History

Our graduate program is personalized and student-oriented, with small classes taught by our world-renowned faculty. Because of our selective admissions, we attentively mentor the graduate students we admit, guiding them to research rigorously, and to write and speak about history dynamically.

Benefiting from our small classes and intensive one-on-one training, our students produce scholarship of the highest quality using a wide array of sources and techniques. This translates to our extremely competitive job market placement for Ph.D. students and continued success both within and outside of the academy for M.A. students.

Our department offers two degrees: an M.A. and a Ph.D., with concentrations in medieval history and modern history. While students most often specialize in topics relating to Europe and the Americas, the department regularly offers courses on transnational and global themes. The range of possibilities is further broadened by Fordham’s many interdisciplinary programs, which foster productive discussion across fields.

We take great pride in our students’ development. As a member of our department, you will have the opportunity to:

Learn the skills of the historian

Our graduate program develops your skills in critical analysis, archival research, and persuasive writing. Because of the large size and diversity of our faculty, you will have the opportunity to study a broad selection of historical periods, topics, and methodologies alongside experts in the field.

Become an exemplary teacher

Our department emphasizes the importance of pedagogy. If enrolled in our Ph.D. program, you will receive one-on-one training from a faculty member to prepare you for teaching undergraduate courses. Subsequently, you will gain invaluable experience teaching your courses.

Education for the whole person

Our Fordham community emphasizes the significance of the Jesuit principle of cura personalis, or care for the whole person. With seminars of an average of nine students, we provide intimate classroom experiences to ensure you receive personal attention from your professors and hone your unique skills.

Develop a practical skill set

A Fordham graduate degree in history also offers you a transferable set of skills for work outside of the academy. Our faculty have experience in such historical activities as textual editing, oral history, and archival description, and they are eager to assist you in developing a range of professional skills, such as college and high-school teaching, documentary editing, and journalism.

Study in New York City

At Fordham, you reap the innumerable benefits of studying in New York, one of America's most exciting cities and a global cultural and financial capital: living in a vibrant and culturally diverse atmosphere; exploring an urban landscape that is, in itself, historical; and researching in a wide range of local universities, museums, and libraries. Few areas around the globe rival New York in the educational—and recreational—opportunities it can provide you.

For more information 

For more information about Graduate-level History, please visit our page on the Fordham website. 

The History Department welcomes applications for its graduate programs at the M.A. and Ph.D. level. Applicants for the Ph.D. must have an M.A. at Fordham or another institution. Our department also welcomes students from the New York doctoral consortium and will also accept applications from those who wish to take individual courses as non-matriculated students.

M.A. in History

We welcome full- and part-time students to apply.

Admission requirements for the M.A.

  • Bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university (unless applying to the Accelerated M.A. Program)
  • Six courses in history in undergraduate program
  • GPA of at least 3.0 (B)
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
  • For foreign students, English proficiency exams such as the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)
  • A writing sample of 7-12 pages
  • Three letters of recommendation which speak to the candidate's suitability for graduate study (most often from former professors)
  • Official transcripts of school records

Accelerated M.A.

We also offer an early admissions M.A. program for outstanding undergraduate history students at Fordham whose grade point averages meet or exceed 3.2. Students submit their applications in the spring of their junior year and enter the program in the senior year, when they take two graduate courses. These courses count toward the BA and are accepted for the M.A. at Fordham.

With credit for the two courses, students are able to complete a history M.A. in their fifth year of schooling. Students from Rose Hill, Lincoln Center, and Professional and Continuing Studies are eligible to opt for early admissions into the M.A. program, though all courses are given at the Rose Hill campus.

Ph.D. in History

We also strongly recommend that you contact a faculty member in your field director via email, letter, or phone. A list of faculty in the History Department is available online. All non-matriculated students who are interested in taking classes should fill out an application form.

Admission Requirements for the Ph.D.

