feminist, queer, critical race, postcolonial, and other critical scholarly literatures and methods. While it focuses on the contemporary period (after 1975), the course surveys a range of theories, situating them in social and political context. Disciplinary focus may vary from year to year, but the interdisciplinary character of the field will be retained. Taught in English. Coursework in Spanish for credit toward the Spanish major or minor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, LALS, PLUR, SPAN, WGSS.

MLAL 3001. THE ITALIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE IN LITERATURE AND FILM. (4 Credits)

The Italian American experience has found cogent and compelling expression in numerous works of fiction, poetry, drama and cinema. The rich documents left by immigrants from the earliest times to the contemporary writers provide a rich body for exploring styles, achievements, traditions and, generally, the life of Italian Americans and their changing status and civic concerns. The course discusses the representation of Italian American identity, stereotypes, family relationships, sexual mores, political and social values. The contribution of Italian Americans to the various art forms of the American world will be highlighted. The discussions will include theories from the most recent ethnic studies. Authors and critics to be studied are Di Donato, Tusiani, Mangione, Ardizzone, Puzo, Barolini, Stella, Gardaphè, Marazzi, Scorsese, among others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MLAL 3003. INTERCULTURAL THEORY. (4 Credits)

In this course, we will explore the "contact zone" as a theoretical concept and a site of encounters, conflicts, and negotiations. In her book Imperial Eyes: Travel Writing and Transculturation (1992), Mary Louise Pratt describes the contact zone as "...the space in which peoples geographically and historically separated come into contact with each other and establish ongoing relations, usually involving conditions of coercion, radical inequality, and intractable conflict". Like Pratt, the contact zones as we study them will not only stress ideas of co-existence and interaction, but also insist on "asymmetrical relations of power". Over the course of the semester, we will focus in particular on the following themes: home/displacement, temporality, personhood/community, translingualism/transculturation/translation, and recycling/adaptation/appropriation/imitation. In this course, not only will we study the contact zone but we also envision the classroom as a multilingual, multicultural and multidisciplinary contact zone that fosters creative responses through a series of activities and collaborative projects. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: SPAN.

MLAL 3007. SPANISH LINGUISTICS. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the linguistic study of the Spanish language. The course surveys the formal domains of linguistics - including phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, and sociolinguistics – with an exclusive focus on the Spanish language. The course is taught in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ASSC.

MLAL 3010. POLITICS AND POETRY IN THE MIDDLE AGES: THE RISE OF VERNACULAR CULTURE IN THE MEDITERRANEAN. (4 Credits)

This course analyses the development of vernacular culture and literature in the Mediterranean during the Middle Ages. Students will explore the political, historical, and linguistic context within which vernacular languages and cultures emerged between the XI-XIII centuries. Following Dante’s On Vernacular language - the first linguistic and poetic “map” of the Middle Ages- students will retrace the interrelations linking the Italian vernacular culture to the other traditions within the “romance” domain in the Mediterranean. With the imperial court of Frederick II in Sicily, the Pope in Rome, and the most powerful centers of trade and finance in Florence and other Italian city-states, the Italian peninsula provides a special standing point for the analysis of the relationship between poetry and power in different political contexts: the court of the emperor Frederick II and the powerful communal republics in center and northern Italy will be the focus of the course. Among the texts, authors, and movements included are: Provencal and Italian trobadours; the “Sicilian School” and the encyclopedic culture at the court of the emperor Frederick II (poetry, law, philosophy, medicine, astronomy, translations); religious literature and the Tuscan School of poetry (S. Francis, Jacopone da Todi, Guittone d’Arezzo); the “New Sweet Style” (Guido Guinizzelli, Guido Cavalcanti, Dante Alighieri). Fulfills the Advanced Literature requirement of the core and satisfies the requirement of Minor and Major in Italian. Cross-listed with MVST and COLI. Taught in English with coursework in Italian for credit in Italian. ITAL 2500 or ITAL 2561 or Instructor's Permission Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITAL, ITMA, MLL, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 or ITAL 2561.

MLAL 3030. MASTERPIECES OF CHINESE FILM: THEORY & TEXTS. (4 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to Chinese film, focusing on important genres, directors and movements. We will follow two parallel (often times intersecting) threads throughout the course: "politics of film" as well as "poetics of film." The former explores Chinese film's engaging dialogue with Chinese sociopolitical issues whereas the latter investigates key terms of film theory such as spectatorship, gaze, apparatus theory, and authorship.

Attribute: ALC.

MLAL 3043. MODERN CHINESE LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

Survey of modern Chinese literature: this course will introduce students to major writers and canonical works from China’s modern period. We will discuss formal aesthetics, historical contexts, cultural upheaval and transformation, gender and class relations, family and kinship, as well as dialogues between national and regional imaginaries. All readings in English (students may opt to read in Chinese). No previous knowledge of China or Chinese required. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GLBL.

MLAL 3045. WOMEN IN CHINESE LITERATURE AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

ln this course we will examine issues of gender and representation in the context of Chinese society. We will explore the roles that women have played in China, how women are portrayed in various Chinese texts and genres - poetry short stories and novels, and films - and how Chinese women write about themselves and others. This course is taught inEnglish and no prior knowledge of Chinese is required. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, INST.

MLAL 3047. CHINESE CULTURE: TRADITIONS AND TRANSFORMATION. (4 Credits)

This course provides a broad introduction to Chinese culture from earliest times to the contemporary period. Students will engage with diverse genres including philosophical texts, Buddhist sutras, folklore, modern fictions, films and visual materials. We will explore topics on Chinese culture, including philosophical and religious systems, the status of art, gender roles, encounters between tradition and modernity, and legacies of Maoism. All readings in English (students may opt to read in Chinese). No previous knowledge of China or Chinese required. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, GLBL.

MLAL 3057. MEDIEVAL GERMAN LITERATURE: POTIONS, PASSIONS, PLAYERS, AND PRAYERS. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the rich literary and cultural heritage of Medieval Germany. The texts will all be read in English translation, but we will go over some passages in their original languages in class to catch some of the flavor of the Medieval German. Topics covered will include pre-Christian charms, the epic of the Nibelungs, love poetry, and urban carneval plays. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, GERM, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

MLAL 3060. MAGIC AND REALITY IN RUSSIAN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

Explores the traditions of Mysticism and the Fantastic in Russian literature. By analyzing magical motifs both as an exploration of the inexplicable and as an artistic means to counter social and ideological oppression, students will develop their understanding of different periods and aspects of Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet culture. Selected readings include works by Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Bulgakov, Petrushevkaya and Pelevin, among others. Conducted in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, INST, OCST.

MLAL 3065. DOSTOEVSKY. (4 Credits)

This course explores the oeuvre of Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (1821-1881), one of the greatest Russian novelists and world literature’s most insightful psychologists. Select texts include: The Gambler, The Idiot, The Adolescent, The Brothers Karamazov (dubbed by Freud “the most magnificent novel ever written”), several short stories, etc. TAUGHT IN ENGLISH. May count toward Minor in Russian if course work is completed in Russian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: OCST, RUSS.

MLAL 3070. RUSSIAN VISIONS: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN RUSSIAN LITERATURE AND ART IN MID-19TH/EARLY 20TH CENTURY. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary course explores the interaction between the Russian visual arts and Russian literature during two artistically flourishing periods of Russian and early Soviet history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The first is the rise of the daguerreotype in Russia (and photojournalism shortly thereafter) in conjunction with the rise of the Natural School in Russian literature in the 1840s. The second is the pinnacle of the Russian avant-garde (1917-1932: and visual art from several movements such as Constructivism, Zaum, Russian Cubism and Cubo-Futurism) in conjunction with the brilliant work of dissident Soviet writers during this time. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, OCST, RUSS.

MLAL 3080. TOLSTOY, DOSTOEVSKY AND THE MEANING OF LIFE AND DEATH. (4 Credits)

We will read two works – one large book on Russian family life, one short meditation on death – from each of Russia’s two most famous authors: Leo Tolstoy and Fyodor Dostoevsky. We will read Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina (1878) and The Death of Ivan Ilych (1886) and Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov (1880) and The Dream of a Ridiculous Man (1877). Tolstoy and Dostoevsky are each profound psychologies and religious philosophers. While Tolstoy masters interpersonal and societal relations, Dostoevsky illuminates the extreme ranges of the human psyche. Tolstoy’s Levin in Anna Karenina asks “What is the meaning of life?” and Dostoevsky’s Ivan Karamazov struggles to reconcile God’s creation with the suffering of innocent children. The two novels were written in close proximity of 4each other and bear fruitful comparisons. Tolstoy’s The Death of Ivan Ilych explores the mind of a prestigious court official who is terminally ill. Dostoevsky’s The Dream of a Ridiculous Man reveals the story of a man who dreams his own death. These two great authors are often pitted against each other, but Dostoevsky himself described Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina as “flawless,” and Tolstoy adored Dostoevsky’s religious teachings in The Brother’s Karamazov expressed through the character of Father Zosima. This course shows how the works of the great Russian writers compliment our understanding of life and death. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, OCST.

MLAL 3090. 100 YEARS OF WAR AND PEACE. REVOLUTION IN RUSSIA AND SOVIET LITERATURE: TOLSTOY, BULGAKOV AND BELY. (4 Credits)

This course explores three masterpieces of Russian and Soviet revolution that reflect the ongoing war and peace of the Russian psyche. We'll begin with Tolstoy's War and Peace (1867), continue with Andrei Bely's Petersburg (1913), and end with Bulgakov's Master and Margarita (1967). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

MLAL 3200. MACHIAVELLI'S UTOPIA. (4 Credits)

In this course we will analyze The Prince as well as Machiavelli's creative work (e.g., his theatrical piece The Mandrake Root and his short story Belfagor. By adopting an interdisciplinary approach for the examination of both the historical and the artistic context in which Machiavelli lived, we will address the question of how and why The Prince was misinterpreted by Italian and European intellectuals and humanists of Machiavelli’s time, leading to a misperception of many of the text's core ideas in an historical moment in which Europe was steadily transforming itself into a domain of absolutism (we will read Reginald Pole, Innocent Gentillet, Erasmus, Montaigne, among others). We will retrieve the original cultural context in which Machiavelli wrote: a climate of strong limitation of political creativity and liberty, which lead Machiavelli to compose The Prince (1513 ca.) inspired by an utopian desire for a new leader who could reconcile all the contradictions of Italy. Course taught in English. Coursework in Italian for credit in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITAL, ITRE.

MLAL 3202. ARIOSTO TO GALILEO: THE INVENTION OF MODERNITY IN RENAISSANCE ITALY. (4 Credits)

Ariosto and Galileo represent two chronological ends of a revolutionary intellectual period in the Italian Renaissance culture. Between the years 1516 (date of the first edition of Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso) and 1610 (date of edition of Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius), Italian civilization contributed significantly to the shaping of a new idea of reality. The course is dedicated to the study of this particular period in which masterpieces such as the Furioso, Torquato Tasso’s pastoral poem Aminta, and his epic poem Jerusalem Delivered, as well as Galileo’s works (Sidereus Nuncius, Copernican Letters, Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems) become the founding texts of a new realism that questioned and distrusted appearances and, by doing so, prepared the intellectual background where Galileo could develop his new scientific method and discover intellectual models useful for his innovative comprehension of the natural world (with strong implications about the separation of theology and science). Recent scholarship insists on the deep influence that literary humanism had on Galileo’s mind who, no surprise, was a reader, a writer of literature and also a literary critic (for example he wrote about Ariosto and also an incomplete commentary on Tasso’s Jerusalem). The course is therefore dedicated to the study of the relationship of literature to the History of Science with close reading of the above mentioned works and also following an interdisciplinary approach devoted to the exploration of the artistic civilization around Ariosto, Tasso and Galileo. Taught in English with coursework in Italian for credit in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

MLAL 3203. DANTE AND HIS TRANSLATORS. (4 Credits)

According to the conservative estimates, there are hundreds of translations into English of The Divine Comedy. Which one is the real Dante? Umberto Eco wrote a book on translation entitled Saying Almost the Same Thing. Comparing a few of these translations, such as those of Ciardi, Singleton, and Mandelbaum, may actually reveal aspects and meanings of the original that the translations slightly altered or that may be missing altogether. So which Dante are we reading? How do translations influence interpretations? This course will discuss the various translations as well as theories of translation in or order to deepen our understanding of the Divine Comedy. Taught in English. If you are counting this course towards your Italian major or minor, the coursework must be done in Italian.Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ITAL, MVLI, MVST.

MLAL 3210. ISLAM AND ITALY. (4 Credits)

From Medieval Sicily to the Renaissance and the modern world, the involvement of Arab culture in Italy has been both varied and enduring in nature. This course examines interaction between these two cultures from the 900s to today. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

MLAL 3300. LITERATURES AND CULTURES OF MODERN ISRAEL. (4 Credits)

The course will explore major themes in modern Israeli literature, film, art, and popular culture. Among topics discussed will be the social and cultural dynamics of Israeli history and contemporary life, constructions of identity, questions of ethnicity, nationality, gender, war, and conflict, and more. Texts and assignments will be in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

MLAL 3307. GERMANY AND MIGRATION. (4 Credits)

Migrants have played a role in many countries' culture. Germans started coming to the U.S. in the 17th century, and about 17% of Americans have German ancestry. Migrants entered Germany starting around the turn of the 20th century, and today about 21% of Germany's population has a migration background. How do migrants assimilate and learn the language of their new country? What influences do migrants have on a country's culture and language? In the first part of the semester, we will examine the migration of Germans to the United States, and in the second part we will focus on migration into Germany. Taught in ENGLISH. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ASSC, COLI.

MLAL 3325. ‘The Gatekeepers?’ Documentary Cinema in Israel. (4 Credits)

The course presents a survey of Israeli documentary cinema from the 1940s to the present. Topics covered include: early Zionist documentary, the shadow of the Holocaust, The Occupation, militarism and war, Orthodox Judaism and other minority groups, social protest and its cinematic representation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, JWST.

MLAL 3350. PROMISED LAND: ISRAELI CULTURE BETWEEN UTOPIA AND DYSTOPIA. (4 Credits)

From its inception, Zionism was imbued with utopian energies. Tel-Aviv, the first Hebrew city is named after a utopian novel, Herzl's Altneuland (Old-New Land). The Kibbutz phenomenon is often studied as an example of a concrete, real-life utopia. Since the 1973 October War, however, we have seen also a marked increase in the production of Hebrew literary dystopias, usually depicting the destruction of the Jewish State. This course explores Israeli culture through the prism of utopia/dystopia. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, JWST, MEST.

MLAL 3402. INTRODUCTION TO RUSSIAN DRAMA. (4 Credits)

this course examines the modern Russian theatrical tradition from the nineteenth century to the present and explores a range of plays that include works by Pushkin, Gogol, Ostrovsky, Chekhov, Bulgakov, Shvarts, Petrushevskaya, Pelevin, Grishkovets, among others. Conducted in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, OCST.

MLAL 3405. MASTERPIECES OF RUSSIAN FILM. (4 Credits)

Examining some of the most critically acclaimed works of Russian, Soviet, and post-Soviet cinema, students will gain an insight into a variety of historical, cultural, and social contexts through the creative lens of Dziga Vertov, Sergei Eisenstein, Andrei Tarkovsky, Alexander Sokurov, Kira Muratova, Larissa Shepitko, and other Russian-language directors. The course focuses on analyzing cinematic "texts" through critical watching, reading, thinking, and writing. Taught in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, OCST.

MLAL 3410. ARAB CINEMA: HISTORY AND CULTURAL IDENTITY. (4 Credits)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of cinema in the Arab world, tracing the industry’s development from colonial times to the present. It analyzes the ambiguous relationship with commercial Western cinema, and the effect of Egyptian market dominance in the region. Tracing the influence on the medium of local and regional art forms and modes of thought, both classical and popular, the class shows how indigenous and external factors combine in a dynamic process of “cultural repackaging.” We will focus on Iraq, Lebanon, and Palestine while exploring problematic issues such as European coproduction for Arab art films, including their relation to cultural identity and their reception in the region and abroad. Class discussions will be in English. All readings will be in English translation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, CCUS, COLI, INST, MEST.

MLAL 3440. ARABIC LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. (4 Credits)

A survey of Arabic literature from the 6th century A.D. to the present, this course will explore the development of the literary genres of the Arabic canon, while keeping a keen (and critical) eye on the political, cultural, religious and social circumstances that have accompanied – and, in many cases, given rise to – their development. Some of the questions the course will explore are: What is considered “literature” in the Arabic canon? What is the relationship between literature and politics? What impact has the Quran had on Arabic literature? What is the role of women in the Arabic literary tradition? What kind of dialogue has there been between Arabic and “Western” literatures? What is “commitment” in contemporary Arabic literature? Class discussions will be in English. All readings will be in English translation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GLBL, MEST.

MLAL 3442. ARAB CULTURE AND NEWS MEDIA. (4 Credits)

The American news media portrays the Arab world as one of endless political upheaval and repression, with a culture shaped strictly by Islam. This course broadens students' understanding of contemporary Arab societies through the study of Arab TV/radio/print/internet news, propaganda and cartoons from those sanctioned by government-run outletsto those of national-resistance activists, democracy-promoting movements and even jihadists. The news is used in this course to investigate cultural issues, including authority and decision-making, religion, gender and family dynamics, in Arab societies as well as to explore American-Arab relations. Through a study of media, students can compare Arab culture as portrayed by American media and American culture as portrayed by the media in Arab world. The class is conducted in English, with materials in English and Arabic with English subtitles. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, MEST.

MLAL 3450. THE ARAB SPRING IN ARABIC LIT. (4 Credits)

A suwey of Arabic literature from 2011 to the present, this course will explore the development of tfie literary gertres of the Arab Spring in the Middle East. What is the relationship between literature and politics? We will read short stories, poetry graphic novels, blogs,and Facebook pages ol prominent literary and social figures, redefining and modernizing the notion of what is literature in order to try and workout whether the revolulion could have been predicted, and how it took place. Class discussions will be in English. All readings will be in English translation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, PJST.

MLAL 3474. THE ARAB ISRAELI CONFLICT: CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES. (4 Credits)

The Arab-Israeli conflict is one of the longest and most controversial conflicts in the world. Through careful analysis of Israeli literature and film, this course provides a nuanced cultural and political history of Arab-Israeli relations. Our texts emphasize the dialectic relationship between art and politics, representation and history, as well as aesthetic and ethics. The course thus explores the effect of art on politics, and the effect of politics on art. Specifically, we examine how art is instrumental in producing 1) "imagined communities" with stable national identities and 2) political resistance that disrupts these hegemonic metanarratives. We also consider the internal dynamics of Israeli society as represented in literature and film, especially tensions between the Jewish-Arab, Ashkenazi-Mizrahi, and religious-secular communities. By analyzing canonical and more contemporary stories, poems, and films (including those by S. Yizhar, Amos Oz, Said Kashua, Mahmoud Darwish, among others) we explore the dialectic between art and politics in Israeli society since 1948.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, JWST, MEST, MLL.

MLAL 3475. OPPOSITIONAL THOUGHT IN ISLAMIC LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This class will explore various schools of thought and practice in Islamic liteature. Works will range from the writings of early Islamic scholars like Al-Ashari, Mutazila, Al-Ghazali, and Rumi to the resurgence of the literalist approach to Islamic scripture in the contemporary Arab world. The course will be taught in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

MLAL 3500. WRITING UNDER GERMAN CENSORSHIP: A CULTURE OF BANNED BOOKS. (4 Credits)

This course examines the politics of censorship of literature in German society during the twentieth century. Books, articles, pamphlets, and magazines have been classified threatening to the regime, they have been seized from libraries and bookstores across Germany, they have been burned on bonfires during nighttime parades, and they were eliminated from all media. Writers and creators have been infiltrated and observed, fined, jailed, tortured or killed in the name of governmental censorship. We will examine a range of systems and orchestrated campaigns of censorship of the Nazi regime aswell as the government of the former German Democratic Republic. We will look at the implementation of censorship, and we will read important authors who have been banned or self-censored within the larger context of twentieth-century Germany. Taught in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

MLAL 3504. STUDY TOUR: BERLIN TALES: GERMANY'S KIEZ. (4 Credits)

This course will take us on a journey-a journey that will start in the urban sphere of New York City in a classroom reading historical texts and cultural narratives on the metropolis Berlin. But during Spring Break 2012, we will also have a truly unique opportunity of traveling together to discover the actual streets of Berlin, the center of modernity in Germany itself. We will read authors who present conflicting views and engaging perspectives on four distinct Berlins: The Jewish Berlin of the Weimar Repyblic, Berlin during the Third Reich, the City as the Capital of East Germany, and lastly, Berlin as booming Metropolis of the 21st Century. And together, we will visit Berlin to discover different life styles, the pulse of minorities, and the nostalgic feeling of Ostaglie or present day Berlin. TAUGHT IN ENGLISH. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GERM.

MLAL 3535. BUILDING THE IDEAL CITY. ETHICS AND ECONOMICS FOUNDATIONS OF REALIZABLE UTOPIAS. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the investigation of the role that economic concepts such as profit, work, utility, and exchange play in defining the ideal city as a realizable political project. Students will investigate ethical and economic concepts and their interrelation in the debate on the best form of State and government that developed from antiquity to modern American utopias.

Attributes: ALC, MVPH, MVST.

MLAL 3600. WOMEN'S VOICES IN GERMAN AND AUSTRIAN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the role of women in German and Austrian society in particular on literary and theoretical texts produced by women in the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. To articulate their ideas and to establish themselves on a public stage, women writers have used different forms of expression over the course of time such as letters, diaries, poems, novellas, political pamphlets, theoretical articles, dramas and essays. We will study the different genres by exploring questions of gender, authorship, personal, national and transnational identities, and the politicization of the private sphere within the cultural context of Germany and Austria. By analyzing literary texts of authors like Lou Andreas-Salome , Else Lasker-Schuler, Anna Seghers, Ingeborg Bachmann, Marlen Haushofer, Monika Maron, Herta Muller and Julia Franck and drawing on visual arts, film, and feminist theory, we will still situate German-speaking women writers with a global context. Topics to be considered in relation to the literary texts are women as writers and artists, sexuality and bodies, friendship and intimacy, politics and political activism, as well as writing and identities. TAUGHT IN ENGLISH. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GERM, WGSS.

MLAL 3607. TOPICS IN MULTILINGUALISM. (4 Credits)

This course discusses the historical and contemporary underpinnings of multilingualism in the globalized world. The course content includes discussion of empirical social and cognitive research on multilingualism as well as multilingual language education and policy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, GLBL, LALS.

MLAL 3624. MUSIC AND NATION IN THE ARAB WORLD. (4 Credits)

Though music is a domain of individual expression, it may alos reflect or respond to social, cultural and historic influences of a time and place. This course explores the ways in which music acts as an exprssion of national identity in the Arab world. It considers this relationship in a region where the idea of nation has multiple meanings, and where conflicting factors such as regional diversity and the notion of pan-Arabism exists. Specifically, the course focuses on how particular types of music, including the Aleppian, Waslah, Al-Qasida al-ghinaiy, and Al-Muwashah, have affected the development and embodiment of national identity in the 20th century. Course materials are presented in English, however students of Arabic language are encouraged to Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, MEST, PJST.

MLAL 3701. VILLAINS, VAMPS AND VAMPIRES: AN INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN CINEMA. (4 Credits)

Film is a powerful art form and means of communications. The messages embedded in the mesmerizing images often escape us, and we miss the opportunity to understand something about the culture that produced it. With this class we will attempt to explore 20th – and 21st Century ideas and concepts of German identity, culture, history and politics through German film analysis and readings around the topics and genres of villains, vamps and vampires. Each of these genres deal with our most primal nature and its fears: our nightmares, our vulnerability, our alienation our revulsions, our terror of the unknown, our fear of death, our loss identity, and last but not least our often ambiguous relationship to power and sexuality. With this course we intend to read German Cinema through these genres from its inception in the 1890’s until the present. It includes an examination of early expressionist and avant-garde films from the classic German cinema of the Weimar era, fascist cinema, postwar rubble films, New German Cinema from the classic German Cinema from the 1970’s, post 1989 heritage films as well as 21st Century German Films. TAUGHT IN ENGLISH. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, ALC, AMST, COLI.

MLAL 3710. FIN-DE SIECLE VIENNA: KLIMT, CAFES, AND CEMETERIES. (4 Credits)

Vienna at the turn of the 19th to the 20th century was an important center for intellectuals, artists, architects, the opera and literature as well as the sciences not only for Austria, but for the rising movement of Modernism in Europe at large. In Vienna, this intellectual ferment was played out less in universities or elite salons but rather in the cafes and artist studios of their time. There, the Viennese celebrated life and pleasure but also concerned themselves with death quite happily; they sing and write about it, play with it and build monuments to it. This course will examine various aspects of the Viennese contribution to the birth of Modernism and address the most important authors and artists of their time. We will discuss Jugendstil and Impressionism, the architecture of Adolf Loos and Otto Wagner, authors like Arthur Schnitzler, Robert Musil, and Hugo von Hofmannsthal, and give an introduction to the psychoanalysis of Sigmund Freud, whose "Interpretation of Dreams" and "Studies on Hysteria" left their mark on the period. But most excitingly of all during spring break of 2015, we will also have the truly unique opportunity of traveling together to discover the actual streets of Vienna, visit the "Zentralfriedhof" and marvel at Gustav Klimt’s "Beethovenfries" at the "Wiener Secession". Taught in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, INST.

MLAL 3800. CLOISTERS, CASTLES, AND KINGS: MEDIEVAL BAVARIA. (4 Credits)

This course will explore Medieval secular and church history as it manifested itself in the literature and culture of Bavaria. Includes a study abroad component. Spring break visit to Regensburg and Munich. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GERM, MVST.

MLAL 3820. MEMORY AND IDENTITY IN MODERN ITALY. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the historical and cultural process of nation building in the 19th- and 20th-century Italy. Particular attention will be paid to the formation and conceptualization of an Italian national identity as presented or questioned in literary works by Bufalino, Consolo, Levi, Morante, Sciascia and Tomasi di Lampedusa, and films by Blasetti, Rossellini, Scola, the Taviani brothers and Visconti. Conducted in English. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

MLAL 3822. THE ARABIAN NIGHTS. (4 Credits)

This course will examine the cycle of stories, known as the Arabian Nights or 1001 Nights. In the first half of the course we will read some of the major tale cycles and study the relevant historical and cultural contexts. In the second half of the course we will consider a number of adaptations- novels, plays, and films- that have been inspired by the Nights. Class discussion will be in English. All readings will be in English and in Englsih Translation.] Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, MEST.

MLAL 3999. TUTORIAL. (3 Credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

MLAL 4005. QUEER THEORY AND THE AMERICAS. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, WGSS.

MLAL 4010. ANNI DI PIOMBO / YEARS OF LEAD: CULTURE, POLITICS, AND VIOLENCE. (4 Credits)

The period from the late 1960s to the early 1980s in Italy, known as “anni di piombo” or years of lead, was characterized by intense social and political unrest, and terrorist activities. The 1969 bombing in Piazza Fontana in Milan and the 1980 bombing of the train station in Bologna serve as the tragic bookends of a decade of political violence culminating in the kidnapping and murder of Aldo Moro by the Red Brigades in 1978. In this course, we will study these years by closely examining the cultural production of the time – literature, film and other media. We will pay particular attention to the social and political motivations underlying extremist activism, both left- and right-wing, as represented in literature and the popular press, and to writers’, filmmakers’ and intellectuals’ diverse responses to politically motivated violence, whether to criticize the terrorists themselves or to question the state-sponsored “strategy of tension”. We will also discuss the ways in which these experiences have been revisited and reimagined in recent years, and their relevance for today’s Italy. Taught in English with texts in Italian and English translation. Coursework in Italian for credit toward the Italian major or minor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, EP4, ITAL, VAL.

MLAL 4016. REWRITING THE MEDITERRANEAN (20th and 21st Centuries). (4 Credits)

Historically the Mediterranean has been a region where different ethnicities, cultures and religions have emerged, dissolved or coexisted. The enduring encounter of East and West, North and South on its shores and in its waters, however, has been far from peaceful. In this seminar, we will discuss contemporary writers and intellectuals from the Mediterranean, who build on the rich artistic heritage and vital cultural traditions of the region to confront the legacy of centuries-old political and religious divisions. We will analyze the modern construction of the ideas of “Mediterranean culture” and “Mediterranean identity” in the current post-national context by examining fiction and essays by Vincenzo Consolo, Assia Djebar, Juan Goytisolo, Amin Maalouf, Orhan Pamuk and Abraham B. Yehoshua, among others. By telling stories set in the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean – from Italy and Spain to Turkey, Israel and the Middle East – these writers reimagine early civilizations and recast their histories in the present to critique modernity’s narratives of socio-economic and political control, cultural domination and religious exclusion, and offer novel forms of cultural production and critical practice fostering cross-cultural interaction and intercultural understanding. We will conduct our analyses within the conceptual frameworks provided by historians Fernand Braudel, Iain Chambers, David Abulafia and Ian Morris, anthropologist Talal Asad, sociologists Franco Cassano and Edgar Morin, economist Serge Latouche, literary scholar Predrag Matvejevic, and cultural critic Edward Said. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ITAL, MEST, OCST, PJST.

MLAL 4347. LATINOS: FACT AND FICTION. (4 Credits)

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine the experiences of Latin Americans and Latinos. It employs literature and history to introduce students to the benefits of using multiple ways of acquiring knowledge. It then relies on other academic areas such as art and sociology to reinforce its interdisciplinary. As a capstone course, it allows students to incorporate disciplines from their own academic foundation. It covers topics such as politics, social justice, race, gender, and identity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: GLBL, ICC, LALS.

MLAL 4999. TUTORIAL. (2 to 4 Credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

MLAL 5016. REWRITING THE MEDITERRANEAN (20th and 21st Centuries). (3 Credits)

Historically the Mediterranean has been a region where different ethnicities, cultures and religions have emerged, dissolved or coexisted. The enduring encounter of East and West, North and South on its shores and in its waters, however, has been far from peaceful. In this seminar, we will discuss contemporary writers and intellectuals from the Mediterranean, who build on the rich artistic heritage and vital cultural traditions of the region to confront the legacy of centuries-old political and religious divisions. We will analyze the modern construction of the ideas of “Mediterranean culture” and “Mediterranean identity” in the current post-national context by examining fiction and essays by Vincenzo Consolo, Assia Djebar, Juan Goytisolo, Amin Maalouf, Orhan Pamuk and Abraham B. Yehoshua, among others. By telling stories set in the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean – from Italy and Spain to Turkey, Israel and the Middle East – these writers reimagine early civilizations and recast their histories in the present to critique modernity’s narratives of socio-economic and political control, cultural domination and religious exclusion, and offer novel forms of cultural production and critical practice fostering cross-cultural interaction and intercultural understanding. We will conduct our analyses within the conceptual frameworks provided by historians Fernand Braudel, Iain Chambers, David Abulafia and Ian Morris, anthropologist Talal Asad, sociologists Franco Cassano and Edgar Morin, economist Serge Latouche, literary scholar Predrag Matvejevic, and cultural critic Edward Said.

Linguistics (LING) courses:

LING 1100. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS. (3 Credits)

An introduction to linguistics, the study of language. The course surveys the core domains of theoretical linguistics including phonology, syntax, and semantics as well as select areas of applied linguistics. Taught in English.

Attributes: CLAS, COLI, ENGL.

LING 1500. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLINGUISTICS. (3 Credits)

An introduction to psycholinguistics, also called the psychology of language. The course focuses on how the mind and brain acquire and process language across the lifespan and in different populations. Taught in English.

LING 3007. SPANISH LINGUISTICS. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the linguistic study of the Spanish language. The course discusses the formal domains of language structure - including speech sounds and their mental representations, sentence structure and semantic meaning, as well as social realities of language use and language change across different varieties of Spanish in the world. The course is taught in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2001.