  • Master's degree in history from an accredited college or university
  • Official transcript of school records
  • GPA of at least 3.5 (B+)
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
  • For foreign students, English proficiency exams such as the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)
  • A writing sample of 7-12 pages
  • Three letters of recommendation

Graduate Funding and Prizes

Graduate students have several options for funding, both from internal and external sources, as well as student loans. 

The Loomie Prize is awarded annually to the student with the best seminar paper produced during the previous academic year. This award comes with a cash prize and certificate.

HIST 5100. DISASTERS, PLANNING AND PREDICTION IN GLOBAL HISTORY. (4 Credits)

By considering disasters and the regimes of planning and prediction that have been used to prevent and manage them, this course examines the historical interplay between modes of human agency and the perceived “push back” of the phenomenal world. We will also explore how understandings of disasters and control have shaped historical narratives. Students will engage environmental history, urban history, religious studies, the history of science and technology, and material culture. Topics will cover a wide range of geographic areas from the early modern to contemporary periods. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5102. ARCHIVES & NARRATIVES OF GLOBAL HISTORY. (4 Credits)

This course investigates the relationship between global history and particular forms of knowledge production. We will discuss classic and cutting-edge scholarship on the archives and how scholars have grappled with its possibilities and limitations. We will also consider how different ways of narrating history can attend to the silences and revelations of our sources. The interdisciplinary group of authors whose work we will discuss may include Shahid Amin, Natalie Zemon Davis, Brent Edwards, Saidiya Hartman, Lisa Lowe, Carina Ray, Ann Laura Stoler, and Zeb Tortorici. Students will also create their own research projects over the course of the semester.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 5105. THE BLACK RADICAL TRADITION IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE: U.S. & THE CARIBBEAN. (4 Credits)

This course explores the long history of black radicalism through a comparison of the United States and the caribbean as centers of revolutionary movements that engaged problems of democracy, racism and citizenship in the global black diaspora.

Attribute: CENS.

HIST 5200. RENAISSANCE SPAIN: FESTIVE REPUBLICS, RIGHTS, LIBERTIES AND INQUISITIONS. (4 Credits)

Renaissance era Christians in Castile, the great central region of the Iberian Peninsula that forms the core of modern Spain, were guaranteed their rights and liberties as citizens of city-republics through written charters. These city-republics sent delegates to the Cortes, the representative assembly that consulted with the King. Collective life in the cities, whether confraternities celebrating their saints, or open town council meetings of all citizens, created the corpus mysticum of the commonwealth that for Spaniards was the city. This seminar examines urbanism, collective public life, and the growth of the modern state in Renaissance Spain through topics such as: the influence of Islam on Iberian cities, conflict between cities and crown, confraternities and saints' celebrations, public welfare, the creation of the archive, and religious minorities and the inquisition.

HIST 5201. The Renaissance of the Twelfth Century. (4 Credits)

This seminar will explore the history and historiography of one of medieval Europe's most intellectually fertile and creative period, the so-called renaissance of the twelfth century. Particular attention will be given to the historical construction of this period and how it was changed, and continues to change, amid the discovery and editing of new texts, more nuanced categories of historical analysis, and new advances in interdisciplinary research. Students will be expected to give presentations on both primary and secondary sources over the course of the semester. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5202. MEDIEVAL INTERFAITH RELATIONS. (4 Credits)

Interfaith relations are today a valuable and potentially urgent category of historical analysis. This seminar explores relations among Christians, Muslims, and Jews across Europe and the Mediterranean from early medieval papal policy to rise of the Ottoman Turks, with a particular focus on religion, intellectual, and cultural instances of interfaith conflict and coexistence. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 5203. Medieval Hagiography. (4 Credits)

This research seminar introduces students to the challenges and pitfalls of using saints' lives and other hagiographical writings (miracula, furta sacra, etc.) as sources for medieval history. It aims to familiarize students with competing historical approaches to these genres and to provide a practical guide to the scholarly resources necessary to exploit them as historical sources.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 5290. LUTHER AND REFORMATION. (4 Credits)