LING 3015. LANGUAGE AND THOUGHT. (4 Credits)

This course discusses theories and research in the study of language from a cognitive science perspective. The course elaborates on contemporary issues in the relationships between language and thought, including linguistic relativity and embodied cognition, among other areas. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

LING 3607. TOPICS IN MULTILINGUALISM. (4 Credits)

This course discusses the historical and contemporary underpinnings of multilingualism in the globalized world. The course content includes discussion of empirical social and cognitive research on multilingualism as well as multilingual language education and policy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, GLBL.

Arabic (ARAB) courses:

ARAB 1001. INTRODUCTION TO ARABIC I. (5 Credits)

An introductory course that focuses on the four skills: reading, speaking, writing, and listening, providing students, vocabulary and culture, which, studied interdependently comprise the Arabic language.

Attribute: MEST.

ARAB 1501. INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I. (3 Credits)

Continued study of the fundamentals of the Arabic linguistic system with systematically organized reading, writing and conversation exercises. Introduction to literary texts.

Attribute: MEST.

Prerequisites: ARAB 1001 or ARAB 1002.

ARAB 1502. INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II. (3 Credits)

Continued study of the fundamentals of the Arabic linguistic system with systematically organized reading, writing and conversation exercises. Introduction to literary texts.

Attribute: MEST.

Prerequisite: ARAB 1501.

ARAB 2001. ARABIC LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE I. (3 Credits)

These courses are designed for students who have a solid knowledge of Arabic language basics, essential vocabulary, and verb forms and tenses. Text material and course work will focus on developing and expanding the student's vocabulary, learning new grammatical structures and usages, developing good listening and writing skills, applying literal and inferential comprehension skills (reading from magazines, newspapers and short stories. Videos and films are also included), practicing oral skills during class time through structural exercises, and completing written assignments to reinforce the student's understanding of the concepts studied in class.

Attribute: MEST.

Prerequisite: ARAB 1502.

ARAB 2400. APPROACHES TO ARABIC CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This course is based on the knowledge and skills gained in Arabic Language and Literature II. The main focus is on developing fluency and sophistication in reading, writing, and in oral communication. This course is designed to train students how to evaluate and revise their writing in Arabic, while continuing to review and refine pertinent grammatical structures. It aims to increase the students' familiarity with Arabic culture by working with selected Arabic literary texts and Arabic periodicals. The course will be conducted mainly in Arabic. Pre-req ARAB 2001 or Instructor's Permission. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, MEST, PJST.

Prerequisite: ARAB 2001.

ARAB 2450. The Short Story of Arabic Literature. (4 Credits)

Students will learn the history of the Arabic short story, and sample a variety of stories from diverse periods and authors. By reading these stories, students will develop their comprehension skills in Arabic, and will also broaden their knowledge of Arab-world literature. Class discussions will be in Arabic, and will focus on conversational skills in the language. Taught in Arabic. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MEST.

Prerequisite: ARAB 2001.

ARAB 2601. ARABIC CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (3 Credits)

Intensive practice of the spoken and written language with emphasis on proper use of idioms and building of vocabulary based on topics of interest and relevance. A basic course for prospective majors and minors. Prerequisite: ARAB 2001 or equivalent.

Attribute: MEST.

Prerequisite: ARAB 2001.

ARAB 2602. ARABIC IMMERSION IN MOROCCO. (4 Credits)

Through this program, you will take an upper-level Arabic language/literature/culture course based at AMIDEAST's Study Center in Rabat, Morocco. Classes will meet for one month during Fordham's Summer Session I and will be primarily taught in Arabic. This course counts towards your requirements in the Arabic minor at Fordham University. In addition to your class work, you will participate in a number of cultural visits during your stay, including a weekend excursion to Fez. Rabat is one of Morocco’s “imperial cities,” and its modern capital. It is home to the leading educational institutions in the country and offers students opportunities to move from the shops and cafes of the “European” city to the winding alleys and exciting markets of the old “medina” in a few minutes’ walk. Students in the program live with Arabic-speaking Moroccan families and attend classes with Fordham faculty at AMIDEAST’s facilities in the bustling Agdal area of the city.

ARAB 3000. TOPICS IN ARAB CULTURES. (4 Credits)

A broad survey of Arabic culture through the study of some of its major literary figures and texts. The course will examine representative texts from artistic movements in Egypt, Syria, Lebanon and Libya, such as romanticism, realism and post modernism. By the end of the course students will be able to define the main characteristics of these movements. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, MEST.

ARAB 3010. HUMAN RIGHTS IN ARABIC LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This class explores issues of race, gender, class and social justice in Arabic Literature. It focuses on the terminology and concepts related to human rights and the law, with all readings and class discussions held in Arabic. Students will also learn about sharia law and its implications for social justice. This class is especially relevant for students studying political science, Middle East studies and international studies or who wish to minor in Arabic. Prerequisite ARAB 2400 or Instructor's Permission Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: ARAB 2400.

ARAB 4999. TUTORIAL. (1 to 4 Credits)

ARAB 9101. INTRODUCTION TO ARABIC I. (0 Credits)

French (FREN) courses

FREN 1001. INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH I. (5 Credits)

An introductory course that focuses on the four skills: speaking, reading, writing and listening providing students with a basic knowledge of French linguistic structures, vocabulary and culture, which studied interdependently, comprise the French Language.

FREN 1002. INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH II. (3 Credits)

This course will enhance the reading, writing, speaking and listening skills acquired by students in Introduction to French I or from prior study. It will further promote a deeper understanding of French and Francophone cultures.

Prerequisite: FREN 1001.

FREN 1501. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I. (3 Credits)

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts. The second semester continues and amplifies the work of the first. Conducted in French.

Prerequisites: FREN 1001 or FREN 1002.

FREN 1502. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II. (3 Credits)

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: FREN 1501.

FREN 1999. TUTORIAL. (1 Credit)

FREN 2001. FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. (3 Credits)

A critical analysis of selected cultural and literary texts; composition, conversation, and review of pertinent grammatical structures.

Prerequisite: FREN 1502.

FREN 2100. GRAMMAR AND PHONETICS. (4 Credits)

A comprehensive review of French grammar and phonetics with attention to their use in literary and cultural contexts. Intensive practice of the spoken and written language. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: FREN 2001.

FREN 2600. FRANCE: LITERATURE, HISTORY, AND CIVILIZATION. (4 Credits)

The history and civilization of France and its literature in prose, poetry, and drama. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, INST.

Prerequisite: FREN 2001.

FREN 2601. FRENCH CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (4 Credits)

Intensive practice of the spoken and written language with emphasis on proper use of idioms and building of vocabulary based on topics in interest and relevance. A basic course for prospective majors and minors. Prerequiste: FREN 2001 or equivalent. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: FREN 2001.

FREN 3005. FRENCH BUSINESS CULTURE. (4 Credits)

The course examines the codes of French business culture and explores ways for students to prepare themselves for the French marketplace by mastery of these codes. In particular, we will focus on improving your business eloquentia perfecta – oral and speaking skills and appropriate forms of presentation through personalized training, role playing, mock interviews, and business pitches. Beyond incorporating the essentials of business vocabulary, we will explore every aspect of public speaking from grammatical accuracy, phonetics, clarity, and concision, to the effectiveness and communicating your message, your use of body language and physical space. Students will prepare CVs, cover letters, perform interviews, practice networking, and work in groups to develop sample start-up pitches. Students will build up experience and self-confidence with handling real life situations. Invited guests from the French and bi-cultural business and entrepreneurial community in New York City will share their experiences with students and provide opportunities for students to practice their new skills and learn more about bilingual business opportunities. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

FREN 3030. WHAT IS WRITING? THE INSCRIPTION OF CULTURE FROM PAGE TO SCREEN. (4 Credits)

This course examines the foundation of all literature: writing. What is the role of writing in the relation between language and thought? How has writing shaped culture? How has it been shaped by culture? And what is its future in this digital age. We will approach the cultural phenomenon of writing historically as well as philosophically. Topics will include: the transition from manuscript to printed book; the differences between orality and literacy; theories about the origin of writing; the future of reading in an age of SMS and beyond. Readings from: Marot; Rousseau; Desnos; Foucault; Derrida; Cassin; Dehaene. Class in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRMI.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3100. MEDIEVAL FRENCH LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

A survey of medieval French literary genres of the 10th-15th centuries, ranging from lyrical and didactic poetry, prose, and drama, to contemporary cinematic adaptations of medieval texts. Set within their cultural contexts, selected works may comprise courtly and/or Arthurian literature, comedic texts, spiritual and political writings, and film. An excursion to the Morgan Library and Museum or Metropolitan Museum of Art may complement our in-class discussions. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRME, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisite: FREN 2001 (may be taken concurrently).

FREN 3101. WORD AND IMAGE IN MEDIEVAL FRANCE. (4 Credits)

This course examines the medieval French literature that illuminates some of the great cathedrals of twelfth-and thirteenth-century France.To understand medieval cathedrals we must "read" them through the literature of the age. The texts studied will be in modern French translation and will come from a variety of genres: lyric poetry; romance; epic; devotional literature; biography and autobiographical confession. These texts will be related to the stained glass, architecture, and sculpture of several French gothic cathedrals. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRME.

Prerequisites: FREN 2600 or FREN 2601.

FREN 3125. MAPPING THE NATION. (4 Credits)

How did the term l’Hexagone come to be synonymous with continental France? This course examines the hidden ideology of maps, from the burgeoning of cartographic science during the Renaissance to the question of France’s place within the European Union and subsequent responsibility during the ongoing refugee crisis. In addition to considering maps as texts, starting with Guillaume Postel’s 1578 world map with a meridian bisecting Paris, we will also consider texts as maps, attending to questions of space, mobility, and perspective in authors ranging from Montaigne and Rabelais to Proust and Butor. Of particular interest is the process by which space becomes place, and the use of geography as a tool of political ideology. We will explore Michel de Certeau’s distinction between espace and lieu, and take lessons from Mark Monmonier’s compelling essay “How to Lie with Maps.” Benedict Anderson’s idea of “imagined communities” will be useful in discussing the role of graphic and literary representations of space in crafting a sense of French nationhood. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, FRME, FRMO.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3130. CULTURE AND SCIENCE IN FRANCE. (4 Credits)

This course examines the history of the relations between science and culture in France, from the Renaissance to today. We will examine: the historicity of worldviews; religious and secular tensions; the literary expression of scientific ideas; the institutionalization of science by the French state. Fleadings from the works of Rabelais, Descartes, Pascal, Emilie du Chdtelet, Voltaire, Condorcet, Maupassant, Teilhard de Chardin, Duhem, Marie Curie, and Foucault. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, INST.

Prerequisites: FREN 2600 or FREN 2601.

FREN 3175. FRENCH RENAISSANCES. (4 Credits)

This course explores the cultural renaissances of Medieval and Early Modern France. We will compare "the" Renaissance of the 16th century to two earlier "renaissances": one at the court of Charlemagne and the other during the 12th century. We will look at the literary and artistic expressions of these re-births, why they started and what lasting impacts they had on French culture throughout history. We will read works by some of the greatest authors of French literature, including: Rabelais; Marguerite de Navarre; Louise Labé; Montaigne; Scève; Marie de France; Chrétien de Troyes; Abelard & Heloise. Course in French.

Attributes: ALC, FRME.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3225. HOLLYWOOD'S HOLY GRAIL: MEDIEVAL FRENCH LITERATURE ON THE SCREEN. (4 Credits)

This course examines the foundational texts about King Arthur and the Holy Grail that have made their way into American and French films. Why do these thirteenth-century stories about the fourth century continue to fascinate us today in the twenty-first century? Why do they remain so successful as sources for compelling narratives? We will explore the cultural adaptation of these stories to their times and in particular changes made to the role gender plays in them. Topics covered will include: gender; folklore; high and low art; adaptation of text to screen; translation; the political use of the past. Course in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, MVST.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3253. MOLIERE: FROM PAGE TO STAGE. (4 Credits)

This course taught in French explores French Theatre and offers the opportunity to engage in the creative process from page to stage. Students will have the opportunity to participate in different capacities, such as performers, designers, dramaturgs, and stage managers. This course emphasizes the importance of working collaboratively. Students enrolled in the French and Theatre Programs will share their strengths and learn from each other. We will combine reading, theory, and analysis of a single play by Moliere, and put what we learn into practice in rehearsal. The semester will end with a public performance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, FASH, THPL.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3275. DOCUMENTARY AND STORYTELLING IN THE FRANCOPHONE WORLD. (4 Credits)

Focusing on francophone works, this course questions common assumptions about documentary's objectivity. Nudged by filmmakers' endless efforts to reclaim the fictional and subjective dimension of documentary cinema (Marker, Perrault, Varda, Moullet) and a growing number of graphic novelists' intentional collision with social and political reality in their works (Devodeau, Sacco) in print or through interactive media, we will embrace the narrative dimension of a variety of "documentary" works. Theoretical texts will help us situate the primary materials discussed in relation to long-lasting debates about realism, truthfulness and representation in documentary cinema and graphic literature and media. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRMO.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3290. EARLY AUTHORS MODERN THEORY. (4 Credits)

This course explores French writers from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance through the lens of 20th- and 21st-century French thinkers. We will read both original texts and later commentaries to interrogate how our modern theories have shaped our understanding of early French literature and culture, and consequently of the French canon. This juxtaposition will allow us to ask: How have the ideas of the author and of the text changed over time? Do modern theories help reveal aspects of early writers? Or are we merely reworking them in our own image? The early authors we will study may include, from the Middle Ages: Marie de France, Chrétien de Troyes, Christine de Pisan, François Villon; from the Renaissance: Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, Montaigne, Rabelais, Ronsard, Du Bellay, Labé. Among the modern theorists: Bon, Barthes, Foucault, Butor, Deguy, and Cerquiglini. Conducted in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRME, FRMO.

FREN 3300. THE ENLIGHTENMENT. (4 Credits)

The main currents of the French 18th-century Enlightenment: works by Montesquieu, Marivaux, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau and Laclos. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, FRMI.

FREN 3301. FRANCE AND GLOBAL ENLIGHTENMENT. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: FRMI.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3333. TABLEAUX: ART AND THEATER: 1700S. (4 Credits)

This course examines the changing articulation of the 'tableau' and how it informed important aesthetic developments in 18th century theater and painting. Students will read theoretical texts on the theater, such as Diderot's De la poesie dramatique and Mercier's De theatre, theoretical works by Marivaux, Voltaire, Diderot and Beaumarchais, in addition to critical texts on the French salons. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, FRMI.

FREN 3340. NEO-CLASSICAL FRENCH WOMEN WRITERS. (4 Credits)

This course examines women writers in 17th and 18th century France and the various movements, events, literary genres, groups, and institutions their writing informed (i.e. les Precieuses, the Republic of letters, the epistolary novel, etc.). The women studied include: Madame d'Aulnoy, Madame de Scudery, Madame de Lafayette, Madame Riccoboni, Madame du Deffand, La Comtesse de Genlis, Madame de Charriere, Olympe de Gouges, Madame de Roland, and Madame de Stael. (in French) Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, FRME, FRMI.

FREN 3350. THINKERS AND MORALISTS. (4 Credits)

The class reads work by great French thinkers, among them the essayist Montaigne, the theologian Pascal, the humorist Moliere, the satirist LaBruyere and the salon star La Rochefoucauld, the social commentator Alexis de Toqueville, the food writer Brillat-Savarin. We will elucidate the nature and influence of French thinking about many aspects of culture thoughout the early modern period and its effects to the present day. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRME, FRMI.

Prerequisite: FREN 2001 (may be taken concurrently).

FREN 3360. FRENCH AUTOBIOGRAPHY. (4 Credits)

How the French recount their lives, form themselves and interact with others. Three male and three female-authored texts: Montaigne, Rousseau, Grde de Beauvoir, Yourcenar, Kaplan. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, FRMI, FRMO.

FREN 3440. THE FORBIDDEN READING OF FLAUBERT'S MADAME BOVARY. (4 Credits)

La Lecture défendue de Madame Bovary. This course will present a close reading of Flaubert’s novel, often perceived as an icon of realism, that will question such a stance and offer a perspective that is both humorous and, in some ways, scandalous to censors and those readers of Flaubert’s corpus who would sense in Emma’s story a departure from his earlier writings. We shall consider film interpretations of the novel as well as other translations of a work famous for its precise words. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3450. WRITERS AND LAWBREAKERS. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the complex relationship that existed between literature and the law in 19th- and 20th-century France. We use prison literature, adventure novels, memoirs, poetry and plays to discuss societal perceptions of criminals, views of normative behaviors, literal and figurative crimes, and the aesthetic decisions made by artists caught between unacceptable narratives and respect for the literary canon. Readings include Dumas, Hugo, Goncourt, Tristan, Verlaine, Proust, Genet, Paulhan, and Jounhandeau. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3453. THE FLANEUR IN PARIS. (4 Credits)

Why does the figure of the flâneur appear in literature and art in the first decades of the 19th century? What changes (political, economic, social, urban, technical, aesthetic, and poetic) occur that facilitate this new type of urban wanderer? What’s the difference between the 17th- and 18th- century promeneur and the flâneur? Why is the concept of the flâneur impossible until the 19th century? And why does the flâneur disappear as Walter Benjamin argues toward the end of the 19th century? Why is the flâneur predominantly a male category? And is there a descent of the flâneur in the 20th and 21st centuries? In this course we examine the figure of the urban wanderer and flâneur from the last years of the 18th century to the first decade of the 21st century. We examine this figure in the literary and aesthetic works of Mercier, Retif de la Bretonne, Balzac, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Zola, Colette, Apollinaire, Debord, Roubaud, Calle as well as in the philosophical works of Benjamin and other critical texts and films. While we will not be able to walk in Paris, we will explore some of these questions by using New York as our ambulatory laboratory. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRMO.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3460. POSTCOLONIAL REPRESENTATIONS. (4 Credits)

This course examines the cultural production of the Colonial Age and its influence on postcolonial aesthetics and rhetoric, in additions to 19th, 20th, and 21st century novels, plays, movies, paintings, and photographs. We consider products of consumer culture such as plates, toys, commercials and postcards. We devote particular attention to complex systems of cultural representations from the 1870's -1930's to show how the heirs of Colonialism must continually renegotiates them. The second half of the course focuses on North African postcolonial literature. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, FRAN, FRMO, MEST.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3464. FRENCH FILMS D'AUTEUR. (4 Credits)

In this course, you will study French cinema history by focusing particularly on the "Auteur theory" and the work of world-renowned French filmmakers. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRMO.

Prerequisites: FREN 2600 or FREN 2601.

FREN 3465. WOMEN ON THE MARGINS. (4 Credits)

The course explores the roles and identities available to women in nineteenth-century France and the ways in which women expanded the boundaries of those constraints. Through readings of literary and non-literary texts as well as films, paintings, drawings, and fashion plates, we consider such institutions and conditions as female education and conduct, marriage, motherhood, prostitution, sainthood, rebellion, and creativity. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, FRMO, MEST, WGSS.

FREN 3466. DISCOVERING FRENCH CINEMA. (4 Credits)

What is French Cinema? Why is cinema regarded first and foremost as an art form in France? In this course, you will learn how to appreciate the language of cinema, understand how mise en scène, sound, and editing work together in crafting in front our eyes a world that will absorb us for a couple of hours. You will also journey through over a century of film production, from Méliès's early "trick films" to the animation boom of the 2000s, from 1930s poetic realism to the social realism of the 1990s, from Cocteau's and Franju's fantastic cinema to Besson's blockbuster films. We will see how these films can help us understand better why cinema has remained so important to French cultural identity and how French cinema has defined the way audiences abroad see France and French society. Readings introducing you to key film theoretical concepts will accompany the films discussed throughout the semester. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FITV, FRMO.

FREN 3470. FRANCOPHONE NORTH AFRICA. (4 Credits)

If the colonial past has imposed a number of artistic chanllenges on the contemporary North African artists, it has also obliged many of them to be linguistically innovative. In this class, we will explore how North African francophone writers have experimented with French literacy genres, as well as with bilingualism, in their struggles to fashion suitable creative spaces within the colonizer's language. We will use short stories, novels, poetry, memoirs, and films to analyse this relatively new (and often subversive)literary voice, and to see how it interprets and rephrases central contemporary narratives, including those of war, exile, and immigration. Readings many include Bouraoui, Chraibi, Dib, Djebar, Feraoun, Haddad, Mokeddem and Sebbar. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, MEST.

FREN 3471. FRANCOPHONE SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA. (4 Credits)

This course will examine historical and contemporary migration and identities in sub-Saharan francophone Africa. Drawing on anthropology, film, literature, and theatre, we will explore migration from African perspectives. Topics covered include child trafficking, child labor, gender, religion, development and social change, and political consciousness. Readings/films will include: Le ventre de l’atlantique (Fatou Diome), Allah n'est pas obligé (Ahmadou Kourouma) Jaguar, les Maîtres fous (Jean Rouch), Femmes, greniers et capitaux (Claude Meillassoux). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: AFAM, ALC, FRAN, FRMO.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3476. CONFLICT AND VIOLENCE IN FRANCOPHONE AFRICAN CINEMAS. (4 Credits)

The development of film industries across Africa has been inextricably tied with colonial history. We will focus here on the cinematic production of former French colonies, from Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia in North Africa to sub-Saharan countries, including Senegal, Burkina Faso, and Tchad. Often trained in Western film schools, African and North African filmmakers started making films in the 1950s and 1960s, a time also marked by repeated struggles for independence from colonial domination. There is no single way to look at such a diverse and extraordinarily rich corpus. We will look more specifically at how different filmmakers have addressed, performed and questioned the notions of conflict and violence, both physical and psychological, literal and symbolic, at different time periods and in different regional contexts. Ousmane Sembène, Abderrahmane Sissako, Mahamat Saleh Haroun, Nabil Ayouch, Sarah Maldorore will be among the filmmakers included in our discussions. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRAN, FRMO.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3478. THE ESSAY FILM. (4 Credits)

Recently called "the most vibrant and significant kind of filmmaking in the world today" by Timothy Corrigan (2011), the essay film has been embraced by filmmakers worldwide. In this course, however, we will consider primarily the works of four key Francophone filmmakers and essayists, Agnès Varda, Jean-Luc Godard, Chantal Akerman, and Chris Marker. Non-exhaustive, this selective corpus allows for greater exploration of a genre that questions the boundaries between fiction and nonfiction, the declarative and the meditative, the visual and the verbal, the personal and the political. Critical interventions by Alexandre Astruc, Raymond Bellour, Phillip Lopate, Jean-Luc Godard, Timothy Corrigan and others, will help us understand and reflect on the formal integrity of a multifaceted genre, and the specific use of cinematic forms and techniques by filmmakers to convey clear political and aesthetic positions. The last month of the semester will be spent on students’ individual and collective creative experimentations with the essay video, with a special focus on pre-production and production planning and ongoing peer review critiques of each other’s works. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, FRMO.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3479. THE NEW WAVE ARRIVES. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary course examines the “New Wave” as a broad sociocultural phenomenon that not only refers to the cinematic revolution brought about by François Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard, Agnès Varda and other filmmakers in the early 1960s but one that encompasses a wide range of transformations that made 1960s Paris the epicenter of pivotal artistic trends, social transformations and political activity. In addition to the French New Wave, topics include the role of youth popular culture, urban architecture and planning, the impact of the Algerian War and decolonization wars, mass consumerism, the convergence of several social and intellectual movements (women, workers, students, immigrants) in 'May 68'. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, COMM, FITV, FRMO.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3480. FRANCOPHONE CARIBBEAN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This course examines a variety of literary, historical, cultural and linguistic aspects of the francophone Caribbean between 1791 (the beginning of the Haitian Revolution) and today. Topics include articulations of political sovereignty in colonial and post-colonial contexts, francophone Caribbean literary movements, alternative narratives provided by Afro-diasporic voices, and Caribbean feminisms. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, FRAN, FRMO, GLBL.

FREN 3490. AFRICA: SOCIETY AND CULTURE THROUGH FILM. (4 Credits)

Africa has been the object of representations in film since the development of film technology, and Francophone African films and filmmakers have occupied a key place in African filmmaking since the 1960s. This course examines how African modernity and tradition, culture, gender, migration, and conflict are represented in films. The course will examine a wide range of Francophone African films and filmmakers, using the films as insights into understanding African topics and for reflecting on how Africa is represented in films. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3500. FRENCH LITERARY THEORY. (4 Credits)

French Theory became intellectual trend in the United-States thanks to the translation of works by philosophers such as Michel Foucault, Giles Deleuze and Jacques Derrida. This course focuses on that particular theoretical movement and the way it increased significantly the academic relationships between France and the United-States. It also gives students the opportunity to discover today’s main “French theories” , not only understood as coming from France, but also from Québec, Switzerland, and Belgium. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRMO.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600 (may be taken concurrently).

FREN 3510. TRANSLATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE. (4 Credits)

This course considers the question of translation theory and practice from a variety of perspectives: literary, philosophical, and historical. Students will become familiar with the problems most commonly encountered in translation, as well as solutions that have worked or failed. We will examine how these practices of translating into and from French have shaped French cultural and literary history, and since rare is the theorist of translation who is not also a practitioner, we will not only critique existing translations, but also create our own translations. Readings will include literary, philosophical, historical, and cultural texts, by authors like: Christine de Pisan, Du Bellay, de Meziriac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Beckett, Kristeva, Derrida. Taught in French. (Groups ll, lV) Prerequisite FREN 2600 or Instructor's Permission. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3550. IN SEARCH OF LOST TIME: MODERNITY, TEMPORALITY, AND THE SELF IN 20TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

A fundamental construct of Modernity is that it posits a particular relation to time, where the present is defined through a break with the past. This class examines how, for modern writers, a sense of self is indissociable from a broader reflection on the ways in which time structures who we are, and how we perceive the world. Themes include: memory and childhood, the invention of the everyday, day and night, timelessness and the unconscious, measuring time in science. Authors and firms include: Proust, Beckett, Sarraute, Ducharme, Godard (taught in French).

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3555. MAN: BEAST OR MACHINE. (4 Credits)

This course explores what it means to be human, from the early modern period to the present, through a survey of francophone texts dealing with humankind's relationship to animals and machines. We will look at Renaissance humanist texts that argue for man's superiority to animals, which we will compare to their classical atecedents. We will investigate Enlightenment perspectives on the distinction between men, beasts and machines from Descartes, Diderot, and La Mettrie. Theoretical approaches from animal studies and postmodern anti-humanism will be applied to consider how modern society defends and critiques anthropocentrism through art, and how writing reflects our apprehension that machines are a threat to humanity. Course in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRMI.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3564. FRENCH THEATRE AND PERFORMANCE (TAUGHT IN FRENCH). (4 Credits)

This course explores Contemporary French Theatre and offers the opportunity to engage in the creative process from page to rehearsal to a full public performance at the end of the semester. It teaches students how to express themselves more effectively in French. It develops the ability to communicate thoughts and feelings to others. We will combine acting, history, reading, theory and analysis of major modern playwrights. Invited guests from the French and bi-cultural theatre community in New York City will share their experiences with students, and provide opportunities for students to practice their new skills and learn more about. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3565. FRENCH CONTEMPORARY NOVEL. (4 Credits)

This course examines some formal and narrative experiments that have been central to the renewal of the French novel since the 1980's, in particular the popularity of fragmented stories and micro-fictions. This fragmentation can take various forms beyond textual productions, including the turn for many writers to graphic novels, radio narratives, and other types of cross media explorations. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, FRMO.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3566. FRENCH CONTEMPORARY THEATER. (4 Credits)

This course examines French theater focusing on the performative theatrical art of confession and, in particular, "la déclaration d'amour." Special attention will be granted to the relationship between text and performance or to how the word becomes action on stage and how staging affects our perception of the word. Readings include classical and contemporary plays as well as workshops and invited guests. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FREN 3600. FRANCE TODAY. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

FREN 3605. CULTURAL AND LITERARY HISTORY OF JOURNALISM. (4 Credits)

This course examines not only the history of the practice of journalism in France from the rise of mass media in 1830 to the present day, but also the cultural and literary representations of journalism and journalists. Particular attention will be paid to the figure of the grand reporter and the practice of reportage from 1890-1950. Students will read primary sources from the period in question and will be introduced to various theoretical approaches to the study of media. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3630. FRANCOPHONE VOICES FROM NORTH AFRICA. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRAN, MEST.

FREN 3631. NORTH AFRICAN FRANCE. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on young twenty-first century writers of North African descent whose recent literary debuts shocked the French media and literary establishment. An analysis of their public personae as well as a close reading of their works help us understand how French society negotiates volatile political issues such as religion, patriarchy, racism, violence, and sexuality. It also brings a thorough understanidng of the socio-cultural taboos that emerged after decolonization, notably those connected to the French acceptation of the public sphere. Last but not least, it provides a forum to discover and discuss some of the most powerful new voices of contemporary literature. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRAN, MEST.

Prerequisites: FREN 2600 or FREN 2601.

FREN 3637. FRANCOPHONE MIDDLE EAST. (4 Credits)

This course explores the historical and cultural ties between France and the Middle East between 1798 and today. Topics include: Napoleon's campaign in Egypt; Egyptian intellectual diasporas in Paris (1880-1930); francophone poetry in 1920s Syria; francophone writings of the Lebanese civil war; identity politics in contemporary francophone Lebanese theater and cinema. Taught in French. Pre-Req: FREN 2600 or Instructor's Permission. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRAN, FRMO, MEST.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 3640. POSTCOLONIAL REPRESENTATION. (4 Credits)

Novels and essays written in French and published in the 1980's that reflect cultural identities. Authors viewed as interpreters of the postcolonial condition whose works have been redefining traditional conceptions of history and culture, literature and identity. Authors may include Sebbar, Conde, Glissant, Chamoiseau, Confiant. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GLBL, MEST.

FREN 3675. "AMERICA!" FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE PERSPECTIVES. (4 Credits)

Drawing from a wide-ranging selection of literary texts, films, critical essays published or released at different time periods, this interdisciplinary course will examine Francophone constructions of "America." We will thus question the extent to which "America" is a neutral term. Does it refer to a geographical territory or to a site of cultural and political projections, aspirations or criticism? This course will examine how Francophone explorers, artists, intellectuals and politicians have contributed to the production and re-signification of this trope over time. Taught in French. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FRAN, FRMO.

Prerequisite: FREN 2600.

FREN 4998. SENIOR THESIS TUTORIAL. (4 Credits)

Independent research, supervised by a faculty in the language, leading to the completion of a senior thesis.

FREN 4999. TUTORIAL. (3 to 5 Credits)

Study of a particular aspect of French literature or thought. Independent research and readings. Weekly or biweekly meetings with a faculty adviser. Designed for majors with permission of instructor.

FREN 5090. FRENCH FOR READING. (0 Credits)

FREN 9101. INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH I. (0 Credits)

FREN 9102. INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH II. (0 Credits)

FREN 9151. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I. (0 Credits)

FREN 9152. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II. (0 Credits)

FREN 9201. FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. (0 Credits)

German (GERM) courses

GERM 1001. INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN I. (5 Credits)

An introductory course that focuses on the four skills: speaking, reading, writing and listening providing students with a basic knowledge of German linguistic structures, vocabulary and culture, which studied interdependently, comprise the German Language.

GERM 1501. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I. (3 Credits)

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts. Conducted in German.

Prerequisites: GERM 1001 or GERM 1002.

GERM 1502. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II. (3 Credits)

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts. Conducted in German.

Prerequisite: GERM 1501.

GERM 2001. GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. (3 Credits)

A critical analysis of selected cultural and literary texts; composition, conversation, and review of pertinent grammatical structures.

Prerequisite: GERM 1502.