October 31, 2017 marks the 500th anniversary of one of the great cultural movements that shook the History of the world: the release of Martin Luther’s Ninety-Five Theses. Lither disturbed the political, social, and religious structures of Western Europe. Until his death in 1546, he challenged the papacy, the Catholic Church, the Holy Roman Empire, and Henry VIII. The Reformation he began both inspired and outraged. It represented the triumph of technology through the printing press. After Luther, nothing was exactly the same ever again. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5300. History Theory and Methods: The Historian's Tools. (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to a range of intellectual traditions informing historical analysis and writing. Students will study major social thinkers and how historians have grappled with the implications of their ideas. The course aims to develop essential skills as professional readers, analysts researchers and writers. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5310. OCCITANIA: LANGUAGE AND POWER. (4 Credits)

This team-taught interdisciplinary course introduces students to the cultural world of a medieval "south": Occitania, a region defined by language stretching from the foothills of the Alps to the pathways across the Pyrenees and from the Mediterranean almost to the Loire. Students will study the Old Occitan language and its manifestations in documentary writing, historical narrative, and the poetry of the troubadours from the eleventh until the thirteenth centuries. In order to best understand the context for this literature, course topics will include urban and rural communities, gender and power, the Albigensian crusade and its aftermath, and the beginning of vernacular book production.

HIST 5400. GENDER AND HISTORY. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5405. MODERN IRELAND 1690-1923. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5410. Race and Gender in Modern America. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5411. GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN EARLY AMERICA. (4 Credits)

Readings in the history of gender and sexuality discourse in Early America and the British Atlantic world of the 17th nad 18th centuries. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5420. SIN, CRIME AND SEX IN HISTORY. (4 Credits)

Sin and forgiveness were at the heart of the Christian message. In European tradition, sin and crime were closely related. This course examines the history of sin and crime from ancient Christianity to the present, focusing on the rise of sexual delicts. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5472. INVENTING TOTAL WAR. (4 Credits)

The course will explore the development of total war in the 20th century, with particular emphasis on Germany. The dissolution of legal limits on violence and compulsion on the battlefield and at home will be examined.

HIST 5506. EUROPEAN NATIONALISMS AND EARLY MODERN (JEWISH) HISTORY. (4 Credits)

Modern historiography, including Jewish historiography, and history as an academic discipline are products of modern national movements. The narratives they produced provided tools for shaping national and ethnic identities in the modern era, and had long lasting ramifications not only for the study of history but also for the inclusion or exclusion of specific groups in modern European societies. This course will explore how the writing of history has been linked to the larger questions of national identity, and nationalism, and to questions of political inclusion and exclusions. We will read the early Jewish historians from Germany, Poland, and Palestine/Israel and explore how their visions of premodern Jewish history were shaped by larger questions that were also occupying other European historians and intellectuals. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: JWST.

HIST 5516. NATIONALISMS AND RACISMS IN MODERN EUROPE. (4 Credits)

The seminar will focus on the history and historiography on the construction of "race" and nation in modern Europe (from the Enlightenment onwards) and in particular on the multiple connections and intersections between nationalism(s) and racism(s). As issues of cultural identity and questions of immigration and national belonging have become hotly contested in today's European societies, the historiography on these subjects has been steadily growing. We will discuss different historical approaches, theories, and methodologies that emerge from the growing body of works addressing these issues and pay particular attention to socio-cultural histories and to transnational and comparative perspectives. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5553. Book History: Texts, Media and Communications. (4 Credits)

This course examines themes, topics and methods in the history of the book. Book history is defined broadly to encompass the history of media and communication in general, as well as textual analysis. Topics may range across time periods, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and across contintents. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5563. READINGS IN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY. (4 Credits)

A reading course for graduate students on environmental history. This course will introduce students to the most important scholarship in environmental history, both recent works and those that shaped the field in the last century. It is primarily an Atlantic course but will also offer readings related to East Asia, India, and the Middle East. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5566. TECHNOLOGY & EMPIRE. (4 Credits)