GERM 2100. ADVANCED GERMAN GRAMMAR. (4 Credits)

The course is designed to help students gain more insight into the structure of the German language and to further develop and strengthen their knowledge of German grammar. Survey and practice of German grammar as well as more advanced features of German syntax and style. Course will be conducted in English with readings and exercises in German. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 2601. GERMAN CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (3 Credits)

Intermediate-level conversation with some composition. Optional course for students wishing additional practice in self-expression in German. May be taken simultaneously with GERM 1502 or higher.

GERM 2650. BUSINESS GERMAN. (4 Credits)

Development of oral proficiency used in daily communication within the business world, preparing the students both in technical vocabulary and situational usage. Introduction to specialized vocabulary in business and economics. Readings in management, operations, marketing, advertising, banking, etc. Practice in writing business correspondence. Prerequisite: GERM 2001 or permission of instructor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: IPE.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 2800. GERMAN SHORT STORIES. (4 Credits)

This course follows the development of the short story as a genre in German literature with particular emphasis on its manifestation as a means of personal and social integration from the middle of the 20th century to the present day. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3010. FRISCH AUS DER PRESSE: MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION. (4 Credits)

Further development of language skills through analysis and discussion of current texts from a variety of sources such as German-language newspaper articles, films, songs, internet, radio and TV programs, literature excerpts. Specific topics will vary based on students' interests. Work on different types of writing like description, argumentation and creative writing. ln class activities include discussions, paired and group work, and presentations. ln German. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3050. THE SOUND OF MUSIC: GERMAN MUSIC AND MUSICAL GENRES. (4 Credits)

This course traces the history of German music from the Middle Ages to Deutsche Popmusik, from German Lieder to German Schlager, New German Wave to Hip Hop. In-class activities include listening exercises, discussions, paired and group work, presentations on topics related to the music, events, and cultural foci covered. Drawn from authentic German realia, lyrics, interviews, articles, reading assignments will focus on both the music as well as its socio-political context. While engaging authentic German texts and music, it will be the goal of the course to advance stylistic and grammatical overall competence while fine-tuning listening and speaking skills in German. Taught in German. Prerequisite: GERM 2001 or Instructor's Permission. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3051. SURVEY OF LITERATURE I. (4 Credits)

A general survey of the history of German literature from the beginning of the 18th century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3052. SURVEY OF LITERATURE II. (4 Credits)

A general survey of the history of German literature from the beginning to classicism (ca.500-1832). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

GERM 3057. MEDIEVAL GERMAN LITERATURE: POTIONS, PASSIONS, PLAYERS, AND PRAYERS. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the rich literary and cultural heritage of Medieval Germany. The texts will all be read in English translation, but we will go over some passages in their original languages in class to catch some of the flavor of the Medieval German. Topics covered will include pre-Christian charms, the epic of the Nibelungs, love poetry, and urban carneval plays. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3302. GERMAN THROUGH THE SENSES. (4 Credits)

In this course, we focus on texts which read the world through the experience of one particular sense: smell , hearing or taste. Grenouille the protagonist of Patrick Suskind's novel Das Perfum (Perfum, 1985), creates a fragrance which is bottled desirability, becoming a mass murderer in the process. Similarly, the musical genius portrayed in Robert Schneider's Schlafes Bruder (1992) cannot find love in real life and chooses death, the brother of sleep, instead. Franz Kafka's "Hungerkunstler" ("A Hunger Artist," 1922) has turned starvation into an art form, whereas Bella Martha (Mostly Martha), the chef in Sandra Nettelbeck's 2001 film, can only handle her life when she is in the kitchen. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

Prerequisite: GERM 2500.

GERM 3303. BORDERS AND CROSSINGS. (4 Credits)

Doors, gates, walls, and other borders between inside and outside, home and society, me and you, define our daily lives. And to define means to mark off, to draw boundaries. While animals usually stayk within their confined territory, man is the animal that continually resets, violates, and strives to cross these borders. In this course, you will encounter many exciting contributions to German and Austrian literature and film in the 20th-21st centuries. Our focus will be borders and barriers-physical, ideological, intellectual, and metaphysical. Furthermore, we will discuss border/crossings between cultures, countries, identities, reality, and fiction. Throughout this course, you will be exposed to texts and films that will expand and challenge your consciousness regarding the "other" and the (im)possibilities of interpersonal and intercultural communications. Taught in German. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3307. GERMANY AND MIGRATION. (4 Credits)

Migrants have played a role in many countries' culture. Germans started coming to the U.S. in the 17th century, and about 17% of Americans have German ancestry. Migrants entered Germany starting around the turn of the 20th century, and today about 21% of Germany's population has a migration background. How do migrants assimilate and learn the language of their new country? What influences do migrants have on a country's culture and language? In the first part of the semester, we will examine the migration of Germans to the United States, and in the second part we will focus on migration into Germany. Taught in ENGLISH. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ASSC, COLI.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3310. DEEP IN THE FOREST: THE PAGAN-CHRISTIAN ENCHANTMENT OF THE FAIRY TALE. (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to study how the intertwining of Germanic and Christian mythic worlds serves to create the long lasting enchantment of the Grimms' Fairy Tales. The world of myth and fairy tale will be explored from the point of view Realization theory, which emphasizes the effect which myths and stories attempts to elicit from the reader, as described by William Grimm. In contrast to the Grimms' approach to fairy tale enchantment as awakening the human heart, we will also read three tales by Tieck, where there is fear that there is danger lurking deep in the forest of enchantment. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: GERM 2001.

GERM 3566. DEUTSCHLAND 1968: PROTEST, HIPPIES, UND TERRORISTEN (TAUGHT IN GERMAN). (4 Credits)

1968 stands out as a major symbolic and maybe even actual turning point in German politics and societal self-awareness. As we will learn, it is the results of both Germany’s Nazi past, perceptions of Western imperialism, and new demands for freedom by various groups throughout both Germany and the rest of the world. This course will look at various political and social protest and opposition movements in Germany since 1968. We will determine what certain groups believed in, analyze their statements and actions, and try to understand how their world acts as an important framework for understanding Germany in the twentieth century. We will investigate historical and societal conditions as well as aesthetic implications which turned political engagement into acts of terror and terrorism by looking at 20th century German literature, film, and painting. TAUGHT IN GERMAN Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

GERM 4998. SENIOR THESIS TUTORIAL. (4 Credits)

Independent research, supervised by a faculty in the language, leading to the completion of a senior thesis.

GERM 4999. TUTORIAL. (3 to 4 Credits)

Study of a particular aspect of German literature or thought. Independent research and readings. Weekly or bi-weekly meetings with faculty adviser. Designed for majors with permission of instructor.

GERM 5001. GRADUATE READING IN GERMAN I. (0 Credits)

GERM 5002. GRAD.READG.IN GERMAN II. (0 Credits)

GERM 9101. INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN I. (0 Credits)

GERM 9151. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I. (0 Credits)

GERM 9201. GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. (0 Credits)

Hebrew (HEBW) courses

HEBW 1001. INTRODUCTION TO HEBREW I. (5 Credits)

An Introductory course that focuses on the four skills: reading, speaking, writing, listening, providing students vocabulary and culture, which, studied interdependently, comprise the Hebrew language.

Attribute: MEST.

HEBW 1501. INTERMEDIATE HEBREW I. (3 Credits)

Continued study of the fundamentals of the Hebrew linguistic system with systematically organized reading, writing and conversation exercises. Introduction to literary texts.

Prerequisite: HEBW 1001.

HEBW 1502. INTERMEDIATE HEBREW II. (3 Credits)

Continued study of the fundamentals of the Hebrew linguistic system with systematically organized reading, writing and conversation exercises. Introduction to the literary texts.

Attribute: JWST.

Prerequisite: HEBW 1501.

HEBW 2001. HEBREW LANGUAGE & LITERATURE I. (3 Credits)

These courses are design for students who have a solid knowledge of Hebrew language basics, essential vocabulary, and verb forms and tenses. Text material and course work will focus on developing and expanding the student's vocabulary, learning new grammatical structures and usages, developing good listening and writing skills, applying literal and inferential comprehension skills (reading from magazines, newspapers, and short stories. Videos and films are also included), practicing oral skills during class time through structural exercises, and completing written assignments to reinforce the student's understanding of the concepts studied in class.

Attribute: JWST.

Prerequisite: HEBW 1502.

Italian (ITAL) courses

ITAL 1001. INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN I. (5 Credits)

An introductory course that focuses on the four skills: speaking, reading, writing and listening providing students with a basic knowledge of Italian linguistic structures, vocabulary and culture, which studied interdependently, comprise the Italian Language.

ITAL 1002. INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN II. (3 Credits)

This course will enhance the reading, writing, speaking and listening skills acquired by students in Introduction to Italian I or from prior study. It will further promote a deeper understanding of Italian and its literary and cultural traditions.

Prerequisite: ITAL 1001.

ITAL 1501. INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I. (3 Credits)

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts. The second semester continues and amplifies the work of the first. Conducted in Italian.

Prerequisites: ITAL 1001 or ITAL 1002.

ITAL 1502. INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II. (3 Credits)

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts. Conducted in Italian. The second semester of Intermediate Italian consists of an intensive oral and written practice aiming at expanding vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. The course will begin with a review of pronouns (direct, indirect object pronouns, combined pronouns, ci, ne) and verbs (in particular passato prossimo and imperfetto), and will move into the study of more complex linguistic structure including the conditional and subjunctive. Aspects of Italian culture will be presented in readings and activities. Conducted in Italian.

Prerequisite: ITAL 1501.

ITAL 2001. ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. (3 Credits)

A critical analysis of selected cultural and literary texts; composition, conversation, and review of pertinent grammatical structures.

Prerequisite: ITAL 1502.

ITAL 2400. ACTING IN ITALIAN. (0 Credits)

Course focuses on improving diction, pronunciation, expansion of vocabulary and conversational skills through the study and performance of dramatic works.

Attribute: THEA.

ITAL 2500. APPROACHES TO LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

A basic course in Italian literature. Close readings in the major forms, prose fiction, poetry and drama, and an introduction to the varieties of critical strategies for reading them. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

ITAL 2561. READING CULTURE THROUGH LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This course is designed to introduce students to different aspects of Italian cultural tradition and history by closely reading representative literary texts from the early and modern periods, in a variety of genres including poetry, narrative, and drama. Students will acquire a technical vocabulary and practice different interpretive strategies to speak to continue the study of Italian literature and culture at the advanced level. The course¿s thematic focus, and the primary texts and secondary sources may vary. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 2605. ITALIAN CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (4 Credits)

Composition with emphasis on improvement of grammatical skills and facility in Italian phraseology. Recommended for those students continuing in Italian as majors or minors, whose curricula will include historical surveys of Italian literature or civilization. Emphasized skills include letter writing, descriptions and exposition. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 2640. CLASSICS OF ITALIAN CINEMA. (4 Credits)

In this course we will explore selected masterpieces of Italian cinema focusing on the visual techniques and narrative strategies developed by world-renowned filmmakers such as Rossellini, Fellini, Visconti, Antonioni, Wertmuller, Tornatore, Benigni, and others. We will discuss how historical events, national, cultural and gendered Italian identies, fashion, and political and social issues have been represented or constructed by means of innovative and unique cinematic languages. Conducted in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ITMO.

ITAL 2700. FILMING THE CITY INSIDE AND OUT: A CINEMATIC JOURNEY THROUGH ITALY. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to Italian cinema by focusing on the representation of Italian cityscapes and urban life, as well as the dynamic between urban and “peasant” cultures, the urban center and the rural periphery, in modern Italy from the so-called “economic miracle” of the late 1950s to the present, by internationally renowned filmmakers such as Visconti and Antonioni (Milan), Ermanno Olmi (Lombardy), Pupi Avati (Bologna), Fellini (Romagna), Pasolini, Nanni Moretti and Ferzan Ozpetek (Rome), Mario Martone and Matteo Garrone (Naples), among others. At the same time, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of Italian film analysis. Through screenings, critical readings, class discussions, and essay writing, students will develop the appropriate Italian vocabulary and analytical skills to examine a film focusing on its historical and cultural context, and the narrative, visual and sound techniques it employs. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, ITMO.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 2705. THE SOUTH OF ITALY. (4 Credits)

In this coarse, we will explore the rich and diverse cultural production in Southern Italy in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries with the purpose mrchallenging general assumptions and stereotypes about the "South," and breaking through the North-South divide that has plagued Italian culture since Italy's Unification in the 1860s. We will discuss literary texts, visual texts, and music, focusing on the legacy of the past, gender and family relations, urban culture and rural life, the push for modernization, and regional identities versus globalization, among other topics. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, ITMO.

ITAL 2800. ITALY AND THE ARTS. (4 Credits)

A comparative approach to the intimate relationship of literature and painting-sculpture of the 1400-1800 in the contract of treaties in the arts and the cultural society in political circumstance. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ITMA, ITRE.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 2805. GODS, DEMIGODS, AND MEN: RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE ITALIAN THEATER. (4 Credits)

The course is designed to introduce students to the exploration of the theatrical production in Italy during the Renaissance and the Baroque, from Italian theater's rebirth in 15th century Florence to the masterpieces of ht 16th century. We will analyze the development of characters and their vision of truth, society and human relations, while investigating notions of subjectivity and gender. We will see how men, heroes, gods or half-human and half-supernatural creatures struggle against their own desire and lust (or against impediments and adverse fortune) in order to manipulate reality and resolve dilemmas. Readings will include plays by major authors such as Angelo Poliziano, Niccolo Macheavelli, Lodovico Ariosto, Torquato Tasso, Giordano Bruno, And Gian Lorenzo Bernini, and Opera librettos, such as the Orfeo by Alessandro Striggio, with music by Angelo Monteverdi. Some plays will be read entirely, others as selection. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ITRE.

ITAL 2910. EMIGRATION IN LITERATURE AND FILM 1850-PRESENT. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ITMO.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 2999. ITALIAN INTERNSHIP. (2 Credits)

ITAL 3002. THE ART OF TRANSLATION. (4 Credits)

The study of transferring texts from one linguistic code into another; analysis of various elements of texts, literal and figurative meaning, style, syntax, etc. will be the focus of the course as well as hands on practice working with different types of texts translating form English into Italian and vice versa. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 3005. TRANSLATION: THEORY & PRACTICE. (4 Credits)

This course provides students with hands on experience in the process of translation. Discussions focus on questions of style, syntax and other elements present in the fabric of texts in the source language and explore ways of rendering those structures in another target language. The course provides windfalls that help students deepen their understanding and improve their knowledge of both source and target languages. Theoretical works will be discussed in historical perspective. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

ITAL 3010. POLITICS AND POETRY IN THE MIDDLE AGES: THE RISE OF VERNACULAR CULTURE IN THE MEDITERRANEAN. (4 Credits)

This course analyses the development of vernacular culture and literature in the Mediterranean during the Middle Ages. Students will explore the political, historical, and linguistic context within which vernacular languages and cultures emerged between the XI-XIII centuries. Following Dante’s On Vernacular language - the first linguistic and poetic “map” of the Middle Ages- students will retrace the interrelations linking the Italian vernacular culture to the other traditions within the “romance” domain in the Mediterranean. With the imperial court of Frederick II in Sicily, the Pope in Rome, and the most powerful centers of trade and finance in Florence and other Italian city-states, the Italian peninsula provides a special standing point for the analysis of the relationship between poetry and power in different political contexts: the court of the emperor Frederick II and the powerful communal republics in center and northern Italy will be the focus of the course. Among the texts, authors, and movements included are: Provencal and Italian trobadours; the “Sicilian School” and the encyclopedic culture at the court of the emperor Frederick II (poetry, law, philosophy, medicine, astronomy, translations); religious literature and the Tuscan School of poetry (S. Francis, Jacopone da Todi, Guittone d’Arezzo); the “New Sweet Style” (Guido Guinizzelli, Guido Cavalcanti, Dante Alighieri). Fulfills the Advanced Literature requirement of the core and satisfies the requirement of Minor and Major in Italian. Cross-listed with MVST and COLI. Taught in English with coursework in Italian for credit in Italian. ITAL 2500 or ITAL 2561 or Instructor's Permission Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITMA, MLL, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 or ITAL 2561.