This course, "Science, Technology, and Imperialism," will explore the crucial relationship between science and imperialism, with a particular focus on European imperial expansion from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Students will use a wide variety of primary and secondary texts to raise and reframe fundamental questions about the role of science and technology as "tools of empire". For example, the course will explore how the equation of European science and technology with "progress" depended to a large degree on European perceptions of the colonized. Using multiple viewpoints from Europe, Africa, and India, the course will provide a fresh and unique view on the history of Imperialism that will locate science and technology as fundamental to understanding such contested concepts as conquest, progress, and modernity. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5568. Stalinism: Life and Death in Soviet Russia. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5574. U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS. (4 Credits)

This graduate reading course covers the history and historiography of U.S. foreign relations from 1898 to the present. Topics include Open Dorr imperialism, the First and Second World Wars, the Cold War, decolonization, the Vietnam War, and the War on Terror. Students will situate the United States, its domestic cultures, and its foreign policies to different regions, in a global perspective. In addition, students will study the economic, social, intellectual, political, and moral bases of U.S. foreign relations. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5575. THE UNITED STATES & THE WORLD IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. (4 Credits)

This course examines U.S. foreign relations over the course of the twentieth century, with an emphasis on the myriad ways in which peoples, cultures, economies, national governments, non-state organizations, and international institutions interact. Key themes include American foreign policy, capitalism and economic policy, cultural relations, domestic politics, and perceptions of the world. The course will proceed chronologically and will examine major moments and trends: modern warfare, the Great Depression, the origins and trajectory of the Cold War, the nuclear arms race, decolonization and U.S.-Third World relations, the Vietnam War, and America’s wars in the Middle East. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5644. Writing Early America: Historians Who Have Shaped the Discipline. (4 Credits)

This course wil linclude the most significant works in early American history and culture written during the last fifty years. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5645. READINGS IN EARLY AMERICA AND THE ATLANTIC WORLD. (4 Credits)

This graduate readings course will provide students with an introduction to the historiography of early America from contact through the era of revolutions. Major themes include the contesting and connecting of geographical areas across the continent, the everyday experiences of work across lines of race, class, and gender, and the rise and fall of continental and Atlantic empires. + Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5725. HISTORY OF AMERICAN CITIES. (4 Credits)

Readings in US urban history. Topics that may be covered include the growth and development of American cities, their people and diverse communities, urban politics, the urban crisis of the late twentieth century, ideas about what makes for a good city, and the economic, cultural, political, and social role of cities. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5727. HISTORY AND FICTION IN THE AMERICAN WEST. (4 Credits)

This course uses history and literature to study the moving western frontier in the United States. Readings explore its early origins in the 17th and 18th centuries but focus largely on its most iconic manifestations in the 19th century. The course examine race, gender, violence, and social order, among other topics.

HIST 5730. HISTORY OF CAPITALISM. (4 Credits)

A graduate seminar, open to advanced undergraduates, that considers the historical narratives, major thinker, and controversies between seventeenth and twenty-first centuries having to with capitalism as an economic system and a set of social relations. Works by Thomas Robert Malthus, Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Karl Polanyi, Fernand Braudel, among others. Students will produce two essays, one comparing Smith and Marx, and other on a historical topic. Class meetings will emphasize student argument and vigorous conversation and will include a weekly lecture by the instructor. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5733. The Country and the City in American History. (4 Credits)

This course explores the history of the country and the city as natural environments and symbolic landscapes through the works of historians, artists, and poets. It covers the period from the Revolution through the twentieth century, with special attention to the nineteenth century. Topics include Appalachia, slavery, and sharecropping; Lewis Mumford and Jane Jacobs; romantic landscape painting and Central Park. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5734. U.S. CULTURE & SOCIETY TO 1877. (4 Credits)

This course examines American culture and society through important scholarly works in the field. It is designed to provide an introduction to major historical debates and the methodological approaches for beginning graduate students as well as prepare doctoral students for their comprehensive exams in American history. Topics to be covered my include the role of social institutions and the significance of class, gender, culture and race, particularly in connection to colonial life, the revolutionary period, the early republic, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

HIST 5910. Law and Empire in the Iberian World. (4 Credits)

Law and Empire in the Iberian World explores the centrality of legal practices in the expansion of the Iberian Empire, a legal culture which produced the world's largest trove of archival documents. Topics will include the legal cultures in early modern Spain and the Americas; the debate over just wasr and the legality of conquest; how indigenous peoples were legally incorporated into Spanish crown, and how they used law to their advantage (including establishing legally found towns, litigation with the Spanish court system, use of wills and other legal documents); legal questions of honor and ethnicity as related to marriage and office holdings; the legal relationship between the American Viceroyalties and the crown of Castile; and place of role of law and litigation in creating civil society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5913. GOLDEN AGE SPAIN & AMER. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: LALS.

HIST 5918. After Colonialism: Latin America. (4 Credits)

This course focuses onthe 19th and 20th centuries. The course is designed to provide an introduction to major historical debates and methodological approaches for beginning graduate students as well as prepare doctoral students for their comprehensive exams in Latin American History. Readings include primary sources in translation as well as key studies of the era. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5919. United States and Latin American Borderlands. (4 Credits)

This course explores the concept of the borderlands in United States and Latin America history. It uses various categories of analysis, such as race, gender, and hegemony, to discuss the interaction among groups of people as they meet along political and geographic borders. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5920. United States and Latin American Borderlands. (4 Credits)

This course explores the concept of the borderlands in United States and Latin American history. It uses various categories of analysis, such as race, gender and hegemony, to discuss the interaction among groups of people as they meet along political and geographic borders. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5921. SOCIAL MVTS GLOBAL PERS. (4 Credits)

This course examines social movements in the twentieth century. It focuses on events in Latin American, Europe, and the United States, among other regions. It allows students to assess the advantages and limitations using a global approach to historical analysis. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5923. Atlantic World: Empires, Diasporas, and Migrations. (4 Credits)

Introduces students to themes and methods of Atlantic World History, 16-20th centuries. Possible themes include: The making of Iberian, English and French Empires; Indigenous, African, and European encounters; Atlantic Legal Cultures; the Slave Trade; Slavery, and Emancipation; the African Diaspora; Religion; Gender and Sexuality; Race relations; Migration. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 5961. THE AGE OF SULEYMAN 1453-1574. (4 Credits)

The course aims to introduce the students to various aspects of social, political, cultural and intellectual history of the Ottoman Empire in the late 15th and 16th centuries. By focusing on the multifaceted and multidirectional nature of interaction across political, religious, cultural and linguistic boundaries between the Islamic and Christian worlds in late medieval and early modern period, the course will delineate the Ottoman state and empire formation within the theoretical and historiographical framework of the early modern Mediterranean. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6076. NOBLE CULTURE AND SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 6077. THE ANGEVIN EMPIRE. (4 Credits)

From the Middle of the twelfth until the first quarter of the thirteenth centuries, one dynasty, the house of Anjou, were the effective rulers of an enormous agglomeration of kingdoms and principalities which stretched from the North Sea to the Mediterranean and encompassed England, large parts of Ireland, Wales, and nearly half of the territory which today constitutes modern France. Following a wave of renewed scholarly interest in the politics and culture of this period, this class will explore this short-lived but powerful empire, its lands, peoples and rulers. Together we will explore the lives of dynamic individuals within the Angevin court; Angevin court culture, the governance of a medieval "empire"; dynastic politics and diplomacy; the Third Crusade; and England and France after the loss of Normandy.

Attributes: MVSG, MVST.