ITAL 3011. DANTE AND HIS AGE. (4 Credits)

Readings from Dante's Comedy in the light of the cultural production of his day including Proveneal and Sicilian lyric, influential philosophical texts, and economic and political changes in 13th-century northern Italy. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITMA, MVLI, MVST.

ITAL 3012. MEDIEVAL STORYTELLING. (4 Credits)

Narrative tradition in medieval Italy from the Novellino to Boccaccio and Sercambi. Taught in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITMA, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 or ITAL 2561.

ITAL 3020. RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE NOVELLA. (4 Credits)

This course will investigate the evolution of Italian narrative prose from the Renaissance to the Baroque. Particular attention will be devoted to the tradition of the unframed short story (Novella Spicciolata), but we will also explore collections of Novelle composed by major authors such as Bandello, Straparola and Basile. Taught in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITRE.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 3021. VICE AND VIRTUE IN MEDIEVAL ITALIAN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

Informed by Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and Aquinas' Summa as well as by writings of Andrea Capellanus, Abeland and others, this course discusses the ethical value systems sustained in works by Jacopome, G. D'Arezzo, Donte, Petrouea, Boccaecio, as they first expressed in Poetry and Prose. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITMA.

ITAL 3030. CRIMINAL TALES. (4 Credits)

Representation of violence in its political, organized and subversive manifestations in post-war Italy, its historical evolution, its sociological and anthropological interpretations. Films and various literature will be examined. Authors and directors: Rosi, Saviano, Wertmüller, Carofiglio, Camilleri, Mammarella, Ferrara, Salvatores, Giordana, among others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, ITMO.

ITAL 3050. ARTS AND POLITICAL ITALIAN HUMANISM. (4 Credits)

This course analyzes the main characters of the early humanist movement in Italy. It focuses on arts and politics and presents authors such as Petrarch, Valla, Lorentl de Medres. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITMA, ITRE.

ITAL 3051. SURVEY OF LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

The social and cultural background of Italian literature with selected readings and analysis of some of the most representative authors of the time. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITRE.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 3062. ETHICS AND ECONOMIC VALUE IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the literary representation of economic values such as profit, work, and utility as they emerge in medieval texts. Students will analyze these values within the critical perspective of the 13th to 15th century authors as seen in their political, historical, and literary contexts. This course includes works from early European lyric poetry, and authors such as Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Erasmus, and Leon Battista Alberti. Students will learn to set their discussions in the broad perspective of European intellectual history. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITMA.

ITAL 3063. SATURIAN SPIRITS: ART AND LITERATURE IN ITALY. (4 Credits)

As an examination of different literary genres of the Italian Renaissance and Baroque (novella, theatre, poetry, autobiography and epic poems), this course will focus on some of the most important courts of the peninsula (Firenze, Urbino, Mantova, Ferrara, Venezia and Roma), and will explore the relation of the visual arts to the literary production of eminent writers and artists (Brunelleschi, Alberti, Pico della Mirandola, Poliziano, Boiardo, Ariosto, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, Leonardo, Cellini, Vasari, Tasso, Striggio, Marino). In addition to engaging in close-readings of key works, students will be encouraged to investigate other art forms such as paintings, sculpture, architecture and music, in an attempt to address the questions: What role did patronage of the arts play during the Renaissance and Baroque? What did it mean to be a writer and an artist in Italy between the 15th and 17th centuries? Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

ITAL 3111. NEW ITALIAN CINEMA. (4 Credits)

The representation of social and cultural issues elaborated in the dramatic, multimedia discourse of playwrights and film directors such as Pirandello, Fellini, Moretti; in works that include Six Characters, La Dolce Vita, La Vita e Bella. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

ITAL 3120. RENAISSANCE LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

A study of the principal poets and writers of the 15th and 16th centuries. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITRE.

ITAL 3125. MAGNIFICENCE AND POWER: THE MEDICI AND RENAISSANCE FLORENCE. (4 Credits)

The course is dedicated to the study of the relationship between culture and politics. In particular we will discuss how the practice of power and the exercise of patronage affected Florentine writers in 15th and early 16th centuries, during the period of Medici’s supremacy. It will be central to the course to verify why the Medicean government was surprisingly far from being simply a repressive and propagandistic political regime. Indeed, Florence, during those years, became an extraordinary place for the arts and, in particular, for literature. Many Florentine masterpieces were produced in different genres (novella, theatre, poetry, autobiography, epic poems, dialogue) and were influential in the development and the shaping of 16th century European culture-at-large. This course will focus on the literary production of eminent writers and artists such as, but not limited to, Alberti, Pico della Mirandola, Poliziano, Lorenzo de’ Medici, Luigi Pulci, Machiavelli, Michelangelo. In addition to engaging in close-readings of key works, students will be encouraged to investigate other art forms such as painting, sculpture, architecture and music, in an attempt to address the questions: What role did Medici patronage of the Arts play during the Renaissance in Florence? What did it mean to be a writer and an artist in Florence between the 15th and 16th centuries? Course taught in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITRE.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 or ITAL 2561.

ITAL 3215. LOVE AND HONOR IN THE RENAISSANCE COURTS. (4 Credits)

This course will focus on some of the most important courts of the Peninsula (in particular Firenze and Ferrara) and will explore the epic poems of eminent writers such as Pulci, Bolardo, Ariosto, Tasso, and Marino. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITRE.

ITAL 3452. ITALOPHONE MIGRANT LITERATURE FROM AFRICA AND BEYOND . (4 Credits)

In this course, we will read works written by contemporary italophone writers, who have adopted the Italian language initially to document their experience of migration and later to reflect creatively on their culture and country of origin and on Italian society and history. What stories do these writers tell? What personal and historical experiences do they describe and give voice to? What languages and narrative techniques do they employ? What is the cultural impact and political relevance of their work in contemporary Italy considered in the Mediterranean, European and global contexts? Essays on the memory and legacy of Italian colonialism in Africa combined with Homi Bhabha’s conceptualization of hybridization, stereotyping and mimicry as modes of cultural displacement and resistance and Ngũgĩ wa Thion Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GLBL, PJST.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2500 or ITAL 2561.

ITAL 3500. COMEDY AND SATIRE IN ITALIAN CINEMA. (4 Credits)

Commedia all'Italiana or satirical comedy represents a major contribution to world cinema with a significant approach to modifying social injustice, prejudice, and abuses. A broad range of styles and film techniques provide a forum to analyze film language and visual experiences. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

ITAL 3530. THE STAGE AND SOCIETY SINCE 1700. (4 Credits)

Social changes, traditions and reforms, love, family and economics as they are interpreted and cast on the stage by renowned playwrights such as Goldoni, Giacosa, De Filippo, Di Giacomo, Pirandello and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITMO.

ITAL 3550. ITALIAN UNIFICATION: FILM/LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

Realism and idealism in the achievement of Italian unification analyzed in the works of filmmakers such as Blasetti and Scola, and in writers like Foscolo, Mazzini, Garibaldi, Lampedusa and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITMO.

ITAL 3553. ITALY FROM UNIFICATION TO 1945: LITERATURE, CULTURE, AND SOCIETY OF THE MODERN PERIOD. (4 Credits)

This course will focus on major cultural figures such as Carducci, Pascoli, D’Annunzio, Ungaretti, Svevo, Montale, and Calvino, among others, and will explore their relationship with and contribution to the social conditions and developments of their times. Taught in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

ITAL 3625. THE MODERN ITALIAN THEATER. (4 Credits)

Italian playwrights such as: Pirandello, Betti, Fabbri, Dr. Filippo Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ITMO.

ITAL 3650. ITALY AT WAR. (4 Credits)

In this course we will read literary works--narrative, theater and poetry-- written in Italy during three key periods of its modern history, namely WWI, WWII, and the so-called "years of lead" (late 1960 through the early 1980's). We will discuss the response of ltalian writers and intellectuals to war, Fascism and terrorism by focusin'g our attention particularly on the techniques that they use to represent, exalt or denounce individual and collective violence, into support or critique extreme ideologies -whether on the right or on the left. In Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, INST, ITMO.

Prerequisite: ITAL 2001.

ITAL 3701. ITALIAN WOMEN WRITERS. (4 Credits)

Outstanding Italian women writers such as Colonna, Morra, Deledda, Ginzburg, Morante, Maraini, Loy. Taught in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITMO, WGSS.

ITAL 3901. NARRATIVE AND FILM. (4 Credits)

The development, trends, and interplay of literary texts and Italian film in the history of the Italian cinema from its origins to today. Films by DeSica, Visconti, Bertolucci, Pasolini, Taviani, Bellocchio, Rosi, and Tornatore. Literary works by Pirandello, Bassani, Levi, Boccaccio, Cain and Verga. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITMO.

ITAL 3910. ITALY TODAY. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ITMO.

ITAL 3920. WORDS ON FIRE: POETRY/SOC. TODAY. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, ITMO.

ITAL 4006. DANTE'S COSMOS: MEDIEVAL SCIENCE, THEOLOGY, AND POETRY IN THE DIVINA COMMEDIA. (4 Credits)

This course investigates Dante's cosmos in the Divine Comedy through medieval science, theology, and poetry. Disentangling the context of the Comedy from Dante's encyclopedic culture through reading in the disciplines of his time will lead students to a deeper comprehension of the multidimensionality of Dante's universe than is possible through any singular disciplinary. The course will broaden students' perception of the medieval cosmos in contrast with contemporary notions of cosmology. Taught in English with readings and writing in Italian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, MVLI, MVST.

ITAL 4010. ANNI DI PIOMBO / YEARS OF LEAD: CULTURE, POLITICS, AND VIOLENCE. (4 Credits)

The period from the late 1960s to the early 1980s in Italy, known as “anni di piombo” or years of lead, was characterized by intense social and political unrest, and terrorist activities. The 1969 bombing in Piazza Fontana in Milan and the 1980 bombing of the train station in Bologna serve as the tragic bookends of a decade of political violence culminating in the kidnapping and murder of Aldo Moro by the Red Brigades in 1978. In this course, we will study these years by closely examining the cultural production of the time – literature, film and other media. We will pay particular attention to the social and political motivations underlying extremist activism, both left- and right-wing, as represented in literature and the popular press, and to writers’, filmmakers’ and intellectuals’ diverse responses to politically motivated violence, whether to criticize the terrorists themselves or to question the state-sponsored “strategy of tension”. We will also discuss the ways in which these experiences have been revisited and reimagined in recent years, and their relevance for today’s Italy. Taught in English with texts in Italian and English translation. Coursework in Italian for credit toward the Italian major or minor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, EP4, VAL.

ITAL 4800. ITALIAN INTERNSHIP. (2 to 4 Credits)

ITAL 4998. SENIOR THESIS TUTORIAL. (4 Credits)

Independent research, supervised by a faculty in the language, leading to the completion of a senior thesis.

ITAL 4999. TUTORIAL. (1 to 6 Credits)

Study of a particular aspect of Italian literature or thought. Independent research and readings. Weekly or bi-weekly meetings with faculty adviser. Designed for majors with permission of instructor.

ITAL 5090. ITALIAN FOR READING. (0 Credits)

This course provides students with the skills for reading Italian. It combines instruction of basic structures of grammar and syntax with the application of techniques in building vocabulary, reading comprehension and translation practice in a collaborative learning setting. Students will read texts from various disciplines in the humanities and social sciences and will gain practical experience in translation and research methods.

ITAL 6005. TRANSLATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE. (4 Credits)

Japanese (JPAN) courses

JPAN 1001. INTRODUCTION TO JAPANESE I. (3 to 5 Credits)

An intensive introductory course that focuses on the four skills: speaking, reading, writing and listening, providing students with a basic knowledge of Japanese linguistic structures, vocabulary and culture, which, studied interdependently, comprise the Japanese language.

JPAN 1501. INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I. (3 Credits)

Through review of grammar, intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts.

Prerequisites: JPAN 1001 or JPAN 1002.

JPAN 1502. INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II. (3 Credits)

This continuation course finishes the grammar review and provides further intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts.

Prerequisite: JPAN 1501.

JPAN 2001. JAPANESE LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. (3 Credits)

A critical analysis of selected cultural and literary texts; composition, conversation, and review of pertinent grammatical structures.

Prerequisite: JPAN 1502.

Mandarin Chinese (MAND) courses

MAND 1001. INTRODUCTION TO MANDARIN I. (5 Credits)

An introductory course that focuses on the four skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening providing students with a basic knowledge of Chinese Linguistic structures, vocabulary and culture, which, studied interdependently, comprise the Chinese Language.

MAND 1501. INTERMEDIATE MANDARIN I. (3 Credits)

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts.

Attribute: IPE.

Prerequisites: MAND 1001 or MAND 1002.

MAND 1502. INTERMEDIATE MANDARIN II. (3 Credits)

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts. Conducted in Chinese.

Prerequisite: MAND 1501.

MAND 2001. MANDARIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. (3 Credits)

A critical analysis of selected cultural and literary texts: composition, conversation, and review of pertinent grammatical structures.

Prerequisite: MAND 1502.

MAND 2500. APPROACHES TO LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

An intensive reading course in the major genres (prose, fiction and drama) of Mandarin Chinese literature. A basic introduction to literature in Mandarin Chinese and to the varieties of critical strategies for reading its forms or genres. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: MAND 2001.

MAND 2550. READING CHINESE SHORT STORIES. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the narrative of well-known 19th and 20th- century Chinese writers such as Lu Xun, Bing Xin and others. Upon completion of the course, students will have acquired a basic knowledge of modern Chinese literature and will have further enhanced their speaking, reading and writing skills in Mandarin Chinese. Taught in Chinese. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MAND 2601. MANDARIN CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (4 Credits)

This course is designed for advanced mandarin learners to improve their listening, speaking, reading, and writing proficeincy. It will enable the learners to acquire up-to-date spoken Chinese by introducing contemporary TV series, mini plays, and movies. Students will also produce written texts based on the materials covered in class. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

MAND 2650. ADVANCED BUSINESS MANDARIN. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: MAND 2001.

MAND 3002. TOPICS IN CHINESE CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This course is designed for intermediate high and advanced chinese learners. The aims of the course are 1) to further develop students' language proficiency in all areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing and 2) to increase students' awareness and appreciation of Chinese culture. Students will learn various aspects of contemporary Chinese society and compare Chinese cultural practice products and perspectives with their own culture to enhance understanding of Chinese people and culture. Class discussions will be held and reading and writing assignments will be assigned regularly to help students improve their skills in articulating Chinese in spoken and written forms. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: MAND 2500.

MAND 3015. LEARNING MANDARIN CHINESE THROUGH MUSIC AND SONGS. (4 Credits)

This course introduces to students representative songs of various genres. Through learning lyrics of the songs, students continue consolidate their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Mandarin Chinese and continue to learn Chinese culture.Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: MAND 2500.

MAND 3020. LEARN CHINESE THROUGH FILM. (4 Credits)

It is a course designed for advanced Chinese learners, who successfully completed Mandarin 2500 or equivalent to continue developing their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing through studying Chinese films and to achieve a better understanding of Chinese culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI.

Prerequisite: MAND 2500.

MAND 3030. MASTERPIECES OF CHINESE FILM: THEORY & TEXTS. (4 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to Chinese film, focusing on important genres, directors and movements. We will follow two parallel (often times intersecting) threads throughout the course: "politics of film" as well as "poetics of film." The former explores Chinese film's engaging dialogue with Chinese sociopolitical issues whereas the latter investigates key terms of film theory such as spectatorship, gaze, apparatus theory, and authorship.

Attribute: ALC.

MAND 3040. TOPICS IN MANDARIN CHINESE LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This course examines the rich tradition of Mandarin Chinese literature form 1900 to present. Readings include a variety of genres in Mandarin Chinese, such as short stories, critical essays, poetry and screen plays. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, INST, PJST.

Prerequisite: MAND 2500.

MAND 3050. CHINA IN THE HEADLINES: AN ADVANCED NEWSPAPER READING COURSE IN MANDARIN CHINESE. (4 Credits)

This course will have students' reading skills in formal written Chinese through studying texts, such as, new reports, editorial essays, and transcripts of interviews. A variety of students will also develop listening and speaking skills through watching news clips and discussion and debate over top stories in Chinese media. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, PJST.

Prerequisite: MAND 2001.

MAND 3055. CHINA AND GLOBALIZATION. (4 Credits)

This course is designed to further develop students’ all-around Mandarin Chinese language skills through intensive readings related to the multifaceted nature of contemporary globalization and social, political, and economic aspects of developments in the context of China. Students will solidify their advanced-level language skills and develop superior level skills, such as defending one’s view, making a hypothesis, and handling linguistically unfamiliar situations, through activities such as discussion and debate. Students are expected to reach at least advance-low level at the end of the semester. Courses in Translation. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST.

MAND 4999. TUTORIAL. (3 to 4 Credits)

MAND 9101. INTRO TO MANDARIN I. (0 Credits)

MAND 9152. INTERMEDIATE MANDARIN II. (0 Credits)

MAND 9201. MANDARIN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE. (0 Credits)

Russian (RUSS) courses

RUSS 1001. INTRODUCTION TO RUSSIAN I. (5 Credits)

An introductory course that focuses on the four skills: speaking, reading, writing and listening providing students with a basic knowledge of Russian linguistic structures, vocabulary and culture, which studied interdependently, comprise the Russian Language.

RUSS 1501. INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I. (3 Credits)

Review and continuation of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts.

Prerequisites: RUSS 1001 or RUSS 1002.

RUSS 1502. INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II. (3 Credits)

The second semester continues and amplifies the work of the first. Conducted in Russian.

Prerequisite: RUSS 1501.

RUSS 1901. GRAMMAR REVIEW RUSSIA SPEAKER. (4 Credits)

For heritage speakers of Russian. Will improve the literacy of native Russian speakers. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

RUSS 1999. TUTORIAL. (1 Credit)

RUSS 2001. RUSSIAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. (3 Credits)

A critical analysis of selected cultural and luterary texts; composition, conversation, and review of pertinent grammatical structures.

Prerequisite: RUSS 1502.

RUSS 2300. RUSSIAN FROM INTERMEDIATE TO ADVANCED. (4 Credits)

This course helps students progress from Intermediate to Advanced proficiency (ACTFL) or form 1 to 2 on the ILR scale. We will develop 4 skills: 1)Engage in conversation to communicate information on autobiographical topics, as well as topics of community, national or international interest; 2)When reading, understand main ideas and supporting details of authentic narrative and descriptive texts; 3)When listening, understand main ideas and most supporting details in connected discourse on a variety of general interest topics, such as news stories, explanations, instructions, anecdotes, or travelogue descriptions; 4)In writing, use a variety of cohesive devices up to several paragraphs in length and exhibit control of the most frequently used syntactic structures and a range of general vocabulary. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: RUSS 2001.

RUSS 2500. APPROACHES TO LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This course examines the masterpieces of the nineteenth-century Russian prose, using a broad selection of the excerpts from the literary works of Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy and Chekhov. One of the goals of the course is to analyze how these writers expanded the boundaries of the genres in which they worked, even as they exposed the acute social problems of their time. Taught in Russian. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: OCST.

Prerequisite: RUSS 2001.

RUSS 2601. RUSSIAN CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

RUSS 2640. RUSSIAN SHORT FICTION. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

RUSS 2650. MEDIA AND THE RUSSIAN STATE: NEWS OUTLETS FROM 19TH CENTURY TO PRESENT DAY RUSSIA. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, OCST, PJST.

Prerequisite: RUSS 2001.

RUSS 3002. GENRES AND STYLES RUSSIAN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to a wide variety of genres in both sychronic as well as in diachronic aspect. It will undertake a close analytical examination of a number of types of literary and folkloric texts. These masterworks of Russian literature will be analyzed in terms of their defining features such as their intrinsic imaginative system, language devices, themes, and ethical function, which are significant for the chronologically relevant cultural tradition. The course will enable students to perceive the literary works in their multi-dimensional depths as the students will engage in a deeper analysis of each text surveyed. The course will include texts from the present day to the distant Russian literary past. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

RUSS 4999. TUTORIAL. (4 Credits)

RUSS 9101. INTRODUCTION TO RUSSIAN I. (0 Credits)

RUSS 9151. INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I. (0 Credits)

RUSS 9152. INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II. (0 Credits)

RUSS 9201. RUSSIAN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE. (0 Credits)

Spanish (SPAN) courses

SPAN 1001. INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH I. (5 Credits)

An introductory course that focuses on the four skills: speaking, reading, writing and listening providing students with a basic knowledge of Spanish linguistic structures, vocabulary and culture, which studied interdependently, comprise the Spanish Language.

SPAN 1002. INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH II. (3 Credits)

This course will enhance the reading, writing, speaking and listening skills acquired by students in Introduction to Spanish I or from prior study. It will further promote a deeper understanding of Spanish and Hispanic cultures.

Prerequisite: SPAN 1001.

SPAN 1501. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I. (3 Credits)

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts. The second semester continues and amplifies the work of the first. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SPAN 1001 or SPAN 1002.

SPAN 1502. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II. (3 Credits)

Review of grammar. Intensive practice in conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of graded literary texts. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 1501.

SPAN 2001. SPANISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. (3 Credits)

Study of selected literary texts and review of pertinent grammatical structures, textual analysis, composition, and conversation. Conducted in Spanish.

Attribute: LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 1502.

SPAN 2301. ADVANCED FOR SPANISH SPEAKERS. (3 Credits)

An advanced review of grammar for students with bilingual experiences in English and Spanish. Study of selected literary texts. Textural analysis, continued development of written and oral skills.

Attribute: LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 1501.

SPAN 2305. SPANISH CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (4 Credits)

Intensive practice of the spoken and written language with emphasis on proper use of idioms and buildings of vocabulary based on topics of interest and relevance. A basic course for prospective majors and minors, not open to Spanish native speakers. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: LALS.

Prerequisites: SPAN 2001 or SPAN 2301.

SPAN 2500. APPROACHES TO LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

A basic course in Spanish literature. Close readings in the major forms, prose fiction, poetry and drama, and an introduction to the varieties of critical strategies for reading them. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisites: SPAN 2001 or SPAN 2301.

SPAN 2640. SPANISH AND NEW YORK CITY. (4 Credits)

This course works to achieve greater linguistic fluency and cultural understanding of the Spanish-speaking world. We will examine the Latin Americans and Latino experience in NYC through a variety of written and visual texts. Students will work in community to improve their language skills and cultural understanding in a highly contextualized environment. Community service required. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, AMST, ASLT, LAHA, LALS, URST.

SPAN 2650. BUSINESS SPANISH. (4 Credits)

This course emphasizes key communicative skills to provide students with tools to work in Spanish in a wide variety of capacities. Students will learn essential vocabulary and discuss different cultural practices in the professional Spanish-speaking world. The class will explore important sectors of the economy in Spain, Latin America, and the United States as well as geographic elements (trade agreements, political circumstances, etc.) that shape them. Attention will be paid to both for-profit and non-profit models. Taught in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: LAHA, LALS.

SPAN 2655. CREATIVE WRITING IN SPANISH. (4 Credits)

This course will explore various modes of creative writing (journals, short stories, microcuentos, poems, etc.). Readings about the process of writing by Hispanic authors, and certain exemplary texts will serve as guide and inspiration, while a workshop format will allow for revising and developing as second language writers. Taught in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 2700. HISPANIC LEGENDS. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to fundamental myths, folktales, and fables from a variety of Spanish-speaking countries and periods. Special attention will be paid to sources, interpretation, and analysis of these stories. among topics to be considered are the types, structure and patterns of legends, the role of the hero, common devices such as personification, and orality. Written assignments include analytical essays, response papers, and creative writing. Taught in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, LALS.

Prerequisites: SPAN 2001 or SPAN 2301.

SPAN 3001. SPAIN: LITERATURE AND CULTURE SURVEY. (4 Credits)

A broad survey of Spanish culture through the study of some of its major literary figures and texts. The course will examine representative texts from important artistic movements in Spain, such as the Renaissance, the baroque, neoclassicism, romanticism, realism and postmodernism. By the end of the course, students will be able to define the main characteristics of these movements and will be familiar with important literary figures, such as Garcilaso de la Vega, Calderón de la Barca, Lope de Vega, Moratín, Bécquer, Larra, Leopoldo Alas, Pardo Bazán, Antonio Machado, Unamuno, Ramón Sénder, Aleixandre and Martín Gaite. Students will also be familiar with Spanish history and its relationship to the cultural field. Prereq: SPAN 2500 or Instructors Permission; Taught in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3002. LATIN AMERICA: LITERATURE AND CULTURE SURVEY. (4 Credits)

(May be applied to other groups depending on topic offered) The study of Spanish-American society through its cultural expressions: literature, art, music, film, and print journalism. To focus, in a given semester, on topics such as: "Literature and Art in Colonial Spanish America," "Literature and Film in Contemporary Spanish America," "Revolution in Spanish American Literature and Art," "Civilization and Barbarism," "National Identity, Race, and Gender in Spanish America," "Dictatorship and Resistance in Spanish America," and others. Taught in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, ALC, AMST, ASLT, COLI, GLBL, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3005. THEMES IN LATINA/O AND LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES. (4 Credits)

This course allows students to explore ways to synthesize key topics in Latin American and Latina/o Studies (LALS) as an interdisciplinary field of study. It will compare the distinct approaches to these topics of the different disciplines represented by the LALS faculty (including History, Literature, Film Studies, Theology, Art History, Sociology, and Anthropology). Conducted in English. Coursework in Spanish for credit toward the Spanish major and minor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, CCUS, COMC, COMM, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3007. SPANISH LINGUISTICS. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the linguistic study of the Spanish language. The course discusses the formal domains of language structure - including speech sounds and their mental representations, sentence structure and semantic meaning, as well as social realities of language use and language change across different varieties of Spanish in the world. The course is taught in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ASSC, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2001.

SPAN 3066. SURVEY OF LATIN AMERICAN FILM. (4 Credits)

A panoramic view of the cinema of Hispanic America and Brazil, from the Golden Age of Mexican film to the present. Particular emphasis will be placed on students' use of the language itself of film studies, as well as on the connections between transnational networks of filmmakers and the emergence of pan-Latin American identities. Taught in Spanish. Prereq: SPAN 2500 or Instructor's Permission. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, LAHA.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3072. GEOGRAPHIES OF POWER/INJUSTICE. (4 Credits)

Throughout this course, the aim is to develop in students a critical perspective on the spatiality of social life, that is, to foster students understanding of how relations of power and dispossession are inscribed into the built environment in both urban and rural landscapes. Through in-depth study of 20th and 21st century Spanish American works of fiction and film, we will study how space (which simultaneously shapes, and is shaped by, social life)is politically produced and reproduced, thus creating structures of privilege and advantage for some, and of social control and cultural, gender and class exclusion or domination for others. Taught in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: LALS.

SPAN 3210. TRANSATLANTIC PICARESQUE. (4 Credits)

Exploration of the origins of this uniquely entertaining genre, its most exemplary manifestation in Spain, and its transatlantic resource in the New World. Texts include Lazarillo de Tormes, El Buscon, De Don Catrin de La Fachenda, El Lazarillo de Ciegos Caminantes, and others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3230. SINFUL BUSINESS. (4 Credits)

Analysis of greed in Colonial and Golden Age writings on New World treasure. Exploration of Classical and Jungian roots of negativity toward commercial navigation. Prose and poetry by authors such as Horace, Ovid, Cabeza de Vaca, Siguenza y Gongora, Quevedo, and Gongora. Taught in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, LAHA.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500 (may be taken concurrently).

SPAN 3250. GOD, GOLD, AND GLORY. (4 Credits)

In-depth examination of colonial narratives of exploration and conquest. Comparative study of text and film representations of this powerful moment of Spanish imperialism. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3275. HYBRID FUTURES: A PANORAMA OF MEXICAN SHORT FICTION. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the main themes of Mexican science fiction, from the late nineteenth century to today, using a panoramic approach that encompasses different forms of cultural production and media (literature, film, comics, street art, etc.). Through the science fiction lenses we will examine Mexico’s relation to technology and the processes of modernization, as well as the imagined future of labor, gender, and immigration, among other issues. We will frame Mexican science fiction as part of a larger Latin American tradition, while also discussing the connections to more mainstream (i.e. American and English) visions of the genre. All materials will be available online.

Attributes: ALC, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3300. MODERN LATIN AMERICAN VISUAL CULTURE. (4 Credits)

In this course, we will identify, follow, and compare a number of narrative and historical currents as they are represented in Latin American visual culture, from independence to the present. We will do this across a broad variety of media, including concrete poetry, performance art, photography, painting, film, television, sculpture, comics, and theater. We will focus on theoretical, historical, ethical, political, and identitarian approaches to these different disciplinary categories of visual culture. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: INST, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3301. FEDERICO GARCIA LORCA AND HIS WORLD. (4 Credits)

The course is an in-depth study of the works and person of Spanish author Federico Garcia Lorca (1898-1936) in its socio-historical, artistic and cultural contexts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3305. POSTHUMAN MESTIZAJE AND THE NON-HUMAN TURN IN MEXICAN CULTURE. (4 Credits)

The course will study the posthuman subjects that emerge in Mexican culture in the late nineteenth century. We will study cyborgs, zombies, and other forms of posthuman beings and their relation to modernity. Secondly, we will focus on the non-human: technological objects, artificial intelligences, commodities, and other entities that have had a life on their own. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3407. FOREIGNNESS & TRANSLATION: MULTILINGUAL AUTOBIO WRITING IN CONTEMP LATIN-AM & LATINO LIT (1980-2015). (4 Credits)

This course studies manifestations of multilingualism in contemporary Latin-American and Latino literature, more particularly multilingualism that creates a tension between mother tongue and adoptive language when one of the languages is Spanish. It focuses on narratives and memoirs written by authors whose roots are in the Southern Cone (Argentina and Chile: Manuel Puig, Sylvia Molloy, Paloma Vidal, Ariel Dorfman…), the Caribbean (Pérez Firmat, Judith Ortiz Cofer…) and México (Richard Rodríguez, Gloria Anzaldúa, Ilan Stavans…). The paradoxes of multlingualism will be approached formally (categories of multilingualism: alternating between languages, self-translation, code-switching…; rhetorical patterns, central tropes), thematically (identity construction and the perception of the self, the affective function of language) and sociologically (the difficulties to publish real bilingual texts as a consequence of unequal relationships of power between North and South). Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3530. EXCESS IN SPANISH LIT. (4 Credits)

National identity in Spain was constructed beyond European ethics and aesthetics. This course focuses on the tragic consequences of presenting Spain as the Other, examining representations in modern literature and film. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3535. UNUS MUNDUS: DECONSTRUCTING 'TIME' THROUGH SPANISH LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3540. SPAIN AND ISLAM. (4 Credits)

Islam has been a major constant in the construction of Spanish national and cultural identity from the Middle Ages to our present day. This course will explore the nature of this Islamic constant through the different political and cultural contexts of Spanish history. Course material will include literary sources from Medieval lyric to modern fiction as well as other cultural forms, including Medieval music and contemporary cinema. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, LAHA, LALS, MEST, MVLI, MVST.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3550. EXPRESSING THE COLONIES. (4 Credits)

This course will consider Colonial texts following the age of discovery and conquest. Exploration of Sor Juana, el Inca Garcilaso, Balbuena, Acosta, Vazquez, de Espinosa, and others will seek to identify how the writings contributed to the expression of the newly established colonies and institutions. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3560. REIMAGINING THE COLONIES. (4 Credits)

Study of modern Latin American historical fiction (novels and short stories) set in the Colonial period. Exploration of the factors that inform contemporary authors' literary imaginations as they envision and recreate this crucial period in Latin American history. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3561. REPRESENTING THE GYPSY. (4 Credits)