HIST 6078. The Crusader States: The Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem 1099-1291. (4 Credits)

This course charts the social, political, and cultural history of the feudal principalities that were established by Latin Christians in the Eastern Mediterranean in the wake of the First Crusade. Students will be introduced to the narrative and documentary sources through which the hisory of the Latin Kingdom has been constructed, as well as teh archaelogy and art of the Levant during the period of Frankish occupation and settlement. In addition, we will engage with the major historiographical debates concerning the constitutional organziation of the Latin kingdom, the relationship between the Frankish crusaders and Muslim and eastern Christian populations over whom they ruled, and the "colonial" character of the Latin settlements. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6133. MED REL INSTITUTIONS. (4 Credits)

Today, the Catholic Church appears to as a hierarchical entity united under the supreme leadership of the pope. This is in contrast with the situation in the Middle Ages, when people made careful distintions between monks, nuns, canons, secular priests, minor and major orders, cardinals, lay brothers and sisters, and a multitude of other clerics. Committed to their respective ranks and vocations, churchmen and churchwomen often found themselves competing with one another. In so doing, they were less likely to submit to papal authority than to enlist it for their own purposes. The seminar will examine these groups, their institutional identities, and typical conflicts of interest. The institutions of the medieval church-male and femal monasteries, cathedral chapters, parishes, religious orders, dioceses, the papacy and other bodies-maintianed their own two identities and pursued their own ends. The church they formed was not monolithic: medieval religious institutions were often in competition with one another for reasons both secular and religious; and, unlike modern church, religious institutions played a role in government and were the sole providers of many social services. Through consideration of medieval sources and modern sutdies, the course will examine the institutions that formed the medieval church, their histories, identities and members, their conflicts, and their relations to society. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 6152. MEDIEVAL WOMEN & FAMILY. (4 Credits)

Studies in the social, economic and religious roles of women and the organization of the family in European society from the early to the later Middle Ages. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 6153. MED ECONOMY & SOCIETY. (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the major economic trends of the period from the Germanic invasions through the 'agricultural depression' on the 15th century. We will also consider the social impact of changes in seigneurial and peasant agriculture, the 'commercial revolution,' the rise of the textile industry, the Great Famine, the Black Death, and the Hundred Years War. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 6256. TORTURE AND WESTERN CULTURE. (4 Credits)

This course examines a very difficult subject that sheds an unsettling light on the history of Europe and the United States. Torture in the twenty-first century world is ubiquitous, and the very public controversy surrounding American practices is only shocking to those who do not pay attention to the world. Our goal in this seminar is to examine the history of torture in its European-American context and to determine just where current practices fit into that history. We will also ponter whether torture is a practice that can (and should) be eradicated, or whether we must adjust to the presence of torture as a permanent feature of the world and American landscape. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: CETH.

HIST 6305. THE ENGLISH REFORMATION. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6310. Early Modern European Intellectual and Political History. (4 Credits)

This course will consider the development of early modern Europe thought and politics from the 16th through the 18th centuries. Coverage may include the intellectual and political implications of the Renaissance and the Reformation, the rise of the early modern state and its expansion, popular revolts, Scientific Revolution, political theory, absolutism, republicanism, war and empire, the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. The course is designed to provide an introduction to major historical debates and methodological approaches for beginning graduate students as well as prepare doctoral students for their comprehensive exams in Early Modern European History. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6315. Early Modern European Society and Cultural History. (4 Credits)

This course will consider the development of early modern European society and culture from the 16th through the 18th centuries. Coverage may include the social and cultural implications of the Renaissance and the Reformation, the divergence of popular and elite culture, the social dimensions of expanding population and trade, print and literacy, the economics foundations of social change, popular revolts, the impact of empire on society and culture, the Englightenment and the French Revolution. The course is designed to provide an introduction to major historical debates and methodological approaches for beginning graduate students as well as prepare doctoral students for their comprehensive exams in Early Modern European History. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6355. Late European Political and Intellectual History. (4 Credits)

This course will explore central themes in the development of European political and intellectual life during the 19th and 20th centuries. At the discretion of the instructor students would be expected to explore topics including but not limited to liberalism, conservatism, romanticism, nationalism, modernism, counter-enlightenment, fascism, socialism, Western Marxism, memory, gender, constructions of sexuality, colonialist and racial ideologies, consumerism, and the late-twentieth century counter-cultures. The goal of the course would be to ensure students a reasonable command of the issues associated with the selected items. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6360. Late European Social and Cultural History. (4 Credits)