This course will explore the representation of the gypse in spanish literature and culture from the late Middle Ages to the present. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, LAHA, LALS, PJST.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3575. PAINTING THE EMPIRE: UNDERSTANDING THE SPANISH EMPIRE THROUGH ART AND LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

The Golden Age of Spanish art and literature (known as “el Siglo de Oro”) coincided with the configuration of Spain as a global empire after the rise of the Habsburg dynasty to the Spanish throne (from around 1550 to around 1650). This course proposes a study of the main social, political and cultural conflicts that conformed that empire from a multidisciplinary perspective that combines the works of the empire’s most famous painters (El Greco, Diego Velázquez, José de Ribera, among others) with the works of its most representative writers (Lope de Vega, Miguel de Cervantes, María de Zayas, among others); topics such as the symbolic construction and shaping of space, gender, national identity or social and religious relationships will be approached through a combination of visual and textual representations. The course will also take great advantage of the important collections of Spanish Renaissance and Baroque painting held at several New York institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art of the Hispanic Society of America, including visits to those institutions and field work. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3582. NEW YORK IN LATINO LITERATURE AND FILM. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, ALC, AMST, ASLT, COLI, LAHA, LALS, PLUR.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3583. NEW YORK CITY LATINO THEATRE AND PERFORMANCE. (4 Credits)

Explores the diversity of Latino performance styles in NYC, from theatrical performances to performance art and spoken word, by studying the works presented in NYC’s Latino repertory theaters, musical theater venues, performance art and spoken word presentations, such as El Repertorio Espanol, Teatro Circulo, the Puerto Rican Travelling Theater/Pregones Theater, and INTAR. It will study the works of performance artists such as Carmelita Tropicana and Josefina Baez, of spoken word poets such as Willie Perdomo, Edwin Torres and Caridad del la Luz, and Alberto Sandoval-Sanchez, and Diana Taylor. Conducted in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: LALS, PLUR.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3610. CHILDREN'S GAZE IN LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

This course examines Latin American short stories, novels and poetry which focus on the way children and adolescents view the world and how they process their immediate socioeconomic and geographic contexts to construct their world view and find their place in society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GLBL, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3625. SPANISH-AMERICAN SHORT FICTION. (4 Credits)

The short story and the short novel in Spanish America from its beginnings in the 19th-century. Authors may include: Echeverria, Quiroga, Borges, Rulfo, Fuentes, Carpentier, Cortar, Onetti, Garcia Marquez, Piera, Garro and Allende. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GLBL, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3642. SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE AND POPULAR MUSIC. (4 Credits)

The significant role of popular music such as bolero, tango, milonga in Latin American Postmodern Novel. Authors may include: M. Puig, R. Sanchez, G. Cabrera Infante, L. Otero , M. Montero, R. Ampero. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3701. SPANISH-AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS. (4 Credits)

Texts by Spanish-American women writers from the Colonial period to the present. Issues of female writing and representation. Evaluation of the status of writing as a woman in recent critical theory. Authors may include: Sor Juana, Mistral, Bombal, Castellanos, Poniatowska, Ferre, and Allende. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, ALC, AMST, ASLT, COLI, GLBL, LAHA, LALS, WGSS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3710. CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN FICTION. (4 Credits)

In this course we will study the major trends in Latin American fiction from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. Significant attention will be placed on writers of the 1960's "bloom" generation, their technical innovations and their role as intellectuals. Major post-boom authors will then be studied focusing on themes such as migration, transnationalism, memory, end-of-the-century politics of identity, and the increasing professionalization of the Latin American writer. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3712. LITERATURES OF THE LATIN AMERICAN BOOM AND POST-BOOM. (4 Credits)

We will first explore the "Boom," a time in the 1960s and 70s when certain Spanish American authors (such as García Márquez, Cortázar, Vargas Llosa, Fuentes, and Donoso) became known internationally for their sophisticated narrative techniques, engagement with politics, and re-imagining of national identity. We will then examine how more contemporary works of Spanish American fiction (by such authors as Poniatowska, Bolaño, Fuguet, and Eltit) grapple with the legacy of the "Boom." Other issues to be discussed include modernism, "magical realism," historical fiction, and works by authors transitioning between the Boom and Post-Boom (including Puig, Sarduy, and Allende). Taught in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3715. LATIN AMERICAN CYBERLITERATURE. (4 Credits)

Latin American Cyberliterature explores the articulation of cyberspace and literature and analyzes the use of hypertexts, blogs and blognovels by Faverón, Neuman, Paz Soldán, Volpi, Rivera Garza and Pron. Taught in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3730. WRITING VIOLENCE: PERU, 1980-2000. (4 Credits)

In this course we will study the different representations of violence in Peruvian narrative, poetry and film whose main subject was the armed conflict during the 1980's and 90's between the Peruvian state and subversive groups (Shining Path and MRTA). Most reading will be literary but the course has a strong interdisciplinary nature since a thorough study of historical, sociological and anthropological texts related to this period of Peruvian history and culture will be included. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, GLBL, LAHA, LALS, PJST.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3770. CULTURES OF MEMORY AND POSTMEMORY IN CONTEMPORARY CHILE. (4 Credits)

This course will explore artifacts and movements of cultural memory -- literature, criticism, film, photography, and other media -- that illuminate efforts in Chile to come to terms with the country’s recent dictatorial past. We will also discuss these artifacts in light of the idea of “postmemory”: how affiliations to, and representations of, this past are (re)constructed in the present and projected into the future. The course will meet once a week during the semester, and then include an optional, one-credit, two-week-long trip to Santiago, Chile immediately after the semester ends. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3771. CULTURES OF MEMORY AND POST-MEMORY IN CONTEMPORARY CHILE. (1 Credit)

This course will explore artifacts and movements of cultural memory -- literature, criticism, film, photography, and other media -- that illuminate efforts in Chile to come to terms with the country’s recent dictatorial past. We will also discuss these artifacts in light of the idea of “postmemory”: how affiliations to, and representations of, this past are (re)constructed in the present and projected into the future. The course will meet once a week during the semester, and then include an optional, one-credit, two-week-long trip to Santiago, Chile immediately after the semester ends.

SPAN 3800. THE SPANISH DIASPORA. (4 Credits)

This course proposes a study of the main religious, political and intellectual Spanish diasporic waves from 1492 to 1939. By exploring different literary and cultural sources produced both inside and outside Spain it aims to determine the impact of exile and displacement in the fomation of Spanish national identity. Taught in Spanish. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, LAHA.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500 (may be taken concurrently).

SPAN 3809. ARGENTINE LITERATURE AND FILM. (4 Credits)

The course will examine in Argentina the fruitful dialogue between literature and film. Analysis of the writers who incorporated into their writing procedures derived from film and created new models of representing reality. Among the authors to be explored are: Manuel Puig, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortatzar, Adolfo Bioy Casares, Eduardo Sacheri, Guillermo Martinez. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, FCRH, INST.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3820. CARIBBEAN LITERATURE. (4 Credits)

Important topics in Caribbean literature such as national identity and gender, national identity and race, discourses of modernity and modernization, dictatorship and resistance, revolution in literature, migration and exile as literary tropes, and the appropriation of popular cultural forms. Authors may include: Marti, Pales Matos, Guillen, Carpentier, Lezama Lima, Mir, Sanchez, Arenas, Verges, and Vega. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ACUP, ADVD, ALC, AMST, ASLT, COLI, GLBL, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3850. NARRATING THE CITY. (4 Credits)

The course uses Spanish, Latin American and United States Latino texts and films to discuss the representation of contemporary urban spaces such as Madrid, Buenos Aires, Mexico City, Havana, Lima and New York. Issues such as globalization, migration from the country to the city, urban subcultures and urban politics will be discussed in relation to readings from authors such as Garcia Lorca, Monsivais, Arlt, Borges, Piglia, Ribeyro, Pacheco, Garcia Canclini, Sanchez, Fusco, and filmmakers such as Nielinsky, Gonzalez Inarritu. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, INST, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3908. FRANCOIST SPAIN. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on cultural production during the regime of Francisco Franco (1939-1975), and examines the regime's ideological approach to the arts by studying the personalities and legislature that shaped the Francoist aesthetics. The course puts state sponsored and subversive art and dialogue with official policies and the struggle for their control to produce a more nuanced understanding of Franco's Spain. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3950. THE FANTASTIC IN SPANISH LITERATURE AND FILM. (4 Credits)

An exploration of the fantasy genre and subgenres in Spanish culture (its evolution, its social and political implications) from medieval chivalry novels and miracles to 21st century horror movies. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3990. SPANISH IMMERSION IN SPAIN. (3 Credits)

Students will receive instruction at their appropriate level of language competency. Classes will meet four hours per day, five days a week for a total of 80 hours. The course will be substituted for the correspondent level of Spanish language at the home university. In addition, participants will engage in a number of cultural excursions within Granada as well as take short trips to other parts of Andalusia. Cultural visits are organized by Prof. Lamas, who also supervises the academic progress of the students. Granada, a recognized World Heritage Site by UNESCO, is one of the most beautiful cities in the world and a center of flamenco culture. The program is based at the University of Granada.

Attribute: ALC.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 3999. TUTORIAL. (3 Credits)

Independent research and readings with supervision from a faculty member.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 4001. CERVANTES AND DON QUIXOTE. (4 Credits)

Lectures, readings and discussion of Don Quixote. Cervantes' importance for the development of modern fiction. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, LAHA, LALS.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 4018. CONTEMPORARY CUBAN CULTURE IN HAVANA. (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary capstone course will study the representation of the Cuban revolutionary process in literature, history, and film. It will explore some of the major topics on the Cuban revolutionary process from the vantage point of historical, literary and cinematic accounts: the relationship of intellectuals to the state, the revision of the past as antecedent to the Cuban revolution and its policies, the place of race, gender and sexuality in revolutionary culture, the Mariel exodus and the revolution’s relationship to Cuban diasporic communities, the critique of revolutionary rhetoric during the post-Soviet “special period” and issues related to consumption, gender, sexuality, race, urban development and subjectivity during the current period of economic and cultural transition from socialism. It will use an interdisciplinary historical, literary and cinematic approach to examine the Cuban revolutionary process and will offer as a complement to the course an optional Spring Study-Tour of Havana. Conducted in English with texts in Spanish and English translation. Coursework in Spanish for credit toward the Spanish major and minor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: CCUS, COMC, COMM, FITV, GLBL, ICC.

SPAN 4100. SPEAKING FOR/AS THE OTHER. (4 Credits)

What are the implications of giving voice to those who are "voiceless"? This course explores the role of writing and speaking during the encounter of black, Indian, mestizo and Hispanic cultures in Latin America and Latina/o United States. By examining these cultural encounters, the course examines the political and ethical implications of speaking for and as the other. Conducted in English with texts in Spanish and English translation. Coursework in Spanish for credit toward the Spanish major and minor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: COLI, EP4, LALS, VAL.

SPAN 4511. SPANISH CIVIL WAR. (4 Credits)

This course examines how the Spanish Civil War has been represented in Spanish Cultural Production both during the war and in the decades following Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ALC, COLI, ICC, INST.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 4520. SPAIN IN CONTEXT. (4 Credits)

Focusing on the relationship between creativity and society, the course explores the literature and culture of Spain’s diverse regions. The course comprises the following elements: classes taught by Dr. Lamas, trips, cultural visits, and gatherings/workshops with prestigious Spanish intellectuals and artists (at the so-called tertulias). Students work in groups towards a final project, which will be presented in class as a Podcast, and handled to the instructor as a journal article ready for publication in the magazine Por Granada, available in print and on line. The course is offered in conjunction with Fordham in Granada. Only students enrolled in the Program can register for this class. Granada, a recognized World Heritage Site by UNESCO, is one of the most beautiful cities in the world. It is the hometown of Federico García Lorca, and a center of flamenco culture. The Alhambra Palace, the Albaicín neighborhood, the Cathedral, and the numerous Baroque churches of the city are testimonies of its rich past, which continues to be alive through its vibrant university community. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attributes: ICC, LALS, PJST.

SPAN 4800. INTERNSHIP. (4 Credits)

SPAN 4855. FASCISMS, AESTHETICS & THE HISPANIC WORLD. (4 Credits)

This course will explore various iterations of fascism in Spain, Latin America, and the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will concentrate first on debates among historians about the definitions and origins of fascism, and then move on to its aesthetic embodiments throughout the Spanish-speaking world. We will examine primary texts that both uphold and undermine fascist ideals, as well as theoretical texts that illuminate the mechanisms by which this works. Our discussions will be informed by historical, philosophical, and literary approaches to fascism’s beginnings its transnational and transatlantic repercussions; and the persistence today of fascist rhetoric and aesthetics on three continents, particularly vis-à-vis the growing Hispanic presence in the US. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: ICC.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 4998. SENIOR THESIS TUTORIAL. (4 Credits)

Independent research, supervised by a faculty in the language, leading to the completion of a senior thesis.

SPAN 4999. TUTORIAL. (1 to 4 Credits)

Study of a particular aspect of Hispanic literature or thought. Independent research and readings. Weekly or bi-weekly meetings with faculty adviser. Designed for majors with permission of instructor.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2500.

SPAN 5090. SPANISH FOR READING. (0 Credits)

SPAN 9101. INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH I. (0 Credits)

SPAN 9152. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II. (0 Credits)

Courses in Other Areas

German

Aside from courses with the subject code, the following courses have the GERM attribute and count toward the German majors and minor:

Course Title Credits
MLAL 3057MEDIEVAL GERMAN LITERATURE: POTIONS, PASSIONS, PLAYERS, AND PRAYERS4
MLAL 3504STUDY TOUR: BERLIN TALES: GERMANY'S KIEZ4
MLAL 3600WOMEN'S VOICES IN GERMAN AND AUSTRIAN LITERATURE4
MLAL 3800CLOISTERS, CASTLES, AND KINGS: MEDIEVAL BAVARIA4
MVST 3057MEDIEVAL GERMAN LITERATURE: POTIONS, PASSIONS, PLAYERS, AND PRAYERS4
MVST 3800CLOISTERS, CASTLES, AND KINGS: MEDIEVAL BAVARIA4

Italian

Aside from courses with the subject code, the following courses have the ITAL attribute and count toward the Italian majors and minor:

Course Title Credits
ARHI 2341MEDIEVAL DESIRE AND DEVOTION4
ARHI 251018th CENTURY ART4
ARHI 3455MICHELANGELO4
COLI 3112ITALIAN NEOREALIST CINEMA4
COLI 3200MACHIAVELLI'S UTOPIA4
COLI 4016REWRITING THE MEDITERRANEAN (20th and 21st Centuries)4
HIST 3541MODERN ITALY4
HIST 3549GLOBAL ITALY4
HIST 4542SEMINAR: ITALY THROUGH FOREIGN EYES4
MLAL 3010POLITICS AND POETRY IN THE MIDDLE AGES: THE RISE OF VERNACULAR CULTURE IN THE MEDITERRANEAN4
MLAL 3200MACHIAVELLI'S UTOPIA4
MLAL 3203DANTE AND HIS TRANSLATORS4
MLAL 4010ANNI DI PIOMBO / YEARS OF LEAD: CULTURE, POLITICS, AND VIOLENCE4
MLAL 4016REWRITING THE MEDITERRANEAN (20th and 21st Centuries)4
MVST 4006DANTE'S COSMOS SCIENCE, THEOLOGY AND LITERATURE4
MVST 4007MEDIEVAL FOUNDATIONS OF MODERNITY4
THEA 2750PERFORMING ITALIAN4

Spanish

Aside from courses with the subject code, the following courses have the SPAN attribute and count toward the Spanish majors and minor:

Course Title Credits
COLI 3407FOREIGNNESS & TRANSLATION: MULTILINGUAL AUTOBIO WRITING IN CONTEMP LATIN-AM & LATINO LIT (1980-2015)4
LALS 3407FOREIGNNESS & TRANSLATION: MULTILINGUAL AUTOBIO WRITING IN CONTEMP LATIN-AM & LATINO LIT (1980-2015)4
MLAL 3000GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES4
MLAL 3003INTERCULTURAL THEORY4