This course will explore central themes in the development of European social and cultural life during the 19th and 20th centuries. At the discretion of the instructor, students would be expected to explore topics including but not limited to liberalism, conservation, romanticism, nationalism, modernism, counter-enlightenment, fascism, socialism, Western Marxism, memory, gender, constructions of sexuality, colonalist and racial ideologies, consumerism, and the late-20th century counter-cultures. The goal of the course would be to ensure students a reasonable command of the issues associated with the selected themes. Instructors are expected to ensure a representative distribution of themes across time periods. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6520. EUROPE GLOBAL. (4 Credits)

Perspectives on 19th/20th century Europe in light of imperialism/colonialism, trade & commerce, transnational & global networks of migration, exchange, ideas. Focus on socio-cultural and economic influences between Europe and underworld.

HIST 6530. EUROPEAN CITY: 1700-2000. (4 Credits)

Upper level study of European urban history, concentrating on theoretical and interpretive approaches to the study of the city and urban life. Methods or research, evidence, and analysis form basis of seminar discussions and student research. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6662. SEXUALITY IN AMERICA. (4 Credits)

Readings in the literature of the history of sexuality in American from the Colonial Era to the end of the 20th century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6710. THE CIVIL WAR. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6721. US Culture and Society Since 1877. (4 Credits)

An exploration of American culture and society through important scholarly works in the field. The course is designed to provide an introduction to major hisorical debates and the methodological approaches for beginning graduate studentsas well as prepare doctoral students for their comprehensive exams in American history. Topics to be covered may include the role of social instituitinos and the significance of class, gender, culture, and race, particularly in connection to colonial life, the the revolutionary period, the early republic, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Instructors are expected to ensure a representative distribution of themes across time periods. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6724. US Thought and Politics to 1877. (4 Credits)

An exploration of American intellectual and political history through important scholarly works in the field. The course is designed to provide an introduction to major historical debates and the methodological approaches for beginning graduate students as well as prepare doctoral students for their comprehensive exams in American history. Topics to be covered may include the formation of American ideology, political movements, and the contributions of major ideological and intellectual figures, particularly in connection to the rise of the U.S. as an economic and military power, the Progressive era, the world wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the civil rights movement. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6725. United States Thought and Politics Since 1877. (4 Credits)

An expolration of American intellectual and political history through important scholarly works in the field. The course is designed to provide an introduction to major historical debates and the methodolgical approaches for beginning graduate students for their comprehensive exams in American history. Topics to be covered may include the formation of American ideology, political movements, and the contributions of major ideological and intellectual figures, particularly in connection to the rise of the U.S. as an economic and military power, the Progressive era, the world wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the civil rights movement. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6731. US IMMIGRATION & ETHNICITY. (4 Credits)

This course will examine several important issues that have engaged the attention of historians of immigration and ethnicity. These include perennial concerns as the nature of the processes of settlement and Americanization, and the evolution of American views on citizenship and immigration policy. Also among the issues to be discussed are recent trends in thinking about the invention of racial identities and about ethnic diasporas and "transnationalism." Finally, the course will cover several cases of the stresses of ethnic identity in wartime. Readings will include recent scholarly monographs and articles, as well as several examples of ethnic memoir literature. Note that the course is organized thematically, and that readings have therefore been chosen because they reflect on the themes under discussion. As a result, not all ethnic groups are covered adequately. Students will have a chance to deal with the ethnic groups of their choice in their independent work. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 6853. AMERICA BETWEEN THE WARS. (4 Credits)

The course will focus upon political, economic and social events and trends in America during the era between the two World Wars of this century. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

HIST 7056. PSM:MED POLITICAL CULTURES. (4 Credits)

This course, the first part of a two-semester proseminar/seminar sequence will introduce students to recent debates and different approaches to cultures of power and political processes in western Europe in the central middle ages. Among the many toopics we might consider are lordship, status and authority, political assembly and consultation, courtliness and persuasion, rulership and sanctity, and the rise of accountability. Students will become familiar with a wide range of source material, from diplomatic and documentary collections to historical narratives and courtly literature. With this solid foundation in the current historiography and available research tools, students will be expected to identify a suitable topic for a sustained research project. Completing this project will be the objective of the seminar course to be offered in the Spring. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 7070. MEDIEVAL INTELLECTUAL CULTURES. (4 Credits)

This course takes a broad approach to medieval intellectual history, focusing not just on the texts and ideas that were central to medieval intellectual life but also on the cultural conditions that enabled scholarship and creativity to flourish. Beginning with the late antique absorption of classical learning, the seminar will over the course of two semesters examine a range of intellectual cultures spanning the western Middle Ages. A particular focus of the class will be the study of the liberal arts and the evolution of teaching practices. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 7110. PSM: CHURCH LAW & MED SOC. (4 Credits)

Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 7150. PSM: MEDIEVAL ENGLAND. (4 Credits)

This is the last half of a year-long course that focuses on the social, economic, and administrative history of England from the eleventh through fifteenth centuries. Special emphasis is placed upon 1) how to identify and exploit a wide variety of primary sources (such as wills, cartularies, court rolls, account rolls, chronicles, among others); 2) how to use major historical collecctions (such as Rolls Series, VCH, Record Commissioners, Royal Historical Manuscripts Commission, the Ordnance Survey, Selden Society, and others); and 3) gaining an awareness of the regions and landscape of medieval England, as well as the contributions of historical geography. Besides treating thematic issues such as the church and society, law and legal system, the growth of government and administration, maritime trade and industry in town and country, the weekly discussions will also consider economy among the peasantry, townspeople, and the landowning elite. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 8000. RESEARCH COLLOQUIUM. (1 Credit)

Required for MA and PhD students in Modern History and taken in conjunction with a research tutorial, this colloquium attends to the professional and presentation aspects of their research project as well as providing a forum for progress reports and feedback.

HIST 8025. SEM: MEDVL RELIG CULTURES. (4 Credits)

Participants will build on the reading and topics from HSGA7025 (Proseminar: Medieval Religious Cultures) to prepare research papers based on sources and debates in the study of medieval religious cultures. Weekly readings will be selected by the participants from materials for their papers; later in the semester, they will present drafts of their own papers, and prepare critiques of others. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 8056. SEM: MED POLITICAL CULTURES. (4 Credits)

In the Spring semester, students will spend the semester working on research papers based on the topics identified in the Fall. At class meetings, students will have the opportunity to present their research and to read and critique each others' writing. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 8070. MEDIEVAL INTELLECTUAL CULTURES. (4 Credits)

Student continue to work on the project they defined in the Proseminar to this course. Classes convene intermittently to discuss progress on the ongoing research projects and for presentations on untranslated or little-known primary source (either recently made available or long forgotten) that deserve greater. Students complete the seminar by giving a 20-minute conference paper on their research project and on their research project and writing a thesis-length original research paper that could be published as a scholarly article. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 8110. SEM: CHURCH LAW & MED SOC. (4 Credits)

This course will consist of a two-semester proseminar/seminar sequence inviting graduate students to formulate and conduct original research projects in the field of medieval church law. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 8150. SEM: MEDIEVAL ENGLAND. (4 Credits)

Continuation of HSGA 7150. The first half of the course focuses on database analysis, writing skills, research methods, and public speaking. Students also work on a final research paper that was formulated in HSGA 7150. Four-credit courses that meet for 150 minutes per week require three additional hours of class preparation per week on the part of the student in lieu of an additional hour of formal instruction.

Attribute: MVSG.

HIST 8999. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (0 to 4 Credits)

HIST 9999. DISSERTATION DIRECTION. (1 Credit)